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Sample records for atomistic simulation study

  1. Atomistic simulations of nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Szlufarska

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of mechanics is pushed to its limit when the functionality of devices is controlled at the nanometer scale. A fundamental understanding of nanomechanics is needed to design materials with optimum properties. Atomistic simulations can bring an important insight into nanostructure-property relations and, when combined with experiments, they become a powerful tool to move nanomechanics from basic science to the application area. Nanoindentation is a well-established technique for studying mechanical response. We review recent advances in modeling (atomistic and beyond of nanoindentation and discuss how they have contributed to our current state of knowledge.

  2. Nuclear wasteform materials: Atomistic simulation case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alex.chroneos@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Institute of Materials Science, NCSR Demokritos, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Rushton, M.J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, C. [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tsoukalas, L.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ever increasing global energy demand combined with a requirement to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions has rekindled an interest in nuclear power generation. In order that nuclear energy remains publicly acceptable and therefore a sustainable source of power it is important that nuclear waste is dealt with in a responsible manner. To achieve this, improved materials for the long-term immobilisation of waste should be developed. The extreme conditions experienced by nuclear wasteforms necessitate the detailed understanding of their properties and the mechanisms acting within them at the atomic scale. This latter issue is the focus of the present review. Atomic scale simulation techniques can accelerate the development of new materials for nuclear wasteform applications and provide detailed information on their physical properties that cannot be easily accessed by experiment. The present article introduces examples of how atomic scale, computational modelling techniques have led to an improved understanding of current nuclear wasteform materials and also suggest how they may be used in the development of new wasteforms.

  3. Atomistic simulations of fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Embedded atom interaction potentials are used to simulate the atomistic aspects of the fracture process. Simulations are presented for the behavior of cracks in pure metals and intermetallics, near the Griffith condition. The materials considered include Fe, Cu, Ni as well as Fe, Ni, Co, and Ti aluminides. The work focuses on the comparative study of fracture behavior in the different materials. The role of the atomic relaxation at the crack tip and of lattice trapping phenomena is analyzed.

  4. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  5. Understanding materials behavior from atomistic simulations: Case study of al-containing high entropy alloys and thermally grown aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinkai Lei

    Atomistic simulation refers to a set of simulation methods that model the materials on the atomistic scale. These simulation methods are faster and cheaper alternative approaches to investigate thermodynamics and kinetics of materials compared to experiments. In this dissertation, atomistic simulation methods have been used to study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of two material systems, i.e. the entropy of Al-containing high entropy alloys (HEAs) and the vacancy migration energy of thermally grown aluminum oxide. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  6. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the pos......In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us...... simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations....

  7. Atomistic Simulations of Nanotube Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Belytschko, T; Schatz, G; Ruoff, R S

    2002-01-01

    The fracture of carbon nanotubes is studied by atomistic simulations. The fracture behavior is found to be almost independent of the separation energy and to depend primarily on the inflection point in the interatomic potential. The rangle of fracture strians compares well with experimental results, but predicted range of fracture stresses is marketly higher than observed. Various plausible small-scale defects do not suffice to bring the failure stresses into agreement with available experimental results. As in the experiments, the fracture of carbon nanotubes is predicted to be brittle. The results show moderate dependence of fracture strength on chirality.

  8. Idealized vs. Realistic Microstructures: An Atomistic Simulation Case Study on γ/γ′ Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal Ni-base superalloys, consisting of a two-phase γ/ γ ′ microstructure, retain high strengths at elevated temperatures and are key materials for high temperature applications, like, e.g., turbine blades of aircraft engines. The lattice misfit between the γ and γ ′ phases results in internal stresses, which significantly influence the deformation and creep behavior of the material. Large-scale atomistic simulations that are often used to enhance our understanding of the deformation mechanisms in such materials must accurately account for such misfit stresses. In this work, we compare the internal stresses in both idealized and experimentally-informed, i.e., more realistic, γ/ γ ′ microstructures. The idealized samples are generated by assuming, as is frequently done, a periodic arrangement of cube-shaped γ ′ particles with planar γ/ γ ′ interfaces. The experimentally-informed samples are generated from two different sources to produce three different samples—the scanning electron microscopy micrograph-informed quasi-2D atomistic sample and atom probe tomography-informed stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric atomistic samples. Additionally, we compare the stress state of an idealized embedded cube microstructure with finite element simulations incorporating 3D periodic boundary conditions. Subsequently, we study the influence of the resulting stress state on the evolution of dislocation loops in the different samples. The results show that the stresses in the atomistic and finite element simulations are almost identical. Furthermore, quasi-2D boundary conditions lead to a significantly different stress state and, consequently, different evolution of the dislocation loop, when compared to samples with fully 3D boundary conditions.

  9. Idealized vs. Realistic Microstructures: An Atomistic Simulation Case Study on γ/γ′ Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Aruna; Bitzek, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Single-crystal Ni-base superalloys, consisting of a two-phase γ/γ′ microstructure, retain high strengths at elevated temperatures and are key materials for high temperature applications, like, e.g., turbine blades of aircraft engines. The lattice misfit between the γ and γ′ phases results in internal stresses, which significantly influence the deformation and creep behavior of the material. Large-scale atomistic simulations that are often used to enhance our understanding of the deformation mechanisms in such materials must accurately account for such misfit stresses. In this work, we compare the internal stresses in both idealized and experimentally-informed, i.e., more realistic, γ/γ′ microstructures. The idealized samples are generated by assuming, as is frequently done, a periodic arrangement of cube-shaped γ′ particles with planar γ/γ′ interfaces. The experimentally-informed samples are generated from two different sources to produce three different samples—the scanning electron microscopy micrograph-informed quasi-2D atomistic sample and atom probe tomography-informed stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric atomistic samples. Additionally, we compare the stress state of an idealized embedded cube microstructure with finite element simulations incorporating 3D periodic boundary conditions. Subsequently, we study the influence of the resulting stress state on the evolution of dislocation loops in the different samples. The results show that the stresses in the atomistic and finite element simulations are almost identical. Furthermore, quasi-2D boundary conditions lead to a significantly different stress state and, consequently, different evolution of the dislocation loop, when compared to samples with fully 3D boundary conditions. PMID:28772453

  10. Thermal stability of silicon nanowires:atomistic simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wen-Liang; Zhang Kai-Wang; Zhong Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential model, we investigate the thermal stability of pristine silicon nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the structural evolutions and the Lindemann indices of silicon nanowires at different temperatures in order to unveil atomic-level melting behaviour of silicon nanowires.The simulation results show that silicon nanowires with surface reconstructions have higher thermal stability than those without surface reconstructions, and that silicon nanowires with perpendicular dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces have somewhat higher thermal stability than nanowires with parallel dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces. Furthermore, the melting temperature of silicon nanowires increases as their diameter increases and reaches a saturation value close to the melting temperature of bulk silicon. The value of the Lindemann index for melting silicon nanowires is 0.037.

  11. Atomistic Simulations of Bicelle Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Hao; Kindt, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Mixtures of long- and short-tail phosphatidylcholine lipids are known to self-assemble into a variety of aggregates combining flat bilayerlike and curved micellelike features, commonly called bicelles. Atomistic simulations of bilayer ribbons and perforated bilayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC, di-C14 tails) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC, di-C6 tails) have been carried out to investigate the partitioning of these components between flat and curved microenvironmen...

  12. Atomistic Simulations of Bicelle Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yong; WANG, HAO; Kindt, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Mixtures of long- and short-tail phosphatidylcholine lipids are known to self-assemble into a variety of aggregates combining flat bilayerlike and curved micellelike features, commonly called bicelles. Atomistic simulations of bilayer ribbons and perforated bilayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC, di-C14 tails) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC, di-C6 tails) have been carried out to investigate the partitioning of these components between flat and curved microenvironmen...

  13. Atomistic simulation study of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates at the water/air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xibing; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations with the CHARMM atomistic force field have been used to study monolayers of a series of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) at the water/air interface. Both the numbers of carbon atoms in the LAS alkyl tail (1 to 11), and the position of attachment of the benzene ring on the alkyl chain have been varied. Totally 36 LAS homologues and isomers have been investigated. The surface tensions of the systems and the average tilt angles of the LAS molecules are found to be related to both the length and the degree of branching of the alkyl tails, whereas the solubility and mobility are mostly determined by the tail length. PMID:20614916

  14. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Atomistic simulations of bicelle mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Hao; Kindt, James T

    2010-06-16

    Mixtures of long- and short-tail phosphatidylcholine lipids are known to self-assemble into a variety of aggregates combining flat bilayerlike and curved micellelike features, commonly called bicelles. Atomistic simulations of bilayer ribbons and perforated bilayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC, di-C(14) tails) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC, di-C(6) tails) have been carried out to investigate the partitioning of these components between flat and curved microenvironments and the stabilization of the bilayer edge by DHPC. To approach equilibrium partitioning of lipids on an achievable simulation timescale, configuration-bias Monte Carlo mutation moves were used to allow individual lipids to change tail length within a semigrand-canonical ensemble. Since acceptance probabilities for direct transitions between DMPC and DHPC were negligible, a third component with intermediate tail length (didecanoylphosphatidylcholine, di-C(10) tails) was included at a low concentration to serve as an intermediate for transitions between DMPC and DHPC. Strong enrichment of DHPC is seen at ribbon and pore edges, with an excess linear density of approximately 3 nm(-1). The simulation model yields estimates for the onset of edge stability with increasing bilayer DHPC content between 5% and 15% DHPC at 300 K and between 7% and 17% DHPC at 323 K, higher than experimental estimates. Local structure and composition at points of close contact between pores suggest a possible mechanism for effective attractions between pores, providing a rationalization for the tendency of bicelle mixtures to aggregate into perforated vesicles and perforated sheets.

  16. Atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Jacobsen, K.W.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper based on effective medium theory interatomic potentials. Results on screw dislocation structures and processes are reviewed with particular focus on point defect mobilities and processes involving cross slip. For example, the sta......We discuss atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper based on effective medium theory interatomic potentials. Results on screw dislocation structures and processes are reviewed with particular focus on point defect mobilities and processes involving cross slip. For example...

  17. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-24

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  18. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wüstner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC. We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  19. Atomistic computer simulations a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brazdova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Many books explain the theory of atomistic computer simulations; this book teaches you how to run them This introductory ""how to"" title enables readers to understand, plan, run, and analyze their own independent atomistic simulations, and decide which method to use and which questions to ask in their research project. It is written in a clear and precise language, focusing on a thorough understanding of the concepts behind the equations and how these are used in the simulations. As a result, readers will learn how to design the computational model and which parameters o

  20. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction......, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential...... of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol....

  1. Atomistic simulation of Voronoi-based coated nanoporous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onur Yildiz, Yunus; Kirca, Mesut

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a new method developed for the generation of periodic atomistic models of coated and uncoated nanoporous metals (NPMs) is presented by examining the thermodynamic stability of coated nanoporous structures. The proposed method is mainly based on the Voronoi tessellation technique, which provides the ability to control cross-sectional dimension and slenderness of ligaments as well as the thickness of coating. By the utilization of the method, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of randomly structured NPMs with coating can be performed efficiently in order to investigate their physical characteristics. In this context, for the purpose of demonstrating the functionality of the method, sample atomistic models of Au/Pt NPMs are generated and the effects of coating and porosity on the thermodynamic stability are investigated by using MD simulations. In addition to that, uniaxial tensile loading simulations are performed via MD technique to validate the nanoporous models by comparing the effective Young’s modulus values with the results from literature. Based on the results, while it is demonstrated that coating the nanoporous structures slightly decreases the structural stability causing atomistic configurational changes, it is also shown that the stability of the atomistic models is higher at lower porosities. Furthermore, adaptive common neighbour analysis is also performed to identify the stabilized atomistic structure after the coating process, which provides direct foresights for the mechanical behaviour of coated nanoporous structures.

  2. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    , as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential......Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches...

  3. Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations of Hexabenzocoronene Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziogos, G.; Megariotis, G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    This study concerns atomistic and coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulations of pristine hexabenzocoronene (HBC) molecular crystals. HBC is a symmetric graphene flake of nanometric size that falls in the category of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, finding numerous applications in the field of organic electronics. The HBC molecule is simulated in its crystalline phase initially by means of an all-atom representation, where the molecules self- organize into well aligned molecular stacks, which in turn create a perfect monoclinic molecular crystal. The atomistic model reproduces fairly well the structural experimental properties and thus can be used as a reliable starting point for the development of a coarsegrained model following a bottom-up approach. The coarse-grained model is developed by applying Iterative Boltzmann Inversion, a systematic coarse-graining method which reproduces a set of target atomistic radial distribution functions and intramolecular distributions at the coarser level of description. This model allows the simulation of HBC crystals over longer time and length scales. The crystalline phase is analyzed in terms of the Saupe tensor and thermomechanical properties are probed at the atomistic level.

  4. Atomistic simulation studies on the dynamics and thermodynamics of nonpolar molecules within the zeolite imidazolate framework-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Pazzona, Federico G; Megariotis, Gregory; Papadopoulos, George K

    2010-02-25

    Statistical-mechanics-based simulation studies at the atomistic level of argon (Ar), methane (CH(4)), and hydrogen (H(2)) sorbed in the zeolite imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) are reported. ZIF-8 is a product of a special kind of chemical process, recently termed as reticular synthesis, which has generated a class of materials of critical importance as molecular binders. In this work, we explore the mechanisms that govern the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of nonpolar sorbates possessing different sizes and strength of interactions with the metal-organic framework to understand the outstanding properties of this novel class of sorbents, as revealed by experiments published elsewhere. For this purpose, we have developed an in-house modeling procedure involving calculations of sorption isotherms, partial internal energies, various probability density functions, and molecular dynamics for the simulation of the sorbed phase over a wide range of occupancies and temperatures within a digitally reconstructed unit cell of ZIF-8. The results showed that sorbates perceive a marked energetic inhomogeneity within the atomic framework of the metal-organic material under study, resulting in free energy barriers that give rise to inflections in the sorption isotherms and guide the dynamics of guest molecules.

  5. Atomistic simulations of nanoscale electrokinetic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Wang, Moran; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    An efficient and accurate algorithm for atomistic simulations of nanoscale electrokinetic transport will be described. The long-range interactions between charged molecules are treated using the Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh method and the Poisson equation for the electric potential is solved using an efficient multi-grid method in physical space. Using this method, we investigate two important applications in electrokinetic transport: electroosmotic flow in rough channels and electowetting on dielectric (EWOD). Simulations of electroosmotic and pressure driven flow in exactly the same geometries show that surface roughness has a much more pronounced effect on electroosmotic flow. Analysis of local quantities shows that this is because the driving force in electroosmotic flow is localized near the wall where the charge density is high. In atomistic simulations of EWOD, we find the contact angle follows the continuum theory at low voltages and always saturates at high voltages. Based on our results, a new mechanism for saturation is identified and possible techniques for controlling saturation are proposed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI 0709187.

  6. Scalable Atomistic Simulation Algorithms for Materials Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiichiro Nakano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A suite of scalable atomistic simulation programs has been developed for materials research based on space-time multiresolution algorithms. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms are presented for molecular dynamics (MD simulations and quantum-mechanical (QM calculations based on the density functional theory. Performance tests have been carried out on 1,088-processor Cray T3E and 1,280-processor IBM SP3 computers. The linear-scaling algorithms have enabled 6.44-billion-atom MD and 111,000-atom QM calculations on 1,024 SP3 processors with parallel efficiency well over 90%. production-quality programs also feature wavelet-based computational-space decomposition for adaptive load balancing, spacefilling-curve-based adaptive data compression with user-defined error bound for scalable I/O, and octree-based fast visibility culling for immersive and interactive visualization of massive simulation data.

  7. Atomistic simulation study of the shear-band deformation mechanism in Mg-Cu metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated plastic deformation of a model Mg-Cu metallic glass in order to study shear banding. In uniaxial tension, we find a necking instability occurs rather than shear banding. We can force the latter to occur by deforming in plane strain, forbidding the change of length in one...... of the transverse directions. Furthermore, in most of the simulations a notch is used to initiate shear bands, which lie at a 45 degrees angle to the tensile loading direction. The shear bands are characterized by the Falk and Langer local measure of plastic deformation D-min(2), averaged here over volumes...... containing many atoms. The D-min(2) profile has a peak whose width is around 10 nm; this width is largely independent of the strain rate. Most of the simulations were, at least nominally, at 100 K, about T-g/3 for this system. The development of the shear bands takes a few tens of ps, once plastic flow has...

  8. Effect of Interface on the Deformation of Aluminium Bicrystal: Atomistic Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamic (MD simulation has been conducted to study the effect of interface structure on the mechanical response of eight symmetric tilt grain boundaries in high stacking-fault Al. It is found that the grain boundaries with E structure unit (SU have higher energy, but the grain boundary energy alone cannot be used as a parameter to determine the mechanical properties of grain boundary. The SUs, especially E units, do have an influence on the mechanical response of grain boundaries. Our results show that the dislocation imitates from E units preferably, but this depends on the dissociation at grain boundary.

  9. Conformational dynamics of dry lamellar crystals of sugar based lipids: an atomistic simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan ManickamAchari

    Full Text Available The rational design of a glycolipid application (e.g. drug delivery with a tailored property depends on the detailed understanding of its structure and dynamics. Because of the complexity of sugar stereochemistry, we have undertaken a simulation study on the conformational dynamics of a set of synthetic glycosides with different sugar groups and chain design, namely dodecyl β-maltoside, dodecyl β-cellobioside, dodecyl β-isomaltoside and a C12C10 branched β-maltoside under anhydrous conditions. We examined the chain structure in detail, including the chain packing, gauche/trans conformations and chain tilting. In addition, we also investigated the rotational dynamics of the headgroup and alkyl chains. Monoalkylated glycosides possess a small amount of gauche conformers (∼20% in the hydrophobic region of the lamellar crystal (LC phase. In contrast, the branched chain glycolipid in the fluid Lα phase has a high gauche population of up to ∼40%. Rotational diffusion analysis reveals that the carbons closest to the headgroup have the highest correlation times. Furthermore, its value depends on sugar type, where the rotational dynamics of an isomaltose was found to be 11-15% and more restrained near the sugar, possibly due to the chain disorder and partial inter-digitation compared to the other monoalkylated lipids. Intriguingly, the present simulation demonstrates the chain from the branched glycolipid bilayer has the ability to enter into the hydrophilic region. This interesting feature of the anhydrous glycolipid bilayer simulation appears to arise from a combination of lipid crowding and the amphoteric nature of the sugar headgroups.

  10. Grain boundary and lattice diffusion in nanocrystal α-iron: An atomistic simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Mohammadzadeh, Mina

    2017-09-01

    To obtain fundamental understanding on the effect of grain boundaries on the diffusion kinetics, molecular dynamics simulations (MD) were carried out on single crystal and nanocrystal (with a mean grain size of 2.5 nm) bcc iron using the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded atom method (2NN-MEAM) interatomic potential. Self-diffusion coefficient in single crystal and nanocrystal samples were calculated in the temperature range from 350 K to 1000 K. A temperature-dependence of the diffusion coefficient according to the Arrhenius law was obtained for both lattice and grain boundary diffusion. By doing so, activation energies as well as pre-exponential factors were derived from the diffusion coefficients and compared to experimental data. MD simulation results show that diffusion rate of iron atoms in nanocrystal sample is 6 to 28 orders of magnitude greater than single crystal. The trajectory of iron atoms during diffusion process verified that diffusion occurs mostly in the grain boundaries of nanocrystal iron; suggesting that grain boundary diffusion is dominant in nanocrystal iron. Based on the obtained results pure grain boundary diffusion coefficient was calculated.

  11. NiTi superelasticity via atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Piyas; Ren, Guowu; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    The NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for the next-generation multifunctional materials. These materials are superelastic i.e. they can fully recover their original shape even after fairly large inelastic deformations once the mechanical forces are removed. The superelasticity reportedly stems from atomic scale crystal transformations. However, very few computer simulations have emerged, elucidating the transformation mechanisms at the discrete lattice level, which underlie the extraordinary strain recoverability. Here, we conduct breakthrough molecular dynamics modelling on the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi single crystals, and unravel the atomistic genesis thereof. The deformation recovery is clearly traced to the reversible transformation between austenite and martensite crystals through simulations. We examine the mechanistic origin of the tension-compression asymmetries and the effects of pressure/temperature/strain rate variation isolatedly. Hence, this work essentially brings a new dimension to probing the NiTi performance based on the mesoscale physics under more complicated thermo-mechanical loading scenarios.

  12. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified Through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2007-01-12

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process. We also discuss a technique for optimizing the calculation of fine-scale information on the fly for use in a coarse-scale simulation, and discuss the specific case of a fine-scale model that calculates void growth explicitly feeding into a coarse-scale mechanics model to study damage localization.

  13. Effects of Atomistic Domain Size on Hybrid Lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Dense Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present a convergence study for a hybrid Lattice Boltzmann-Molecular Dynamics model for the simulation of dense liquids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The velocity field from the atomistic domain is introduced as forcing terms to the Lattice Boltzmann model of the continuum while the mean field of the continuum imposes mean field conditions for the atomistic domain. In the present paper we investigate the effect of varying the size of the atomistic subdomain in simulations of two dimensional flows of liquid argon past carbon nanotubes and assess the efficiency of the method.

  14. Atomistic simulation of the structural and elastic properties of magnesite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZI-JIANG LIU; XIAO-WEI SUN; TING SONG; YUAN GUO; CAI-RONG ZHANG; ZHENG-RONG ZHANG

    2016-09-01

    Atomistic simulation was carried out to study the structural and elastic properties of MgCO$_3$ magnesite within the pressure range of the Earth’s mantle based on a novel force field. The lattice parameters and elasticconstants as a function of pressure up to 150 GPa are calculated. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and previous theoretical results, showing no phase transition over the pressure range of interest. We also found that magnesite exhibits a strong anisotropy throughout the lower mantle and that the nature of the anisotropy changes significantly with depth.

  15. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  16. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  17. Analysis of Twisting of Cellulose Nanofibrils in Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavilainen, S.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile, no sign......We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile......, no significant bending or stretching of nanocellulose is discovered. Considerations of atomic-scale interaction patterns bring about that the twisting arises from hydrogen bonding within and between the chains in a fibril....

  18. An object oriented Python interface for atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynninen, T.; Himanen, L.; Parkkinen, V.; Musso, T.; Corander, J.; Foster, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Programmable simulation environments allow one to monitor and control calculations efficiently and automatically before, during, and after runtime. Environments directly accessible in a programming environment can be interfaced with powerful external analysis tools and extensions to enhance the functionality of the core program, and by incorporating a flexible object based structure, the environments make building and analysing computational setups intuitive. In this work, we present a classical atomistic force field with an interface written in Python language. The program is an extension for an existing object based atomistic simulation environment.

  19. Atomistic simulation of static magnetic properties of bit patterned media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeláez-Echeverri, O. D.; Agudelo-Giraldo, J. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a new design of Co based bit pattern media with out-of-plane uni-axial anisotropy induced by interface effects. Our model features the inclusion of magnetic impurities in the non-magnetic matrix. After the material model was refined during three iterations using Monte Carlo simulations, further simulations were performed using an atomistic integrator of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with Langevin dynamics to study the behavior of the system paying special attention to the super-paramagnetic limit. Our model system exhibits three magnetic phase transitions, one due to the magnetically doped matrix material and the weak magnetic interaction between the nano-structures in the system. The different magnetic phases of the system as well as the features of its phase diagram are explained.

  20. Coupling Length Scales for Multiscale Atomistics-Continuum Simulations: Atomistically Induced Stress Distributions in Si/Si{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Voyiadjis, George Z.

    2001-08-20

    A hybrid molecular-dynamics (MD) and finite-element simulation approach is used to study stress distributions in silicon/silicon-nitride nanopixels. The hybrid approach provides atomistic description near the interface and continuum description deep into the substrate, increasing the accessible length scales and greatly reducing the computational cost. The results of the hybrid simulation are in good agreement with full multimillion-atom MD simulations: atomic structures at the lattice-mismatched interface between amorphous silicon nitride and silicon induce inhomogeneous stress patterns in the substrate that cannot be reproduced by a continuum approach alone.

  1. Hybrid simulations: combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J

    2011-06-14

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. In this work we introduce a straightforward scheme to perform hybrid simulations, making use of virtual sites to couple the two levels of resolution. With the help of these virtual sites interactions between molecules at different levels of resolution, i.e. between CG and atomistic molecules, are treated the same way as the pure CG-CG interactions. To test our method, we combine the Gromos atomistic force field with a number of coarse-grained potentials, obtained through several approaches that are designed to obtain CG potentials based on an existing atomistic model, namely iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and a potential of mean force subtraction procedure (SB). We also explore the use of the MARTINI force field for the CG potential. A simple system, consisting of atomistic butane molecules dissolved in CG butane, is used to study the performance of our hybrid scheme. Based on the potentials of mean force for atomistic butane in CG solvent, and the properties of 1:1 mixtures of atomistic and CG butane which should exhibit ideal mixing behavior, we conclude that the MARTINI and SB potentials are particularly suited to be combined with the atomistic force field. The MARTINI potential is subsequently used to perform hybrid simulations of atomistic dialanine peptides in both CG butane and water. Compared to a fully atomistic description of the system, the hybrid description gives similar results provided that the dielectric screening of water is accounted for. Within the field of biomolecules, our method appears ideally suited to study e.g. protein-ligand binding, where the active site and ligand are modeled in atomistic detail and the rest of the protein

  2. Atomistic simulations of jog migration on extended screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Leffers, T.; Pedersen, O.B.;

    2001-01-01

    We have performed large-scale atomistic simulations of the migration of elementary jogs on dissociated screw dislocations in Cu. The local crystalline configurations, transition paths. effective masses. and migration barriers for the jogs are determined using an interatomic potential based on the...

  3. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-01-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coa

  4. Definition and detection of contact in atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2015-01-01

    In atomistic simulations, contact depends on the accurate detection of contacting atoms as well as their contact area. While it is common to define contact between atoms based on the so-called ‘contact distance’ where the interatomic potential energy reaches its minimum, this discounts, for example,

  5. Definition and detection of contact in atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2015-01-01

    In atomistic simulations, contact depends on the accurate detection of contacting atoms as well as their contact area. While it is common to define contact between atoms based on the so-called ‘contact distance’ where the interatomic potential energy reaches its minimum, this discounts, for example,

  6. Atomistic study of crack propagation and dislocation emission in Cu-Ni multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinedinst, J.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-09-01

    The authors present atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration in multilayered Cu-Ni materials. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and EAM potentials. The atomistic structure of the interface was studied first for a totally coherent structure. Cracks were simulated near a Griffith condition in different possible configurations of the crack plane and front with respect to the axis of the layers. Results show that interface effects predominantly control the mechanical behavior of the system studied.

  7. The notion of a plastic material spin in atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickel, D.; Tenev, T. G.; Gullett, P.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    A kinematic algorithm is proposed to extend existing constructions of strain tensors from atomistic data to decouple elastic and plastic contributions to the strain. Elastic and plastic deformation and ultimately the plastic spin, useful quantities in continuum mechanics and finite element simulations, are computed from the full, discrete deformation gradient and an algorithm for the local elastic deformation gradient. This elastic deformation gradient algorithm identifies a crystal type using bond angle analysis (Ackland and Jones 2006 Phys. Rev. B 73 054104) and further exploits the relationship between bond angles to determine the local deformation from an ideal crystal lattice. Full definitions of plastic deformation follow directly using a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of copper in simple shear and torsion are presented to demonstrate the ability of these new discrete measures to describe plastic material spin in atomistic simulation and to compare them with continuum theory.

  8. Atomistic simulations of high strain rate loading of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, E. M.; Tramontina, D.; Ruestes, C. J.; Tang, Y.; Meyers, M. A.; Gunkelmann, N.; Urbassek, H. M.

    2013-03-01

    Materials loaded at high strain rates can reach extreme temperature and pressure conditions. Most experiments on loading of simple materials use poly crystals, while most atomistic simulations of shock wave loading deal with single crystals, due to the higher computational cost of running polycrystal samples. Of course, atomistic simulations of polycrystals with micron-sized grains are beyond the capabilities of current supercomputers. On the other hand, nanocrystals (nc) with grain sizes below 50 nm can be obtained experimentally and modeled reasonably well at high strain rates, opening the possibility of nearly direct comparison between atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiments using high power lasers. We will discuss MD simulations and links to experiments for nc Cu and Ni, as model f.c.c. solids, and nc Ta and Fe, as model b.c.c. solids. In all cases, the microstructure resulting from loading depends strongly on grain size, strain rate and peak applied pressure. We will also discuss effects related to target porosity in nc's. E.M.B. thanks funding from PICT2008-1325.

  9. Scoring multipole electrostatics in condensed-phase atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Kramer, Christian; Monnard, Fabien W; Nogueira, Elisa S; Ward, Thomas R; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-05-09

    Permanent multipoles (MTPs) embody a natural extension to common point-charge (PC) representations in atomistic simulations. In this work, we propose an alternative to the computationally expensive MTP molecular dynamics simulations by running a simple PC simulation and later reevaluate-"score''-all energies using the more detailed MTP force field. The method, which relies on the assumption that the PC and MTP force fields generate closely related phase spaces, is accomplished by enforcing identical sets of monopoles between the two force fields-effectively highlighting the higher MTP terms as a correction to the PC approximation. We first detail our consistent parametrization of the electrostatics and van der Waals interactions for the two force fields. We then validate the method by comparing the accuracy of protein-ligand binding free energies from both PC and MTP-scored representations with experimentally determined binding constants obtained by us. Specifically, we study the binding of several arylsulfonamide ligands to human carbonic anhydrase II. We find that both representations yield an accuracy of 1 kcal/mol with respect to experiment. Finally, we apply the method to rank the energetic contributions of individual atomic MTP coefficients for molecules solvated in water. All in all, MTP scoring is a computationally appealing method that can provide insight into the multipolar electrostatic interactions of condensed-phase systems.

  10. Atomistic simulations of Mg-Cu metallic glasses: Mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms of plastic deformation in amorphous metals are far from being understood. We have derived potential parameters for molecular dynamics simulations of Mg-Cu amorphous alloys using the Effective Medium Theory. We have simulated the formation of alloys by cooling from the melt......, and have used these glassy configurations to carry out simulations of plastic deformation. These involved different compositions, temperatures (including zero), and types of deformation (uniaxial strain/pure shear), and yielded stress-strain curves and values of flow stress. Separate simulations were...

  11. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  12. Predicting dislocation climb: Classical modeling versus atomistic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Clouet, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The classical modeling of dislocation climb based on a continuous description of vacancy diffusion is compared to recent atomistic simulations of dislocation climb in body-centered cubic iron under vacancy supersaturation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 095501 (2010)]. A quantitative agreement is obtained, showing the ability of the classical approach to describe dislocation climb. The analytical model is then used to extrapolate dislocation climb velocities to lower dislocation...

  13. Atomistic simulation of laser ablation of gold : Effect of pressure relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G. E.; Starikov, S. V.; Stegailov, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    The process of ablation of a gold target by femto- and picosecond laser radiation pulses has been studied by numerical simulations using an atomistic model with allowance for the electron subsystem and the dependence of the ion-ion interaction potential on the electron temperature. Using this potent

  14. Perspective: Machine learning potentials for atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, computer simulations have become a standard tool in essentially all fields of chemistry, condensed matter physics, and materials science. In order to keep up with state-of-the-art experiments and the ever growing complexity of the investigated problems, there is a constantly increasing need for simulations of more realistic, i.e., larger, model systems with improved accuracy. In many cases, the availability of sufficiently efficient interatomic potentials providing reliable energies and forces has become a serious bottleneck for performing these simulations. To address this problem, currently a paradigm change is taking place in the development of interatomic potentials. Since the early days of computer simulations simplified potentials have been derived using physical approximations whenever the direct application of electronic structure methods has been too demanding. Recent advances in machine learning (ML) now offer an alternative approach for the representation of potential-energy surfaces by fitting large data sets from electronic structure calculations. In this perspective, the central ideas underlying these ML potentials, solved problems and remaining challenges are reviewed along with a discussion of their current applicability and limitations.

  15. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site...... of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable...

  16. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2014-05-01

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  17. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: Atomistic battery discharge simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each ...

  18. A numerical study of ultraprecision machining of monocrystalline silicon with laser nano-structured diamond tools by atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Houfu; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong; Fang, Qihong; Fei, Xinjiang

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimension molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is employed to investigate the ultraprecision machining of single crystal silicon with structured nanoscale diamond tool fabricated by laser. The advantages and disadvantages of diamond machining using structured tools are discussed in comparison with those of using non-structured tools. The von Mises stress distribution, hydrostatic stress distribution, atomic displacement, stress, the radial distribution function, cutting forces, frictional coefficient, subsurface temperature and potential energy during the nanometric machining process are studied. A theoretical analysis model is also established to investigate the subsurface damage mechanism by analyzing the distribution of residual stress during the nanoscale machining process. The results show that a structured nanoscale tool in machining brittle material silicon causes a smaller hydrostatic stress, a less compressive normal stress σxx and σyy , a lower temperature and a smaller cutting force. However, the structured nanoscale tool machining results in smaller chip volume and more beta-silicon phase. Besides, the friction coefficient for tool with V-shape groove is smaller than those for non-structured tools and other structured nanoscale tools. This means that the tool with V-shape groove can reduce the resistance to cutting during the nanoscale machining process. In addition, the results also point out that the potential energy of subsurface atoms and the number of other atoms for pyramid-structured tool are much smaller than those of using non-structured tools and other structured nanoscale tools.

  19. Linking Atomistic and Mesoscale Simulations of Water Soluble Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. L.

    2003-03-01

    There exist a range of techniques for studying surfactants and polymers in the mesoscale regime. One of the challenges is to link mesoscale theories and simulations to other calculation methods which address different length scales of the system. We introduce some mesoscale methods of calculation for polymers and surfactants and then present a case study of where mesoscale modelling is used for mechanistic understanding, by linking the method to high throughput in-silico screening methods. We look at the adsorption onto silica of ethylene oxide (EO)/ propylene oxide (PO) block copolymers (lutrols) which have been modified by end-grafting of short, cationic dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA)chains. Given that the silica surface is negatively charged, it is remarkable that in some circumstances, polymers with longercationic chains have a lower adsorption. The effect is attributed to a competition between strong adsorption of the cationic DMAEMA groups driven by electrostatics, and weaker adsorption of the more numerous EO groups. This then raises the question of how we produce the values for the mesoscale parameters in these models and in the second part of the talk we describe a calculation method for doing this for water soluble polymers. The most promising route, but notoriously costly, is based on free energy calculations at the atomistic level. Free energy calculations are computationally intensive in general, but in an aqueous system one is also faced with the additional problem of using complex continuum models and/or accurate interaction potentials for water. Here we show how potential of mean force (PMF)calculations offer a practical alternative which avoids these drawbacks, though one is still faced with extremely long simulations.

  20. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-02-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations.

  1. Atomistic comparative study of VUV photodeposited silicon nitride on InP(100) by simulation and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicstein, J.; Guillonneau, E.; Marquez, J.; How Kee Chun, L. S.; Maisonneuve, D.; David, C.; Wang, Zh.; Palmier, J. F.; Courant, J. L.

    2000-02-01

    We report on an accurate validation of a new Monte Carlo three-dimensional model. Simulations up to 1200 Å layer thickness have been carried out for amorphous thin film layers of SiN:H deposited at low temperature (400-650 K) on (100) InP, by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, ˜185 nm)-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The computer simulations in the mesoscopic-submicronic range are compared with atomic force microscopy and index of refraction measurements. The reconstituted surface roughness and the voids discrete representations of the bulk are found to be in good agreement with these measurements. Simultaneously at around 450 K (at ˜175°C), thermal characteristic evolution of the both surface roughness and bulk porosity showed a transition from rough to smooth deposition and from low to high density.

  2. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  3. Atomistic simulation study of the effect of martensitic transformation volume change on crack-tip material evolution and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grujicic, M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lai, S.G. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Gumbsch, P. [Max Planck-Institut fur Metallforshung Institut fuer Werstoffwissenshaft, Seestrasse 92, D-7000 Stuttgart I (Germany)

    1997-07-15

    The effect of the sign of the F.C.C.{yields}B.C.C. martensitic transformation volume change in Fe-20Ni on material evolution in a region surrounding the crack tip and the accompanying change in the fracture resistance of the material have been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between atoms has been modeled using the embedded atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials. To obtain both the positive and the negative values of the transformation volume change, small adjustments had to be made in the EAM functions. These changes did not significantly affect of the key materials properties, such as the relative thermodynamic stability of the F.C.C. and B.C.C. structures, elastic constants, (11 anti 2){sub bcc} twin boundary energy, (10 anti 1){sub fcc}/(1 anti 21){sub bcc} interfacial energy, etc. The simulation results show that the sign of the transformation volume change has a profound effect on the material evolution and the path of the advancing crack. When the volume change is negative, the region ahead of the crack tip undergoes the transformation only after the other regions around the crack tip have already transformed. The crack tip undergoes a significant blunting and tends to stay on the original crack plane. In sharp contrast, when the volume change is positive, the region ahead of the crack tip transforms first and significant decohesion along the F.C.C./B.C.C. interfaces takes place. Consequently the crack tends to branch out. The effect of material evolution at the crack tip on the ability of the material to withstand further fracture has been quantified by calculating the Eshelby`s F{sub 1} conservation integral. The sign of the transformation volume change is found to have a major effect on the change of the F{sub 1} integral with the simulation time. (orig.)

  4. Stress in titania nanoparticles: An atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkins, Robert; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2014-04-24

    Stress engineering is becoming an increasingly important method for controlling electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of nanostructures, although the concept of stress is poorly defined at the nanoscale. We outline a methodology for computing bulk and surface stress in nanoparticles using atomistic simulation. The method is applicable to ionic and non- ionic materials alike and may be extended to other nanostructures. We apply it to spherical anatase nanoparticles ranging from 2 to 6 nm in diameter and obtain a surface stress of 0.89 N/m, in agreement with experimental measurements. Based on the extent that stress inhomogeneities at the surface are transmitted into the bulk, two characteristic length-scales are identified: below 3 nm bulk and surface regions cannot be defined and the available analytic theories for stress are not applicable, and above about 5 nm the stress becomes well-described by the theoretical Young-Laplace equation. The effect of a net surface charge on the bulk stress is also investigated. It is found that moderate surface charges can induce significant bulk stresses, on the order of 100 MPa, in nanoparticles within this size range.

  5. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  6. Experimental and atomistic simulation studies of corrosion inhibition of copper by a new benzotriazole derivative in acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaled, K.F. [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11711 (Egypt)], E-mail: khaledrice2003@yahoo.com

    2009-07-15

    The efficiency of N-(2-thiazolyl)-1H-benzotriazole-1-carbothioamide (TBC) as a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper in 0.5 M HCl has been tested by weight loss and electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical techniques show that TBC is a mixed-type inhibitor and its inhibition mechanism on copper surface is adsorption assisted by H-bond formation. Impedance measurements show a wide peak presumably given by more than one time constant in the presence of TBC. Also, impedance results show that the values of CPEs (constant phase elements) tend to decrease and both polarization resistance and inhibition efficiency tend to increase with increasing of TBC concentration due to an increase in the electric double layer. Monte Carlo simulations incorporating molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics show that the TBC adsorb on the copper surface firmly through the thiazolyl and carbothioamide groups, the adsorption energy as well as hydrogen bond length have been calculated for both TBC and benzotriazole (BTA) for comparison. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that TBC has higher HOMO, lower LUMO, lower energy gap and lower dipole moment ({mu}) than BTA, which proves that TBC is better copper corrosion inhibitor compared with BTA in 0.5 M HCl.

  7. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  8. Efficiency of various lattices from hard ball to soft ball: theoretical study of thermodynamic properties of dendrimer liquid crystal from atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youyong; Lin, Shiang-Tai; Goddard, William A

    2004-02-18

    Self-assembled supramolecular organic liquid crystal structures at nanoscale have potential applications in molecular electronics, photonics, and porous nanomaterials. Most of these structures are formed by aggregation of soft spherical supramolecules, which have soft coronas and overlap each other in the packing process. Our main focus here is to study the possible packing mechanisms via molecular dynamics simulations at the atomistic level. We consider the relative stability of various lattices packed by the soft dendrimer balls, first synthesized and characterized by Percec et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 1539) with different packing methods. The dendrons, which form the soft dendrimer balls, have the character of a hard aromatic region from the point of the cone to the edge with C(12) alkane "hair". After the dendrons pack into a sphere, the core of the sphere has the hard aromatic groups, while the surface is covered with the C(12) alkane "hair". In our studies, we propose three ways to organize the hair on the balls, Smooth/Valentino balls, Sticky/Einstein balls, and Asymmetric/Punk balls, which lead to three different packing mechanisms, Slippery, Sticky, and Anisotropic, respectively. We carry out a series of molecular dynamics (MD) studies on three plausible crystal structures (A15, FCC, and BCC) as a function of density and analyze the MD based on the vibrational density of state (DoS) method to extract the enthalpy, entropy, and free energies of these systems. We find that anisotropic packed A15 is favored over FCC, BCC lattices. Our predicted X-ray intensities of the best structures are in excellent agreement with experiment. "Anisotropic ball packing" proposed here plays an intermediate role between the enthalpy-favored "disk packing" and entropy-favored "isotropic ball packing", which explains the phase transitions at different temperatures. Free energies of various lattices at different densities are essentially the same, indicating that the

  9. Shock Hugoniot behavior of single crystal titanium using atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenchery, Karoon; Dongare, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Atomistic shock simulations are performed for single crystal titanium using four different interatomic potentials at impact velocities ranging from 0.5 km/s to 2.0 km/s. These potentials comprise of three parameterizations in the formulation of the embedded atom method and one formulation of the modified embedded atom method. The capability of the potentials to model the shock deformation and failure behavior is investigated by computing the shock hugoniot response of titanium and comparing to existing experimental data. In addition, the capability to reproduce the shock induced alpha (α) to omega (ω) phase transformation seen in Ti is investigated. The shock wave structure is discussed and the velocities for the elastic, plastic and the α-ω phase transformation waves are calculated for all the interatomic potentials considered.

  10. Quantum-based Atomistic Simulation of Transition Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, J A; Benedict, L X; Glosli, J N; Hood, R Q; Orlikowski, D A; Patel, M V; Soderlind, P; Streitz, F H; Tang, M; Yang, L H

    2005-08-29

    First-principles generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT) provides a fundamental basis for transferable multi-ion interatomic potentials in d-electron transition metals within density-functional quantum mechanics. In mid-period bcc metals, where multi-ion angular forces are important to structural properties, simplified model GPT or MGPT potentials have been developed based on canonical d bands to allow analytic forms and large-scale atomistic simulations. Robust, advanced-generation MGPT potentials have now been obtained for Ta and Mo and successfully applied to a wide range of structural, thermodynamic, defect and mechanical properties at both ambient and extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. Recent algorithm improvements have also led to a more general matrix representation of MGPT beyond canonical bands allowing increased accuracy and extension to f-electron actinide metals, an order of magnitude increase in computational speed, and the current development of temperature-dependent potentials.

  11. Aggregation behavior of amphiphilic cyclodextrins in a nonpolar solvent: evidence of large-scale structures by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and solution studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Raffaini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemically modified cyclodextrins carrying both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substituents may form supramolecular aggregates or nanostructures of great interest. These systems have been usually investigated and characterized in water for their potential use as nanocarriers for drug delivery, but they can also aggregate in apolar solvents, as shown in the present paper through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and dynamic light scattering measurements. The simulations, carried out with a large number of molecules in vacuo adopting an unbiased bottom-up approach, suggest the formation of bidimensional structures with characteristic length scales of the order of 10 nm, although some of these sizes are possibly affected by the assumed periodicity of the simulation cell, in particular at longer lengths. In any case, these nanostructures are stable at least from the kinetic viewpoint for relatively long times thanks to the large number of intermolecular interactions of dipolar and dispersive nature. The dynamic light scattering experiments indicate the presence of aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius of the order of 80 nm and a relatively modest polydispersity, even though smaller nanometer-sized aggregates cannot be fully ruled out. Taken together, these simulation and experimental results indicate that amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins do also form large-scale nanoaggregates even in apolar solvents.

  12. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E.M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a co...

  13. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: h.ogawa@aist.go.jp

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation.

  14. Atomistic Simulations of Uranium Incorporation into Iron (Hydr)Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-04-29

    Atomistic simulations were carried out to characterize the coordination environments of U incorporated in three Fe-(hydr)oxide minerals: goethite, magnetite, and hematite. The simulations provided information on U-O and U-Fe distances, coordination numbers, and lattice distortion for U incorporated in different sites (e.g., unoccupied versus occupied sites, octahedral versus tetrahedral) as a function of the oxidation state of U and charge compensation mechanisms (i.e., deprotonation, vacancy formation, or reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II)). For goethite, deprotonation of first shell hydroxyls enables substitution of U for Fe(III) with a minimal amount of lattice distortion, whereas substitution in unoccupied octahedral sites induced appreciable distortion to 7-fold coordination regardless of U oxidation states and charge compensation mechanisms. Importantly, U-Fe distances of ~3.6 Å were associated with structural incorporation of U and cannot be considered diagnostic of simple adsorption to goethite surfaces. For magnetite, the octahedral site accommodates U(V) or U(VI) with little lattice distortion. U substituted for Fe(III) in hematite maintained octahedral coordination in most cases. In general, comparison of the simulations with available experimental data provides further evidence for the structural incorporation of U in iron (hydr)oxide minerals.

  15. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock Compressed Quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geom- etry optimised system of a polar slab in a 3-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under repres...

  16. Coupling Length Scales for Multiscale Atomistics-Continuum Simulations: Atomistically Induced Stress Distributions in Si/Si3N4 Nanopixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Voyiadjis, George Z.

    2001-08-01

    A hybrid molecular-dynamics (MD) and finite-element simulation approach is used to study stress distributions in silicon/silicon-nitride nanopixels. The hybrid approach provides atomistic description near the interface and continuum description deep into the substrate, increasing the accessible length scales and greatly reducing the computational cost. The results of the hybrid simulation are in good agreement with full multimillion-atom MD simulations: atomic structures at the lattice-mismatched interface between amorphous silicon nitride and silicon induce inhomogeneous stress patterns in the substrate that cannot be reproduced by a continuum approach alone.

  17. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-03-24

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Grain-Boundary Fracture: Cohesive Zone Models Parameterized From Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Yamakov, Vesselin

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale modeling strategy is developed to study grain boundary fracture in polycrystalline aluminum. Atomistic simulation is used to model fundamental nanoscale deformation and fracture mechanisms and to develop a constitutive relationship for separation along a grain boundary interface. The nanoscale constitutive relationship is then parameterized within a cohesive zone model to represent variations in grain boundary properties. These variations arise from the presence of vacancies, intersticies, and other defects in addition to deviations in grain boundary angle from the baseline configuration considered in the molecular dynamics simulation. The parameterized cohesive zone models are then used to model grain boundaries within finite element analyses of aluminum polycrystals.

  19. Atomistic simulations of grain boundary migration in face centred cubic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Schönfelder, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    In this work, atomistic grain boundary (GB) migration and GB self-diffusion simulations of planar [001] twist GBs as well as various planar tilt GBs in face-centred cubic bicrystals have been performed. The utilized simulation method of choice was molecular dynamics (MD). Due to the planar geometry of the studied GBs, no driving force (DF) on the GB is exerted due to GB curvature. Therefore one necessary and important feature of this work was to derive DF concepts to drive planar GBs continuo...

  20. Dislocation pinning effects on fracture behavior: Atomistic and dislocation dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, S. J.; Farkas, D.

    2002-10-01

    We introduce an approach in which results from atomistic simulations are combined with discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of crack-tip plasticity. The method is used to study the effects of dislocation pinning due to grain boundaries or secondary particles on the fracture behavior of aluminum. We find that the fracture resistance is reduced with decreasing pinning distance. The results show that the pinning of the dislocations causes a net decrease in the shear stress projected on the slip plane, preventing further dislocation emission. Semibrittle cleavage occurs after a certain number of dislocations is emitted.

  1. Atomistic study on the FCC/BCC interface structure with {112}KS orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Keonwook [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-09-23

    In this study, atomistic simulation is used to explore the atomic interface structure, the intrinsic defect network, and mechanism of twin formation from the {112}KS Cu-Nb interface. The interface structure of different material systems AI-Fe and AI-Nb are also compared with Cu-Nb interface.

  2. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, J. H.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  3. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work be

  4. Accurate Evaluations of Strain and Stress in Atomistic Simulations of Crystalline Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jerry Zhijian; Li, Xiantao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the accuracy of Irving-Kirkwood type of formulas for the approximation of continuum quantities from atomistic simulations. Such formulas are derived by expressing the displacement, deformation gradient and stress in terms of certain kernel functions. We propose two criteria for choosing the kernel functions to significantly improve the sampling accuracy. We present a simple procedure to construct kernel functions that meet these criteria. Further, numerical tests on homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems provide validations for our analysis.

  5. Investigations on the mechanical behavior of nanowires with twin boundaries by atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xia, E-mail: tianxia@lsec.cc.ac.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, HoHai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the deformation behavior of twinned Cu nanowires with a <111> growth orientation under tension. Due to the existence of the twin boundaries, the strength of the twinned nanowires is higher than that of the twin-free nanowire and the yielding stress of twinned nanowires is inversely proportional to the spacings of the twin boundaries. Moreover, The ductility of the twin-free nanowire is the highest of all and it grows with the increasing spacings of the twin boundaries for twinned nanowires. Besides, we find that the twin boundaries can be served as dislocation sources as well as the free surfaces and grain boundaries.

  6. Atomistic protein folding simulations on the submillisecond time scale using worldwide distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vijay S; Baker, Ian; Chapman, Jarrod; Elmer, Sidney P; Khaliq, Siraj; Larson, Stefan M; Rhee, Young Min; Shirts, Michael R; Snow, Christopher D; Sorin, Eric J; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2003-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of protein folding have the potential to be a great complement to experimental studies, but have been severely limited by the time scales accessible with current computer hardware and algorithms. By employing a worldwide distributed computing network of tens of thousands of PCs and algorithms designed to efficiently utilize this new many-processor, highly heterogeneous, loosely coupled distributed computing paradigm, we have been able to simulate hundreds of microseconds of atomistic molecular dynamics. This has allowed us to directly simulate the folding mechanism and to accurately predict the folding rate of several fast-folding proteins and polymers, including a nonbiological helix, polypeptide alpha-helices, a beta-hairpin, and a three-helix bundle protein from the villin headpiece. Our results demonstrate that one can reach the time scales needed to simulate fast folding using distributed computing, and that potential sets used to describe interatomic interactions are sufficiently accurate to reach the folded state with experimentally validated rates, at least for small proteins.

  7. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non

  8. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  9. Scaling of slip avalanches in sheared amorphous materials based on large-scale atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dansong; Dahmen, Karin A.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Atomistic simulations of binary amorphous systems with over 4 million atoms are performed. Systems of two interatomic potentials of the Lennard-Jones type, LJ12-6 and LJ9-6, are simulated. The athermal quasistatic shearing protocol is adopted, where the shear strain is applied in a stepwise fashion with each step followed by energy minimization. For each avalanche event, the shear stress drop (Δ σ ), the hydrostatic pressure drop (Δ σh ), and the potential energy drop (Δ E ) are computed. It is found that, with the avalanche size increasing, the three become proportional to each other asymptotically. The probability distributions of avalanche sizes are obtained and values of scaling exponents fitted. In particular, the distributions follow a power law, P (Δ U )˜Δ U-τ , where Δ U is a measure of avalanche sizes defined based on shear stress drops. The exponent τ is 1.25 ±0.1 for the LJ12-6 systems, and 1.15 ±0.1 for the LJ9-6 systems. The value of τ for the LJ12-6 systems is consistent with that from an earlier atomistic simulation study by Robbins et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 105703 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.105703, but the fitted values of other scaling exponents differ, which may be because the shearing protocol used here differs from that in their study.

  10. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks: An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation combined with a mapping/reverse mapping procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazutin, A. A.; Glagolev, M. K.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Khokhlov, A. R. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds RAS, Vavilova Str. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    An algorithm involving classical molecular dynamics simulations with mapping and reverse mapping procedure is here suggested to simulate the crosslinking of the polystyrene dissolved in dichloroethane by monochlorodimethyl ether. The algorithm comprises consecutive stages: molecular dynamics atomistic simulation of a polystyrene solution, the mapping of atomistic structure onto coarse-grained model, the crosslink formation, the reverse mapping, and finally relaxation of the structure dissolved in dichloroethane and in dry state. The calculated values of the specific volume and the elastic modulus are in reasonable quantitative correspondence with experimental data.

  11. Fracture toughness from atomistic simulations: Brittleness induced by emission of sessile dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-08-04

    Using atomistic simulations of crack response for intermetallic materials the author shows that when the emitted dislocations are sessile and stay in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip the emitted dislocations can actually lead to brittle failure. She present the results of an atomistic simulation study of the simultaneous dislocation emission and crack propagation process in this class of materials. She used a molecular statics technique with embedded atom (EAM) potentials developed for NiAl. The crystal structure of NiAl is the CsCl type (B2) with a lattice parameter of 0.287 nm, which is reproduced by the potential together with the cohesive energy and elastic constants. The compound stays ordered up to the melting point, indicating a strong tendency towards chemical ordering with a relatively high energy of the antiphase boundary (APB). As a result of this relatively large energy the dislocations of 1/2<111> type Burgers vectors imply a high energy and the deformation process occurs via the larger <100> type dislocations.

  12. Three-dimensional Hybrid Continuum-Atomistic Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, S; Hornung, R; Garcia, A; Hadjiconstantinou, N

    2004-04-15

    We present an adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme for modeling multi-scale hydrodynamics. The AMAR approach extends standard conservative adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms by providing a robust flux-based method for coupling an atomistic fluid representation to a continuum model. The atomistic model is applied locally in regions where the continuum description is invalid or inaccurate, such as near strong flow gradients and at fluid interfaces, or when the continuum grid is refined to the molecular scale. The need for such ''hybrid'' methods arises from the fact that hydrodynamics modeled by continuum representations are often under-resolved or inaccurate while solutions generated using molecular resolution globally are not feasible. In the implementation described herein, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) provides an atomistic description of the flow and the compressible two-fluid Euler equations serve as our continuum-scale model. The AMR methodology provides local grid refinement while the algorithm refinement feature allows the transition to DSMC where needed. The continuum and atomistic representations are coupled by matching fluxes at the continuum-atomistic interfaces and by proper averaging and interpolation of data between scales. Our AMAR application code is implemented in C++ and is built upon the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) framework developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. SAMRAI provides the parallel adaptive gridding algorithm and enables the coupling between the continuum and atomistic methods.

  13. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  14. Origin of unrealistic blunting during atomistic fracture simulations based on MEAM potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Won-Seok; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2014-06-01

    Atomistic simulations based on interatomic potentials have frequently failed to correctly reproduce the brittle fracture of materials, showing an unrealistic blunting. We analyse the origin of the unrealistic blunting during atomistic simulations by modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) potentials for experimentally well-known brittle materials such as bcc tungsten and diamond silicon. The radial cut-off which has been thought to give no influence on MEAM calculations is found to have a decisive effect on the crack propagation behaviour. Extending both cut-off distance and truncation range can prevent the unrealistic blunting, reproducing many well-known fracture behaviour which have been difficult to reproduce. The result provides a guideline for future atomistic simulations that focus on various fracture-related phenomena including the failure of metallic-covalent bonding material systems using MEAM potentials.

  15. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  16. Long-time atomistic simulations with the Parallel Replica Dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Danny

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) -- the numerical integration of atomistic equations of motion -- is a workhorse of computational materials science. Indeed, MD can in principle be used to obtain any thermodynamic or kinetic quantity, without introducing any approximation or assumptions beyond the adequacy of the interaction potential. It is therefore an extremely powerful and flexible tool to study materials with atomistic spatio-temporal resolution. These enviable qualities however come at a steep computational price, hence limiting the system sizes and simulation times that can be achieved in practice. While the size limitation can be efficiently addressed with massively parallel implementations of MD based on spatial decomposition strategies, allowing for the simulation of trillions of atoms, the same approach usually cannot extend the timescales much beyond microseconds. In this article, we discuss an alternative parallel-in-time approach, the Parallel Replica Dynamics (ParRep) method, that aims at addressing the timescale limitation of MD for systems that evolve through rare state-to-state transitions. We review the formal underpinnings of the method and demonstrate that it can provide arbitrarily accurate results for any definition of the states. When an adequate definition of the states is available, ParRep can simulate trajectories with a parallel speedup approaching the number of replicas used. We demonstrate the usefulness of ParRep by presenting different examples of materials simulations where access to long timescales was essential to access the physical regime of interest and discuss practical considerations that must be addressed to carry out these simulations. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  17. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Reischl, Bernhard; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Nordlund, Kai; Lassila, Antti

    2017-03-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20-60 %rh. Force-distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation.

  18. Atomistic-Continuum Hybrid Simulation of Heat Transfer between Argon Flow and Copper Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Yijin; Chen, C L

    2016-01-01

    A simulation work aiming to study heat transfer coefficient between argon fluid flow and copper plate is carried out based on atomistic-continuum hybrid method. Navier-Stokes equations for continuum domain are solved through the Pressure Implicit with Splitting of Operators (PISO) algorithm, and the atom evolution in molecular domain is solved through the Verlet algorithm. The solver is validated by solving Couette flow and heat conduction problems. With both momentum and energy coupling method applied, simulations on convection of argon flows between two parallel plates are performed. The top plate is kept as a constant velocity and has higher temperature, while the lower one, which is modeled with FCC copper lattices, is also fixed but has lower temperature. It is found that, heat transfer between argon fluid flow and copper plate in this situation is much higher than that at macroscopic when the flow is fully developed.

  19. Atomistic simulations of fracture in the B2 phase of the Nb-Ti-Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Computer Simulation Lab.

    1998-06-30

    Atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration in the B2 phase of Nb-rich alloys in the Nb-Ti-Al are presented. The alloy compositions studied are Nb-16Al-16Ti and Nb-16Al-33Ti. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and empirical embedded atom method (EAM) potentials for the ternary system developed in previous work. The behavior of a semi-infinite crack was studied under mode I loading for different crack tip geometries. The crack was embedded in a simulation cell with periodic boundary conditions along the direction parallel to the crack front and fixed boundary conditions along the periphery of the simulation cell. The quasi-static simulations were carried out using a molecular statics relaxation technique to obtain the minimum energy configuration of the atoms starting from their initial elastic positions, under increasingly higher stress intensities. The competition between dislocation emission and cleavage was studied in these alloys as a function of Ti content. Cracks along {l_brace}110{r_brace}-type planes with crack fronts oriented along different directions were studied. The alloys showed increased ductility with increased Ti content. The simulations show more ductile behavior than other intermetallics, due to easier dislocation emission processes at the crack tip. (orig.) 30 refs.

  20. Hybrid simulations : combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. I

  1. Atomistic simulation of nanoporous layered double hydroxide materials and their properties. I. Structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayong; Kim, Yongman; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2005-06-01

    An atomistic model of layered double hydroxides, an important class of nanoporous materials, is presented. These materials have wide applications, ranging from adsorbents for gases and liquid ions to nanoporous membranes and catalysts. They consist of two types of metallic cations that are accommodated by a close-packed configuration of OH- and other anions in a positively charged brucitelike layer. Water and various anions are distributed in the interlayer space for charge compensation. A modified form of the consistent-valence force field, together with energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulations, is utilized for developing an atomistic model of the materials. To test the accuracy of the model, we compare the vibrational frequencies, x-ray diffraction patterns, and the basal spacing of the material, computed using the atomistic model, with our experimental data over a wide range of temperature. Good agreement is found between the computed and measured quantities.

  2. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  3. Atomistic Simulations of Functional Au-144(SR)(60) Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Gurtovenko, A. A.; Martinez-Seara, H.

    2012-01-01

    Charged monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been studied in aqueous solution by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at physiological temperature (310 K). Particular attention has been paid to electrostatic properties that modulate the formation of a complex comprised...... of the nanoparticle together with surrounding ions and water. We focus on Au-144 nanoparticles that comprise a nearly spherical Au core (diameter similar to 2 nm), a passivating Au-S interface, and functionalized alkanethiol chains. Cationic and anionic AuNPs have been modeled with amine and carboxyl terminal groups...... potential displays a minimum for AuNP- at 1.9 nm from the center of the nanoparticle, marking a preferable location for Na+, while the AuNP+ potential (affecting the distribution of Cl-) rises almost monotonically with a local maximum. Comparison to Debye-Huckel theory shows very good agreement for radial...

  4. An atomistic-continuum hybrid simulation of fluid flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiang; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have found that slip length could be as large as on the order of 1 μm for fluid flows over superhydrophobic surfaces. Superhydrophobic surfaces can be achieved by patterning roughness on hydrophobic surfaces. In the present paper, an atomistic-continuum hybrid approach is developed to simulate the Couette flows over superhydrophobic surfaces, in which a molecular dynamics simulation is used in a small region near the superhydrophobic surface where the continuum assumption i...

  5. Atomistic simulation of shocks in single crystal and polycrystalline Ta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, E. M.; Higginbotham, A.; Park, N.; Tang, Y.; Suggit, M.; Mogni, G.; Ruestes, C. J.; Hawreliak, J.; Erhart, P.; Meyers, M. A.; Wark, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of shocks in Ta single crystals and polycrystals were carried out using up to 360 million atoms. Several EAM and FS type potentials were tested up to 150 GPa, with varying success reproducing the Hugoniot and the behavior of elastic constants under pressure. Phonon modes were studied to exclude possible plasticity nucleation by soft-phonon modes, as observed in MD simulations of Cu crystals. The effect of loading rise time in the resulting microstructure was studied for ramps up to 0.2 ns long. Dislocation activity was not observed in single crystals, unless there were defects acting as dislocation sources above a certain pressure. E.M.B. was funded by CONICET, Agencia Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (PICT2008-1325), and a Royal Society International Joint Project award.

  6. Nanometric mechanical cutting of metallic glass investigated using atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Su, Jih-Kai

    2017-02-01

    The effects of cutting depth, tool nose radius, and temperature on the cutting mechanism and mechanics of amorphous NiAl workpieces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations based on the second-moment approximation of the many-body tight-binding potential. These effects are investigated in terms of atomic trajectories and flow field, shear strain, cutting force, resistance factor, cutting ratio, and pile-up characteristics. The simulation results show that a nanoscale chip with a shear plane of 135° is extruded by the tool from a workpiece surface during the cutting process. The workpiece atoms underneath the tool flow upward due to the adhesion force and elastic recovery. The required tangential force and normal force increase with increasing cutting depth and tool nose radius; both forces also increase with decreasing temperature. The resistance factor increases with increasing cutting depth and temperature, and decreases with increasing tool nose radius.

  7. Comparative study of grain-boundary migration and grain-boundary self-diffusion of [0 0 1] twist-grain boundaries in copper by atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, B. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstrasse 14, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Gottstein, G. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstrasse 14, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)]. E-mail: gottstein@imm.rwth-aachen.de; Shvindlerman, L.S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2005-04-15

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study grain-boundary migration as well as grain-boundary self-diffusion of low-angle and high-angle [0 0 1] planar twist grain boundaries (GBs) in copper. Elastic strain was imposed to drive the planar [0 0 1] twist GBs. The temperature dependence of the GB mobility was determined over a wide misorientation range. Additionally grain-boundary self-diffusion was studied for all investigated [0 0 1] planar twist GBs. A comparison of the activation energies determined shows that grain-boundary migration and self-diffusion are distinctly different processes. The behavior of atoms during grain-boundary migration was analyzed for all studied GBs. The analysis reveals that usually in absolute pure materials high-angle planar [0 0 1] twist GBs move by a collective shuffle mechanism while low-angle GBs move by a dislocation based mechanism. The obtained activation parameters were analyzed with respect to the compensation effect.

  8. Atomistic simulation for deforming complex alloys with application toward TWIP steel and associated physical insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Shaofeng; Liu, Jiabin; Li, Xiaoyan; Wei, Yujie; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The interest in promoting deformation twinning for plasticity is mounting for advanced materials. In contrast to disordered grain boundaries, highly organized twin boundaries are beneficial to promoting strength-ductility combination. Twinning deformation typically involves the kinetics of stacking faults, its interplay with dislocations, as well as the interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries. While the latter has been intensively studied, the dynamics of stacking faults has been rarely touched upon. In this work, we report new physical insights on the stacking fault dynamics in twin induced plasticity (TWIP) steels. The atomistic simulation is made possible by a newly introduced approach: meta-atom molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation suggests that the stacking fault interactions are dominated by dislocation reactions that take place spontaneously, different from the existing mechanisms. Whether to generate a single stacking fault, or a twinning partial and a trailing partial dislocation, depends upon a unique parameter, namely the stacking fault energy. The latter in turn determines the deformation twinning characteristics. The complex twin-slip and twin-dislocation interactions demonstrate the dual role of deformation twins as both the dislocation barrier and dislocation storage. This duality contributes to the high strength and high ductility of TWIP steels.

  9. Markov-chain model of classified atomistic transition states for discrete kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Smith, Roger

    2011-10-01

    Classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The scheme is then used to determine transitions that can be applied in a lattice-based kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) atomistic simulation model. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements are considered as local transition events constrained in potential energy wells over certain local time periods. These processes are represented by Markov chains of multidimensional Boolean valued functions in three-dimensional lattice space. The events inhibited by the barriers under a certain level are regarded as thermal fluctuations of the canonical ensemble and accepted freely. Consequently, the fluctuating system evolution process is implemented as a Markov chain of equivalence class objects. It is shown that the process can be characterized by the acceptance of metastable local transitions. The method is applied to a problem of Au and Ag cluster growth on a rippled surface. The simulation predicts the existence of a morphology-dependent transition time limit from a local metastable to stable state for subsequent cluster growth by accretion. Excellent agreement with observed experimental results is obtained.

  10. Atomistic simulation of the structure and elastic properties of gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jiankuai; Gall, Ken; Dunn, Martin L.

    2004-09-01

    We performed atomistic simulations to study the effect of free surfaces on the structure and elastic properties of gold nanowires aligned in the and crystallographic directions. Computationally, we formed a nanowire by assembling gold atoms into a long wire with free sides by putting them in their bulk fcc lattice positions. We then performed a static relaxation on the assemblage. The tensile surface stresses on the sides of the wire cause the wire to contract along the length with respect to the original fcc lattice, and we characterize this deformation in terms of an equilibrium strain versus the cross-sectional area. While the surface stress causes wires of both orientations and all sizes to increasingly contract with decreasing cross-sectional area, when the cross-sectional area of a nanowire is less than 1.83 nm×1.83 nm, the wire undergoes a phase transformation from fcc to bct, and the equilibrium strain increases by an order of magnitude. We then applied a uniform uniaxial strain incrementally to 1.2% to the relaxed nanowires in a molecular statics framework. From the simulation results we computed the effective axial Young's modulus and Poisson's ratios of the nanowire as a function of cross-sectional area. We used two approaches to compute the effective elastic moduli, one based on a definition in terms of the strain derivative of the total energy and another in terms of the virial stress often used in atomistic simulations. Both give quantitatively similar results, showing an increase in Young's modulus with a decrease of cross-sectional area in the nanowires that do not undergo a phase transformation. Those that undergo a phase transformation experience an increase of about a factor of three of Young's modulus. The Poisson's ratio of the wires that do not undergo a phase transformation show little change with the cross-sectional area. Those wires that undergo a phase transformation experience an increase of about 10% in Poisson's ratio. The wires show

  11. Dynamic Deformation of Thermosetting Polymers---All Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsige, Mesfin; Shenogina, Natalia; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila; Patnaik, Soumya

    2013-03-01

    We are using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interconnection between structural and mechanical properties of highly cross-linked polymer networks. In this study we focused on the widely used resin-hardener system composed of DGEBA epoxy oligomers and aromatic amine hardener DETDA. Accurate cross-linked models were developed using the effective cross-linking procedure that enables to generate thermoset structures with realistic structural characteristics. These models were used to examine the elastic properties of thermosetting networks with various degrees of curing and length of resin strands both in glassy and rubbery states. In our recent study we employed static deformation approach to estimate potential energy contribution to the mechanical response. In the present work we are using dynamic deformation approach which takes into account both potential energy and thermal motions in the structure. Uniaxial, volumetric and shear dynamic deformation modes were used to obtain Young's, bulk, shear moduli and Poisson's ratio directly. We also calculated elastic constants using formulae of linear elasticity and analyzed the results obtained by direct deformation and interconversion methods. The elastic properties determined from these two approaches are in good agreement with each other and also with experimental data.

  12. Atomistic simulations of the radiation resistance of oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, A., E-mail: alain.chartier@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Van Brutzel, L. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Crocombette, J.-P. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMP, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-09-01

    Fluorite compounds such as urania and ceria, or related compounds such as pyrochlores and also spinels show different behaviors under irradiations, which ranges from perfect radiation resistance to crystalline phase change or even complete amorphization depending on their structure and/or their composition. Displacement cascades - dedicated to the understanding of the ballistic regime and performed by empirical potentials molecular dynamics simulations - have revealed that the remaining damages of the above mentioned oxides are reduced to point defects unlike what is observed in zircon and zirconolite, which directly amorphize during the cascade. The variable behavior of these point defects is the key of the various responses of these materials to irradiations. This behavior can be investigated by two specific molecular dynamics methodologies that will be reviewed here: (i) the method of point defects accumulation as a function of temperature that gives access to the dose effects and to the critical doses for amorphization; (ii) the study Frenkel pairs life-time - i.e. their time of recombination as function of temperature - that may be used as a tool to understand the results obtained in displacements cascades or to identify the microscopic mechanisms responsible for the amorphization/re-crystallization during the point defects accumulations.

  13. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Electrical Double

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zifeng; Milner, Scott; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2015-03-01

    The electrical double layer (EDL) near the polymer/water interface plays a key role in the colloidal stability of latex paint. To elucidate the structure of the EDL at the molecular level, we conducted an all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We studied two representative surface charge groups in latex, the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the grafted short polyelectrolyte charged by dissociated methyl methacrylic acid (MAA) monomers. Our results confirm that the Poisson-Boltzmann theory works well outside the Stern layer. Our calculated electrostatic potential at the Outer Helmholtz Plane (OHP) is close to the zeta potential measured experimentally, which suggests that the potential at the OHP is a good estimate of the zeta potential. We found that the position of the OHP for the MAA polyelectrolyte system extends much further into the aqueous phase than that in the SDS system, resulting in a Stern layer that is twice as thick. This model will allow for future investigations of the interactions of the surface with different surfactants and rheology modifiers, which may serve as a guide to tune the rheology of latex formulations. We thank Dow Chemical Company for financial support.

  14. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  15. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro, E-mail: strachan@purdue.edu [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices.

  16. Atomistic Simulations of Material Properties under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi

    Extreme conditions involve low or high temperatures (> 1500 K), high pressures (> 30 MPa), high strains or strain rates, high radiation fluxes (> 100 dpa), and high electromagnetic fields (> 15T). Material properties under extreme conditions can be extremely different from those under normal conditions. Understanding material properties and performance under extreme conditions, including their dynamic evolution over time, plays an essential role in improving material properties and developing novel materials with desired properties. To understand material properties under extreme conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with recently developed reactive force fields (ReaxFF) and traditional embedded atom methods (EAM) potentials to examine various materials (e.g., energetic materials and binary liquids) and processes. The key results from the simulations are summarized below. Anisotropic sensitivity of RDX crystals: Based on the compress-and-shear reactive dynamics (CS-RD) simulations of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals, we predict that for mechanical shocks between 3 and 7 GPa, RDX is the most sensitive to shocks perpendicular to the (100) and (210) planes, while it is insensitive to those perpendicular to the (120), (111), and (110) planes. The simulations demonstrate that the molecular origin of anisotropic shock sensitivity is the steric hindrance to shearing of adjacent slip planes. Mechanisms of hotspot formation in polymer bonded explosives (PBXs): The simulations of a realistic model of PBXs reveal that hotspots may form at the nonplanar interfaces where shear relaxation leads to a dramatic temperature increase that persists long after the shock front has passed the interface. For energetic materials this temperature increase is coupled to chemical reactions that eventually lead to detonation. We show that decreasing the density of the binder eliminates the hotspots or reduces the sensitivity. Cavitation in binary metallic liquids

  17. Methods for atomistic abrasion simulations of laterally periodic polycrystalline substrates with fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, S. J.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Gkagkas, K.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we discuss a method to generate laterally periodic polycrystalline samples with fractal surfaces for use in molecular dynamics simulations of abrasion. We also describe a workflow that allows us to produce random lateral distributions of simple but realistically shaped hard abrasive particles with Gaussian size distribution and random particle orientations. We evaluate some on-the-fly analysis and visualization possibilities that may be applied during a molecular dynamics simulation to considerably reduce the post-processing effort. Finally, we elaborate on a parallelizable post-processing approach to evaluating and visualizing the surface topography, the grain structure and orientation, as well as the temperature distribution in large atomistic systems.

  18. Towards Novel Energy Solutions - an Electronic/Atomistic Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Rui

    This thesis focuses on computer modeling and multi-scale simulations of new materials that can potentially be used in novel energy applications, i.e., the dye molecules in dye-sensitizedsolar- cells and polymers for the capacitive energy storage. The aim is to understand physical properties of existing materials and then to find ways to improve them. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. A fast mollified impulse method for biomolecular atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, L.; Hochbruck, M.; Singh, C. V.

    2017-03-01

    Classical integration methods for molecular dynamics are inherently limited due to resonance phenomena occurring at certain time-step sizes. The mollified impulse method can partially avoid this problem by using appropriate filters based on averaging or projection techniques. However, existing filters are computationally expensive and tedious in implementation since they require either analytical Hessians or they need to solve nonlinear systems from constraints. In this work we follow a different approach based on corotation for the construction of a new filter for (flexible) biomolecular simulations. The main advantages of the proposed filter are its excellent stability properties and ease of implementation in standard softwares without Hessians or solving constraint systems. By simulating multiple realistic examples such as peptide, protein, ice equilibrium and ice-ice friction, the new filter is shown to speed up the computations of long-range interactions by approximately 20%. The proposed filtered integrators allow step sizes as large as 10 fs while keeping the energy drift less than 1% on a 50 ps simulation.

  20. Atomistic simulations of CO2 and N2 within cage-type silica zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Lindsey; Heitzer, Henry; Russell, Colin; Kohen, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of CO(2) and N(2), both as single components and as binary mixtures, in two cage-type silica zeolites was studied using atomistic simulations. The zeolites considered, ITQ-3 and paradigm cage-type zeolite ZK4 (the all-silica analog of LTA), were chosen so that the principles illustrated can be generalized to other adsorbent/adsorbate systems with similar topology and types of interactions. N(2) was chosen both because of the potential uses of N(2)/CO(2) separations and because it differs from CO(2) most significantly in the magnitude of its Coulombic interactions with zeolites. Despite similarities between N(2) and CO(2) diffusion in other materials, we show here that the diffusion of CO(2) within cage-type zeolites is dominated by an energy barrier to diffusion located at the entrance to the narrow channels connecting larger cages. This barrier originates in Coulombic interactions between zeolites and CO(2)'s quadrupole and results in well-defined orientations for the diffusing molecules. Furthermore, CO(2)'s favorable electrostatic interactions with the zeolite framework result in preferential binding in the windows between cages. N(2)'s behavior, in contrast, is more consistent with that of molecules previously studied. Our analysis suggests that CO(2)'s behavior might be common for adsorbates with quadrupoles that interact strongly with a material that has narrow windows between cages.

  1. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  2. Coarse-grained versus atomistic simulations: realistic interaction free energies for real proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ali; Pool, René; van Dijk, Erik; Bijlard, Jochem; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap; Feenstra, K Anton

    2014-02-01

    To assess whether two proteins will interact under physiological conditions, information on the interaction free energy is needed. Statistical learning techniques and docking methods for predicting protein-protein interactions cannot quantitatively estimate binding free energies. Full atomistic molecular simulation methods do have this potential, but are completely unfeasible for large-scale applications in terms of computational cost required. Here we investigate whether applying coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations is a viable alternative for complexes of known structure. We calculate the free energy barrier with respect to the bound state based on molecular dynamics simulations using both a full atomistic and a CG force field for the TCR-pMHC complex and the MP1-p14 scaffolding complex. We find that the free energy barriers from the CG simulations are of similar accuracy as those from the full atomistic ones, while achieving a speedup of >500-fold. We also observe that extensive sampling is extremely important to obtain accurate free energy barriers, which is only within reach for the CG models. Finally, we show that the CG model preserves biological relevance of the interactions: (i) we observe a strong correlation between evolutionary likelihood of mutations and the impact on the free energy barrier with respect to the bound state; and (ii) we confirm the dominant role of the interface core in these interactions. Therefore, our results suggest that CG molecular simulations can realistically be used for the accurate prediction of protein-protein interaction strength. The python analysis framework and data files are available for download at http://www.ibi.vu.nl/downloads/bioinformatics-2013-btt675.tgz.

  3. Using atomistic simulations to model cadmium telluride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Kenny, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to conduct research on how defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. On-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the CdTe thin film growth on the (1 1 1) surfaces. The results show that on the (1 1 1) surfaces the growth mechanisms on surfaces which are terminated by Cd or Te are quite different, regardless of the deposition energy (0.1∼ 10 eV). On the Te-terminated (1 1 1) surface the deposited clusters first form a single mixed species layer, then the Te atoms in the mixed layer moved up to form a new layer. Whilst on the Cd-terminated (1 1 1) surface the new Cd and Te layers are formed at the same time. Such differences are probably caused by stronger bonding between ad-atoms and surface atoms on the Te layer than on the Cd layer.

  4. Atomistic-Scale Simulations of Defect Formation in Graphene under Noble Gas Ion Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L; Iberi, Vighter; Cullen, David A; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Sang, Xiahan; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Rondinone, Adam J; Unocic, Raymond R; van Duin, Adri C T

    2016-09-27

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation with a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. Additionally, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He(+) irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.

  5. Features of structure and phase transitions in pure uranium and U-Mo alloys: atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotova, L. N.; Kuksin, A. Yu; Smirnova, D. E.; Starikov, S. V.; Tseplyaev, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    We study structural properties of cubic and tetragonal phases of U-Mo alloys using atomistic simulations: molecular dynamics and density functional theory. For pure uranium and U-Mo alloys at low temperatures we observe body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure, which is similar to the metastable γ°-phase found in the experiments. At higher temperatures bct structure transforms to a quasi body-centered cubic (q-bcc) phase that exhibits cubic symmetry just on the scale of several interatomic spacings or when averaged over time. Instantaneous pair distribution function (PDF) differs from PDF for the time-averaged atomic coordinates corresponding to the bcc lattice. The local positions of uranium atoms in q-bcc lattice correspond to the bct structure, which is energetically favourable due to formation of short U-U bonds. Transition from bct to q-bcc could be considered as ferro-to paraelastic transition of order-disorder type. The temperature of transition depends on Mo concentration. For pure uranium it is equal to about 700 K, which is well below than the upper boundary of the stability region of the α-U phase. Due to this reason, bct phase is observed only in uranium alloys containing metals with low solubility in α-U.

  6. Free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: A network analysis of atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the structure of a protein is a hierarchy of conformations interconverting on multiple time scales. However, the conformational heterogeneity is rarely considered in the context of enzymatic catalysis in which the reactant is usually represented by a single conformation of the enzyme/substrate complex. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate with concomitant interconversion of two forms of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+). Recent experimental results suggest that multiple substates exist within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and they are catalytic competent at different reaction rates. In this study, millisecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed on LDH to explore the free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex, and network analysis was used to characterize the distribution of the conformations. Our results provide a detailed view of the kinetic network the Michaelis complex and the structures of the substates at atomistic scale. It also shed some light on understanding the complete picture of the catalytic mechanism of LDH.

  7. Analysis of Boundary Conditions for Crystal Defect Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlacher, V.; Ortner, C.; Shapeev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations of crystal defects are necessarily restricted to finite computational domains, supplying artificial boundary conditions that emulate the effect of embedding the defect in an effectively infinite crystalline environment. This work develops a rigorous framework within which the accuracy of different types of boundary conditions can be precisely assessed. We formulate the equilibration of crystal defects as variational problems in a discrete energy space and establish qualitatively sharp regularity estimates for minimisers. Using this foundation we then present rigorous error estimates for (i) a truncation method (Dirichlet boundary conditions), (ii) periodic boundary conditions, (iii) boundary conditions from linear elasticity, and (iv) boundary conditions from nonlinear elasticity. Numerical results confirm the sharpness of the analysis.

  8. Atomistic study of the buckling of gold nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Paer A.T., E-mail: par.olsson@mek.lth.se [Division of Mechanics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Park, Harold S., E-mail: parkhs@bu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    In this work, we present results from atomistic simulations of gold nanowires under axial compression, with a focus on examining the effects of both axial and surface orientation effects on the buckling behavior. This was accomplished by using molecular statics simulations while considering three different crystallographic systems: <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace}, <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} and <1 1 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace}, with aspect ratios spanning from 20 to 50 and cross-sectional dimensions ranging from 2.45 to 5.91 nm. The simulations indicate that there is a deviation from the inverse square length dependence of critical forces predicted from traditional linear elastic Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko beam theories, where the nature of the deviation from the perfect inverse square length behavior differs for different crystallographic systems. This variation is found to be strongly correlated to either stiffening or increased compliance of the tangential stiffness due to the influence of nonlinear elasticity, which leads to normalized critical forces that decrease with decreasing aspect ratio for the <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} and <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} systems, but increase with decreasing aspect ratio for the <1 1 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} system. In contrast, it was found that the critical strains are all lower than their bulk counterparts, and that the critical strains decrease with decreasing cross-sectional dimensions; the lower strains may be an effect emanating from the presence of the surfaces, which are all more elastically compliant than the bulk and thus give rise to a more compliant flexural rigidity.

  9. Atomistic simulation of laser-pulse surface modification: Predictions of models with various length and time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikov, Sergey V., E-mail: starikov@ihed.ras.ru; Pisarev, Vasily V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-07

    In this work, the femtosecond laser pulse modification of surface is studied for aluminium (Al) and gold (Au) by use of two-temperature atomistic simulation. The results are obtained for various atomistic models with different scales: from pseudo-one-dimensional to full-scale three-dimensional simulation. The surface modification after laser irradiation can be caused by ablation and melting. For low energy laser pulses, the nanoscale ripples may be induced on a surface by melting without laser ablation. In this case, nanoscale changes of the surface are due to a splash of molten metal under temperature gradient. Laser ablation occurs at a higher pulse energy when a crater is formed on the surface. There are essential differences between Al ablation and Au ablation. In the first step of shock-wave induced ablation, swelling and void formation occur for both metals. However, the simulation of ablation in gold shows an additional athermal type of ablation that is associated with electron pressure relaxation. This type of ablation takes place at the surface layer, at a depth of several nanometers, and does not induce swelling.

  10. Atomistic simulation of grain boundary structure in a series of B2 intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutasa, B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1996-08-01

    Using molecular statics and interatomic potentials of the embedded atom type, the relaxed atomistic grain boundary structures in B2 aluminides were investigated in order to study trends in a series of B2 compounds. The compounds studied: FeAl, NiAl and CoAl show increasing anti-phase boundary energies. The atomistic structure of the {Sigma}=5(310)[100] and {Sigma}=5(210)[100] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in these compounds was studied considering possible variations of local chemical composition on grain boundary energetics. The structures obtained for the three alloys are very similar. A discussion of the trends in energetics across this series of compounds is entered into. (orig.)

  11. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Atomistic simulation of helium bubble nucleation in palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu, Wangyu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: wangyuhu2001cn@yahoo.com.cn; Xiao Shifang [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)], E-mail: sfxiao@yahoo.com.cn; Yang Jianyu [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Deng Huiqiu [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A palladium crystal has been constructed with 11808 atoms. 55 helium atoms occupied the octahedral position of palladium crystal are introduced and retained in a spherical region. Molecular dynamic simulations are performed in a constant temperature and constant volume ensemble (NVT) with temperature controlled by Nose-Hoover thermostat. The interactions between palladium atoms are described with modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM), the interactions between palladium atom and helium atom are in the form of Morse potential, and the interactions between helium atoms are in the form of L-J potential function. With the analysis of the radial distribution function (RDF) and microstructure, it reveals that some of helium atoms form a series of clusters with different size, and the nucleation core is random at low temperature, and which is the embryo of helium bubble. Increasing temperature can accelerate the process of bubble nucleation, and the clusters will aggregate and coalesce into a bigger one in which there are no palladium atoms, and it is considered as a helium bubble.

  13. A hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach for simulating surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, John L; Morton, Seth M; Moore, Justin E; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-01-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a technique that has broad implications for biological and chemical sensing applications by providing the ability to simultaneously detect and identify a single molecule. The Raman scattering of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. These enhancements stem from a twofold mechanism: an electromagnetic mechanism (EM), which is due to the enhanced local field near the metal surface, and a chemical mechanism (CM), which is due to the adsorbate specific interactions between the metal surface and the molecules. The local field near the metal surface can be significantly enhanced due to the plasmon excitation, and therefore chemists generally accept that the EM provides the majority of the enhancements. While classical electrodynamics simulations can accurately simulate the local electric field around metal nanoparticles, they offer few insights into the spectral changes that occur in SERS. First-principles simulations can directly predict the Raman spectrum but are limited to small metal clusters and therefore are often used for understanding the CM. Thus, there is a need for developing new methods that bridge the electrodynamics simulations of the metal nanoparticle and the first-principles simulations of the molecule to facilitate direct simulations of SERS spectra. In this Account, we discuss our recent work on developing a hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach to simulate SERS. This hybrid method is called the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method and consists of an atomistic electrodynamics model of the metal nanoparticle and a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) description of the molecule. In contrast to most previous work, the DIM/QM method enables us to retain a detailed atomistic structure of the nanoparticle and provides a natural bridge between the electronic structure methods and the macroscopic

  14. Coupling-of-length-scale approach for multiscale atomistic-continuum simulations: Atomistically-induced stress distributions in Si/Si_3N4 nanopixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Voyiadjis, George; Madhukar, Anupam

    2001-03-01

    A hybrid molecular-dynamics and finite-element simulation approach has been used to investigate stress distributions in Si(111) nanopixels covered with both crystalline and amorphous Si_3N4 thin films. Surfaces, lattice-mismatched interfaces, edges, and corners create stress fields on the order of 1 GPa inside the Si substrate with patterns that cannot be reproduced by a continuum approach alone. For these atomistically-induced inhomogeneouse stresses, the hybrid simulation approach provides an excellent agreement with the standard molecular dynamics, with considerably less computational costs.

  15. Atomistic studies of dislocations in {alpha}-iron using bond-order potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrovec, Matous; Elsaesser, Christian; Gumbsch, Peter [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik IWM, Freiburg (Germany); IZBS, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Macroscopic plastic behavior is closely linked to properties of dislocations at the nanometer scale. Direct experimental observations of the dislocation core region and of its changes during dislocation motion are unfortunately impossible and better understanding of these phenomena can be obtained only with the help of atomistic simulations. Recent atomistic studies of dislocations in iron have provided however very different outcomes, both in terms of atomic structures and energetics. The most likely reason of these large differences is a lack of reliable interatomic potentials, which would be able to describe adequately the atomic bonding and magnetic interactions in iron. In the present work we present studies of dislocations in {alpha}-iron using a bond-order potential, which is based on a tight-binding bond representation. The model is able to capture the directional character of bonds present in transition metals and includes a description of magnetic effects within the Stoner model of itinerant magnetism. We compare results of our simulations with available first-principles predictions as well as with predictions of other empirical interatomic potentials and discuss underlying causes of the differences.

  16. Atomistic simulation of defect structure in ternary intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.C.; Ternes, J.K.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Interatomic potentials of the Embedded Atom type were used to study defect structure in ternary intermetallics. Interatomic potentials with appropriate inner consistency were developed for the modeling of ternary systems. Alloys were considered in the Nb-Al-Ti and in the Ni-Al-Ti systems. The stability of ternary phases in these systems was studied, particularly the B2 phase in Nb rich alloys of the Nb-Al-Ti system. The effects of increasing Ti additions in these alloys were studied, as well as the APB energies in these ternary alloys.

  17. Atomistic simulation of nanoporous layered double hydroxide materials and their properties. II. Adsorption and diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayong; Harale, Aadesh; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2007-12-01

    Nanoporous layered double hydroxide (LDH) materials have wide applications, ranging from being good adsorbents for gases (particularly CO2) and liquid ions to membranes and catalysts. They also have applications in medicine, environmental remediation, and electrochemistry. Their general chemical composition is [M1-xIIMxIII(OH-)2]x+[Xn/mm -•nH2O], where M represents a metallic cation (of valence II or III), and Xn/mm - is an m-valence inorganic, or heteropolyacid, or organic anion. We study diffusion and adsorption of CO2 in a particular LDH with MII=Mg, MIII=Al, and x ≃0.71, using an atomistic model developed based on energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulations, together with a modified form of the consistent-valence force field. The adsorption isotherms and self-diffusivity of CO2 in the material are computed over a range of temperature, using molecular simulations. The computed diffusivities are within one order of magnitude of the measured ones at lower temperatures, while agreeing well with the data at high temperatures. The measured and computed adsorption isotherms agree at low loadings, but differ by about 25% at high loadings. Possible reasons for the differences between the computed properties and the experimental data are discussed, and a model for improving the accuracy of the computed properties is suggested. Also studied are the material's hydration and swelling properties. As water molecules are added to the pore space, the LDH material swells to some extent, with the hydration energy exhibiting interesting variations with the number of the water molecules added. The implications of the results are discussed.

  18. Predicting growth of graphene nanostructures using high-fidelity atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, Keven F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zhou, Xiaowang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, Donald K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schultz, Peter A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bartelt, Norman Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this project we developed t he atomistic models needed to predict how graphene grows when carbon is deposited on metal and semiconductor surfaces. We first calculated energies of many carbon configurations using first principles electronic structure calculations and then used these energies to construct an empirical bond order potentials that enable s comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of growth. We validated our approach by comparing our predictions to experiments of graphene growth on Ir, Cu and Ge. The robustness of ou r understanding of graphene growth will enable high quality graphene to be grown on novel substrates which will expand the number of potential types of graphene electronic devices.

  19. Atomistic Simulation of Intrinsic Defects and Trivalent and Tetravalent Ion Doping in Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. S. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed in order to investigate key issues related to intrinsic defects and a variety of dopants from trivalent and tetravalent ions. The most favorable intrinsic defect is determined to be a scheme involving calcium and hydroxyl vacancies. It is found that trivalent ions have an energetic preference for the Ca site, while tetravalent ions can enter P sites. Charge compensation is predicted to occur basically via three schemes. In general, the charge compensation via the formation of calcium vacancies is more favorable. Trivalent dopant ions are more stable than tetravalent dopants.

  20. Visualization and analysis of atomistic simulation data with OVITO-the Open Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Open Visualization Tool (OVITO) is a new 3D visualization software designed for post-processing atomistic data obtained from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. Unique analysis, editing and animations functions are integrated into its easy-to-use graphical user interface. The software is written in object-oriented C++, controllable via Python scripts and easily extendable through a plug-in interface. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://ovito.sourceforge.net/.

  1. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.gomezselles@imdea.org; Martin-Bragado, Ignacio [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Claverie, Alain [CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Sklenard, Benoit [CEA, LETI, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Benistant, Francis [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  2. Ultrafast laser melting of Au nanoparticles: atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningyu; Rokhlin, S. I.; Farson, D. F.

    2011-10-01

    In spite of the technological importance of laser modification and processing of nanoparticles, the interaction of laser energy with nanoparticles is not well understood. In this work, integrated molecular dynamics (MD) and two-temperature (TTM) computational models have been developed to study ultrafast laser interaction with free Au nanoparticles with sizes 2.44-6.14 nm. At low intensity, when surface premelting and solid-liquid phase transition dominate, a nonhomogeneous surface premelting mechanism was identified. The appearance of a contiguous surface liquid layer (complete surface premelting) is size dependent and is not related to surface premelting history. The effects of temporary superheating and stable supercooling of nanoparticles were found and examined.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of He Clustering and Defects Produced in Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ti-Jiang; WANG Yue-Xia; PAN Zheng-Ying; JIANG Xiao-Mei; ZHOU Liang; ZHU Jing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the molecular dynamics method, the stability of small He-vacancy clusters is studied under the condition of the high He and low vacancy densities. The result shows that there is a competition between He atoms detrapped and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) emitted during the clustering of He atoms. When the He number is above a critical value of 9, the SIA emission is predominant. The SIA emission can result in deep capture of He atoms since the binding energy of He to a He-vacancy cluster is increased with the number of SIAs created. The cluster thus grows up. In addition, more SIAs are created when the temperature is elevated. The average volume of a He atom is increased. The cluster expansion takes place at high temperature.

  4. Atomistic Simulation of Protein Encapsulation in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Tianwei; van der Spoel, David

    2016-01-28

    Fabrication of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with large apertures triggers a brand-new research area for selective encapsulation of biomolecules within MOF nanopores. The underlying inclusion mechanism is yet to be clarified however. Here we report a molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of protein encapsulation in MOFs. Evaluation for the binding of amino acid side chain analogues reveals that van der Waals interaction is the main driving force for the binding and that guest size acts as a key factor predicting protein binding with MOFs. Analysis on the conformation and thermodynamic stability of the miniprotein Trp-cage encapsulated in a series of MOFs with varying pore apertures and surface chemistries indicates that protein encapsulation can be achieved via maintaining a polar/nonpolar balance in the MOF surface through tunable modification of organic linkers and Mg-O chelating moieties. Such modifications endow MOFs with a more biocompatible confinement. This work provides guidelines for selective inclusion of biomolecules within MOFs and facilitates MOF functions as a new class of host materials and molecular chaperones.

  5. Experimental approach and atomistic simulations to investigate the radiation tolerance of complex oxides: Application to the amorphization of pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattonnay, G.; Thomé, L.; Sellami, N.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Legros, C.; Tetot, R.

    2014-05-01

    Both experimental approach and atomistic simulations are performed in order to investigate the influence of the composition of pyrochlores on their radiation tolerance. Therefore, Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 were irradiated with 4 MeV Au and 92 MeV Xe ions in order to study the structural changes induced by low and high-energy irradiations. XRD results show that, for both irradiations, the structural modifications are strongly dependent on the sample composition: Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized, whereas Gd2Zr2O7 is transformed into a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure. Using atomistic simulations with new interatomic potentials derived from the SMTB-Q model, the lattice properties and the defect formation energies were calculated in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7. Calculations show that titanates have a more covalent character than zirconates. Moreover, in Gd2Ti2O7 the formation of cation antisite defects leads to strong local distortions around Ti-defects and to a decrease of the Ti coordination number, which are not observed in Gd2Zr2O7. Thus, the radiation resistance is related to the defect stability: the accumulation of structural distortions around Ti-defects could drive the Gd2Ti2O7 amorphization induced by irradiation.

  6. Large Scale 3-D Dislocation Dynamics and Atomistic Simulations of Flow and Strain-Hardening Behavior of Metallic Micropillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies show strong strengthening effects for micrometer-scale FCC as well as two-phase superalloy crystals, even at high initial dislocation densities. This talk shows results from large-scale 3-D discrete dislocation simulations (DDS) used to explicitly model the deformation behavior of FCC Ni (flow stress and strain-hardening) as well as superalloy microcrystals for diameters ranging from 1 - 20 microns. The work shows that two size-sensitive athermal hardening processes, beyond forest and precipitation hardening, are sufficient to develop the dimensional scaling of the flow stress, stochastic stress variation, flow intermittency and, high initial strain-hardening rates, similar to experimental observations for various materials. In addition, 3D dislocation dynamics simulations are used to investigate strain-hardening characteristics and dislocation microstructure evolution with strain in large 20 micron size Ni microcrystals (bulk-like) under three different loading axes: 111, 001 and 110. Three different multi-slip loading axes, , and , are explored for shear strains of ~0.03 and final dislocation densities of ~1013/m2. The orientation dependence of initial strain hardening rates and dislocation microstructure evolution with strain are discussed. The simulated strain hardening results are compared with experimental data under similar loading conditions from bulk single-crystal Ni. Finally, atomistic simulation results on the operation of single arm sources in Ni bipillars with a large angle grain boundary is discussed. The atomistic simulation results are compared with experimental mechanical behavior data on Cu bipillars with a similar large angle grain boundary. This work was supported by AFOSR (Dr. David Stargel), and by a grant of computer time from the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program, at the Aeronautical Systems Center/Major Shared Resource Center.

  7. Symmetry Breaking and Fine Structure Splitting in Zincblende Quantum Dots: Atomistic Simulations of Long-Range Strain and Piezoelectric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaikh; Usman, Muhammad; Heitzinger, Clemens; Rahman, Rajib; Schliwa, Andrei; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2007-04-01

    Electrons and holes captured in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) are subject to symmetry breaking that cannot be represented in with continuum material representations. Atomistic calculations reveal symmetry lowering due to effects of strain and piezo-electric fields. These effects are fundamentally based on the crystal topology in the quantum dots. This work studies these two competing effects and demonstrates the fine structure splitting that has been demonstrated experimentally can be attributed to the underlying atomistic structure of the quantum dots.

  8. Thermodynamic and mechanical properties of copper precipitates in α-iron from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Paul; Marian, Jaime; Sadigh, Babak

    2013-07-01

    Precipitate hardening is commonly used in materials science to control strength by acting on the number density, size distribution, and shape of solute precipitates in the hardened matrix. The Fe-Cu system has attracted much attention over the last several decades due to its technological importance as a model alloy for Cu steels. In spite of these efforts several aspects of its phase diagram remain unexplained. Here we use atomistic simulations to characterize the polymorphic phase diagram of Cu precipitates in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and establish a consistent link between their thermodynamic and mechanical properties in terms of thermal stability, shape, and strength. The size at which Cu precipitates transform from BCC to a close-packed 9R structure is found to be strongly temperature dependent, ranging from approximately 4 nm in diameter (˜2700atoms) at 200 K to about 8 nm (˜22800atoms) at 700 K. These numbers are in very good agreement with the interpretation of experimental data given Monzen [Philos. Mag. APMAADG0141-861010.1080/01418610008212077 80, 711 (2000)]. The strong temperature dependence originates from the entropic stabilization of BCC Cu, which is mechanically unstable as a bulk phase. While at high temperatures the transition exhibits first-order characteristics, the hysteresis, and thus the nucleation barrier, vanish at temperatures below approximately 300 K. This behavior is explained in terms of the mutual cancellation of the energy differences between core and shell (wetting layer) regions of BCC and 9R nanoprecipitates, respectively. The proposed mechanism is not specific for the Fe-Cu system but could generally be observed in immiscible systems, whenever the minority component is unstable in the lattice structure of the host matrix. Finally, we also study the interaction of precipitates with screw dislocations as a function of both structure and orientation. The results provide a coherent picture of precipitate strength that unifies

  9. Role of Ionic Clusters in Dynamics of Ionomer Melts: From Atomistic to Coarse Grained Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anupriya

    Ionomers, polymers decorated with ionizable groups, have found application in numerous technologies where ionic transport is required. The ionic groups associate into random clusters resulting in substantial effect on structure, dynamics and transport of these materials. The effects of topology, size and dynamics of these aggregates however remain an open question. Here we probe cluster formation correlated with polymer dynamics through a model system of randomly sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) melts with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations over a broad time and length scales ranging from that within the ionic clusters through polymer segmental dynamics to the motion of the entire molecules. The cluster evolution was probed by fully atomistic studies. We find ladder-like aggregates that transform to globule-like with increasing the dielectric constant of media for sodium neutralized SPS. With increasing dielectric constant, the size of the aggregates decrease and their number increases. Concurrently, the mobility of the polymer increases. The counterion radius and valency affect both morphology and dynamics as is evident in the calculated static and dynamic structure factors. It is further manifested in the results of viscosity obtained through non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique. Finally, to access larger length scales a three bead coarse-grained model to describe sulfonated styrene that we have developed will be discussed in view of the outstanding challenges in ionic polymers. Supported in part by DOE Grant No. DE-SC007908. This work was carried out in collaboration with Dvora Perahia and Gary Grest while I was a postdoc at Clemson University. I gratefully acknowledge both of them for their support and encouragement.

  10. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

  11. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  12. Atomistic computer simulations of FePt nanoparticles. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M.

    2007-12-20

    In the present dissertation, a hierarchical multiscale approach for modeling FePt nanoparticles by atomistic computer simulations is developed. By describing the interatomic interactions on different levels of sophistication, various time and length scales can be accessed. Methods range from static quantum-mechanic total-energy calculations of small periodic systems to simulations of whole particles over an extended time by using simple lattice Hamiltonians. By employing these methods, the energetic and thermodynamic stability of non-crystalline multiply twinned FePt nanoparticles is investigated. Subsequently, the thermodynamics of the order-disorder transition in FePt nanoparticles is analyzed, including the influence of particle size, composition and modified surface energies by different chemical surroundings. In order to identify processes that reduce or enhance the rate of transformation from the disordered to the ordered state, the kinetics of the ordering transition in FePt nanoparticles is finally investigated by assessing the contributions of surface and volume diffusion. (orig.)

  13. Atomistic Simulations of Chemical Reactivity of TATB Under Thermal and Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaa, M R; Reed, E J; Fried, L E

    2009-09-23

    The study of chemical transformations that occur at the reactive shock front of energetic materials provides important information for the development of predictive models at the grain-and continuum scales. A major shortcoming of current high explosives models is the lack of chemical kinetics data of the reacting explosive in the high pressure and temperature regimes. In the absence of experimental data, long-time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with reactive chemistry become a viable recourse to provide an insight into the decomposition mechanism of explosives, and to obtain effective reaction rate laws. These rates can then be incorporated into thermo-chemical-hydro codes (such as Cheetah linked to ALE3D) for accurate description of the grain and macro scales dynamics of reacting explosives. In this talk, I will present quantum simulations of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) crystals under thermal decomposition (high density and temperature) and shock compression conditions. This is the first time that condensed phase quantum methods have been used to study the chemistry of insensitive high explosives. We used the quantum-based, self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method (SCC{_}DFTB) to calculate the interatomic forces for reliable predictions of chemical reactions, and to examine electronic properties at detonation conditions for a relatively long time-scale on the order of several hundreds of picoseconds. For thermal decomposition of TATB, we conducted constant volume-temperature simulations, ranging from 0.35 to 2 nanoseconds, at {rho} = 2.87 g/cm{sup 3} at T = 3500, 3000, 2500, and 1500 K, and {rho} = 2.9 g/cm{sup 3} and 2.72 g/cm{sup 3}, at T = 3000 K. We also simulated crystal TATB's reactivity under steady overdriven shock compression using the multi-scale shock technique. We conducted shock simulations with specified shock speeds of 8, 9, and 10 km/s for up to 0.43 ns duration, enabling us to track the

  14. Predictive atomistic simulations of electronic properties of realistic nanoscale devices: A multiscale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Ravi Pramod Kumar

    Scaling of CMOS towards its ultimate limits, where quantum effects and atomistic variability due to fabrication, along with recent emphasis on heterogeneous integration of non-digital devices for increasing the functional diversification presents us with fundamentally new challenges. A comprehensive understanding of design and operation of these nanoscale transistors, and other electronic devices like RF-MEMS, requires an insight into their electronic and mechanical properties that are strongly influenced by underlying atomic structure. Hence, continuum descriptions of materials and use of empirical models at these scales become questionable. This increase in complexity of electronic devices necessitates an understanding at a more fundamental level to accurately predict the performance and reliability of these devices. The objective of this thesis is to outline the application of multiscale predictive modeling methods, ranging from atoms to devices, for addressing these challenges. This capability is demonstrated using two examples: characterization of (i) dielectric charging in RF-MEMS, and (ii) transport properties of Ge-nanofins. For characterizing the dielectric charging phenomenon, a continuum dielectric charging model, augmented by first principles informed trap distributions, is used to predict current transient measurements across a broad range of voltages and temperatures. These simulations demonstrate using ab initio informed model not only reduces the empiricism (number of adjustable parameters) in the model but also leads to a more accurate model over a broad range of operating conditions, and enable the precise determination of additional material parameters. These atomistic calculations also provide detailed information about the nature of charge traps and their trapping mechanisms that are not accessible experimentally; such information could prove invaluable in defect engineering. The second problem addresses the effect of the in-homogeneous strain

  15. Atomistic Study on Size Effects in Thermally Induced Martensitic Phase Transformation of NiTi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Gur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomistic study shows strong size effects in thermally induced martensitic phase transformation evolution kinetics of equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs. It is shown that size effects are closely related to the presence of free surfaces; thus, NiTi thin films and nanopillars are studied. Quasi-static molecular dynamics simulations for several cell sizes at various (constant temperatures are performed by employing well-established interatomic potentials for NiTi. The study shows that size plays a crucial role in the evolution of martensite phase fraction and, importantly, can significantly change the phase transformation temperatures, which can be used for the design of NiTi based sensors, actuators, or devices at nano- to microscales. Interestingly, it is found that, at the nanometer scale, Richard’s equation describes very well the martensite phase fraction evolution in NiTi thin films and nanopillars as a function of temperature.

  16. Large-scale atomistic and quantum-mechanical simulations of a Nafion membrane: Morphology, proton solvation and charge transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Komarov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the structure formation in a hydrated Nafion membrane and the solvation and transport of protons in the water channel of the membrane. For the water/Nafion systems containing more than 4 million atoms, it is found that the observed microphase-segregated morphology can be classified as bicontinuous: both majority (hydrophobic and minority (hydrophilic subphases are 3D continuous and organized in an irregular ordered pattern, which is largely similar to that known for a bicontinuous double-diamond structure. The characteristic size of the connected hydrophilic channels is about 25–50 Å, depending on the water content. A thermodynamic decomposition of the potential of mean force and the calculated spectral densities of the hindered translational motions of cations reveal that ion association observed with decreasing temperature is largely an entropic effect related to the loss of low-frequency modes. Based on the results from the atomistic simulation of the morphology of Nafion, we developed a realistic model of ion-conducting hydrophilic channel within the Nafion membrane and studied it with quantum molecular dynamics. The extensive 120 ps-long density functional theory (DFT-based simulations of charge migration in the 1200-atom model of the nanochannel consisting of Nafion chains and water molecules allowed us to observe the bimodality of the van Hove autocorrelation function, which provides the direct evidence of the Grotthuss bond-exchange (hopping mechanism as a significant contributor to the proton conductivity.

  17. Atomistic study of deposition process of Al thin film on Cu substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yongzhi, E-mail: yzcaohit@gmail.com [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zhang Junjie; Sun Tao; Yan Yongda; Yu Fuli [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we report molecular dynamics based atomistic simulations of deposition process of Al atoms onto Cu substrate and following nanoindentation process on that nanostructured material. Effects of incident energy on the morphology of deposited thin film and mechanical property of this nanostructured material are emphasized. The results reveal that the morphology of growing film is layer-by-layer-like at incident energy of 0.1-10 eV. The epitaxy mode of film growth is observed at incident energy below 1 eV, but film-mixing mode commences when incident energy increase to 10 eV accompanying with increased disorder of film structure, which improves quality of deposited thin film. Following indentation studies indicate deposited thin films pose lower stiffness than single crystal Al due to considerable amount of defects existed in them, but Cu substrate is strengthened by the interface generated from lattice mismatch between deposited Al thin film and Cu substrate.

  18. A dynamic atomistic-continuum method for the simulation of crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Zhon Gy

    2002-01-01

    We present a coupled atomistic-continuum method for the modeling of defects and interface dynamics in crystalline materials. The method uses atomistic models such as molecular dynamics near defects and interfaces, and continuum models away from defects and interfaces. We propose a new class of matching conditions between the atomistic and the continuum regions. These conditions ensure the accurate passage of large-scale information between the atomistic and the continuum regions and at the same time minimize the reflection of phonons at the atomistic-continuum interface. They can be made adaptive by choosing appropriate weight functions. We present applications to dislocation dynamics, friction between two-dimensional crystal surfaces, and fracture dynamics. We compare results of the coupled method and of the detailed atomistic model.

  19. A Spectral Multiscale Method for Wave Propagation Analysis: Atomistic-Continuum Coupled Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Amit K; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new multiscale method which is capable of coupling atomistic and continuum domains for high frequency wave propagation analysis. The problem of non-physical wave reflection, which occurs due to the change in system description across the interface between two scales, can be satisfactorily overcome by the proposed method. We propose an efficient spectral domain decomposition of the total fine scale displacement along with a potent macroscale equation in the Laplace domain to eliminate the spurious interfacial reflection. We use Laplace transform based spectral finite element method to model the macroscale, which provides the optimum approximations for required dynamic responses of the outer atoms of the simulated microscale region very accurately. This new method shows excellent agreement between the proposed multiscale model and the full molecular dynamics (MD) results. Numerical experiments of wave propagation in a 1D harmonic lattice, a 1D lattice with Lennard-Jones potential, a ...

  20. Identifying early stage precipitation in large-scale atomistic simulations of superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Bristowe, Paul D.

    2017-04-01

    A method for identifying and classifying ordered phases in large chemically and thermally disordered atomistic models is presented. The method uses Steinhardt parameters to represent local atomic configurations and develops probability density functions to classify individual atoms using naïve Bayes. The method is applied to large molecular dynamics simulations of supersaturated Ni-20 at% Al solid solutions in order to identify the formation of embryonic γ‧-Ni3Al. The composition and temperatures are chosen to promote precipitation, which is observed in the form of ordering and is found to occur more likely in regions with above average Al concentration producing ‘clusters’ of increasing size. The results are interpreted in terms of a precipitation mechanism in which the solid solution is unstable with respect to ordering and potentially followed by either spinodal decomposition or nucleation and growth.

  1. Structures, nanomechanics, and disintegration of single-walled GaN nanotubes: atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    We have investigated the structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of single-walled GaN nanotubes by using atomistic simulations and a Tersoff-type potential. The Tersoff potential for GaN effectively describes the properties of GaN nanotubes. The nanomechanics of GaN nanotubes under tensile and compressive loadings have also been investigated, and Young's modulus has been calculated. The caloric curves of single-walled GaN nanotubes can be divided into three regions corresponding to nanotubes, the disintegrating range, and vapor. Since the stability or the stiffness of a tube decreases with increasing curving sheet-to-tube strain energy, the disintegration temperatures of GaN nanotubes are closely related to the curving sheet-to-tube strain energy.

  2. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes varies according to the nanoparticle charge and the chemical nature of their protecting side groups. We report atomistic simulations of an anionic Au nanoparticle (AuNP-) interacting with membranes...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment......, it forms relatively weak contacts with the zwitterionic head groups (in particular choline) of the phosphatidylcholine lipids. Consequently, AuNP- does not immerse deeply in the leaflet, enabling, e.g., lateral diffusion of the nanoparticle along the surface. On the cytosolic side, AuNP- remains...

  3. Atomistic simulations of surface coverage effects in anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosalvez, M.A.; Foster, A.S.; Nieminen, R.M

    2002-12-30

    Atomistic simulations of anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon have been performed in order to determine the dependence of the etch rates of different crystallographic orientations on surface coverage and clustering of OH radicals. We show that the etch rate is a non-monotonic function of OH coverage and that there always exists a coverage value at which the etch rate reaches a maximum. The dependence of the anisotropy of the etching process on coverage, including the dependence of the fastest-etched plane orientation, is implicitly contained in the model and predictions of convex corner under-etching structures are made. We show that the whole etching process is controlled by only a few surface configurations involving a particular type of next-nearest neighbours. The relative value of the removal probabilities of these confitions determines the balance in the occurrence of step propagation and etch pitting for all surface orientations.

  4. Atomistic simulations of cation hydration in sodium and calcium montmorillonite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guomin; Neretnieks, Ivars; Holmboe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the last four decades, numerous studies have been directed to the swelling smectite-rich clays in the context of high-level radioactive waste applications and waste-liners for contaminated sites. The swelling properties of clay mineral particles arise due to hydration of the interlayer cations and the diffuse double layers formed near the negatively charged montmorillonite (MMT) surfaces. To accurately study the cation hydration in the interlayer nanopores of MMT, solvent-solute and solvent-clay surface interactions (i.e., the solvation effects and the shape effects) on the atomic level should be taken into account, in contrast to many recent electric double layer based methodologies using continuum models. Therefore, in this research we employed fully atomistic simulations using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the software package GROMACS along with the CLAYFF forcefield and the SPC/E water model. We present the ion distributions and the deformation of the hydrated coordination structures, i.e., the hydration shells of Na+ and Ca2+ in the interlayer, respectively, for MMT in the first-layer, the second-layer, the third-layer, the fourth-layer, and the fifth-layer (1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, and 5W) hydrate states. Our MD simulations show that Na+ in Na-MMT nanopores have an affinity to the ditrigonal cavities of the clay layers and form transient inner-sphere complexes at about 3.8 Å from clay midplane at water contents less than the 5W hydration state. However, these phenomena are not observed in Ca-MMT regardless of swelling states. For Na-MMT, each Na+ is coordinated to four water molecules and one oxygen atom of the clay basal-plane in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state, and with five to six water molecules in the first hydration shell within a radius of 3.1 Å at all higher water contents. In Ca-MMT, however each Ca2+ is coordinated to approximately seven water molecules in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state and

  5. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  6. Atomistic simulations of highly conductive molecular transport junctions under realistic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.

    2013-01-01

    We report state-of-the-art atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe structure-conductance relationships in Au-benzenedithiolate (BDT)-Au junctions under elongation. Our results demonstrate that large increases in conductance are associated with the formation of monatomic chains (MACs) of Au atoms directly connected to BDT. An analysis of the electronic structure of the simulated junctions reveals that enhancement in the s-like states in Au MACs causes the increases in conductance. Other structures also result in increased conductance but are too short-lived to be detected in experiment, while MACs remain stable for long simulation times. Examinations of thermally evolved junctions with and without MACs show negligible overlap between conductance histograms, indicating that the increase in conductance is related to this unique structural change and not thermal fluctuation. These results, which provide an excellent explanation for a recently observed anomalous experimental result [Bruot et al., Nat. Nanotechnol., 2012, 7, 35-40], should aid in the development of mechanically responsive molecular electronic devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. A Metascalable Computing Framework for Large Spatiotemporal-Scale Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, K; Seymour, R; Wang, W; Kalia, R; Nakano, A; Vashishta, P; Shimojo, F; Yang, L H

    2009-02-17

    A metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel computing framework has been developed for large spatiotemporal-scale atomistic simulations of materials based on spatiotemporal data locality principles, which is expected to scale on emerging multipetaflops architectures. The framework consists of: (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms for high complexity problems; (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, while introducing multiple parallelization axes; and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these O(N) algorithms onto a multicore cluster based on hybrid implementation combining message passing and critical section-free multithreading. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving: (1) inter-node parallel efficiency well over 0.95 for 218 billion-atom molecular-dynamics and 1.68 trillion electronic-degrees-of-freedom quantum-mechanical simulations on 212,992 IBM BlueGene/L processors (superscalability); (2) high intra-node, multithreading parallel efficiency (nanoscalability); and (3) nearly perfect time/ensemble parallel efficiency (eon-scalability). The spatiotemporal scale covered by MD simulation on a sustained petaflops computer per day (i.e. petaflops {center_dot} day of computing) is estimated as NT = 2.14 (e.g. N = 2.14 million atoms for T = 1 microseconds).

  8. Thermochemistry of organic reactions in microporous oxides by atomistic simulations: benchmarking against periodic B3LYP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleken, Francesca; Svelle, Stian; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Olsbye, Unni; Arstad, Bjørnar; Swang, Ole

    2010-07-15

    The methylation of ethene by methyl chloride and methanol in the microporous materials SAPO-34 and SSZ-13 has been studied using different periodic atomistic modeling approaches based on density functional theory. The RPBE functional, which earlier has been used successfully in studies of surface reactions on metals, fails to yield a qualitatively correct description of the transition states under study. Employing B3LYP as functional gives results in line with experimental data: (1) Methanol is adsorbed more strongly than methyl chloride to the acid site. (2) The activation energies for the methylation of ethene are slightly lower for SSZ-13. Furthermore, the B3LYP activation energies are lower for methyl chloride than for methanol.

  9. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Raffaini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a “bottom up” approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD, which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties.

  10. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a “bottom up” approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties. PMID:26734094

  11. On the atomistic mechanisms of alkane (methane-pentane) separation by distillation: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2007-11-01

    Insights into the liquid-vapor transformation of methane-pentane mixtures were obtained from transition path sampling molecular dynamics simulations. This case study of the boiling of non-azeotropic mixtures demonstrates an unprejudiced identification of the atomistic mechanisms of phase separation in the course of vaporization which form the basis of distillation processes. From our simulations we observe spontaneous segregation events in the liquid mixture to trigger vapor nucleation. The formation of vapor domains stabilizes and further promotes the separation process by preferential evaporation of methane molecules. While this discrimination holds for all mixtures of different composition studied, a full account of the boiling process requires a more complex picture. At low methane concentration the nucleation of the vapor domains includes both methane and pentane molecules. The pentane molecules, however, tend to form small aggregates and undergo rapid re-condensation within picoseconds to nanoseconds scales. Accordingly, two aspects of selectivity accounting for methane-pentane separation in the course of liquid-vapor transformations were made accessible to molecular dynamics simulations: spontaneous segregation in the liquid phase leading to selective vapor nucleation and growth favoring methane vaporization and selective re-condensation of pentane molecules.

  12. Coupling Lattice Boltzmann with Atomistic Dynamics for the multiscale simulation of nano-biological flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We describe a recent multiscale approach based on the concurrent coupling of constrained molecular dynamics for long biomolecules with a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann treatment of solvent hydrodynamics. The multiscale approach is based on a simple scheme of exchange of space-time information between the atomistic and mesoscopic scales and is capable of describing self-consistent hydrodynamic effects on molecular motion at a computational cost which scales linearly with both solute size and solvent volume. For an application of our multiscale method, we consider the much studied problem of biopolymer translocation through nanopores: we find that the method reproduces with remarkable accuracy the statistical scaling behavior of the translocation process and provides valuable insight into the cooperative aspects of biopolymer and hydrodynamic motion.

  13. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  14. Atomistic study of mixing at high Z / low Z interfaces at Warm Dense Matter Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Glosli, James; Rudd, Robert; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team

    2016-10-01

    We use atomistic simulations to study different aspects of mixing occurring at an initially sharp interface of high Z and low Z plasmas in the Warm/Hot Dense Matter regime. We consider a system of Diamond (the low Z component) in contact with Ag (the high Z component), which undergoes rapid isochoric heating from room temperature up to 10 eV, rapidly changing the solids into warm dense matter at solid density. We simulate the motion of ions via the screened Coulomb potential. The electric field, the electron density and ionizations level are computed on the fly by solving Poisson equation. The spatially varying screening lengths computed from the electron cloud are included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. We compute the electric field generated at the Ag-C interface as well as the dynamics of the ions during the mixing process occurring at the plasma interface. Preliminary results indicate an anomalous transport of high Z ions (Ag) into the low Z component (C); a phenomenon that is partially related to the enhanced transport of ions due to the generated electric field. These results are in agreement with recent experimental observation on Au-diamond plasma interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen Petrov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded and oxidatively damaged (unfolded forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL, and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields

  16. Atomistic study of hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries in nickel: I. Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranchi, A.; Curtin, W. A.

    Hydrogen ingress into a metal is a persistent source of embrittlement. Fracture surfaces are often intergranular, suggesting favorable cleave crack growth along grain boundaries (GBs) as one driver for embrittlement. Here, atomistic simulations are used to investigate the effects of segregated hydrogen on the behavior of cracks along various symmetric tilt grain boundaries in fcc Nickel. An atomistic potential for Ni-H is first recalibrated against new quantum level computations of the energy of H in specific sites within the NiΣ5(120)⟨100⟩ GB. The binding energy of H atoms to various atomic sites in the NiΣ3(111) (twin), NiΣ5(120)⟨100⟩, NiΣ99(557)⟨110⟩, and NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ GBs, and to various surfaces created by separating these GBs into two possible fracture surfaces, are computed and used to determine equilibrium H concentrations at bulk H concentrations typical of embrittlement in Ni. Mode I fracture behavior is then studied, examining the influence of H in altering the competition between dislocation emission (crack blunting; "ductile" behavior) and cleavage fracture ("brittle" behavior) for intergranular cracks. Simulation results are compared with theoretical predictions (Griffith theory for cleavage; Rice theory for emission) using the computed surface energies. The deformation behavior at the GBs is, however, generally complex and not as simple as cleavage or emission at a sharp crack tip, which is not unexpected due to the complexity of the GB structures. In cases predicted to emit dislocations from the crack tip, the presence of H atoms reduces the critical load for emission of the dislocations and no cleavage is found. In the cases predicted to cleave, the presence of H atoms reduces the cleavage stress intensity and makes cleavage easier, including NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ which emits dislocations in the absence of H. Aside from the one unusual NiΣ9(221)⟨110⟩ case, no tendency is found for H to cause a ductile

  17. Atomistic simulation of CO 2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2013-10-02

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide) dimethyl ether, CH3O(CH 2CH2O)nCH3 (PEO for short) is a widely applied physical solvent that forms the major organic constituent of a class of novel nanoparticle-based absorbents. Good predictions were obtained for pressure-composition-density relations for CO2 + PEO oligomers (2 ≤ n ≤ 12), using the Potoff force field for PEO [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044514 (2012)] together with the TraPPE model for CO2 [AIChE J. 47, 1676 (2001)]. Water effects on Henrys constant of CO2 in PEO have also been investigated. Addition of modest amounts of water in PEO produces a relatively small increase in Henrys constant. Dependence of the calculated Henrys constant on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Atomistic simulation of CO2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bingbing; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2014-06-01

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide) dimethyl ether, CH3O(CH2CH2O)nCH3 (PEO for short) is a widely applied physical solvent that forms the major organic constituent of a class of novel nanoparticle-based absorbents. Good predictions were obtained for pressure-composition-density relations for CO2 + PEO oligomers (2 ≤ n ≤ 12), using the Potoff force field for PEO [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044514 (2012)] together with the TraPPE model for CO2 [AIChE J. 47, 1676 (2001)]. Water effects on Henry's constant of CO2 in PEO have also been investigated. Addition of modest amounts of water in PEO produces a relatively small increase in Henry's constant. Dependence of the calculated Henry's constant on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length.

  19. Analytical potential for atomistic simulations of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Paul; Albe, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical bond-order potential for silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide that has been optimized by a systematic fitting scheme. The functional form is adopted from a preceding work [Phys. Rev. B 65, 195124 (2002)] and is built on three independently fitted potentials for SiSi , CC , and SiC interaction. For elemental silicon and carbon, the potential perfectly reproduces elastic properties and agrees very well with first-principles results for high-pressure phases. The formation enthalpies of point defects are reasonably reproduced. In the case of silicon stuctural features of the melt agree nicely with data taken from literature. For silicon carbide the dimer as well as the solid phases B1, B2, and B3 were considered. Again, elastic properties are very well reproduced including internal relaxations under shear. Comparison with first-principles data on point defect formation enthalpies shows fair agreement. The successful validation of the potentials for configurations ranging from the molecular to the bulk regime indicates the transferability of the potential model and makes it a good choice for atomistic simulations that sample a large configuration space.

  20. Atomistic Studies of Cation Transport in Tetragonal ZrO2 During Zirconium Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2013-10-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is one of the major degradation mechanisms of these alloys. During corrosion the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cation ions is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO2. The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration barriers of some defect clusters can be much lower than those of point defects. The migration of Zr interstitials at some special grain boundaries is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed.

  1. A study of conditions for dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akanksha; Acharya, Amit; Maloney, Craig E.

    2015-02-01

    We perform atomistic simulations of dislocation nucleation in defect free crystals in 2 and 3 dimensions during indentation with circular (2D) or spherical (3D) indenters. The kinematic structure of the theory of Field Dislocation Mechanics (FDM) is shown to allow the identification of a local feature of the atomistic velocity field in these simulations as indicative of dislocation nucleation. It predicts the precise location of the incipient spatially distributed dislocation field, as shown for the cases of the Embedded Atom Method potential for Al and the Lennard-Jones pair potential. We demonstrate the accuracy of this analysis for two crystallographic orientations in 2D and one in 3D. Apart from the accuracy in predicting the location of dislocation nucleation, the FDM based analysis also demonstrates superior performance than existing nucleation criteria in not persisting in time beyond the nucleation event, as well as differentiating between phase boundary/shear band and dislocation nucleation. Our analysis is meant to facilitate the modeling of dislocation nucleation in coarser-than-atomistic scale models of the mechanics of materials.

  2. Net charge changes in the calculation of relative ligand-binding free energies via classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-30

    The calculation of binding free energies of charged species to a target molecule is a frequently encountered problem in molecular dynamics studies of (bio-)chemical thermodynamics. Many important endogenous receptor-binding molecules, enzyme substrates, or drug molecules have a nonzero net charge. Absolute binding free energies, as well as binding free energies relative to another molecule with a different net charge will be affected by artifacts due to the used effective electrostatic interaction function and associated parameters (e.g., size of the computational box). In the present study, charging contributions to binding free energies of small oligoatomic ions to a series of model host cavities functionalized with different chemical groups are calculated with classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Electrostatic interactions are treated using a lattice-summation scheme or a cutoff-truncation scheme with Barker-Watts reaction-field correction, and the simulations are conducted in boxes of different edge lengths. It is illustrated that the charging free energies of the guest molecules in water and in the host strongly depend on the applied methodology and that neglect of correction terms for the artifacts introduced by the finite size of the simulated system and the use of an effective electrostatic interaction function considerably impairs the thermodynamic interpretation of guest-host interactions. Application of correction terms for the various artifacts yields consistent results for the charging contribution to binding free energies and is thus a prerequisite for the valid interpretation or prediction of experimental data via molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis and correction of electrostatic artifacts according to the scheme proposed in the present study should therefore be considered an integral part of careful free-energy calculation studies if changes in the net charge are involved.

  3. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schebarchov, D., E-mail: Dmitri.Schebarchov@gmail.com [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Schulze, T. P., E-mail: schulze@math.utk.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1300 (United States); Hendy, S. C. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  4. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebarchov, D.; Schulze, T. P.; Hendy, S. C.

    2014-02-01

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  5. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  6. Bulk Heterojunction Morphologies with Atomistic Resolution from Coarse-Grain Solvent Evaporation Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Control over the morphology of the active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells is paramount to achieve high-efficiency devices. However, no method currently available can predict morphologies for a novel donor–acceptor blend. An approach which allows reaching relevant length scales, retaining chemical specificity, and mimicking experimental fabrication conditions, and which is suited for high-throughput schemes has been proven challenging to find. Here, we propose a method to generate atom-resolved morphologies of BHJs which conforms to these requirements. Coarse-grain (CG) molecular dynamics simulations are employed to simulate the large-scale morphological organization during solution-processing. The use of CG models which retain chemical specificity translates into a direct path to the rational design of donor and acceptor compounds which differ only slightly in chemical nature. Finally, the direct retrieval of fully atomistic detail is possible through backmapping, opening the way for improved quantum mechanical calculations addressing the charge separation mechanism. The method is illustrated for the poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT)–phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) mixture, and found to predict morphologies in agreement with experimental data. The effect of drying rate, P3HT molecular weight, and thermal annealing are investigated extensively, resulting in trends mimicking experimental findings. The proposed methodology can help reduce the parameter space which has to be explored before obtaining optimal morphologies not only for BHJ solar cells but also for any other solution-processed soft matter device. PMID:28209056

  7. Rotational viscosity of a liquid crystal mixture:a fully atomistic molecular dynamics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ran; Peng Zeng-Hui; Liu Yong-Gang; Zheng Zhi-Gang; Xuan Li

    2009-01-01

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics(MD)simulations at 293, 303 and 313 K have been performed for the four. component liquid crystal mixture, E7, using the software package Material Studio. Order parameters and orientational time correlation functions(TCFs)were calculated from MD trajectories. The rotational viscosity coefficients(RVCs)of the mixture were ca]culated using the Nemtsov-Zakharov and Fialkowski methods based on statistical-mechanical approaches. Temperature dependences of RVC and density were discussed in detall. Reasonable agreement between the simulated and experimental values was found.

  8. Coupling atomistic and continuum length scales in heteroepitaxial systems: Multiscale molecular-dynamics/finite-element simulations of strain relaxation in Si/ Si3 N4 nanopixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2005-09-01

    A hybrid atomistic-continuum simulation approach has been implemented to study strain relaxation in lattice-mismatched Si/Si3N4 nanopixels on a Si(111) substrate. We couple the molecular-dynamics (MD) and finite-element simulation approaches to provide an atomistic description near the interface and a continuum description deep into the substrate, increasing the accessible length scales and greatly reducing the computational cost. The results of the hybrid simulation are validated against full multimillion-atom MD simulations. We find that strain relaxation in Si/Si3N4 nanopixels may occur through the formation of a network of interfacial domain boundaries reminiscent of interfacial misfit dislocations. They result from the nucleation of domains of different interfacial bonding at the free edges and corners of the nanopixel, and subsequent to their creation they propagate inwards. We follow the motion of the domain boundaries and estimate a propagation speed of about ˜2.5×103m/s . The effects of temperature, nanopixel architecture, and film structure on strain relaxation are also investigated. We find: (i) elevated temperature increases the interfacial domain nucleation rates; (ii) a thin compliant Si layer between the film and the substrate plays a beneficial role in partially suppressing strain relaxation; and (iii) additional control over the interface morphology may be achieved by varying the film structure.

  9. Phase separation in H2O:N2 mixture - molecular dynamics simulations using atomistic force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A; Gee, R; Bastea, S; Fried, L

    2006-09-25

    A class II atomistic force field with Lennard-Jones 6-9 nonbond interactions is used to investigate equations of state (EOS) for important high explosive detonation products N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 700-2500 K and pressure range 0.1-10 GPa. A standard 6th order parameter-mixing scheme is then employed to study a 2:1 (molar) H{sub 2}O:N{sub 2} mixture, to investigate in particular the possibility of phase-separation under detonation conditions. The simulations demonstrate several important results, including: (1) the accuracy of computed EOS for both N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O over the entire range of temperature and pressure considered; (2) accurate mixing-demixing phase boundary as compared to experimental data; and (3) the departure of mixing free energy from that predicted by ideal mixing law. The results provide comparison and guidance to state-of-the-art chemical kinetic models.

  10. Systematic study of grain boundary atomistic structures and related properties in cubic zirconia bicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, N.; Ikuhara, Y. [Inst. of Engineering Innovation, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Oba, F. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    Systematic grain boundary study of cubic zirconia has been conducted by using bicrystals. It is clearly demonstrated that grain boundary atomistic structures dramatically change according to the misorientations and plane orientations of the boundaries, resulting in a dramatic change of excess energies and solute segregation behaviors. Combining with theoretical calculations, it is found that grain boundaries possess unique coordination-deficient cation sites at the cores, and their densities have a clear correlation with these properties in high-angle grain boundaries. This result indicates that grain boundary properties in ceramics are possibly determined by the accumulation of coordination-deficient sites. Thus, systematic grain boundary study using bicrystal offers fundamental understandings of the relationship between atomistic structures and properties in ceramic grain boundaries. (orig.)

  11. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  12. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M.n.; Marrink, S.j.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MAR- TINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell surrou

  13. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Tucker, Garritt J. (Drexel University)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled "Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations." During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel computers

  14. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-14

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.

  15. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  16. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich Weiss Straße 4, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Sugii, Taisuke, E-mail: taisuke.sugii.zs@hitachi.com [Center for Technology Innovation – Mechanical Engineering, Research & Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T{sub g} in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T{sub g} increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T{sub g} in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T{sub g} is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  17. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion of P and C near grain boundaries in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkele, P.; Kizler, P. [MPA, Univ. Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Schmauder, S. [IMWF, Univ. Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    It is well known that thermal ageing of steels can be caused by the segregation of phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) to grain boundaries. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion of P and C to grain boundaries in bcc iron will allow, if validated, predictions of the time-dependent segregation. Simulations of the Fe-P-C system are presented, where the diffusion of Fe and P is realized via a vacancy mechanism and the diffusion of C is realized via an interstitial mechanism. Time-dependent segregations have been simulated for different temperatures and start conditions and are found to follow Johnson-Mehl-Avrami laws. A comparison of the simulation results with available AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) data shows close agreement with respect to P segregation. In simulations starting with a pre-filled grain boundary in increase of P and a decrease of C in the grain boundary are found where the decrease of C proceeds significantly faster than the increase of P for any temperature. The temperature-dependent ratios of the different speeds of P- and C-segregation, due to their different diffusion mechanisms, are calculated as a result of the simulations. (orig.)

  18. Atomistic simulation of dislocation core structures in ordered TiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panova, J.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Interatomic potentials of the Embedded Atom type were used in the simulation of the dislocation core structures in TiAl. Different orientations of the dislocation line were simulated for the most commonly observed TiAl slip systems. Low-temperature dislocation behavior is interpreted in terms of ordinary dislocation motion. The effect of applied stress on the shape of the dislocation core and its mobility is examined as well. For the superdislocations several possible types of dissociations were studied.

  19. Multiscale atomistic simulation of metal-oxygen surface interactions: Methodological development, theoretical investigation, and correlation with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Judith C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-01-09

    The purpose of this grant is to develop the multi-scale theoretical methods to describe the nanoscale oxidation of metal thin films, as the PI (Yang) extensive previous experience in the experimental elucidation of the initial stages of Cu oxidation by primarily in situ transmission electron microscopy methods. Through the use and development of computational tools at varying length (and time) scales, from atomistic quantum mechanical calculation, force field mesoscale simulations, to large scale Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) modeling, the fundamental underpinings of the initial stages of Cu oxidation have been elucidated. The development of computational modeling tools allows for accelerated materials discovery. The theoretical tools developed from this program impact a wide range of technologies that depend on surface reactions, including corrosion, catalysis, and nanomaterials fabrication.

  20. Electrocaloric effects in the lead-free Ba (Zr ,Ti )O3 relaxor ferroelectric from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhijun; Prokhorenko, Sergei; Prosandeev, Sergey; Nahas, Y.; Wang, D.; Íñiguez, Jorge; Defay, E.; Bellaiche, L.

    2017-07-01

    Atomistic effective Hamiltonian simulations are used to investigate electrocaloric (EC) effects in the lead-free Ba (Zr0.5Ti0.5)O3 (BZT) relaxor ferroelectric. We find that the EC coefficient varies nonmonotonically with the field at any temperature, presenting a maximum that can be traced back to the behavior of BZT's polar nanoregions. We also introduce a simple Landau-based model that reproduces the EC behavior of BZT as a function of field and temperature, and which is directly applicable to other compounds. Finally, we confirm that, for low temperatures (i.e., in nonergodic conditions), the usual indirect approach to measure the EC response provides an estimate that differs quantitatively from a direct evaluation of the field-induced temperature change.

  1. Scalability of a Low-Cost Multi-Teraflop Linux Cluster for High-End Classical Atomistic and Quantum Mechanical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Scalability of a low-cost, Intel Xeon-based, multi-Teraflop Linux cluster is tested for two high-end scientific applications: Classical atomistic simulation based on the molecular dynamics method and quantum mechanical calculation based on the density functional theory. These scalable parallel applications use space-time multiresolution algorithms and feature computational-space decomposition, wavelet-based adaptive load balancing, and spacefilling-curve-based data compression for scalable I/O. Comparative performance tests are performed on a 1,024-processor Linux cluster and a conventional higher-end parallel supercomputer, 1,184-processor IBM SP4. The results show that the performance of the Linux cluster is comparable to that of the SP4. We also study various effects, such as the sharing of memory and L2 cache among processors, on the performance.

  2. Atomistic simulation of Cu-Ta thin film deposition and other phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, T.P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a metal with good properties to act as a diffusion barrier material in computer chips, where it should prevent the mixing of Cu into Si and SiO. The deposition of thin Cu films onto various Ta substrates has been studied through molecular dynamics simulations, using either empirical

  3. Hamiltonian replica exchange combined with elastic network analysis to enhance global domain motions in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermeir, Katja; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Coarse-grained elastic network models (ENM) of proteins offer a low-resolution representation of protein dynamics and directions of global mobility. A Hamiltonian-replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) approach has been developed that combines information extracted from an ENM analysis with atomistic explicit solvent MD simulations. Based on a set of centers representing rigid segments (centroids) of a protein, a distance-dependent biasing potential is constructed by means of an ENM analysis to promote and guide centroid/domain rearrangements. The biasing potentials are added with different magnitude to the force field description of the MD simulation along the replicas with one reference replica under the control of the original force field. The magnitude and the form of the biasing potentials are adapted during the simulation based on the average sampled conformation to reach a near constant biasing in each replica after equilibration. This allows for canonical sampling of conformational states in each replica. The application of the methodology to a two-domain segment of the glycoprotein 130 and to the protein cyanovirin-N indicates significantly enhanced global domain motions and improved conformational sampling compared with conventional MD simulations.

  4. Development and evaluation of an automatically adjusting coarse-grained force field for a β-O-4 type lignin from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Yingying; Huang, Shuaiyu; Zhang, Song; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This goal of this work was to develop a coarse-grained (CG) model of a β-O-4 type lignin polymer, because of the time consuming process required to achieve equilibrium for its atomistic model. The automatic adjustment method was used to develop the lignin CG model, which enables easy discrimination between chemically-varied polymers. In the process of building the lignin CG model, a sum of n Gaussian functions was obtained by an approximation of the corresponding atomistic potentials derived from a simple Boltzmann inversion of the distributions of the structural parameters. This allowed the establishment of the potential functions of the CG bond stretching and angular bending. To obtain the potential function of the CG dihedral angle, an algorithm similar to a Fourier progression form was employed together with a nonlinear curve-fitting method. The numerical potentials of the nonbonded portion of the lignin CG model were obtained using a potential inversion iterative method derived from the corresponding atomistic nonbonded distributions. The study results showed that the proposed CG model of lignin agreed well with its atomistic model in terms of the distributions of bond lengths, bending angles, dihedral angles and nonbonded distances between the CG beads. The lignin CG model also reproduced the static and dynamic properties of the atomistic model. The results of the comparative evaluation of the two models suggested that the designed lignin CG model was efficient and reliable.

  5. An atomistic study on configuration, mechanics and growth of nanoscale filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Alireza

    The objective of this dissertation is to study the characteristics of nanoscale materials as a function of their configuration and to investigate the nanoscale production methods, which enable us to tune their properties. Interplay between structure and function in atomically thin crystalline nanofilaments is sensitive to their conformations, size, and defect densities. At the nanoscale, dimensional confinement often creates a strong correlation between their physical properties and geometrical shape, and this is particularly important as their physical properties both influence, and are influenced by their conformations and structure. In the first part of the thesis, we focus on conformations of ultra-thin and ultra-long nanoscale filaments. As the synthesis lengths approach their persistence length, their conformational behavior is not unlike semi-flexible filaments. However, the ability to control their configuration is still limited and the exact relation between geometry and functions are yet to be explored. In this dissertation, we develop a novel approach to create and control the conformation of nanotubes, nanoribbons and nanowires as a method to tuning their properties. Our approach is based on controlling the boundary constraints on these nanofilaments by applying twist and displacement to their ends. We develop conformational phase diagrams by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We observe the formation of scrolled and folded nanostructures in graphene nanoribbons, and well-defined plectonemes in carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires. We develop a stability analysis using minimization of bend and twist energies stored in the conformations, suitably modified by the long range van der Waals interactions. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the molecular dynamics simulation results. In the case of graphene nanoribbons, we further investigate the effect of unpassivated edges on their structural evolution. The soft

  6. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alan [The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harlen, Oliver G. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Harris, Sarah A., E-mail: s.a.harris@leeds.ac.uk [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lonsdale, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Mulholland, Adrian J. [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Pearson, Arwen R. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The current computational techniques available for biomolecular simulation are described, and the successes and limitations of each with reference to the experimental biophysical methods that they complement are presented. Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  7. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Huh, Joonsuk; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have multiple functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimic a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains about 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the...

  8. Atomistic Simulations of Fluid Flow through Graphene Channels and Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton E.

    2015-01-01

    conductivity, extremely low surface friction and superior mechanical properties, graphene channels and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates to be implemented as fluid conduits in nanosystems. Performing Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the transport of water......The transport of aqueous solutions in artificial nanopores is of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, carbon nano-structured materials (fullerenes) have attracted a great deal of attention in nanotechnology. In fact, due to their large specific surface area, high thermal...

  9. Atomistic Simulations of Fluid Flow through Graphene Channels and Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton E.;

    2015-01-01

    The transport of aqueous solutions in artificial nanopores is of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, carbon nano-structured materials (fullerenes) have attracted a great deal of attention in nanotechnology. In fact, due to their large specific surface area, high thermal...... conductivity, extremely low surface friction and superior mechanical properties, graphene channels and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates to be implemented as fluid conduits in nanosystems. Performing Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the transport of water...

  10. Modeling micelle-templated mesoporous material SBA-15: atomistic model and gas adsorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Coasne, Benoit; Hung, Francisco R; Gubbins, Keith E

    2009-05-19

    We report the development of a realistic molecular model for mesoporous silica SBA-15, which includes both the large cylindrical mesopores and the smaller micropores in the pore walls. The methodology for modeling the SBA-15 structure involves molecular and mesoscale simulations combined with geometrical interpolation techniques. First, a mesoscale model is prepared by mimicking the synthesis process using lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The main physical features of this mesoscale pore model are then carved out of an atomistic silica block; both the mesopores and the micropores are incorporated from the mimetic simulations. The calculated pore size distribution, surface area, and simulated TEM images of the model structure are in good agreement with those obtained from experimental samples of SBA-15. We then investigate the adsorption of argon in this structure using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. The adsorption results for our SBA-15 model are compared with those for a similar model that does not include the micropores; we also compare with results obtained in a regular cylindrical pore. The simulated adsorption isotherm for the SBA-15 model shows semiquantitative agreement with the experimental isotherm for a SBA-15 sample having a similar pore size. We observe that the presence of the micropores leads to increased adsorption at low pressure compared to the case of a model without micropores in the pore walls. At higher pressures, for all models, the filling proceeds via the monolayer-multilayer adsorption on the mesopore surface followed by capillary condensation, which is mainly controlled by the mesopore diameter and is not influenced by the presence of the micropores.

  11. Atomistic Simulation and Electronic Structure of Lithium Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Zero-temperature density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Lithium ion on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N--methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N--methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3--methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Lithium ion solvation shell through zero-temperature DFT simulations of [Li(Anion)sub n](exp n-1) -clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated lithium ions in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having 2-3 anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], while solvation shells with 4 anions dominate in [EMIM][BF sub 4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of 4 anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion) sub n](exp n -1) - clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We estimate the ion diffusion coefficients and quantify both size and simulation time effects. We find estimates of lithium ion diffusion are a reasonable order of magnitude and can be corrected for simulation time effects. Simulation size, on the other hand, is also important, with diffusion coefficients from long PFF-MD simulations of small cells having 20-40% error compared to large-cell values. Finally, we compute the electrochemical window using differences in electronic energy levels of both isolated cation/anion pairs and small ionic liquid systems with Li-salt doping. The single pair and liquid

  12. Atomistic simulations of the tensile and melting behavior of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yuhang; Meng Qingyuan; Zhao Wei

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Stillinger-Weber potential are used to study the tensile and melting behavior of single-crystalline silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The tensile tests show that the tensile behavior of the SiNWs is strongly dependent on the simulation temperature, the strain rate, and the diameter of the nanowires.For a given diameter, the critical load significantly decreases as the temperature increases and also as the strain rate decreases. Additionally, the critical load increases as the diameter increases. Moreover, the melting tests demonstrate that both melting temperature and melting heat of the SiNWs decrease with decreasing diameter and length, due to the increase in surface energy. The melting process of SiNWs with increasing temperature is also investigated.

  13. Octadecahedral and dodecahedral iron nanoparticles: An atomistic simulation on stability and shape evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ning; Huang, Rao; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Fe nanoparticles have attracted great interest due to their potent magnetic and catalytic properties which strongly depend on the structures and morphologies. In this article, molecular dynamic simulations were employed to investigate structural and thermal stabilities of body-centered cubic Fe nanoparticles with octadecahedral, dodecahedral and spherical shapes. Size-dependent structural stability was firstly examined. Subsequently, computer simulations on the heating process of octadecahedral Fe nanoparticle discovered that {100} facets premelt earlier than {110} ones. As a result, the dodecahedral nanoparticle enclosed by {110} facets exhibited a better thermal stability than the octadecahedral one terminated by both {110} and {100} facets. Nevertheless, it was found that the octadecahedron presented a better shape stability than the dodecahedron by monitoring the shape factor and statistical radius during continuous heating. This study provides a significant insight not only into the experimental preparation of polyhedral Fe nanoparticles but also into their utilization in high-temperature environments.

  14. Atomistic study of the long-lived quantum coherences in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sangwoo; Rebentrost, Patrick; Valleau, Stéphanie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-02-08

    A remarkable amount of theoretical research has been carried out to elucidate the physical origins of the recently observed long-lived quantum coherence in the electronic energy transfer process in biological photosynthetic systems. Although successful in many respects, several widely used descriptions only include an effective treatment of the protein-chromophore interactions. In this work, by combining an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, time-dependent density functional theory, and open quantum system approaches, we successfully simulate the dynamics of the electronic energy transfer of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex. The resulting characteristic beating of populations and quantum coherences is in good agreement with the experimental results and the hierarchy equation of motion approach. The experimental absorption, linear, and circular dichroism spectra and dephasing rates are recovered at two different temperatures. In addition, we provide an extension of our method to include zero-point fluctuations of the vibrational environment. This work thus presents, to our knowledge, one of the first steps to explain the role of excitonic quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes based on their atomistic and molecular description.

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Filled With Metal Nanowires By Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Daniel; Keblinski, Pawel; Pulickel, Ajayan; Nayak, Saroj

    2002-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we studied mechanical behavior of (10,10) carbon nanotubes filled with a crystalline fcc metal wires. The interatomic interactions were described by a combination of Terfoff’s bond-order potential for carbon, embedded atom method (EAM) potential for metal and pair potential for carbon-metal interactions. The elastic properties, as well as failure mechanism were determined by simulating three point bending test, by pressing the center and the ends of relatively long tube in determined relatively small ring areas. We observed that following elastic response, at larger deformation, the metal wire yields well before the carbon bonding is affected. The behavior of filled tubes was compared with that of hollow tubes. Interesting is thet the hollow carbon (10,10) nanotube is more strong elastically than the same tube filled with Au-metal nanowire. We also simulated indentation of filled tubes residing on a hard flat surface. Similarly as in the bending test, metal wire yields first, is cut in between hard cylinder and hard plane and pushed away from under the indenter. Upon further increase of the indentation force, carbon tube is broken and forms two open ends that are rapidly zipped around the cut metal wire. Remarkably, the shape of the zipped tube ends strong depend of the speed of the punching of the tube. This result imply a possibility of designing tubes with various closed end shapes with applicationusing in the nanoscale manipulation procedures used for production.

  16. Accelerating atomistic simulations through self-learning bond-boost hyperdynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    By altering the potential energy landscape on which molecular dynamics are carried out, the hyperdynamics method of Voter enables one to significantly accelerate the simulation state-to-state dynamics of physical systems. While very powerful, successful application of the method entails solving the subtle problem of the parametrization of the so-called bias potential. In this study, we first clarify the constraints that must be obeyed by the bias potential and demonstrate that fast sampling of the biased landscape is key to the obtention of proper kinetics. We then propose an approach by which the bond boost potential of Miron and Fichthorn can be safely parametrized based on data acquired in the course of a molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we introduce a procedure, the Self-Learning Bond Boost method, in which the parametrization is step efficiently carried out on-the-fly for each new state that is visited during the simulation by safely ramping up the strength of the bias potential up to its optimal value. The stability and accuracy of the method are demonstrated.

  17. Computational investigations on polymerase actions in gene transcription and replication: Combining physical modeling and atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We stay away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while addressing statistical physics modeling approaches along with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single subunit T7 RNA polymerase, and summarize commensurate studies on structurally similar DNA polymerases as well. For multi-subunit RNA polymerases that have been actively studied in recent years, we leave systematical reviews of the simulation achievements to latest computational chemistry surveys, while covering only representative studies published very recently, including our own work modeling structure-based elongation kinetic of yeast RNA polymerase II. In the end, we briefly go through physical modeling on elongation pauses and backtracking activities of the multi-subunit RNAPs. We emphasize on the fluctuation and control mechanisms of the polymerase actions, highlight the non-equilibrium nature of the operation system, and try to build some perspectives toward understanding the polymerase impacts from the single molecule level to a genome-wide scale. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 11275022).

  18. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  19. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B4C ), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (˜200 000 atoms /cell ) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B4C , using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001 )/⟨10 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (01 1 ¯ 1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101 ⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B4C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B4C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  20. Towards understanding photomigration: Insights from atomistic simulations of azopolymer films explicitly including light-induced isomerization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos L.

    2016-10-01

    The light-induced surface modification of a thin film of poly-(disperse orange-3-methylmethacrylate) is investigated computationally using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations specifically tailored to include photoisomerization dynamics. For a model surface consisting of a periodic pattern of alternating irradiated and dark spots, it is shown that repeated photoisomerization in the irradiated areas initially leads to a local temperature increase and a raised surface profile accompanied by a migration of molecules away from the bright spots. After switching off the light source and letting the system cool down, this leads to an inversion of the surface profile, i.e., dips in the bright spots and bumps in the dark spots. To separate the effect of photoisomerization from the pure heating effect, a second simulation is performed in which no photoisomerization is allowed to occur in the bright spots, but the equivalent amount of energy is introduced there locally in the form of heat. This also leads to a raised surface in these areas; however, no outward migration of molecules is observed and the surface pattern practically vanishes when the system is subsequently cooled back to room temperature.

  1. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  2. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B(4)C), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (∼200,000  atoms/cell) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B(4)C, using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001)/⟨101̅0⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (011̅1̅)/⟨1̅101⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B(4)C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B(4)C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  3. The Soft Mode Driven Dynamics in Ferroelectric Perovskites at the Nanoscale: An Atomistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCash, Kevin

    The discovery of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale has incited a lot of interest in perovskite ferroelectrics not only for their potential in device application but also for their potential to expand fundamental understanding of complex phenomena at very small size scales. Unfortunately, not much is known about the dynamics of ferroelectrics at this scale. Many of the widely held theories for ferroelectric materials are based on bulk dynamics which break down when applied to smaller scales. In an effort to increase understanding of nanoscale ferroelectric materials we use atomistic resolution computational simulations to investigate the dynamics of polar perovskites. Within the framework of a well validated effective Hamiltonian model we are able to accurately predict many of the properties of ferroelectric materials at the nanoscale including the response of the soft mode to mechanical boundary conditions and the polarization reversal dynamics of ferroelectric nanowires. Given that the focus of our study is the dynamics of ferroelectric perovskites we begin by developing an effective Hamiltonian based model that could simultaneously describe both static and dynamic properties of such materials. Our study reveals that for ferroelectric perovskites that undergo a sequence of phase transitions, such as BaTiO3. for example, the minimal parameter effective Hamiltonian model is unable to reproduce both static and dynamical properties simultaneously. Nevertheless we developed two sets of parameters that accurately describes the static properties and dynamic properties of BaTiO3 independently. By creating a tool that accurately models the dynamical properties of perovskite ferroelectrics we are able to investigate the frequencies of the soft modes in the perovskite crystal. The lowest energy transverse optical soft modes in perovskite ferroelectrics are known to be cause of the ferroelectric phase transition in these materials and affect a number of electrical properties

  4. Force-Field Derivation and Atomistic Simulation of HMX/Graphite Interface and Polycrystal Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙瑶; 刘永刚; 聂福德; 陈军

    2012-01-01

    Interface is the key issue to understand the performance of composite materials. In this work, we study the interface between octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and graphite, try to find out its contribution to mixture explosives. The work starts from the force-field derivation. We get ab initio based pair potentials across the interface, and then use them to study the interface structural and mechanical properties. A series of large scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The structure evolution, energy variation and elastic/plastic transformation of interface and polycrystal systems are calculated. The desensitizing mechanism of graphite to HMX is discussed.

  5. Atomistic simulations, mesoscopic modeling, and theoretical analysis of thermal conductivity of bundles composed of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2013-09-01

    The propensity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to self-organize into continuous networks of bundles has direct implications for thermal transport properties of CNT network materials and defines the importance of clear understanding of the mechanisms and scaling laws governing the heat transfer within the primary building blocks of the network structures—close-packed bundles of CNTs. A comprehensive study of the thermal conductivity of CNT bundles is performed with a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of heat transfer between adjacent CNTs and the intrinsic conductivity of CNTs in a bundle with a theoretical analysis that reveals the connections between the structure and thermal transport properties of CNT bundles. The results of MD simulations of heat transfer in CNT bundles consisting of up to 7 CNTs suggest that, contrary to the widespread notion of strongly reduced conductivity of CNTs in bundles, van der Waals interactions between defect-free well-aligned CNTs in a bundle have negligible effect on the intrinsic conductivity of the CNTs. The simulations of inter-tube heat conduction performed for partially overlapping parallel CNTs indicate that the conductance through the overlap region is proportional to the length of the overlap for CNTs and CNT-CNT overlaps longer than several tens of nm. Based on the predictions of the MD simulations, a mesoscopic-level model is developed and applied for theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of heat transfer in bundles consisting of CNTs with infinitely large and finite intrinsic thermal conductivities. The general scaling laws predicting the quadratic dependence of the bundle conductivity on the length of individual CNTs in the case when the thermal transport is controlled by the inter-tube conductance and the independence of the CNT length in another limiting case when the intrinsic conductivity of CNTs plays the dominant role are derived. An application of the scaling laws to bundles of

  6. Atomistic simulation of point defects and diffusion in B2 NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishin, Y.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-08-04

    NiAl is a strongly ordered compound with a large atomic size difference between the components. Due to these features it demonstrates the so-called triple-defect mechanism of compositional disorder with Ni anti-structural atoms in Ni-rich compositions and Ni vacancies in Al-rich compositions. Diffusion mechanisms in triple-defect compounds are more involved than in antisite disorder compounds. Because every Ni atom in the B2 structure is surrounded by Al atoms and vise versa, every nearest-neighbor (NN) jump of a vacancy induces local disorder, which is very unfavorable. The authors therefore have to consider diffusion of Ni and Al along their own sublattices by next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) vacancy jumps. Alternatively, one can think of cycled mechanisms in which the crystal order is destroyed only locally and temporarily, but is totally restored when the diffusion cycle is complete. In this study the authors apply molecular statics simulations to evaluate the energetics of the point defect formation and migration in NiAl by different mechanisms. The goal of their simulations is to predict the mechanisms that are the easiest, thus dominating, at different alloy compositions.

  7. Atomistic Simulation of Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xujun; Marchi, Massimo; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi; Abel, Stéphane

    2016-04-19

    Solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAP, 2-benzene-ring PAH) and pyrene (PYR, 4-benzene-ring PAH), into a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle was studied through all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that NAP as well as PYR could move between the micelle shell and core regions, contributing to their distribution in both regions of the micelle at any PAH concentration. Moreover, both NAP and PYR prefer to stay in the micelle shell region, which may arise from the greater volume of the micelle shell, the formation of hydrogen bonds between NAP and water, and the larger molecular volume of PYR. The PAHs are able to form occasional clusters (from dimer to octamer) inside the micelle during the simulation time depending on the PAH concentration in the solubilization systems. Furthermore, the micelle properties (i.e., size, shape, micelle internal structure, alkyl chain conformation and orientation, and micelle internal dynamics) are found to be nearly unaffected by the solubilized PAHs, which is irrespective of the properties and concentrations of PAHs.

  8. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies of the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.

  9. Does Fe(2+) in olivine-based interstellar grains play any role in the formation of H2? Atomistic insights from DFT periodic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Ruiz, J; Ugliengo, P; Sodupe, M; Rimola, A

    2016-05-25

    Using periodic DFT-D2 methods, atomistic simulations of interstellar H adsorption and H2 formation on a (010) Fe-containing olivine surface are presented. At variance with the (010) Mg2SiO4 surface and key to these processes are the large Fe/H interaction energies, suggesting that olivine surfaces are good reservoirs of H atoms for subsequent recombination to form H2.

  10. Simulation of folding of a small alpha-helical protein in atomistic detail using worldwide-distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Snow, Christopher D; Shirts, Michael R; Pande, Vijay S

    2002-11-08

    By employing thousands of PCs and new worldwide-distributed computing techniques, we have simulated in atomistic detail the folding of a fast-folding 36-residue alpha-helical protein from the villin headpiece. The total simulated time exceeds 300 micros, orders of magnitude more than previous simulations of a molecule of this size. Starting from an extended state, we obtained an ensemble of folded structures, which is on average 1.7A and 1.9A away from the native state in C(alpha) distance-based root-mean-square deviation (dRMS) and C(beta) dRMS sense, respectively. The folding mechanism of villin is most consistent with the hydrophobic collapse view of folding: the molecule collapses non-specifically very quickly ( approximately 20ns), which greatly reduces the size of the conformational space that needs to be explored in search of the native state. The conformational search in the collapsed state appears to be rate-limited by the formation of the aromatic core: in a significant fraction of our simulations, the C-terminal phenylalanine residue packs improperly with the rest of the hydrophobic core. We suggest that the breaking of this interaction may be the rate-determining step in the course of folding. On the basis of our simulations we estimate the folding rate of villin to be approximately 5micros. By analyzing the average features of the folded ensemble obtained by simulation, we see that the mean folded structure is more similar to the native fold than any individual folded structure. This finding highlights the need for simulating ensembles of molecules and averaging the results in an experiment-like fashion if meaningful comparison between simulation and experiment is to be attempted. Moreover, our results demonstrate that (1) the computational methodology exists to simulate the multi-microsecond regime using distributed computing and (2) that potential sets used to describe interatomic interactions may be sufficiently accurate to reach the folded state

  11. Atomistic Simulation Study of Vacancy Clusters in Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    found to be very mobile with migration energies of 0.56 and 0.39 eV, respectively, compared to previously calculated single and divacancy migration...CF 1985 Massachusetts Institute of Techonology Signature of Author Department of Nuclear Engineering December 4, 1985 C e r t i f i e d b y S i d n...using molecular statics with an interatomic potential recently derived from first principles. Tri- and tetravacancies are found to be very mobile with

  12. Atomistic simulation of He bubble in Fe as obstacle to dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez Haghighat, S. M.; Lucas, G.; Schäublin, R.

    2009-07-01

    Degradation of mechanical properties due to nanometric irradiation induced defects is one of the challenging issues in designing materials for future fusion reactors. Various types of defects such as voids and He bubbles may be produced due to high dose of neutron irradiation due to fusion reaction. We study the influence of He bubble on the mobility of an edge dislocation in pure bcc-Fe using molecular dynamics simulation as a function of bubble size, He density and temperature. It appears that low contents He bubbles are penetrable defects, which size and temperature rise make them harder and softer, respectively. At high He contents a size dependent loop punching is observed, which at larger bubble sizes leads to a multistep dislocation-defect interaction. It also appears that the bubble surface curvature and temperature are the main parameters in the screw segments annihilation needed for the release of the dislocation from the bubble.

  13. Atomistic simulations of tungsten surface evolution under low-energy neon implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Marie; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the divertor of fusion reactors, where it will be subject to a high flux of particles coming from the fusion plasma as well as a significant heat load. Under helium plasma exposure in fusion-reactor-like conditions, a nanostructured morphology is known to form on the tungsten surface in certain temperature and incident energy ranges, although the formation mechanism is not fully established. A recent experimental study (Yajima et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 282-6) using neon or argon exposure did not produce similar nanostructure. This article presents molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten aimed at investigating the surface evolution and elucidating the role of noble gas mass in fuzz formation. In contrast to helium, neon impacts can sputter both tungsten and previously implanted neon atoms. The shorter range of neon ions, along with sputtering, limit the formation of large bubbles and likely prevents nanostructure formation.

  14. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France); Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  15. Lipid exchange mechanism of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein clarified by atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artturi Koivuniemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the mechanisms associated with the CETP-mediated lipid exchange. To this end we used both atomistic and coarse-grained models whose results were consistent with each other. We found CETP to bind to the surface of high density lipoprotein (HDL -like lipid droplets through its charged and tryptophan residues. Upon binding, CETP rapidly (in about 10 ns induced the formation of a small hydrophobic patch to the phospholipid surface of the droplet, opening a route from the core of the lipid droplet to the binding pocket of CETP. This was followed by a conformational change of helix X of CETP to an open state, in which we found the accessibility of cholesteryl esters to the C-terminal tunnel opening of CETP to increase. Furthermore, in the absence of helix X, cholesteryl esters rapidly diffused into CETP through the C-terminal opening. The results provide compelling evidence that helix X acts as a lid which conducts lipid exchange by alternating the open and closed states. The findings have potential for the design of novel molecular agents to inhibit the activity of CETP.

  16. Pathway for insertion of amphiphilic nanoparticles into defect-free lipid bilayers from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2015-04-28

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used in biological applications that involve potential contact with cellular membranes. As a result, it is essential to gain a physical understanding of NP-membrane interactions to guide the design of next-generation bioactive nanoparticles. In previous work, we showed that charged, amphiphilic NPs can fuse with lipid bilayers after contact between protruding solvent-exposed lipid tails and the NP monolayer. Fusion was only observed at the high-curvature edges of large bilayer defects, but not in low-curvature regions where protrusions are rarely observed. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to show that the same NPs can also fuse with low-curvature bilayers in the absence of defects if NP-protrusion contact occurs, generalizing the results of our previous work. Insertion proceeds without applying biasing forces to the NP, driven by the hydrophobic effect, and involves the transient generation of bilayer curvature. We further find that NPs with long hydrophobic ligands can insert a single ligand into the bilayer core in a manner similar to the binding of peripheral proteins. Such anchoring may precede insertion, revealing potential methods for engineering NP monolayers to enhance NP-bilayer fusion in systems with a low likelihood of lipid tail protrusions. These results reveal new pathways for NP-bilayer fusion and provide fundamental insight into behavior at the nano-bio interface.

  17. Atomistic Simulations of High-intensity XFEL Pulses on Diffractive Imaging of Nano-sized System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phay; Knight, Christopher; Bostedt, Christoph; Young, Linda; Tegze, Miklos; Faigel, Gyula

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a large-scale atomistic computational method based on a combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics (MC/MD) method to simulate XFEL-induced radiation damage dynamics of complex materials. The MD algorithm is used to propagate the trajectories of electrons, ions and atoms forward in time and the quantum nature of interactions with an XFEL pulse is accounted for by a MC method to calculate probabilities of electronic transitions. Our code has good scalability with MPI/OpenMP parallelization, and it has been run on Mira, a petascale system at the Argonne Leardership Computing Facility, with particle number >50 million. Using this code, we have examined the impact of high-intensity 8-keV XFEL pulses on the x-ray diffraction patterns of argon clusters. The obtained patterns show strong pulse parameter dependence, providing evidence of significant lattice rearrangement and diffuse scattering. Real-space electronic reconstruction was performed using phase retrieval methods. We found that the structure of the argon cluster can be recovered with atomic resolution even in the presence of considerable radiation damage. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  18. Atomistic simulation on charge mobility of amorphous tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3): origin of Poole-Frenkel-type behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuki; Lennartz, Christian

    2008-07-21

    The atomistic simulation of charge transfer process for an amorphous Alq(3) system is reported. By employing electrostatic potential charges, we calculate site energies and find that the standard deviation of site energy distribution is about twice as large as predicted in previous research. The charge mobility is calculated via the Miller-Abrahams formalism and the master equation approach. We find that the wide site energy distribution governs Poole-Frenkel-type behavior of charge mobility against electric field, while the spatially correlated site energy is not a dominant mechanism of Poole-Frenkel behavior in the range from 2x10(5) to 1.4x10(6) V/cm. Also we reveal that randomly meshed connectivities are, in principle, required to account for the Poole-Frenkel mechanism. Charge carriers find a zigzag pathway at low electric field, while they find a straight pathway along electric field when a high electric field is applied. In the space-charge-limited current scheme, the charge-carrier density increases with electric field strength so that the nonlinear behavior of charge mobility is enhanced through the strong charge-carrier density dependence of charge mobility.

  19. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  20. Atomistic simulations of displacement cascades in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Manan, E-mail: manan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Chandra, Sharat [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Valsakumar, M.C. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Mathi Jaya, S. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: (a) The averaged distortion index and the Y–O bond length of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} octahedra as a function of the simulation time for 5 keV PKA. (b) Shows the nearest neighbourhood of one of the Y ions as a function of simulation time, showing the destruction and the recovery of the YO{sub 6} octahedron during the cascade corresponding to 5 keV Y PKA. - Highlights: • Qualitative difference in displacement cascades exists for Y and O PKA. • Nearest neighbour correlation between Y and O ions exists even at cascade peak. • Cascade core in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not undergo melting. • Topological connectivity of YO{sub 6} polyhedra plays important role in stability of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: We study the characteristics of displacement cascades in single crystal Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} using classical molecular dynamics. There are two possible ways to generate the cascades in yttria, using either the Y or the O atoms as the primary knock-on (PKA) atom. It is shown that there is a qualitative difference in the characteristics of the cascades obtained in these two cases. Even though the crystal is seen to be in a highly disordered state in the cascade volume, as seen from the plots of radial distribution function, the correlation between the Y and O atoms is not completely lost. This facilitates a quick recovery of the system during the annealing phase. Topological connectivity of the YO{sub 6} polyhedral units plays an important role in imparting stability to the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal. These characteristics of the cascades can help explain the stability of the yttria nanoparticles when they are dispersed in oxide dispersion strengthened steels.

  1. Effect of point and grain boundary defects on the mechanical behavior of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under tension via atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Khanh Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Spearot, Douglas E., E-mail: dspearot@uark.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    Atomistic simulation is used to study the structure and energy of defects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the role of defects on the mechanical properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2}. First, energy minimization is used to study the structure and energy of monosulfur vacancies positioned within the bottom S layer of the MoS{sub 2} lattice, and 60° symmetric tilt grain boundaries along the zigzag and armchair directions, with comparison to experimental observations and density functional theory calculations. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are used to subject suspended defect-containing MoS{sub 2} membranes to a state of multiaxial tension. A phase transformation is observed in the defect-containing membranes, similar to prior work in the literature. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with point defects, groups of monosulfur vacancies promote stress-concentration points, allowing failure to initiate away from the center of the membrane. For monolayer MoS{sub 2} membranes with grain boundaries, failure initiates at the grain boundary and it is found that the breaking force for the membrane is independent of grain boundary energy.

  2. Fluid Simulations with Atomistic Resolution: Multiscale Model with Account of Nonlocal Momentum Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svitenkov, A.I.; Chivilikhin, S.A.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Boukhanovsky, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microscale flow phenomena turn out to be highly non-trivial for simulation and require the use of heterogeneous modeling approaches. While the continuum Navier-Stokes equations and related boundary conditions quickly break down at those scales, various direct simulation methods and hybrid

  3. Structures of the Alzheimer's Wild-Type Aβ1-40 Dimer from Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, Bogdan; Tran, Thanh T; Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Sterpone, Fabio; Nguyen, Phuong H; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2015-08-20

    We have studied the dimer of amyloid beta peptide Aβ of 40 residues by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics. The Aβ-dimers have been found to be the smallest toxic species in Alzheimer's disease, but their inherent flexibilities have precluded structural characterization by experimental methods. Though the 24-μs-scale simulation reveals a mean secondary structure of 18% β-strand and 10% α helix, we find transient configurations with an unstructured N-terminus and multiple β-hairpins spanning residues 17-21 and 30-36, but the antiparallel and perpendicular peptide orientations are preferred over the parallel organization. Short-lived conformational states also consist of all α topologies, and one compact peptide with β-sheet structure stabilized by a rather extended peptide with α-helical content. Overall, this first all-atom study provides insights into the equilibrium structure of the Aβ1-40 dimer in aqueous solution, opening a new avenue for a comprehensive understanding of the impact of pathogenic and protective mutations in early-stage Alzheimer's disease on a molecular level.

  4. Feature activated molecular dynamics: an efficient approach for atomistic simulation of solid-state aggregation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manish; Sinno, Talid

    2004-11-01

    An efficient approach is presented for performing efficient molecular dynamics simulations of solute aggregation in crystalline solids. The method dynamically divides the total simulation space into "active" regions centered about each minority species, in which regular molecular dynamics is performed. The number, size, and shape of these regions is updated periodically based on the distribution of solute atoms within the overall simulation cell. The remainder of the system is essentially static except for periodic rescaling of the entire simulation cell in order to balance the pressure between the isolated molecular dynamics regions. The method is shown to be accurate and robust for the Environment-Dependant Interatomic Potential (EDIP) for silicon and an Embedded Atom Method potential (EAM) for copper. Several tests are performed beginning with the diffusion of a single vacancy all the way to large-scale simulations of vacancy clustering. In both material systems, the predicted evolutions agree closely with the results of standard molecular dynamics simulations. Computationally, the method is demonstrated to scale almost linearly with the concentration of solute atoms, but is essentially independent of the total system size. This scaling behavior allows for the full dynamical simulation of aggregation under conditions that are more experimentally realizable than would be possible with standard molecular dynamics.

  5. Effect of initial ion positions on the interactions of monovalent and divalent ions with a DNA duplex as revealed with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Timothy J; Wang, Yongmei

    2013-01-01

    Monovalent (Na(+)) and divalent (Mg(2+)) ion distributions around the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer were studied by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with AMBER molecular modeling software. Different initial placements of ions were tried and the resulting effects on the ion distributions around DNA were investigated. For monovalent ions, results were found to be nearly independent of initial cation coordinates. However, Mg(2+) ions demonstrated a strong initial coordinate dependent behavior. While some divalent ions initially placed near the DNA formed essentially permanent direct coordination complexes with electronegative DNA atoms, Mg(2+) ions initially placed further away from the duplex formed a full, nonexchanging, octahedral first solvation shell. These fully solvated cations were still capable of binding with DNA with events lasting up to 20 ns, and in comparison were bound much longer than Na(+) ions. Force field parameters were also investigated with modest and little differences arising from ion (ions94 and ions08) and nucleic acid description (ff99, ff99bsc0, and ff10), respectively. Based on known Mg(2+) ion solvation structure, we conclude that in most cases Mg(2+) ions retain their first solvation shell, making only solvent-mediated contacts with DNA duplex. The proper way to simulate Mg(2+) ions around DNA duplex, therefore, should begin with ions placed in the bulk water.

  6. Atomistic simulation of martensite-austenite phase transition in nanoscale nickel-titanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kexel, Christian; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-09-01

    Shape-memory (SM) alloys can, after initial inelastic deformation, reconstruct their pristine lattice structure upon heating. The underlying phenomenon is the structural solid-solid phase transition from low-temperature lower-symmetry martensite to the high-temperature higher-symmetry austenite. Conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi) with near-equiatomic concentration already possesses an eminent importance for many applications, whereas the nanostructured equivalent can exhibit yet enhanced thermomechanical properties. However, no plausible microscopic theory of the SM effect in NiTi exists, especially for nanoscale systems. We investigate the thermally induced martensite-austenite phase transition in free equiatomic nanocrystals, comprising up to approximately 40 000 atoms, by means of molecular-dynamics simulations (MD) using a classical Gupta-type many-body scheme. Thereby we complement and extend a previously published study [D. Mutter, P. Nielaba, Eur. Phys. J. B 84, 109 (2011)]. The structural transition, revealing features of a first-order phase transition, is demonstrated. It is contrasted with the melting phase transition, a quantum solid model and bulk experimental findings. Moreover, a nucleation-growth process is observed as well as the irreversibility of the transition upon cooling.

  7. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-04-15

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium–10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble growth and superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, molecular dynamics is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the molecular dynamics simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe (Smirnova et al. 2013) is employed. Initial gas bubbles with low Xe concentration are generated in a U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atom atoms are continuously added into the bubbles, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that the gas bubble growth is accompanied by partial dislocation emission, which results in a star-shaped dislocation structure and an anisotropic stress field. The emitted partial dislocations have a Burgers vector along the <111> direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Dislocation loop punch-out was not observed. A tensile stress was found along <110> directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in body-centered cubic U10Mo fuels.

  8. Atomistic mechanism of microRNA translation upregulation via molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ye

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous 23-25 nt RNAs that play important gene-regulatory roles in animals and plants. Recently, miR369-3 was found to upregulate translation of TNFα mRNA in quiescent (G0 mammalian cell lines. Knock down and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that microRNA-protein complexes (with FXR1 and AGO2 are necessary for the translation upregulation. However the molecular mechanism of microRNA translation activation is poorly understood. In this study we constructed the microRNA-mRNA-AGO2-FXR1 quadruple complex by bioinformatics and molecular modeling, followed with all atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to investigate the interaction mechanisms for the complex. A combined analysis of experimental and computational data suggests that AGO2-FXR1 complex relocalize microRNA:mRNA duplex to polysomes in G0. The two strands of dsRNA are then separated upon binding of AGO2 and FXR1. Finally, polysomes may improve the translation efficiency of mRNA. The mutation research confirms the stability of microRNA-mRNA-FXR1 and illustrates importance of key residue of Ile304. This possible mechanism can shed more light on the microRNA-dependent upregulation of translation.

  9. Atomistic simulations of electrolyte solutions and hydrogels with explicit solvent models

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Jonathan; Reiser, Steffen; Horsch, Martin; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Two of the most challenging tasks in molecular simulation consist in capturing the properties of systems with long-range interactions (e.g. electrolyte solutions) as well as systems containing large molecules such as hydrogels. For the development and optimization of molecular force fields and models, a large number of simulation runs have to be evaluated to obtain the sensitivity of the target properties with respect to the model parameters. The present work discusses force field development for electrolytes regarding thermodynamic properties of their aqueous solutions. Furthermore, simulations are conducted for the volume transition of hydrogels in the presence of electrolytes. It is shown that the properties of these complex systems can be captured by molecular simulation.

  10. Atomistic Simulations of Dislocations in a Model BCC Multicomponent Concentrated Solid Solution Alloy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    temperature. The initial condition for the MD simulations was a molecular statics relaxed core under the applied stress of interest. The system was...kink-pair model, the kink-pair activation energy DН(t) at an applied stress t is written as DHðtÞ ¼ DH0 1 ðt=t0Þp q (1) where t0 is the T¼ 0 K...effective activation energy for glide as evidenced by the direct MD simulation data in Fig. 6. 3.3. Critical resolved shear stress for the edge

  11. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-02-05

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have several functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be among the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria, the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level, we introduce an atomistic model that mimics a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains approximately 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate, and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the transfer between collective excited states of pigments can result in robust energy funneling to the initial excitation conditions and temperature changes. Moreover, the same mechanism describes the coexistence of multiple time scales of excitation dynamics frequently observed in ultrafast optical experiments. While our findings support the hypothesis of supertransfer, the model reveals energy transport through multiple channels on different length scales.

  12. Computational Investigations on Polymerase Actions in Gene Transcription and Replication Combining Physical Modeling and Atomistic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We keep away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while address only statistical physics modeling approach and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation approach. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single-subunit T7 RNA poly...

  13. Radiation tolerance of ceramics—Insights from atomistic simulation of damage accumulation in pyrochlores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Gale, Julian D.

    2010-10-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effects of radiation damage accumulation in two pyrochlore-structured ceramics, namely Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7. It is well known from experiment that the titanate is susceptible to radiation-induced amorphization, while the zirconate does not go amorphous under prolonged irradiation. Our simulations show that cation Frenkel pair accumulation eventually leads to amorphization of Gd2Ti2O7. Anion disorder occurs with cation disorder. The amorphization is accompanied by a density decrease of about 12.7% and a decrease of about 50% in the elastic modulus. In Gd2Zr2O7, amorphization does not occur, because the residual damage is not sufficiently energetic to drive the material amorphous. Subtle differences in damage accumulation and annealing between the two pyrochlores lead to drastically different radiation response as the damage accumulates.

  14. Recent applications of boxed molecular dynamics: a simple multiscale technique for atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Jonathan; Vazquez, Saulo; Martinez-Nunez, Emilio; Marks, Alison; Rodgers, Jeff; Glowacki, David R; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-06

    In this paper, we briefly review the boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) method which allows analysis of thermodynamics and kinetics in complicated molecular systems. BXD is a multiscale technique, in which thermodynamics and long-time dynamics are recovered from a set of short-time simulations. In this paper, we review previous applications of BXD to peptide cyclization, solution phase organic reaction dynamics and desorption of ions from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). We also report preliminary results of simulations of diamond etching mechanisms and protein unfolding in atomic force microscopy experiments. The latter demonstrate a correlation between the protein's structural motifs and its potential of mean force. Simulations of these processes by standard molecular dynamics (MD) is typically not possible, because the experimental time scales are very long. However, BXD yields well-converged and physically meaningful results. Compared with other methods of accelerated MD, our BXD approach is very simple; it is easy to implement, and it provides an integrated approach for simultaneously obtaining both thermodynamics and kinetics. It also provides a strategy for obtaining statistically meaningful dynamical results in regions of configuration space that standard MD approaches would visit only very rarely.

  15. Atomistic Simulations of Orientation and Shock Velocity Dependences on Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan; Wixom, Ryan; Mattsson, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Predicting the behavior of energetic materials requires a detailed description of how chemical reaction, energy and pressure fronts propagate during initial stages of detonation. In this talk, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to examine orientation and shock velocity dependences in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). This work utilizes an empirical, variable charge reactive force field (ReaxFF) that is implemented in the LAMMPS package with a time-averaged bond-order method for on-the-fly chemical species identification. The accuracy of ReaxFF is validated by comparisons of activation barriers for dissociation of a single PETN molecule along various dissociation channels with higher-fidelity, but more expensive, density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The response of single-crystal PETN to shock compression is simulated using the multi-scale shock technique (MSST) along the insensitive (100) directions, as well as the sensitive (001) and (110) directions, at steady shock velocities ranging from 6-10 km/s. Hugoniot curves, particle velocities of shocked molecules, and evolution of reaction products with time from MD simulations with ReaxFF will be discussed and compared to that from DFT calculations.

  16. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  17. Study of Nanowires Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Monk, Joshua D

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation I present computational studies that focus on the unique characteristics of metallic nanowires. We generated virtual nanowires of nanocrystalline nickel (nc-Ni) and single crystalline silver (Ag) in order to investigate particular nanoscale effects. Three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies were performed for each sample using the super computer System X located at Virginia Tech. Thermal grain growth simulations were performed on 4 nm grain size nc-Ni by o...

  18. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability...

  19. Accelerated path integral methods for atomistic simulations at ultra-low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Felix; Marx, Dominik; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-08-07

    Path integral methods provide a rigorous and systematically convergent framework to include the quantum mechanical nature of atomic nuclei in the evaluation of the equilibrium properties of molecules, liquids, or solids at finite temperature. Such nuclear quantum effects are often significant for light nuclei already at room temperature, but become crucial at cryogenic temperatures such as those provided by superfluid helium as a solvent. Unfortunately, the cost of converged path integral simulations increases significantly upon lowering the temperature so that the computational burden of simulating matter at the typical superfluid helium temperatures becomes prohibitive. Here we investigate how accelerated path integral techniques based on colored noise generalized Langevin equations, in particular the so-called path integral generalized Langevin equation thermostat (PIGLET) variant, perform in this extreme quantum regime using as an example the quasi-rigid methane molecule and its highly fluxional protonated cousin, CH5 (+). We show that the PIGLET technique gives a speedup of two orders of magnitude in the evaluation of structural observables and quantum kinetic energy at ultralow temperatures. Moreover, we computed the spatial spread of the quantum nuclei in CH4 to illustrate the limits of using such colored noise thermostats close to the many body quantum ground state.

  20. Early and transient stages of Cu oxidation: Atomistic insights from theoretical simulations and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Zou, Lianfeng; Zhou, Guangwen; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Judith C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of metal oxidation is critical to corrosion control, catalysis synthesis, and advanced materials engineering. Although, metal oxidation process is rather complicated, different processes, many of them coupled, are involved from the onset of reaction. Since first introduced, there has been great success in applying heteroepitaxial theory to the oxide growth on a metal surface as demonstrated in the Cu oxidation experiments. In this paper, we review the recent progress in experimental findings on Cu oxidation as well as the advances in the theoretical simulations of the Cu oxidation process. We focus on the effects of defects such as step edges, present on realistic metal surfaces, on the oxide growth dynamics. We show that the surface steps can change the mass transport of both Cu and O atoms during oxide growth, and ultimately lead to the formation of different oxide morphology. We also review the oxidation of Cu alloys and explore the effect of a secondary element to the oxide growth on a Cu surface. From the review of the work on Cu oxidation, we demonstrate the correlation of theoretical simulations at multiple scales with various experimental techniques.

  1. A Coarse-Grained DNA Model Parameterized from Atomistic Simulations by Inverse Monte Carlo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Korolev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer modeling of very large biomolecular systems, such as long DNA polyelectrolytes or protein-DNA complex-like chromatin cannot reach all-atom resolution in a foreseeable future and this necessitates the development of coarse-grained (CG approximations. DNA is both highly charged and mechanically rigid semi-flexible polymer and adequate DNA modeling requires a correct description of both its structural stiffness and salt-dependent electrostatic forces. Here, we present a novel CG model of DNA that approximates the DNA polymer as a chain of 5-bead units. Each unit represents two DNA base pairs with one central bead for bases and pentose moieties and four others for phosphate groups. Charges, intra- and inter-molecular force field potentials for the CG DNA model were calculated using the inverse Monte Carlo method from all atom molecular dynamic (MD simulations of 22 bp DNA oligonucleotides. The CG model was tested by performing dielectric continuum Langevin MD simulations of a 200 bp double helix DNA in solutions of monovalent salt with explicit ions. Excellent agreement with experimental data was obtained for the dependence of the DNA persistent length on salt concentration in the range 0.1–100 mM. The new CG DNA model is suitable for modeling various biomolecular systems with adequate description of electrostatic and mechanical properties.

  2. Micron-scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Void Collapse and Hotspot Growth in PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Material defects and other heterogeneities such as dislocations, micro-porosity, and grain boundaries play key roles in the shock-induced initiation of detonation in energetic materials. We performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of nanoscale voids on hotspot growth and initiation in micron-scale pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) crystals under weak shock loading (Up = 1.25 km/s; Us = 4.5 km/s). We used the ReaxFF potential implemented in LAMMPS. We built a pseudo-2D PETN crystal with dimensions 0.3 μm × 0.22 μm × 1.3 nm containing a 20 nm cylindrical void. Once the initial shockwave traversed the entire sample, the shock-front absorbing boundary condition was applied, allowing the simulation to continue beyond 1 nanosecond. Results show an exponentially increasing hotspot growth rate. The hotspot morphology is initially symmetric about the void axis, but strong asymmetry develops at later times, due to strong coupling between exothermic chemistry, temperature, and divergent secondary shockwaves emanating from the collapsing void. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Superlattice of stress domains in nanometer-size semiconductor devices predicted from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Kodiyalam, Sanjay; Madhukar, Anupam; Nakano, Aiichiro; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Walsh, Phillip; Vashishta, Priya

    2001-03-01

    Semiconductor industry association estimates pixel sizes in next generation devices to be on the order of 70 nm by the year of 2008. Although recent measurements of local strain distributions2 and strain relaxation in nano wires have reached 100-nm spatial resolution, experimental tools for determining stresses for sub 100 nm, feature sizes are still to be developed4. On the other hand, recent developments in efficient simulation algorithms on state-of-the-art parallel computers5 enable us to gain valuable information on interface structure and atomic level stresses in nanopixels of < 100 nm size. Here, we present results for a 27.5-million atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a 70 nm x 70 nm crystalline silicon nanopixel covered with amorphous silicon nitride and placed on a 140 nm x 140 nm crystalline silicon substrate. The stresses parallel to the silicon/silicon nitride interface exhibit a hexagonal superlattice of stress domains with a lattice constant of 12.8 (±1.8) nm. From our analysis of the 70 nm x 70 nm pixel and on comparing with a smaller 25 nm x 25 nm nanopixel, we conclude that for square pixels the superlattice constant is independent of the pixel size and is entirely determined by the mismatch between silicon and silicon nitride. Such stress inhomogeneity with values of up to ±2 GPa will have a significant impact on the performance of semiconductor devices with sub 100 nm features.

  4. Harnessing atomistic simulations to predict the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroukhani, S.; Nguyen, L. D.; Leung, K. W. K.; Singh, C. V.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles is key to understanding the microscopic features that govern the plastic flow of modern alloys. In this spirit, the current manuscript examines the rate at which an edge dislocation overcomes an obstacle in aluminum. Predictions were made using different popular variants of Harmonic Transition State Theory (HTST) and compared to those of direct Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The HTST predictions were found to be grossly inaccurate due to the large entropy barrier associated with the dislocation-obstacle interaction. Considering the importance of finite temperature effects, the utility of the Finite Temperature String (FTS) method was then explored. While this approach was found capable of identifying a prominent reaction tube, it was not capable of computing the free energy profile along the tube. Lastly, the utility of the Transition Interface Sampling (TIS) approach was explored, which does not need a free energy profile and is known to be less reliant on the choice of reaction coordinate. The TIS approach was found capable of accurately predicting the rate, relative to direct MD simulations. This finding was utilized to examine the temperature and load dependence of the dislocation-obstacle interaction in a simple periodic cell configuration. An attractive rate prediction approach combining TST and simple continuum models is identified, and the strain rate sensitivity of individual dislocation obstacle interactions is predicted.

  5. Atomistic simulations of calcium uranyl(VI) carbonate adsorption on calcite and stepped-calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudou, Slimane; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2012-07-17

    Adsorption of actinyl ions onto mineral surfaces is one of the main mechanisms that control the migration of these ions in environmental systems. Here, we present computational classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the behavior of U(VI) in contact with different calcite surfaces. The calcium-uranyl-carbonate [Ca(2)UO(2)(CO(3))(3)] species is shown to display both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption to the flat {101̅4} and the stepped {314̅8} and {31̅2̅16} planes of calcite. Free energy calculations, using the umbrella sampling method, are employed to simulate adsorption paths of the same uranyl species on the different calcite surfaces under aqueous condition. Outer-sphere adsorption is found to dominate over inner-sphere adsorption because of the high free energy barrier of removing a uranyl-carbonate interaction and replacing it with a new uranyl-surface interaction. An important binding mode is proposed involving a single vicinal water monolayer between the surface and the sorbed complex. From the free energy profiles of the different calcite surfaces, the uranyl complex was also found to adsorb preferentially on the acute-stepped {314̅8} face of calcite, in agreement with experiment.

  6. Simulating surface-enhanced Raman optical activity using atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    Raman optical activity has proven to be a powerful tool for probing the geometry of small organic and biomolecules. It has therefore been expected that the same mechanisms responsible for surface-enhanced Raman scattering may allow for similar enhancements in surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA). However, SEROA has proved to be an experimental challenge and mirror-image SEROA spectra of enantiomers have so far not been measured. There exists a handful of theories to simulate SEROA, all of which treat the perturbed molecule as a point-dipole object. To go beyond these approximations, we present two new methods to simulate SEROA: the first is a dressed-tensors model that treats the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object; the second method is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which considers the entire charge density of the molecule. We show that although the first method is acceptable for small molecules, it fails for a medium-sized one such as 2-bromohexahelicene. We also show that the SEROA mode intensities and signs are highly sensitive to the nature of the local electric field and gradient, the orientation of the molecule, and the surface plasmon frequency width. Our findings give some insight into why experimental SEROA, and in particular observing mirror-image SEROA for enantiomers, has been difficult.

  7. Accelerated path integral methods for atomistic simulations at ultra-low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Felix; Marx, Dominik; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-08-01

    Path integral methods provide a rigorous and systematically convergent framework to include the quantum mechanical nature of atomic nuclei in the evaluation of the equilibrium properties of molecules, liquids, or solids at finite temperature. Such nuclear quantum effects are often significant for light nuclei already at room temperature, but become crucial at cryogenic temperatures such as those provided by superfluid helium as a solvent. Unfortunately, the cost of converged path integral simulations increases significantly upon lowering the temperature so that the computational burden of simulating matter at the typical superfluid helium temperatures becomes prohibitive. Here we investigate how accelerated path integral techniques based on colored noise generalized Langevin equations, in particular the so-called path integral generalized Langevin equation thermostat (PIGLET) variant, perform in this extreme quantum regime using as an example the quasi-rigid methane molecule and its highly fluxional protonated cousin, CH5+. We show that the PIGLET technique gives a speedup of two orders of magnitude in the evaluation of structural observables and quantum kinetic energy at ultralow temperatures. Moreover, we computed the spatial spread of the quantum nuclei in CH4 to illustrate the limits of using such colored noise thermostats close to the many body quantum ground state.

  8. Atomistic simulations of the Fe K-edge EXAFS in FeF3 using molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonane, Inga; Timoshenko, Janis; Kuzmin, Alexei

    2016-10-01

    Atomistic simulations of the experimental Fe K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of rhombohedral (space group R\\bar{3}c) FeF3 at T = 300 K were performed using classical molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) methods. The use of two complementary theoretical approaches allowed us to account accurately for thermal disorder effects in EXAFS and to validate the developed force-field model, which was constructed as a sum of two-body Buckingham-type (Fe-F and F-F), three-body harmonic (Fe-F-Fe) and Coulomb potentials. We found that the shape of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectrum of FeF3 is a more sensitive probe for the determination of potential parameters than the values of structural parameters (a, c, x(F)) available from diffraction studies. The best overall agreement between the experimental and theoretical EXAFS spectra calculated using ab initio multiple-scattering approach was obtained for the iron effective charge q(Fe) = 1.71. The RMC method coupled with the evolutionary algorithm was used for more elaborate analysis of the EXAFS data. The obtained results suggest that our force-field model slightly underestimates the amplitude of thermal vibrations of fluorine atoms in the direction perpendicular to the Fe-F bonds.

  9. The Glycan Role in the Glycopeptide Immunogenicity Revealed by Atomistic Simulations and Spectroscopic Experiments on the Multiple Sclerosis Biomarker CSF114(Glc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Agostino; Scrima, Mario; Novellino, Ettore; D'Errico, Gerardino; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-03-01

    Glycoproteins are often recognized as not-self molecules by antibodies triggering the onset of severe autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Thus, the development of antigen-mimicking biomarkers represents an attractive strategy for an early diagnosis of the disease. An example is the synthetic glycopeptide CSF114(Glc), which was designed and tested as MS biomarker and whose clinical application was limited by its reduced ability to detect autoantibodies in MS patients. In the attempt to improve the efficacy of CSF114(Glc), we have characterized all the events leading to the final binding of the biomarker to the autoantibody using atomistic simulations, ESR and NMR experiments. The glycosydic moiety plays a primary role in the whole process. In particular, in an environment mimicking that used in the clinical tests the glycopeptide assumes a α-helix structure that is functional for the interaction with the antibody. In this conformation CSF114(Glc) binds the monoclonal antibody mAb8-18C5 similarly to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG, which is a known MS auto-antigen, thus explaining its diagnostic activity. Our study offers new molecular bases to design more effective biomarkers and provides a most valid protocol to investigate other systems where the environment effect is determinant for the biological activity.

  10. Structure Based Modeling of Small Molecules Binding to the TLR7 by Atomistic Level Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gentile

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-Like Receptors (TLR are a large family of proteins involved in the immune system response. Both the activation and the inhibition of these receptors can have positive effects on several diseases, including viral pathologies and cancer, therefore prompting the development of new compounds. In order to provide new indications for the design of Toll-Like Receptor 7 (TLR7-targeting drugs, the mechanism of interaction between the TLR7 and two important classes of agonists (imidazoquinoline and adenine derivatives was investigated through docking and Molecular Dynamics simulations. To perform the computational analysis, a new model for the dimeric form of the receptors was necessary and therefore created. Qualitative and quantitative differences between agonists and inactive compounds were determined. The in silico results were compared with previous experimental observations and employed to define the ligand binding mechanism of TLR7.

  11. Advantages and challenges in coupling an ideal gas to atomistic models in adaptive resolution simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, K.; Fogarty, A. C.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2015-09-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations, molecular fluids are modeled employing different levels of resolution in different subregions of the system. When traveling from one region to the other, particles change their resolution on the fly. One of the main advantages of such approaches is the computational efficiency gained in the coarse-grained region. In this respect the best coarse-grained system to employ in the low resolution region would be the ideal gas, making intermolecular force calculations in the coarse-grained subdomain redundant. In this case, however, a smooth coupling is challenging due to the high energetic imbalance between typical liquids and a system of non-interacting particles. In the present work, we investigate this approach, using as a test case the most biologically relevant fluid, water. We demonstrate that a successful coupling of water to the ideal gas can be achieved with current adaptive resolution methods, and discuss the issues that remain to be addressed.

  12. Atomistic simulation of fcc-bcc phase transition in single crystal A1 under uniform compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Shao Jian-Li; Li Yan-Fang; Duan Su-Qing; [ Liang Jiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    By molecular dynamics simulations employing an embedded atom model potential,we investigate the fcc-to-bcc phase transition in single crystal Al,caused by uniform compression.Results show that the fec structure is unstable when the pressure is over 250 GPa,in reasonable agreement with the calculated value through the density functional theory.The morphology evolution of the structural transition and the corresponding transition mechanism are analysed in detail.The bec (011) planes are transited from the fcc (11(1)) plane and the (1(1)1) plane.We suggest that the transition mechanism consists mainly of compression,shear,slid and rotation of the lattice.In addition,our radial distribution function analysis explicitly indicates the phase transition of A1 from fcc phase to bcc structure.

  13. Investigation of the thermal stability of Cu nanowires using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granberg, F.; Parviainen, S., E-mail: stefan.parviainen@helsinki.fi; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2014-06-07

    We present a method for determining the melting point of copper nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics simulations and use it to investigate the dependence of the melting point on wire diameter. The melting point is determined as the temperature at which there is a significant change in the fraction of liquid atoms in the wire, according to atomic bond angle analysis. The results for the wires with diameters in the range 1.5 nm to 20 nm show that the melting point is inversely proportional to the diameter while the cross-sectional shape of the wire does not have a significant impact. Comparison of results obtained using different potentials show that while the absolute values of the melting points may differ substantially, the melting point depression is similar for all potentials. The obtained results are consistent with predictions based on the semi-empirical liquid drop model.

  14. HBP Builder: A Tool to Generate Hyperbranched Polymers and Hyperbranched Multi-Arm Copolymers for Coarse-grained and Fully Atomistic Molecular Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyang; Ma, Li; Li, Shanlong; Tan, Haina; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-01

    Computer simulation has been becoming a versatile tool that can investigate detailed information from the microscopic scale to the mesoscopic scale. However, the crucial first step of molecular simulation is model building, particularly for hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) and hyperbranched multi-arm copolymers (HBMCs) with complex and various topological structures. Unlike well-defined polymers, not only the molar weight of HBPs/HBMCs with polydispersity, but the HBPs/HBMCs with the same degree of polymerization (DP) and degree of branching (DB) also have many possible topological structures, thus making difficulties for user to build model in molecular simulation. In order to build a bridge between model building and molecular simulation of HBPs and HBMCs, we developed HBP Builder, a C language open source HBPs/HBMCs building toolkit. HBP Builder implements an automated protocol to build various coarse-grained and fully atomistic structures of HBPs/HBMCs according to user’s specific requirements. Meanwhile, coarse-grained and fully atomistic output structures can be directly employed in popular simulation packages, including HOOMD, Tinker and Gromacs. Moreover, HBP Builder has an easy-to-use graphical user interface and the modular architecture, making it easy to extend and reuse it as a part of other program.

  15. Orientation dependence of structural transition in fcc Al driven under uniaxial compression by atomistic simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Shao Jian-Li; Duan Su-Qing; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2011-01-01

    By molecular dynamics simulations employing an embedded atom method potential, we have investigated structural transformations in single crystal Al caused by uniaxial strain loading along the[001],[011]and[111]directions.We find that the structural transition is strongly dependent on the crystal orientations. The entire structure phase transition only occurs when loading along the[001]direction, and the increased amplitude of temperature for[001]loading is evidently lower than that for other orientations. The morphology evolutions of the structural transition for [011]and[111]loadings are analysed in detail. The results indicate that only 20% of atoms transit to the hcp phase for[011]and[111]loadings, and the appearance of the hcp phase is due to the partial dislocation moving forward on {111}fcc family. For[011]loading, the hcp phase grows to form laminar morphology in four planes, which belong to the{111}fcc family;while for[111]loading, the hcp phase grows into a laminar structure in three planes, which belong to the {111}fcc family except for the(111)plane. In addition, the phase transition is evaluated by using the radial distribution functions.

  16. Atomistic simulation of the point defects in TaW ordered alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhong-Liang Lin; Jian-Min Zhang; Yan Zhang; Vincent Ji

    2011-01-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with modified analytic embeddedatom method (MAEAM), the formation, migration and activation energies of the point defects for six-kind migration mechanisms in B2-type TaW alloy have been investigated. The results showed that the anti-site defects TaW and WTa were easier to form than Ta and W vacancies owing to their lower formation energies. Comparing the migration and activation energies needed for six-kind migration mechanisms of a Ta (or W) vacancy, we found that one nearest-neighbour jump (1NNJ) was the most favourable because of its lowest migration and activation energies, but it would lead to a disorder in the alloy. One next-nearest-neighbour jump (1NNNJ) and one third-nearest-neighbour jump (1TNNJ) could maintain the ordered property of the alloy but required higher migration and activation energies. So the 1NNNJ and 1TNNJ should be replaced by straight [100] six nearestneighbor cyclic jumps (S[100]6NNCJ) (especially) or bent [100] six nearest-neighbour cyclic jumps (B[100]6NNCJ) and [110] six nearest-neighbor cyclic jumps ([110]6NNCJ), respectively.

  17. Atomistic Simulations of Helium Clustering and Grain Boundary Reconstruction in Alpha-Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation and clustering of He atoms at Σ3 <110> {112} and Σ73b<110>{661} grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe, as well as their effects on GB reconstruction, have been investigated using atomic-level computer simulations. The accumulation of He atoms and the evolution of the GB structure all depend on local He concentration, temperature and the original GB structure. At a local He concentration of 1%, small He clusters are formed in the Σ3 GB, accompanied by the emission of single self-interstitial Fe atoms (SIAs). At a He concentration of 5%, a large number of SIAs are emitted from He clusters in the Σ3 GB and collect at the periphery of these clusters. The SIAs eventually form <100> dislocation loops between two He clusters. It is likely that impurities may promote the formation of <100> loops and enhance their stabilities in α-Fe. At a He concentration of 10%, the large number of emitted SIAs are able to rearrange themselves, forming a new GB plane within the Σ3 GB, which results in self-healing of the GB and leads to GB migration. In contrast to the Σ3 GB, He clusters are mainly formed along the GB dislocation lines in the Σ73b, and the emitted SIAs accumulate at the cores of the GB dislocations, leading to the climb of the dislocations within the GB plane. As compared to bulk Fe, a higher number density of clusters form at GBs, but the average cluster size is smaller. The product of cluster density and average cluster size is roughly constant at a given He level, and is about the same in bulk and GB regions and varies linearly with the He concentration.

  18. Microchemical effects in irradiated Fe–Cr alloys as revealed by atomistic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malerba, L., E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D. [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Zhurkin, E.E. [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, K-89, Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hou, M. [Physique des Solides Irradiés et des Nanostructures CP234, Faculté des Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Vörtler, K.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Neutron irradiation produces evolving nanostructural defects in materials, that affect their macroscopic properties. Defect production and evolution is expected to be influenced by the chemical composition of the material. In turn, the accumulation of defects in the material results in microchemical changes, which may induce further changes in macroscopic properties. In this work we review the results of recent atomic-level simulations conducted in Fe–Cr alloys, as model materials for high-Cr ferritic–martensitic steels, to address the following questions: 1. Is the primary damage produced in displacement cascades influenced by the Cr content? If so, how? 2. Does Cr change the stability of radiation-produced defects? 3. Is the diffusivity of cascade-produced defects changed by Cr content? 4. How do Cr atoms redistribute under irradiation inside the material under the action of thermodynamic driving forces and radiation-defect fluxes? It is found that the presence of Cr does not influence the type of damage created by displacement cascades, as compared to pure Fe, while cascades do contribute to redistributing Cr, in the same direction as thermodynamic driving forces. The presence of Cr does change the stability of point-defects: the effect is weak in the case of vacancies, stronger in the case of self-interstitials. In the latter case, Cr increases the stability of self-interstitial clusters, especially those so small to be invisible to the electron microscope. Cr reduces also significantly the diffusivity of self-interstitials and their clusters, in a way that depends in a non-monotonic way on Cr content, as well as on cluster size and temperature; however, the effect is negligible on the mobility of self-interstitial clusters large enough to become visible dislocation loops. Finally, Cr-rich precipitate formation is favoured in the tensile region of edge dislocations, while it appears not to be influenced by screw dislocations; prismatic dislocation loops

  19. Accelerating molecular Monte Carlo simulations using distance and orientation dependent energy tables: tuning from atomistic accuracy to smoothed “coarse-grained” models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, S.; Zuckerman, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Typically, the most time consuming part of any atomistic molecular simulation is due to the repeated calculation of distances, energies and forces between pairs of atoms. However, many molecules contain nearly rigid multi-atom groups such as rings and other conjugated moieties, whose rigidity can be exploited to significantly speed up computations. The availability of GB-scale random-access memory (RAM) offers the possibility of tabulation (pre-calculation) of distance and orientation-dependent interactions among such rigid molecular bodies. Here, we perform an investigation of this energy tabulation approach for a fluid of atomistic – but rigid – benzene molecules at standard temperature and density. In particular, using O(1) GB of RAM, we construct an energy look-up table which encompasses the full range of allowed relative positions and orientations between a pair of whole molecules. We obtain a hardware-dependent speed-up of a factor of 24-50 as compared to an ordinary (“exact”) Monte Carlo simulation and find excellent agreement between energetic and structural properties. Second, we examine the somewhat reduced fidelity of results obtained using energy tables based on much less memory use. Third, the energy table serves as a convenient platform to explore potential energy smoothing techniques, akin to coarse-graining. Simulations with smoothed tables exhibit near atomistic accuracy while increasing diffusivity. The combined speed-up in sampling from tabulation and smoothing exceeds a factor of 100. For future applications greater speed-ups can be expected for larger rigid groups, such as those found in biomolecules. PMID:22120971

  20. Atomistic Simulations of Thermophoretic Motion of water Nanodroplets in Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    tension (Marangoni effect), pressure gradients, and thermophoresis. Hence, electrophoresis has been used for driving electrically charged particles in nanosystems and gradients in the surface tension have been exploited to drive flow through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) immersed into a lipid membrane Pressure...... fabricated nanomotors, and thermodiffusion is expected to allow microscale manipulation and control of flow in nanofluidic devices. In a recent theoretical study, thermophoresis was shown to induce motion of solid gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes. In the present investigation, we study...

  1. Martensitic transformation during coalescence of Fe-Ni nanoparticles. Atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkina, L. E.; Karkin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Martensitic transformation during coalescence of two Fe-20 at.% Ni nanoparticles of size d ∼3-7 nm has been studied using molecular dynamics. Orientation relationship analysis showed that Kurdyumov-Sachs orientation relationship was observed between the initial γ-phase and the final α phase (at T = 0 K) for all of the studied cases of misorientation. A significant change in the type of contact boundaries between the two nanoparticles was obtained after the completion of the martensitic transformation, which was caused by a change in the indices of the misorientation axis of the particles and in the number of symmetry elements for it.

  2. Structure And Mobilities Of Tungsten Grain Boundaries Calculated From Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies and mobilities of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  3. Thermodynamic and morphological analysis of large silicon self-interstitial clusters using atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Claire Y.; Sattler, Andreas; Sinno, Talid

    2015-04-01

    We study computationally the formation of thermodynamics and morphology of silicon self-interstitial clusters using a suite of methods driven by a recent parameterization of the Tersoff empirical potential. Formation free energies and cluster capture zones are computed across a wide range of cluster sizes (2 disordered, three-dimensional configurations, or one of two macroscopically distinct planar configurations. The latter correspond to the well-known Frank and perfect dislocation loops observed experimentally in ion-implanted silicon. The relative importance of the different cluster morphologies is a function of cluster size and temperature and is dictated by a balance between energetic and entropic forces. The competition between these thermodynamic forces produces a sharp transition between the three-dimensional and planar configurations, and represents a type of order-disorder transition. By contrast, the smaller state space available to smaller clusters restricts the diversity of possible structures and inhibits this morphological transition.

  4. Thermodynamic and morphological analysis of large silicon self-interstitial clusters using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Claire Y.; Sinno, Talid, E-mail: talid@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sattler, Andreas [Siltronic AG, Hanns-Seidel-Platz 4, D-81737 München (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    We study computationally the formation of thermodynamics and morphology of silicon self-interstitial clusters using a suite of methods driven by a recent parameterization of the Tersoff empirical potential. Formation free energies and cluster capture zones are computed across a wide range of cluster sizes (2 < N{sub i} < 150) and temperatures (0.65 < T/T{sub m} < 1). Self-interstitial clusters above a critical size (N{sub i} ∼ 25) are found to exhibit complex morphological behavior in which clusters can assume either a variety of disordered, three-dimensional configurations, or one of two macroscopically distinct planar configurations. The latter correspond to the well-known Frank and perfect dislocation loops observed experimentally in ion-implanted silicon. The relative importance of the different cluster morphologies is a function of cluster size and temperature and is dictated by a balance between energetic and entropic forces. The competition between these thermodynamic forces produces a sharp transition between the three-dimensional and planar configurations, and represents a type of order-disorder transition. By contrast, the smaller state space available to smaller clusters restricts the diversity of possible structures and inhibits this morphological transition.

  5. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  6. Atomistic studies of grain boundaries and heterophase interfaces in alloys and compounds. Final report, July 1987-August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, Vaclav

    1998-08-01

    The overarching goal of the research supported by this grant was investigation of the structure and properties of interfaces in multicomponent systems by atomistic modeling. Initially, the research was devoted to studies of segregation to grain boundaries in binary disordered alloys. The next step was then studies of the structure and properties of grain boundaries in ordered compounds, specifically Ni3Al and NiAl, and grain boundary segregation in these compounds in the case of off-stoichiometry. Finally, the structure of Nb/sapphire interfaces, in particular the core configurations of the misfit dislocations, was studied.

  7. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, JOhn W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 are candidate materials for applications in extreme environments because of their high melting point, good mechanical properties and reasonable oxidation resistance. Unlike many ceramics, these materials have high thermal conductivity which can be advantageous, for example, to reduce thermal shock. Recently, we developed Tersoff style interatomic potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  8. Molecular and intermolecular effects in collagen fibril mechanics: a multiscale analytical model compared with atomistic and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Both atomistic and experimental studies reveal the dependence of collagen fibril mechanics on biochemical and biophysical features such as, for instance, cross-link density, water content and protein sequence. In order to move toward a multiscale structural description of biological tissues, a novel analytical model for collagen fibril mechanics is herein presented. The model is based on a multiscale approach that incorporates and couples: thermal fluctuations in collagen molecules; the uncoiling of collagen triple helix; the stretching of molecular backbone; the straightening of the telopeptide in which covalent cross-links form; slip-pulse mechanisms due to the rupture of intermolecular weak bonds; molecular interstrand delamination due to the rupture of intramolecular weak bonds; the rupture of covalent bonds within molecular strands. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with available atomistic results and experimental data, highlighting the importance of cross-link density in tuning collagen fibril mechanics. The typical three-region shape and hysteresis behavior of fibril constitutive response, as well as the transition from a yielding-like to a brittle-like behavior, are recovered with a special insight on the underlying nanoscale mechanisms. The model is based on parameters with a clear biophysical and biochemical meaning, resulting in a promising tool for analyzing the effect of pathological or pharmacological-induced histochemical alterations on the functional mechanical response of collagenous tissues.

  9. Atomistic deformation mechanisms in twinned copper nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jianjun; Niu, Xinrui; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Gangfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we perform molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the compression response and atomistic deformation mechanisms of twinned nanospheres. The relationship between load and compression depth is calculated for various twin spacing and loading directions. Then, the overall elastic properties and the underlying plastic deformation mechanisms are illuminated. Twin boundaries (TBs) act as obstacles to dislocation motion and lead to strengthening. As the loading direction varies, the plastic deformation transfers from dislocations intersecting with TBs, slipping parallel to TBs, and then to being restrained by TBs. The strengthening of TBs depends strongly on the twin spacing.

  10. Atomistic Mechanisms of Fatigue in Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; Willemann, M.; Hyde, B.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the mechanisms of fatigue behavior in nanocrystalline metals at the atomic scale using empirical force laws and molecular level simulations. A combination of molecular statics and molecular dynamics was used to deal with the time scale limitations of molecular dynamics. We show that the main atomistic mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in these materials is the formation of nanovoids ahead of the main crack. The results obtained for crack advance as a function of stress intensity amplitude are consistent with experimental studies and a Paris law exponent of about 2.

  11. Atomistic MD simulation reveals the mechanism by which CETP penetrates into HDL enabling lipid transfer from HDL to CETP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilpa-Karhu, Geraldine; Jauhiainen, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP), a protein mediating transfer of neutral lipids between lipoproteins, has been proposed as a means to elevate atheroprotective HDL subpopulations and thereby reduce atherosclerosis. However, off-target and adverse effects of the inhibition have raised doubts about the molecular mechanism of CETP-HDL interaction. Recent experimental findings have demonstrated the penetration of CETP into HDL. However, atomic level resolution of CETP penetration into HDL, a prerequisite for a better understanding of CETP functionality and HDL atheroprotection, is missing. We constructed an HDL particle that mimics the actual human HDL mass composition and investigated for the first time, by large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics, the interaction of an upright CETP with a human HDL-mimicking model. The results demonstrated how CETP can penetrate the HDL particle surface, with the formation of an opening in the N barrel domain end of CETP, put in evidence the major anchoring role of a tryptophan-rich region of this domain, and unveiled the presence of a phenylalanine barrier controlling further access of HDL-derived lipids to the tunnel of CETP. The findings reveal novel atomistic details of the CETP-HDL interaction mechanism and can provide new insight into therapeutic strategies. PMID:25424006

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Surface Diffusion : Atomistic and Collective Processes

    CERN Document Server

    1997-01-01

    The interest in the problem of surface diffusion has been steadily growing over the last fifteen years. This is clearly evident from the increase in the number of papers dealing with the problem, the development of new experimental techniques, and the specialized sessions focusing on diffusion in national and international meetings. Part of the driving force behind this increasing activity is our recently acquired ability to observe and possibly control atomic scale phenomena. It is now possible to look selectively at individual atomistic processes and to determine their relative importance during growth and reactions at surfaces. The number of researchers interested in this problem also has been growing steadily which generates the need for a good reference source to farniliarize newcomers to the problem. While the recent emphasis is on the role of diffusion during growth, there is also continuing progress on the more traditional aspects of the problem describing mass transport in an ensemble of particles. S...

  13. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement...

  14. Characterization and quantification of the role of coherence in ultrafast quantum biological experiments using quantum master equations, atomistic simulations, and quantum process tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Rebentrost, Patrick; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2010-01-01

    Long-lived electronic coherences in various photosynthetic complexes at cryogenic and room temperature have generated vigorous efforts both in theory and experiment to understand their origins and explore their potential role to biological function. The ultrafast signals resulting from the experiments that show evidence for these coherences result from many contributions to the molecular polarization. Quantum process tomography (QPT) was conceived in the context of quantum information processing to characterize and understand general quantum evolution of controllable quantum systems, for example while carrying out quantum computational tasks. We introduce our QPT method for ultrafast experiments, and as an illustrative example, apply it to a simulation of a two-chromophore subsystem of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex, which was recently shown to have long-lived quantum coherences. Our Fenna-Matthews-Olson model is constructed using an atomistic approach to extract relevant parameters for the s...

  15. Systematic Structural Change in Selected Rare Earth Oxide Pyrochlores as Determined by Wide-Angle CBED and a Comparison with the Results of Atomistic Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Yasunori; Withers, Ray L.; Minervini, Licia; Grimes, Robin W.

    2000-08-01

    An unknown oxygen atom fractional co-ordinate characteristic of the pyrochlore structure type has been determined for selected rare earth zirconate and titanate pyrochlores via a systematic row wide-angle CBED technique and shown to vary systematically with rare earth ion size. In the case of the titanate pyrochlore Gd2Ti2O7, the obtained results contrast with previously published X-ray results. Atomistic computer simulation is used to predict the value of the same parameter for a wide range of oxide pyrochlores. Comparison of calculated values with experimentally determined values shows that the general trends are correctly predicted although there appears to be systematic underestimation of both the observed values (by approximately 0.007) as well as their rate of change with rare earth ion size. Cation anti-site disorder is proposed as the origin of these discrepancies.

  16. Three-dimensional stress field around a membrane protein: atomistic and coarse-grained simulation analysis of gramicidin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Cui, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    Using both atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) models, we compute the three-dimensional stress field around a gramicidin A (gA) dimer in lipid bilayers that feature different degrees of negative hydrophobic mismatch. The general trends in the computed stress field are similar at the atomistic and CG levels, supporting the use of the CG model for analyzing the mechanical features of protein/lipid/water interfaces. The calculations reveal that the stress field near the protein-lipid interface exhibits a layered structure with both significant repulsive and attractive regions, with the magnitude of the stress reaching 1000 bar in certain regions. Analysis of density profiles and stress field distributions helps highlight the Trp residues at the protein/membrane/water interface as mechanical anchors, suggesting that similar analysis is useful for identifying tension sensors in other membrane proteins, especially membrane proteins involved in mechanosensation. This work fosters a connection between microscopic and continuum mechanics models for proteins in complex environments and makes it possible to test the validity of assumptions commonly made in continuum mechanics models for membrane mediated processes. For example, using the calculated stress field, we estimate the free energy of membrane deformation induced by the hydrophobic mismatch, and the results for regions beyond the annular lipids are in general consistent with relevant experimental data and previous theoretical estimates using elasticity theory. On the other hand, the assumptions of homogeneous material properties for the membrane and a bilayer thickness at the protein/lipid interface being independent of lipid type (e.g., tail length) appear to be oversimplified, highlighting the importance of annular lipids of membrane proteins. Finally, the stress field analysis makes it clear that the effect of even rather severe hydrophobic mismatch propagates to only about two to three lipid layers, thus putting a

  17. An Atomistic-Scale Study for Thermal Conductivity and Thermochemical Compatibility in (DyY)Zr2O7 Combining an Experimental Approach with Theoretical Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liu; Choy, Kwang-Leong; Wheatley, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic oxides that have high-temperature capabilities can be deposited on the superalloy components in aero engines and diesel engines to advance engine efficiency and reduce fuel consumption. This paper aims to study doping effects of Dy3+ and Y3+on the thermodynamic properties of ZrO2 synthesized via a sol-gel route for a better control of the stoichiometry, combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the calculation of theoretical properties. The thermal conductivity is investigated by the MD simulation and Clarke’s model. This can improve the understanding of the microstructure and thermodynamic properties of (DyY)Zr2O7 (DYZ) at the atomistic level. The phonon-defect scattering and phonon-phonon scattering processes are investigated via the theoretical calculation, which provides an effective way to study thermal transport properties of ionic oxides. The measured and predicted thermal conductivity of DYZ is lower than that of 4 mol % Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (4YSZ). It is discovered that DYZ is thermochemically compatible with Al2O3 at 1300 °C, whereas at 1350 °C DYZ reacts with Al2O3 forming a small amount of new phases.

  18. An atomistic modelling of the porosity impact on UO{sub 2} matrix macroscopic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelea, A., E-mail: andrei.jelea@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Institute of Physical Chemistry Ilie Murgulescu, Romanian Academy, 202 Spl Independentei St., 060021 Bucharest-12 (Romania); Colbert, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Ribeiro, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Treglia, G. [Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Pellenq, R.J.-M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > The porosity impact on the UO{sub 2} matrix thermomechanical properties was investigated. > Atomistic simulation techniques were used in this study. > The UO{sub 2} thermal expansion coefficient is modified due to the pore surface effects. > The elastic moduli at 0 K and at finite temperature decrease linearly with porosity. - Abstract: The porosity impact on the UO{sub 2} matrix thermomechanical properties was investigated using atomistic simulation techniques. The porosity modifies the thermal expansion coefficient and this is attributed to pore surface effects. The elastic moduli at 0 K and at finite temperature decrease with porosity, this variation being well approximated using affine functions. These results agree with other mesoscale model predictions and experimental data, showing the ability of the semiempirical potential atomistic simulations to give an overall good description of the porous UO{sub 2}. However, the surface effects are incompletely described.

  19. Atomistic simulation and ab initio study of the defect structure of spinel-related Li{sub 0.5−0.5x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5−0.5x}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widatallah, H.M., E-mail: hishammw@squ.edu.om [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, Al-Khoudh, 123 Muscat (Oman); Moore, E.A. [Department of Life, Health and Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Babo, A.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, PO Box 123, Khartoum 11115 (Sudan); Al-Barwani, M.S.; Elzain, M. [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, Al-Khoudh, 123 Muscat (Oman)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Unit cell of Li0{sub 5−0.5x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5−0.5x}O{sub 4}, showing the lowest energy structure obtained using interatomic potential and DFT ab initio calculations. Large white spheres O{sup 2−}; small light grey spheres Mg{sup 2+} (evenly substituting of Li{sup +} and Fe{sup 3+} at octahedral sites); small dark grey spheres Fe{sup 3+}; small black spheres Li{sup +}. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Defect structure of Li{sub 0.5−0.5x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5−x}O{sub 4} is studied with atomistic and DFT methods. ► 19 possible defect structure models with ∼60 defect configurations are investigated. ► The most favourable model found is when Mg{sup 2+} ions evenly replace Li{sup +} and octahedral Fe{sup 3+}. ► This defect structure decreases the magnetisation relative to that of Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4}. ► Experimentally-deduced models, at variance with the one obtained here, are discussed. -- Abstract: The position of magnesium ions in Mg{sup 2+}-doped lithium ferrite of the composition Li{sub 0.5−0.5x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5−0.5x}O{sub 4}, which has been a matter of uncertainty among some experimentalists, is investigated using interatomic potential and ab initio DFT calculations. Among possible 19 defect structure models, some of which have been reported experimentally to be the most favorable, the lowest energy is found for Mg{sup 2+} ions evenly replacing Li{sup +} and Fe{sup 3+} ion on octahedral sites. This gives a decrease in magnetisation for the Mg{sup 2+}-doped ferrite relative to the un-doped lithium ferrite. The results suggest that some experimental observations of increased magnetisation of spinel lithium ferrite on Mg{sup 2+}-doping could be due to substitution of Mg{sup 2+} or Li{sup +} on tetrahedral sites at the high temperatures used in preparation of the solid and/or the presence of undetected defects in the initial precursors.

  20. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  1. Atomistic simulation of tantalum nanoindentation: Effects of indenter diameter, penetration velocity, and interatomic potentials on defect mechanisms and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruestes, C.J., E-mail: cjruestes@hotmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Stukowski, A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 (Germany); Tang, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tramontina, D.R. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Erhart, P. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Gothenburg 41296 (Sweden); Remington, B.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Urbassek, H.M. [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Meyers, M.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Bringa, E.M. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2014-09-08

    Nanoindentation simulations are a helpful complement to experiments. There is a dearth of nanoindentation simulations for bcc metals, partly due to the lack of computationally efficient and reliable interatomic potentials at large strains. We carry out indentation simulations for bcc tantalum using three different interatomic potentials and present the defect mechanisms responsible for the creation and expansion of the plastic deformation zone: twins are initially formed, giving rise to shear loop expansion and the formation of sequential prismatic loops. The calculated elastic constants as function of pressure as well as stacking fault energy surfaces explain the significant differences found in the defect structures generated for the three potentials investigated in this study. The simulations enable the quantification of total dislocation length and twinning fraction. The indenter velocity is varied and, as expected, the penetration depth for the first pop-in (defect emission) event shows a strain rate sensitivity m in the range of 0.037–0.055. The effect of indenter diameter on the first pop-in is discussed. A new intrinsic length-scale model is presented based on the profile of the residual indentation and geometrically necessary dislocation theory.

  2. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study of atomic layer deposition derived from density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2014-01-30

    To describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4 and H2O, a three-dimensional on-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo model is developed. In this model, all atomistic reaction pathways in density functional theory (DFT) are implemented as reaction events on the lattice. This contains all steps, from the early stage of adsorption of each ALD precursor, kinetics of the surface protons, interaction between the remaining precursors (steric effect), influence of remaining fragments on adsorption sites (blocking), densification of each ALD precursor, migration of each ALD precursors, and cooperation between the remaining precursors to adsorb H2O (cooperative effect). The essential chemistry of the ALD reactions depends on the local environment at the surface. The coordination number and a neighbor list are used to implement the dependencies. The validity and necessity of the proposed reaction pathways are statistically established at the mesoscale. The formation of one monolayer of precursor fragments is shown at the end of the metal pulse. Adsorption and dissociation of the H2O precursor onto that layer is described, leading to the delivery of oxygen and protons to the surface during the H2O pulse. Through these processes, the remaining precursor fragments desorb from the surface, leaving the surface with bulk-like and OH-terminated HfO2, ready for the next cycle. The migration of the low coordinated remaining precursor fragments is also proposed. This process introduces a slow reordering motion (crawling) at the mesoscale, leading to the smooth and conformal thin film that is characteristic of ALD.

  3. Atomistic study of multimechanism diffusion by self-interstitial defects in -Fe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anento, Napoleon [Universitat Politechnica de Catalunia; Serra, Anna [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive molecular dynamics study of self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters containing up to 37 defects over a wide range of temperatures in iron. A long simulation time and high statistics of defect jumps allowed a detailed treatment of the data to be performed. Diffusion exhibits a change in mechanism from three-dimensional to one-dimensional for clusters of 4-7 SIAs. Stable sessile configurations present in the diffusion process are described and their influence on the diffusion parameters is discussed. Diffusion coefficients, correlation factors estimated, and mechanisms observed, are compared with previously published results, and the influence of the interatomic potential is considered.

  4. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  5. Combined atomistic-continuum model for simulation of laser interaction with metals: application in the calculation of melting thresholds in Ni targets of varying thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, D. S.; Zhigilei, L. V.

    The threshold laser fluence for the onset of surface melting is calculated for Ni films of different thicknesses and for a bulk Ni target using a combined atomistic-continuum computational model. The model combines the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method for simulation of non-equilibrium processes of lattice superheating and fast phase transformations with a continuum description of the laser excitation and subsequent relaxation of the conduction band electrons based on the two-temperature model (TTM). In the hybrid TTM-MD method, MD substitutes the TTM equation for the lattice temperature, and the diffusion equation for the electron temperature is solved simultaneously with MD integration of the equations of motion of atoms. The dependence of the threshold fluence on the film thickness predicted in TTM-MD simulations qualitatively agrees with TTM calculations, while the values of the thresholds for thick films and bulk targets are 10% higher in TTM-MD. The quantitative differences between the predictions of TTM and TTM-MD demonstrate that the kinetics of laser melting as well as the energy partitioning between the thermal energy of atomic vibrations and energy of the collective atomic motion driven by the relaxation of the laser-induced pressure should be taken into account in interpretation of experimental results on surface melting.

  6. Multiscale modeling for ferroelectric materials: identification of the phase-field model’s free energy for PZT from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Benjamin; Landis, Chad M.; Kamlah, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Within a knowledge-based multiscale simulation approach for ferroelectric materials, the atomic level can be linked to the mesoscale by transferring results from first-principles calculations into a phase-field model. A recently presented routine (Völker et al 2011 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 23 435-51) for adjusting the Helmholtz free energy coefficients to intrinsic and extrinsic ferroelectric material properties obtained by DFT calculations and atomistic simulations was subject to certain limitations: caused by too small available degrees of freedom, an independent adjustment of the spontaneous strains and piezoelectric coefficients was not possible, and the elastic properties could only be considered in cubic instead of tetragonal symmetry. In this work we overcome such restrictions by expanding the formulation of the free energy function, i.e. by motivating and introducing new higher-order terms that have not appeared in the literature before. Subsequently we present an improved version of the adjustment procedure for the free energy coefficients that is solely based on input parameters from first-principles calculations performed by Marton and Elsässer, as documented in Völker et al (2011 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 23 435-51). Full sets of adjusted free energy coefficients for PbTiO3 and tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 are presented, and the benefits of the newly introduced higher-order free energy terms are discussed.

  7. The alloying processes in solid–solid and liquid–solid Li–Pb interfaces with atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Xianglai [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Deng, Huiqiu; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hu, Wangyu, E-mail: wyuhu@hnu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • B2-LiPb forms in these three kinds of Li–Pb interfaces. • The nucleation of the B2-LiPb at the solid–solid Li–Pb interface is the earliest. • The B2-LiPb acts as a diffusion barrier. • The block Li in the critical interface sample collapses from distortion. • The interface width growth rate of the liquid–solid interface is the largest. - Abstract: The alloying processes of solid–solid (at 400 K) and liquid–solid (at 500 K) Li–Pb interfaces are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with embedded-atom method (EAM) potentials. As a comparison, a critical Li–Pb interface at 450 K near the melting point of Li is also studied. Three-stage feature, including the interface disordering, nucleation and growth of an intermetallic phase (B2-LiPb), has been clearly observed in these three cases. It is found that the alloying products are the same, however, the nucleation of the intermetallic phase at the solid–solid Li–Pb interface is earlier than that in the other two cases. The block Li in the solid–solid interface sample keeps the body-centered cubic structure during the course of simulation, while in the critical Li–Pb interface sample, it collapses from the excessive lattice distortion. As simulation time increasing, the interface widths increase gradually with decreasing growth rates, and the growth rate is the largest for the liquid–solid interface and the smallest for the solid–solid interface. The interface width of the solid–solid Li–Pb interface saturates at about 0.3 ns for the diffusion barrier—B2-LiPb almost traversed across the entire interface plane at that time.

  8. Atomistic study of a nanometer-scale pump based on the thermal ratchet concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey

    In this study, a novel concept of nanoscale pump fabricated using Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. The development of nanofluidic systems provides unprecedented possibilities for the control of biology and chemistry at the molecular level with potential applications in low energy cost devices...... of great interest in nanofluidics. Thermophoresisis the phenomenon observed when a mixture of two or more types of motile objects experience a force induced by a thermal gradient and the different types of objects respond to it differently, inducing a motion and segregation of the objects. Using molecular...... dynamics simulations, we explore the possibility to design thermophoretic pumping devices fabricated of CNTs for water transport in nanoconduits. The design of the nanopumps is based on the concept of the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet....

  9. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle...... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  10. Atomistic simulations of pH-dependent self-assembly of micelle and bilayer from fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2012-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the self-assembly and phase behavior of pH-sensitive surfactants has implications in areas such as targeted drug delivery. Here we present a study of the formation of micelle and bilayer from lauric acids using a state-of-the-art simulation technique, continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) with conformational sampling in explicit solvent and the pH-based replica-exchange protocol. We find that at high pH conditions a spherical micelle is formed, while at low pH conditions a bilayer is formed with a considerable degree of interdigitation. The mid-point of the phase transition is in good agreement with experiment. Preliminary investigation also reveals that the effect of counterions and salt screening shifts the transition mid-point and does not change the structure of the surfactant assembly. Based on these data we suggest that CpHMD simulations may be applied to computational design of surfactant-based nano devices in the future.

  11. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present ...... (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3]....

  12. Comparison of the Solid Solution Properties of Mg-RE (Gd, Dy, Y Alloys with Atomistic Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamic simulations have been performed to study the solid solution mechanism of Mg100-xREx (RE=Gd,Dy,Y, x=0.5,1,2,3,4  at.%. The obtained results reveal that the additions of Gd, Dy and Y increase the lattice constants of Mg-RE alloys. Also the axis ratio c/a remains unchanged with increase in temperature, restraining the occurrence of nonbasal slip and twinning. Furthermore, it is confirmed that bulk modulus of Mg alloys can be increased remarkably by adding the Gd, Dy, Y, especially Gd, because the solid solubility of Gd in Mg decrease sharply with temperature in comparison with Dy and Y. Consequently, the addition of the RE can enhance the strength of Mg-based alloys, which is in agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Can pyrene probes be used to measure lateral pressure profiles of lipid membranes? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franova, M. D.; Vattulainen, I.; Ollila, O. H. S.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral pressure profile of lipid bilayers has gained a lot of attention, since changes in the pressure profile have been suggested to shift the membrane protein conformational equilibrium. This relation has been mostly studied with theoretical methods, especially with molecular dynamics...... determinant of the excimer/monomer fluorescence ratio. Thus, the results do not support the usage of di-pyr-PC molecules to measure the shape of the lateral pressure profile. We yet discuss how the probes could potentially be exploited to gain qualitative insight of the changes in pressure profile when lipid...... simulations, since established methods to measure the lateral pressure profile experimentally have not been available. The only experiments that have attempted to gauge the lateral pressure profile have been done by using di-pyrenyl-phosphatidylcholine (di-pyr-PC) probes. In these experiments, the excimer...

  14. Parameterization of the prosthetic redox centers of the bacterial cytochrome bc(1) complex for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, K.; Postila, P. A.; Cramariuc, O.

    2013-01-01

    -molecular interactions at different redox stages of the cyt bc(1) complex. Accordingly, here we present high-precision atomic point charges for the metal centers of the cyt bc(1) complex of Rhodobacter capsulatus derived from extensive density functional theory calculations, fitted using the restrained electrostatic......Cytochrome (cyt) bc(1) is a multi-subunit membrane protein complex that is a vital component of the respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although the complex's dimer structure has been solved using X-ray crystallography, it has not yet been...... studied in large-scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In part, this is due to lack of suitable force field parameters, centered atomic point charges in particular, for the complex's prosthetic redox centers. Accurate redox center charges are needed to depict realistically the inter...

  15. Atomistic simulations of solidification process in B2-LiPb solid(0 0 1)-liquid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Gan, Xianglai; Meng, Xiancai; Xiao, Shifang; Deng, Huiqiu; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu

    2017-07-01

    Li-Pb alloy is considered as a candidate for a blanket material in fusion reactors for its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this work, the solidification process in the B2-LiPb solid(0 0 1)-liquid system is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the liquid phase atoms near the solid-liquid interface separate according to the crystal structure, and the separated atoms constitute (0 0 1) crystal planes through an ordering arrangement, which induces the B2-LiPb crystal to grow layer by layer. The velocity of moving solid-liquid interface in our case increases with the degree of thermostat undercooling. Nonequilibrium concentrations of point defects and a misshapen region are observed in the finally solidified crystal. The formation of the dominant point defect is dominated by defect formation energy. Additionally, Pb atoms are enriched in the misshapen region due to the formation of nonequilibrium concentrations of point defects.

  16. Direct dynamics simulations of the product channels and atomistic mechanisms for the OH(-) + CH3I reaction. Comparison with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Sun, Rui; Siebert, Matthew R; Otto, Rico; Wester, Roland; Hase, William L

    2013-08-15

    Electronic structure and direct dynamics calculations were used to study the potential energy surface and atomic-level dynamics for the OH(-) + CH3I reactions. The results are compared with crossed molecular beam, ion imaging experiments. The DFT/B97-1/ECP/d level of theory gives reaction energetics in good agreement with experiment and higher level calculations, and it was used for the direct dynamics simulations that were performed for reactant collision energies of 2.0, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.05 eV. Five different pathways are observed in the simulations, forming CH3OH + I(-), CH2I(-) + H2O, CH2 + I(-) + H2O, IOH(-) + CH3, and [CH3--I--OH](-). The SN2 first pathway and the proton-transfer second pathway dominate the reaction dynamics. Though the reaction energetics favor the SN2 pathway, the proton-transfer pathway is more important except for the lowest collision energy. The relative ion yield determined from the simulations is in overall good agreement with experiment. Both the SN2 and proton-transfer pathways occur via direct rebound, direct stripping, and indirect mechanisms. Except for the highest collision energy, 70-90% of the indirect reaction for the SN2 pathway occurs via formation of the hydrogen-bonded OH(-)---HCH2I prereaction complex. For the proton-transfer pathway the indirect reaction is more complex with the roundabout mechanism and formation of the OH(-)---HCH2I and CH2I(-)---HOH complexes contributing to the reaction. The majority of the SN2 reaction is direct at 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 eV, dominated by stripping. At 0.05 eV the two direct mechanisms and the indirect mechanisms have nearly equal contributions. The majority of the proton-transfer pathway is direct stripping at 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 eV, but the majority of the reaction is indirect at 0.05 eV. The product relative translational energy distributions are in good agreement with experiment for both the SN2 and proton-transfer pathways. For both, direct reaction preferentially transfers the product

  17. Tunable thermodynamic stability of Au-CuPt core-shell trimetallic nanoparticles by controlling the alloy composition: insights from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Wen, Yu-Hua; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-11-07

    A microscopic understanding of the thermal stability of metallic core-shell nanoparticles is of importance for their synthesis and ultimately application in catalysis. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to investigate the thermodynamic evolution of Au-CuPt core-shell trimetallic nanoparticles with various Cu/Pt ratios during heating processes. Our results show that the thermodynamic stability of these nanoparticles is remarkably enhanced upon rising Pt compositions in the CuPt shell. The melting of all the nanoparticles initiates at surface and gradually spreads into the core. Due to the lattice mismatch among Au, Cu and Pt, stacking faults have been observed in the shell and their numbers are associated with the Cu/Pt ratios. With the increasing temperature, they have reduced continuously for the Cu-dominated shell while more stacking faults have been produced for the Pt-dominated shell because of the significantly different thermal expansion coefficients of the three metals. Beyond the overall melting, all nanoparticles transform into a trimetallic mixing alloy coated by an Au-dominated surface. This work provides a fundamental perspective on the thermodynamic behaviors of trimetallic, even multimetallic, nanoparticles at the atomistic level, indicating that controlling the alloy composition is an effective strategy to realize tunable thermal stability of metallic nanocatalysts.

  18. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  19. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provide a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  20. Atomistic study of a nanometer-scale pump based on the thermal ratchet concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel concept of nanoscale pump fabricated using Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. The development of nanofluidic systems provides unprecedented possibilities for the control of biology and chemistry at the molecular level with potential applications in low energy cost devices, novel medical tools, and a new generation of sensors. CNTs offer a number of attractive features for the fabrication of fluidic nanodevices including fast flow, useful electronic and thermal properties, high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. Therefore, the transport of liquids in CNTs is now of great interest in nanofluidics. Thermophoresis is the phenomenon observed when a mixture of two or more types of motile objects experience a force induced by a thermal gradient and the different types of objects respond to it differently, inducing a motion and segregation of the objects. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the possibility to design thermophoretic pumping devices fabricated of CNTs for water transport in nanoconduits. The design of the nanopumps is based on the concept of the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet. We aknowledge partial support from Fondecyt project 11130559 and Redoc udec.

  1. Generation of c-component edge dislocations in α-zirconium during neutron irradiation - An atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C. H.; Liu, Xiangli

    2009-09-01

    The nucleation and multiplication of c-component edge dislocation segments during neutron irradiation in zirconium and its alloys is known to have important consequences to their in-reactor deformation behavior. Although there are ample experimental observations showing the close correlation between the edge-type and the screw-type of c-dislocations, the relation between them is unclear. In this paper, we performed atomistic study of the interaction between a [0 0 0 1] screw dislocation and a vacancy cluster in the form of a platelet on the basal plane. The local minimum-energy configuration was obtained using the conjugate-gradient method, with boundary relaxation achieved via a modified Green's function method. Under stress-free conditions, the vacancy clusters maintained their cavity nature. With a [0 0 0 1] screw dislocation in the close neighborhood, vacancy clusters containing more than 23 vacancies collapse into faulted vacancy loops. Interaction at even closer range leads to the disappearance of the vacancy cluster and the development of an edge component on the originally straight screw dislocation in the form of a helical line. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the experimentally observed behavior of growth acceleration in zirconium and its alloys.

  2. Boundary-dependent mechanical properties of graphene annular under in-plane circular shearing via atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Lin, Qianling; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-02-01

    Graphene annulus possesses special wrinkling phenomenon with wide range of potential applications. Using molecular dynamics simulation, this study concerns the effect of boundary on the mechanical properties of circular and elliptical graphene annuli under circular shearing at inner edge. Both the wrinkle characteristic and torque capacity of annular graphene can be effectively tuned by outer boundary radius and aspect ratio. For circular annulus with fixed inner radius, the critical angle of rotation can be increased by several times without sacrificing its torque capacity by increasing outer boundary radius. The wrinkle characteristic of graphene annulus with elliptical outer boundary differs markedly with that of circular annulus. Torque capacity anomalously decreases with the increase of aspect ratio, and a coupled effect of the boundary aspect ratio and the ratio of minor axis to inner radius on wrinkling are revealed. By studying the stress distribution and wrinkle characteristics, we find the decay of torque capacity is the result of circular stress concentration around the minor axis, while the nonuniform stress distribution is anomalously caused by the change of wrinkle profiles near the major axis. The specific mechanism of out-of-plane deformation on in-plane strength provides a straightforward means to develop novel graphene-based devices.

  3. Boundary-dependent mechanical properties of graphene annular under in-plane circular shearing via atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Lin, Qianling; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene annulus possesses special wrinkling phenomenon with wide range of potential applications. Using molecular dynamics simulation, this study concerns the effect of boundary on the mechanical properties of circular and elliptical graphene annuli under circular shearing at inner edge. Both the wrinkle characteristic and torque capacity of annular graphene can be effectively tuned by outer boundary radius and aspect ratio. For circular annulus with fixed inner radius, the critical angle of rotation can be increased by several times without sacrificing its torque capacity by increasing outer boundary radius. The wrinkle characteristic of graphene annulus with elliptical outer boundary differs markedly with that of circular annulus. Torque capacity anomalously decreases with the increase of aspect ratio, and a coupled effect of the boundary aspect ratio and the ratio of minor axis to inner radius on wrinkling are revealed. By studying the stress distribution and wrinkle characteristics, we find the decay of torque capacity is the result of circular stress concentration around the minor axis, while the nonuniform stress distribution is anomalously caused by the change of wrinkle profiles near the major axis. The specific mechanism of out-of-plane deformation on in-plane strength provides a straightforward means to develop novel graphene-based devices. PMID:28198805

  4. Comparison of coarse-grained (MARTINI) and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of α and β toxin nanopores in lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJAT DESIKAN; SWARNA M PATRA; KUMAR SARTHAK; PRABAL K MAITI; K G AYAPPA

    2017-07-01

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) are virulent proteins whose primary goal is to lyse target cells by unregulated pore formation. Molecular dynamics simulations can potentially provide molecular insights on the properties of the pore complex as well as the underlying pathways for pore formation. In this manuscript wecompare both coarse-grained (MARTINI force-field) and all-atom simulations, and comment on the accuracy of the MARTINI coarse-grained method for simulating these large membrane protein pore complexes. We report 20 μs long coarse-grained MARTINI simulations of prototypical pores from two different classes ofpore forming toxins (PFTs) in lipid membranes - Cytolysin A (ClyA), which is an example of an α toxin, and α-hemolysin (AHL) which is an example of a β toxin. We compare and contrast structural attributes such as the root mean square deviation (RMSD) histograms and the inner pore radius profiles from the MARTINIsimulations with all-atom simulations. RMSD histograms sampled by the MARTINI simulations are about a factor of 2 larger, and the radius profiles show that the transmembrane domains of both ClyA and AHL pores undergo significant distortions, when compared with the all-atom simulations. In addition to the fully inserted transmembrane pores, membrane-inserted proteo-lipid ClyA arcs show large shape distortions with a tendency to close in the MARTINI simulations. While this phenomenon could be biologically plausible given the factthat α-toxins can form pores of varying sizes, the additional flexibility is probably due to weaker inter-protomer interactions which are modulated by the elastic dynamic network in the MARTINI force-field. We conclude that there is further scope for refining inter-protomer contacts and perhaps membrane-protein interactions in the MARTINI coarse-grained framework. A robust coarse-grained force-field will enable one to reliably carry out mesoscopic simulations which are required to understand protomer oligomerization, pore

  5. Atomistic simulations of P(NDI2OD-T2) morphologies: from single chain to condensed phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddeo, Claudia; Fazzi, Daniele; Caironi, Mario; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2014-10-30

    We investigate theoretically the structure, crystallinity, and solubility of a high-mobility n-type semiconducting copolymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), and we propose a set of new force field parameters. The force field is reparametrized against density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with the aim to reproduce the correct torsional angles that govern the polymer chain flexibility and morphology. We simulate P(NDI2OD-T2) oligomers in different environments, namely, in vacuo, in the bulk phase, and in liquid toluene and chloronaphthalene solution. The choice of these solvents is motivated by the fact that they induce different kinds of molecular preaggregates during the casting procedures, resulting in variable device performances. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data; the polymer bulk structure, in which the chains are quite planar, is correcly reproduced, yet the isolated chains are flexible enough to fold in vacuo. We also calculate the solubility of P(NDI2OD-T2) in toluene and chloronaphthalene, predicting a much better solubility of the polymer in the latter, also in accordance to experimental observations. Different morphologies and dynamics of the oligomers in the two solvents have been observed. The proposed parameters make it possible to obtain the description of P(NDI2OD-T2) in different environments and can serve as a basis for extensive studies of this polymer semiconductor, such as, for example, the dynamics of aggregation in solvent.

  6. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashishta P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT. This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for an aluminum particle in water based on the conventional DFT, as a target system for large-scale DC-DFT simulations. A pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the aluminum surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production in a low activation-barrier mechanism found in the simulations

  7. Mechanisms of radiation strengthening in Fe–Cr alloys as revealed by atomistic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, D.; Bonny, G. [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Domain, C.; Monnet, G. [EDF-R and D, Département MMC, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Malerba, L., E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    A review of experimental results shows that the dependence on Cr content of radiation-induced strengthening in Fe–Cr alloys and ferritic/martensitic steels is peculiar, exhibiting an increase as soon as Cr is added, followed by a local maximum and then a local minimum. This dependence is to date unexplained. In this paper we try to rationalise it, by reviewing recent (published and unpublished) molecular dynamics simulations work, devoted to the investigation of several possible mechanisms of radiation strengthening in Fe–Cr. In particular, the following questions are addressed quantitatively: (i) Does Cr influence the glide of dislocations? If so, how? (ii) Does Cr influence the interaction between dislocations and radiation-produced defects? If so, why? The latter question involves also a study of the interaction of moving dislocations with experimentally observed Cr-enriched loops. We find that the fact of shifting from a loop-absorption (pure Fe) to a loop-non-absorption (Fe–Cr) regime, because of the Cr–enrichment of loops, contributes to explaining why Fe–Cr alloys harden more under irradiation than Fe. If, in addition, the existence of a large density of invisible and Cr-enriched loops is postulated, the origin of the effect becomes even more clear. Moreover, the different strength of 〈1 1 1〉 and 〈1 0 0〉 loops as obstacles to dislocations movement, depending on whether or not loop absorption can occur, might explain why radiation strengthening decreases between 2% and 9%Cr. The formation of α′ precipitates, on the other hand, explains why radiation strengthening increases again above 9%Cr. Altogether, these effects might explain the origin of the minimum of radiation-induced embrittlement at 9%Cr, as correlated to strengthening.

  8. Atomistic simulation of charge effects: From tunable thin film growth to isolation of surface states with spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wenmei

    This dissertation revitalizes the importance of surface charge effects in semiconductor nanostructures, in particular in the context of thin film growth and exotic electronic structures under delicate spin-orbit coupling. A combination of simulation techniques, including density functional theory calculation, kinetic Monte Carlo method, nonequilibrium Green's function method, and tight binding method, were employed to reveal the underlying physical mechanisms of four topics: (1) Effects of Li doping on H-diffusion in MgH 2 for hydrogen storage. It addresses both the effect of Fermi level tuning by charged dopant and the effect of dopant-defect interaction, and the latter was largely neglected in previous works; (2) Tuning nucleation density of the metal island with charge doping of the graphene substrate. It is the first time that the surface charge doping effect is proposed and studied as an effective approach to tune the kinetics of island nucleation at the early stage of thin film growth; (3) Complete isolation of Rashba surface states on the saturated semiconductor surface. It shows that the naturally saturated semiconductor surface of InSe(0001) with Au single layer film provides a mechanism for the formation of Rashba states with large spin splitting; it opens up an innovative route to obtaining ideal Rashba states without the overwhelming bulk spin-degenerate carriers in spin-dependent transport; (4) Formation of large band gap quantum spin Hall state on Si surface. This study reveals the importance of atomic orbital composition in the formation of a topological insulator, and shows promisingly the possible integration of topological insulator technology into Si-based modern electronic devices.

  9. 预应力对多晶铁冲击行为影响的微观模拟研究∗%Influence of prestress on sho ck b ehavior of p olycrystalline iron via atomistic simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任国武; 张世文; 范诚; 陈永涛

    2016-01-01

    冲击加载铁动力学响应是当前冲击波领域金属材料塑性和相变行为研究最为关注的焦点之一。本文采用分子动力学模拟方法开展预应力作用下冲击加载多晶铁的动力学行为研究。模拟结果表明,随着预应力的增加,导致弹塑转变应力(Hugoniot弹性极限)和冲击波速度提高,符合已有的理论分析结果。微观晶体结构表征则发现较大的预应力导致剪应力大于屈服应力,塑性弛豫时间缩短,加快多晶铁α→ε相转变。进一步通过与平面及柱壳纯铁冲击加载获得的自由面速度剖面对比分析,证实了模拟结果。%Plasticity behavior and phase transition of metal Fe subjected to shock loading have attracted considerable attention in shock physics community, in particular for underlying relationship between them. Experimental examinations and atomistic simulations on shocked Fe have displayed a three-wave structure: elastic wave, plastic wave and transformation wave. However, these studies are primarily limited to the one-dimensional planar case. Recently, owing to the rapid development of experimental techniques, investigating dynamic property of shocked metal has extended to the multi-dimensional loading conditions, such as cylindrical or spherical shocks. In this regard, fruitful findings are achieved, for example, twinning ratio in polycrystalline Fe under implosive compression is found to be much higher than that under planar shock, implying that the the complex stress state plays a critical role. In this paper, we explore the effects of prestress on plasticity and phase transition of shocked polycrystalline iron. The imposed presstress normal to the impact direction in one-dimensional planar shocking represents the varying deviatoric stress, and does not nearly affect the principal stress. The utilized empirical potential for iron could describe the plasticity dislocation and phase transition very well. The simulations

  10. Atomistic study of ternary oxides as high-temperature solid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyu

    understanding of lubricious mechanisms of solid lubricants in general. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was used as the primary tool in this research, complemented by density-functional theory and experiments from our colleagues. In this research, we first developed empirical potential parameters for AgTaO3 and later Cu- Ta-O ternaries using the modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) formalism. With those parameters, we explored the sliding mechanisms of AgTaO3, CuTaO3 and CuTa2O6 at elevated temperatures. Particularly on AgTaO3, we investigated the effects of applied loads as well as surface terminations on friction and wear as functions of temperature. In addition, to optimize the tribological performance of AgTaO3, film reconstruction mechanisms were investigated on Ta2O5/Ag films with varying amounts of Ag. For the potassium chloride-iron system, we studied the effect of contact pressure on interfacial structure, based on which the origin of the commonly observed pressure-dependent shear strengths was explored. We hope this research will benefit the design and development of solid lubricant materials for a wide range of applications.

  11. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelkmar, Pär; Niemelä, Perttu S; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how...... transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements...... process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros). Together with lipids binding in matching positions...

  12. Atomistic simulation of the thermal conductivity in amorphous SiO2 matrix/Ge nanocrystal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryliuk, Vasyl V.; Korotchenkov, Oleg A.

    2017-04-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations with the Tersoff potential aiming to provide a comprehensive picture of the thermal conductivity of amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) matrix with embedded Ge nanocrystals (nc-Ge). The modelling predicts the a-SiO2 matrix thermal conductivity in a temperature range of 50 molecular dynamics simulations with the Tersoff potential are promising for computing the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites based on amorphous SiO2 and can be readily scaled to more complex composite structures with embedded nanoparticles, which thus help design nanocomposites with desired thermal properties.

  13. Properties of the Membrane Binding Component of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Revealed by Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, A.; St-Pierre, J. F.; Magarkar, A.

    2011-01-01

    that the linker has a clear affinity for the interface and preferentially arranges its residues to reside next to the membrane, without a tendency to relocate into the water phase. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of databases for sequences of membrane proteins that have a single transmembrane helical segment...... that was not included in our model. In numerous independent simulations we observed the formation of a salt bridge between ARC 27 and GLU40. The salt bridge closed the flexible loop that formed in the linker and kept it in the vicinity of the membrane-water interface. All simulations supported this conclusion...

  14. Bridging Atomistic/Continuum Scales in Solids with Moving Dislocations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shao-Qiang; LIU Wing K.; KARPOV Eduard G.; HOU Thomas Y.

    2007-01-01

    @@ We propose a multiscale method for simulating solids with moving dislocations. Away from atomistic subdomains where the atomistic dynamics are fully resolved, a dislocation is represented by a localized jump profile, superposed on a defect-free field. We assign a thin relay zone around an atomistic subdomain to detect the dislocation profile and its propagation speed at a selected relay time. The detection technique utilizes a lattice time history integral treatment. After the relay, an atomistic computation is performed only for the defect-free field. The method allows one to effectively absorb the fine scale fluctuations and the dynamic dislocations at the interface between the atomistic and continuum domains. In the surrounding region, a coarse grid computation is adequate.

  15. Atomistic simulation of the structure and elastic properties of pyrite (FeS2) as a function of pressure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sithole, Happy M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Interatomic potential parameters have been derived at simulated temperatures of 0 K and 300 K to model pyrite FeS2. The predicted pyrite structures are within 1% of those determined experimentally, while the calculated bulk modulus is within 7...

  16. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Bjelkmar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements, including up to 120 degrees rotation of the S4 segment, changes in hydrogen-bonding patterns, but only low amounts of translation. A smaller rotation ( approximately 35 degrees of the extracellular end of all S4 segments is present also in a reference 0.5 micros simulation without applied field, which indicates that the crystal structure might be slightly different from the natural state of the voltage sensor. The conformation change upon hyperpolarization is closely coupled to an increase in 3(10 helix contents in S4, starting from the intracellular side. This could support a model for transition from the crystal structure where the hyperpolarization destabilizes S4-lipid hydrogen bonds, which leads to the helix rotating to keep the arginine side chains away from the hydrophobic phase, and the driving force for final relaxation by downward translation is partly entropic, which would explain the slow process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros. Together with lipids binding in matching positions and significant thinning of the membrane also observed in experiments, this provides additional support for the predictive power of microsecond-scale membrane

  17. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, B. S.; Singh, P. L.; Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  18. Quantum transport in RTD and atomistic modeling of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengping

    As devices are scaled down to nanometer scale, new materials and device structures are introduced to extend Moore's law beyond Si devices. In this length scale, carrier transport moves from classical transport to quantum transport; material granularity has more and more impacts on performance. Computer Aided Design (CAD) becomes essential for both industrial and educational purposes. First part focuses on physical models and numerical issues in nano-scale devices modeling. Resonance Tunneling Diode (RTD) is simulated and used to illustrate phenomena in carrier transport. Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) formulism is employed in quantum transport simulation. Inhomogeneous energy grid is used in energy integration, which is critical to capture essential physics in RTD simulation. All simulation results could be reproduced by developed simulators RTDNEGF and NEMO5. In nanostructures, device length becomes comparable to material granularity; it is not proper to consider materials as continuous in many situations. Second part of this work resolves this problem by introducing atomistic modeling method. Valley degeneracy in Si (110) QW is investigated. Inconsistency of experimental observations is resolved by introducing miscut in surface. Impacts of strain and electric field on electronic bandstructure are studied. Research of SiGe barrier disorder effects on valley splitting in Si (100) QW is then conducted. Behaviors of valley splitting in different well widths under electric field are predicted by atomistic simulation. Nearest neighbor empirical tight-binding method is used in electronic calculation and VFF Keating model is used in strain relaxation.

  19. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  20. Primary radiation damage of Zr-0.5%Nb binary alloy: atomistic simulation by molecular dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonchev, M.; Svetukhin, V.; Kapustin, P.

    2017-09-01

    Ab initio calculations predict high positive binding energy (˜1 eV) between niobium atoms and self-interstitial configurations in hcp zirconium. It allows the expectation of increased niobium fraction in self-interstitials formed under neutron irradiation in atomic displacement cascades. In this paper, we report the results of molecular dynamics simulation of atomic displacement cascades in Zr-0.5%Nb binary alloy and pure Zr at the temperature of 300 K. Two sets of n-body interatomic potentials have been used for the Zr-Nb system. We consider a cascade energy range of 2-20 keV. Calculations show close estimations of the average number of produced Frenkel pairs in the alloy and pure Zr. A high fraction of Nb is observed in the self-interstitial configurations. Nb is mainly detected in single self-interstitial configurations, where its fraction reaches tens of percent, i.e. more than its tenfold concentration in the matrix. The basic mechanism of this phenomenon is the trapping of mobile self-interstitial configurations by niobium. The diffusion of pure zirconium and mixed zirconium-niobium self-interstitial configurations in the zirconium matrix at 300 K has been simulated. We observe a strong dependence of the estimated diffusion coefficients and fractions of Nb in self-interstitials produced in displacement cascades on the potential.

  1. Literature review report on atomistic modeling tools for FeCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Daniel Schwen; Enrique Martinez

    2015-12-01

    This reports summarizes the literature review results on atomistic tools, particularly interatomic potentials used in molecular dynamics simulations, for FeCrAl ternary alloys. FeCrAl has recently been identified as a possible cladding concept for accident tolerant fuels for its superior corrosion resistance. Along with several other concepts, an initial evaluation and recommendation are desired for FeCrAl before it’s used in realistic fuels. For this purpose, sufficient understanding on the in-reactor behavior of FeCrAl needs to be grained in a relatively short timeframe, and multiscale modeling and simulations have been selected as an efficient measure to supplement experiments and in-reactor testing for better understanding on FeCrAl. For the limited knowledge on FeCrAl alloys, the multiscale modeling approach relies on atomistic simulations to obtain the missing material parameters and properties. As a first step, atomistic tools have to be identified and this is the purpose of the present report. It was noticed during the literature survey that no interatomic potentials currently available for FeCrAl. Here, we summarize the interatomic potentials available for FeCr alloys for possible molecular dynamics studies using FeCr as surrogate materials. Other atomistic methods such as lattice kinetic Monte Carlo are also included in this report. A couple of research topics at the atomic scale are suggested based on the literature survey.

  2. Atomistic properties of γ uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Benjamin; Deo, Chaitanya; Baskes, Michael; Okuniewski, Maria

    2012-02-22

    The properties of the body-centered cubic γ phase of uranium (U) are calculated using atomistic simulations. First, a modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential is developed for the high temperature body-centered cubic (γ) phase of U. This phase is stable only at high temperatures and is thus relatively inaccessible to first principles calculations and room temperature experiments. Using this potential, equilibrium volume and elastic constants are calculated at 0 K and found to be in close agreement with previous first principles calculations. Further, the melting point, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion and volume change upon melting are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment. The low temperature mechanical instability of γ U is correctly predicted and investigated as a function of pressure. The mechanical instability is suppressed at pressures greater than 17.2 GPa. The vacancy formation energy is analyzed as a function of pressure and shows a linear trend, allowing for the calculation of the extrapolated zero pressure vacancy formation energy. Finally, the self-defect formation energy is analyzed as a function of temperature. This is the first atomistic calculation of γ U properties above 0 K with interatomic potentials.

  3. Impact of hydration on the micromechanical properties of the polymer composite structure of wood investigated with atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasinski, Karol; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2017-06-01

    A model of the secondary layer of wood cell wall consisting of crystalline cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin is constructed and investigated with molecular dynamics simulations in the full range of hydration: from dry to saturated state. The model is considered a composite with the cellulose fibrils embedded in hemicellulose and lignin, forming a soft amorphous matrix. Its complex structure leads to nonlinear and anisotropic swelling and mechanical weakening. The water diffusivity through the pores is affected by an interplay between stiff cellulose fibers and weakening amorphous polymers. The formation and breaking of hydrogen bonds within the polymers and at the interfaces is found to be the underlying mechanism of adsorption-induced mechanical softening. The model is tested for adsorption isotherm, mechanical moduli, hydrogen bonds, and water diffusivity that all undergo a substantial change as the hydration increases. The determined physical and mechanical properties, changing with hydration, agree qualitatively with experimental measurements.

  4. Investigation of the role of polysaccharide in the dolomite growth at low temperature by using atomistic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration of water from surface Mg2+ is most likely the rate-limiting step in the dolomite growth at low temperature. Here, we investigate the role of polysaccharide in this step using classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Free energy (potential of mean force, PMF) calculations have been performed for water molecules leaving the first two hydration layers above the dolomite (104) surface under the following three conditions: without catalyst, with monosaccharide (mannose) and with oligosaccharide (three units of mannose). MD simulations reveal that there is no obvious effect of monosaccharide in lowering the dehydration barrier for surface Mg2+. However, we found that there are metastable configurations of oligosaccharide, which can decrease the dehydration barrier of surface Mg2+ by about 0.7-1.1 kcal/mol. In these configurations, the molecule lies relatively flat on the surface and forms a bridge shape. The hydrophobic space near the surface created by the non-polar -CH groups of the oligosaccha...

  5. Atomistic simulations of the effect of embedded hydrogen and helium on the tensile properties of monocrystalline and nanocrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Kecskes, Laszlo J.; Zhu, Kaigui; Wei, Qiuming

    2016-12-01

    Uniaxial tensile properties of monocrystalline tungsten (MC-W) and nanocrystalline tungsten (NC-W) with embedded hydrogen and helium atoms have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the context of radiation damage evolution. Different strain rates have been imposed to investigate the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) of the samples. Results show that the plastic deformation processes of MC-W and NC-W are dominated by different mechanisms, namely dislocation-based for MC-W and grain boundary-based activities for NC-W, respectively. For MC-W, the SRS increases and a transition appears in the deformation mechanism with increasing embedded atom concentration. However, no obvious embedded atom concentration dependence of the SRS has been observed for NC-W. Instead, in the latter case, the embedded atoms facilitate GB sliding and intergranular fracture. Additionally, a strong strain enhanced He cluster growth has been observed. The corresponding underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Study of interactions between polymer nanoparticles and cell membranes at atomistic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Chin W

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of how the structure of nanoparticles and the interactions with biological cell membranes is important not only for understanding nanotoxicological effects on human, animal health and the environment, but also for better understanding of nanoparticle fabrication for biomedical applications. In this work, we use molecular modelling techniques, namely molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to explore how polymer nanoparticles interact with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid cell membranes. Two different polymers have been considered: 100 monomer units of polyethylene (approx. 2.83 kDa) and polystyrene (approx. 10.4 kDa), both of which have wide industrial applications. We found that, despite the polar lipid head groups acting as an effective barrier to prevent the nanoparticles from interacting with the membrane surface, irreversible adhesion can be initiated by insertion of dangling chain ends from the polymer into the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. In addition, alignment of chain segments from the polymers with that of hydrocarbon chains in the interior of the membrane facilitates the complete immersion of the nanoparticles into the cell membrane. These findings highlight the importance of the surface and the topological structures of the polymer particles that dictate the absorption behaviour into the membrane and, subsequently, induce the possible translocation into the cell. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. PELE web server: atomistic study of biomolecular systems at your fingertips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadkar-Sobhani, Armin; Guallar, Victor

    2013-07-01

    PELE, Protein Energy Landscape Exploration, our novel technology based on protein structure prediction algorithms and a Monte Carlo sampling, is capable of modelling the all-atom protein-ligand dynamical interactions in an efficient and fast manner, with two orders of magnitude reduced computational cost when compared with traditional molecular dynamics techniques. PELE's heuristic approach generates trial moves based on protein and ligand perturbations followed by side chain sampling and global/local minimization. The collection of accepted steps forms a stochastic trajectory. Furthermore, several processors may be run in parallel towards a collective goal or defining several independent trajectories; the whole procedure has been parallelized using the Message Passing Interface. Here, we introduce the PELE web server, designed to make the whole process of running simulations easier and more practical by minimizing input file demand, providing user-friendly interface and producing abstract outputs (e.g. interactive graphs and tables). The web server has been implemented in C++ using Wt (http://www.webtoolkit.eu) and MySQL (http://www.mysql.com). The PELE web server, accessible at http://pele.bsc.es, is free and open to all users with no login requirement.

  8. Investigation of the Role of Polysaccharide in the Dolomite Growth at Low Temperature by Using Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhizhang; Szlufarska, Izabela; Brown, Philip E; Xu, Huifang

    2015-09-29

    Dehydration of water from surface Mg(2+) is most likely the rate-limiting step in the dolomite growth at low temperature. Here, we investigate the role of polysaccharide in this step using classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Free energy (potential of mean force, PMF) calculations have been performed for water molecules leaving the first two hydration layers above the dolomite (104) surface under the following three conditions: without catalyst, with monosaccharide (mannose), and with oligosaccharide (three units of mannose). MD simulations reveal that there is no obvious effect of monosaccharide in lowering the dehydration barrier for surface Mg(2+). However, we found that there are metastable configurations of oligosaccharide, which can decrease the dehydration barrier of surface Mg(2+) by about 0.7-1.1 kcal/mol. In these configurations, the molecule lies relatively flat on the surface and forms a bridge shape. The hydrophobic space near the surface created by the nonpolar -CH groups of the oligosaccharide in the bridge conformation is the reason for the observed reduction of dehydration barrier.

  9. Atomistic simulations on the axial nanowelding configuration and contact behavior between Ag nanowire and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaoqiao; Yang, Xinjun; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Kedian; Yang, Lijun; Xie, Hui

    2017-03-01

    As for the interesting new building blocks, the Ag nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the interesting new building blocks are viewed as the promising candidates for the next-generation interconnects due to their most remarkable electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, and other properties. The axial nanowelding of head-to-head style and side-to-side style is relatively simulated with the molecular dynamics method. As for the head-to-head structural style, SWNTs will move toward the AgNWs and contact with the head of AgNWs. And, the part of the Ag nanowire may be subsequently encapsulated in SWNT with the core-filling Ag atom chain as the final atomic contact configuration during nanowelding, which is related to the nanowelding temperature. When the SWNTs and AgNWs are arranged by the side-to-side contact style, the SWNTs will move along the SWNT surface and may eventually catch up with the AgNW being neck and neck. Aiming at the final axial atomic configurations and the contact behavior during nanowelding process, the related dominant mechanism is revealed in this paper.

  10. Automatic and Systematic Atomistic Simulations in the MedeA® Software Environment: Application to EU-REACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozanska Xavier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the systematic prediction of thermodynamic properties for batches of thousands of molecules using automated procedures. This is accomplished with newly developed tools and functions within the Material Exploration and Design Analysis (MedeA® software environment, which handle the automatic execution of sequences of tasks for large numbers of molecules including the creation of 3D molecular models from 1D representations, systematic exploration of possible conformers for each molecule, the creation and submission of computational tasks for property calculations on parallel computers, and the post-processing for comparison with available experimental properties. After the description of the different MedeA® functionalities and methods that make it easy to perform such large number of computations, we illustrate the strength and power of the approach with selected examples from molecular mechanics and quantum chemical simulations. Specifically, comparisons of thermochemical data with quantum-based heat capacities and standard energies of formation have been obtained for more than 2 000 compounds, yielding average deviations with experiments of less than 4% with the Design Institute for Physical PRoperties (DIPPR database. The automatic calculation of the density of molecular fluids is demonstrated for 192 systems. The relaxation to minimum-energy structures and the calculation of vibrational frequencies of 5 869 molecules are evaluated automatically using a semi-empirical quantum mechanical approach with a success rate of 99.9%. The present approach is scalable to large number of molecules, thus opening exciting possibilities with the advent of exascale computing.

  11. Effects of Zr doping on the surface energy and surface structure of UO{sub 2}: Atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hongxing, E-mail: xiaohongxing2003@163.com [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China); Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China); Tian, Xiaofeng [The College of Nuclear Technology and Automation Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu (China); Wei, Tianguo; Zhao, Yi; Gao, Wen [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2015-10-01

    A shell-core model is applied to investigate the effects of Zr doping on the surface energies and surface structures of the three low Miller index surfaces in UO{sub 2} using the molecular dynamics (MD) technique. The surface energies and atomic structures of the Zr-doped and undoped UO{sub 2} (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces are compared. Simulation results indicate that (i) the surface energy of (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2} depend on the crystallographic orientation, as well as of undoped UO{sub 2}. The (1 0 0) surface exhibits the highest surface energy, followed by the (1 1 0) surface, and the (1 1 1) surface; (ii) Zr doping will significantly increase the surface energy of UO{sub 2} by approximately 20% on (1 0 0) surface, 10% on (1 1 0) surface and 15% on (1 1 1) surface with the ZrO{sub 2} contents ranging from 0 to 12.5 mol%, respectively; (iii) the surface energies of the three low Miller index surfaces decrease with increasing temperature both in undoped UO{sub 2} and in (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2}; (iv) the addition of Zr induces a severe distortion of the (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2} surface structure, and the outermost top layer exhibits the strongest rumpling; (v) the considerable reconstructions can be observed in the two top layers of Zr-doped and undoped UO{sub 2} surfaces when the temperature is elevated to 900–1500 K.

  12. Atomistic insight into the minimum wear depth of Cu(111) surface

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we investigate the minimum wear depth of single crystalline Cu(111) under single asperity friction by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The atomistic mechanisms governing the incipient plasticity are elucidated by characterizing specific defect structures and are correlated to the observed mechanical and frictional responses of the material. Furthermore, the effect of probe radius on the friction process is studied. Our simulations indicate that the formation of we...

  13. Effects of moisture exposure on the crosslinked epoxy system: an atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, S.; Valipour, H.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion of water into the polymer structures can influence the structure and properties of the polymers. The absorbed water is believed to degrade the strength and properties of the polymers and hence it is important to study how it affects the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymers. In this report, the effects of moisture on the epoxy network and its properties are studied. The epoxy in this work is considered as the result of the curing of diglycidyl ether bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with JEFFAMINE®-D230 hardener. Several structural and dynamics analysis has been conducted to investigate the effects of the ingress of water into the polymer structure. The significant changes in the epoxy structure as a result of introducing water to the system are observed. The molecular structure has been monitored as it underwent the water uptake process. The variation of the atomic correlations due to the exposure to the moisture is reported. Moreover, the effects of adding water on the glass transition temperature and Young’s modulus is revealed. The changes in the properties are explained by the results obtained from monitoring the molecular structure.

  14. Atomistic and infrared study of CO-water amorphous ice onto olivine dust grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth; Moreno, Fernando; López-Moreno, J. Juan; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    This work is a study of CO and H2O molecules as adsorbates that interact on the surface of olivine dust grains. Olivine (forsterite) is present on the Earth, planetary dust, in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in particular in comets. The composition of amorphous ice is very important for the interpretation of processes that occur in the solar system and the ISM. Dust particles in ISM are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of amorphous or crystalline silicates (e.g. olivine) organic material, carbon, and other minor constituents. These dust grains are embedded in a matrix of ices, such as H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, and CH4. We consider that any amorphous ice will interact and grow faster on dust grain surfaces. In this work we explore the adsorption of CO-H2O amorphous ice onto several (100) forsterite surfaces (dipolar and non-dipolar), by using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). These models are applied to two possible situations: i) adsorption of CO molecules mixed into an amorphous ice matrix (gas mixture) and adsorbed directly onto the forsterite surface. This interaction has lower adsorption energy than polar molecules (H2O and NH3) adsorbed on this surface; ii) adsorption of CO when the surface has previously been covered by amorphous water ice (onion model). In this case the calculations show that adsorption energy is low, indicating that this interaction is weak and therefore the CO can be desorbed with a small increase of temperature. Vibration spectroscopy for the most stable complex was also studied and the frequencies were in good agreement with experimental frequency values.

  15. The atomistic structure of yttria stabilised zirconia at 6.7 mol%: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Tompsett, David A; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Offer, Gregory J; Brandon, Nigel P; Harrison, Nicholas M

    2016-11-16

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is an important oxide ion conductor used in solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen sensing devices, and for oxygen separation. Doping pure zirconia (ZrO2) with yttria (Y2O3) stabilizes the cubic structure against phonon induced distortions and this facilitates high oxide ion conductivity. The local atomic structure of the dopant is, however, not fully understood. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments have established that, for dopant concentrations below 40 mol% Y2O3, no long range order is established. A variety of local structures have been suggested on the basis of theoretical and computational models of dopant energetics. These studies have been restricted by the difficulty of establishing force field models with predictive accuracy or exploring the large space of dopant configurations with first principles theory. In the current study a comprehensive search for all symmetry independent configurations (2857 candidates) is performed for 6.7 mol% YSZ modelled in a 2 × 2 × 2 periodic supercell using gradient corrected density functional theory. The lowest energy dopant structures are found to have oxygen vacancy pairs preferentially aligned along the 〈210〉 crystallographic direction in contrast to previous results which have suggested that orientation along the 〈111〉 orientation is favourable. Analysis of the defect structures suggests that the Y(3+)-Ovac interatomic separation is an important parameter for determining the relative configurational energies. Current force field models are found to be poor predictors of the lowest energy structures. It is suggested that the energies from a simple point charge model evaluated at unrelaxed geometries is actually a better descriptor of the energy ordering of dopant structures. Using these observations a pragmatic procedure for identifying low energy structures in more complicated material models is suggested. Calculation of the oxygen vacancy migration activation energies within

  16. An Atomistic Study of the Incorporation and Diffusion of Noble Gases in Silicate Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, C.; Valencia, K.; Martinez-Mendoza, C.; Allan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Trace elements are widely used to unravel magmatic processes and constrain the chemical differentiation of the Earth. Central to this enterprise is understanding the controls on trace element fractionation between solid and liquid phases and thus the energetics of incorporating trace elements into crystals. In this contribution we focus on the incorporation of noble gases into crystals, with implications for the degassing processes in the Earth and the atmosphere. We use both ab-initio and classical calculations using interatomic potentials to study the uptake of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar into solid silicates. We calculate atomic defect energies of incorporation both at vacancies and at interstitial positions in solid forsterite. We use these energies to estimate the total uptake of the noble gases bulk into the crystal as a function of temperature. Such concentrations are found to be very low (10-3 and 10-10 ppm) for He up to Ar respectively with the noble gases incorporated predicted to be more favorable at intrinsic vacancies of Si or Mg or at interstitials sites. We also look at the diffusion of these minerals within the lattice and estimate activation energies for such processes. Our results support the hypothesis that noble gases have very low solubilities in bulk solid minerals. Other mechanisms such as adsorption at internal and external interfaces, voids and grain boundaries that can play a mayor role in their storage are also briefly discussed.

  17. Modified NEGF method for atomistic modeling of field emission from carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshipouri, Mahta; Behrooz, Milad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-09-01

    A model to simulate the atomistic properties of the field emission (FE) from a zigzag-single walled carbon nanotube (Z-SWCNT) is presented. By a modification of the self-energy in non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method, we simulated the field emission current, considering the quantum transport of electrons within the CNT. The paper involves investigation on the effect of the n index of the (n , 0) Z-SWCNT and the number of carbon dimers in the length direction as well as the anode-cathode separation on the FE current. Effect of additional gate voltage and substitutional impurities on the FE current is also studied. A comparison between the experimental data and simulation results are also included in the paper. The model can be used to consider different quantum effects of the atomistic emitter structure on the FE current.

  18. Possibilités actuelles du calcul des constantes élastiques de polymères par des méthodes de simulation atomistique Current Possibilities of the Computation of Elastic Constants of Polymers Using Atomistic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal Maso F.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Les propriétés élastiques des phases amorphe et cristalline pures de polymères semi-cristallins ne sont en général pas mesurables directement avec les moyens physiques habituels. Il est donc nécessaire de recourir à des méthodes de calcul numérique. Cet article décrit certaines de ces méthodes, fondées sur des modélisations atomistiques, ainsi qu'une évaluation des implémentations actuelles. Il est montré que la méthode proposée par Zehnder et al. (1996 fournit les meilleurs résultats, au prix d'un temps long de calcul, dû à la dynamique moléculaire. Néanmoins, aucune de ces méthodes n'est vraiment utilisable simplement au jour le jour, car elles requièrent des moyens importants de calcul. Elastic properties of pure crystalline and amorphous phases of a semicrystalline polymer are usually not directly measurable by usual physical means. It therefore is necessary to resort to numerical computing methods. This paper describes some of these methods, based on atomistic simulations, as well as an assessment of current implementations. It is shown that the method proposed by Zehnder et al. (1996 gives the best results, at the expense of long computing time, due to molecular dynamic simulation. Nevertheless none of these methods are really usable on a daily basis, since there are demanding important computing capabilities.

  19. Atomistic Properties of Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirdeshmukh, Dinker B; Subhadra, K G

    2011-01-01

    The book deals with atomistic properties of solids which are determined by the crystal structure, interatomic forces and atomic displacements influenced by the effects of temperature, stress and electric fields. The book gives equal importance to experimental details and theory. There are full chapters dedicated to the tensor nature of physical properties, mechanical properties, lattice vibrations, crystal structure determination and ferroelectricity. The other crystalline states like nano-, poly-, liquid- and quasi crystals are discussed. Several new topics like nonlinear optics and the Rietveld method are presented in the book. The book lays emphasis on the role of symmetry in crystal properties. Comprehensiveness is the strength of the book; this allows users at different levels a choice of chapters according to their requirements.

  20. Going Backward : A Flexible Geometric Approach to Reverse Transformation from Coarse Grained to Atomistic Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of coarse-grained to atomistic models is an important step in obtaining insight about atomistic scale processes from coarse-grained simulations. For this process, called backmapping or reverse transformation, several tools are available, but these commonly require libraries of molecul

  1. Atomistic simulation studies of iron sulphide, platinum antimonide and platinum arsenide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngoepe, PE

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available of Parapapio tooth enamel from Sterkfontein and Swartkrans Sir, ? Codron et al.1 have presented stable carbon isotope data for various non-hominid primates, including two species of Parapapio (extinct baboons) from Sterkfontein and Swartkrans in the Cradle...

  2. Atomistic simulation study of the interaction of organic adsorbates with fluorapatite surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkhonto, D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available MMM 2006 UL Methodology Block I Block II surface •Region I : ions relaxed •Region II : ions kept at bulk equilibrium position } } Metadise program • Static lattice minimisation technique • Forces between species described by potential model... • Surface Ca move into the bulk Ca-O shorter. • Alternating lengthening and shortening of F-F distances into the bulk. MMM 2006 UL γw(Jm-2) 0.45 0.75 0.61 0.72 1.67 0.88 Surface energies of un-relaxed, relaxed and hydrated surfaces. ( )2h b H...

  3. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms.

  4. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle vor...... dynamics. Recent work on the thermophoretic motion of water nanodroplets confined inside carbon nanotubes, and multiscale techniques for polar liquids will be discussed in detail at the symposium....... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  5. Nanoscale finite element models for vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes:atomistic versus continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R ANSARI; S ROUHI; M ARYAYI

    2013-01-01

    By the atomistic and continuum finite element models, the free vibration behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied. In the atomistic finite element model, the bonds and atoms are modeled by the beam and point mass elements, respectively. The molecular mechanics is linked to structural mechanics to determine the elastic properties of the mentioned beam elements. In the continuum finite element approach, by neglecting the discrete nature of the atomic structure of the nanotubes, they are modeled with shell elements. By both models, the natural frequencies of SWCNTs are computed, and the effects of the geometrical parameters, the atomic structure, and the boundary conditions are investigated. The accuracy of the utilized methods is verified in comparison with molecular dynamic simulations. The molecular structural model leads to more reliable results, especially for lower aspect ratios. The present analysis provides valuable information about application of continuum models in the investigation of the mechanical behaviors of nanotubes.

  6. On the junction physics of Schottky contact of (10, 10) MX{sub 2} (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) nanotube and (10, 10) carbon nanotube (CNT): an atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Amretashis [Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK), Delmenhorst (Germany); Universitaet Bremen, Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science (BCCMS), Bremen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Armchair nanotubes of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} offer a sizeable band gap, with the advantage of a one dimensional (1D) electronic material, but free from edge roughness and thermodynamic instability of nanoribbons. Use of such semiconducting MX{sub 2} (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) armchair nanotubes (NTs) in conjunction with metallic carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be useful for nanoelectronics and photonics applications. In this work, atomistic simulations of MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT and WS{sub 2} NT-CNT junctions are carried out to study the physics of such junctions. With density functional theory (DFT) we study the carrier density distribution, effective potential, electron difference density, electron localization function, electrostatic difference potential and projected local density of states of such MX{sub 2} NT-CNT 1D junctions. Thereafter the conductance of such a junction under moderate bias is studied with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. From the forward bias characteristics simulated from NEGF, we extract diode parameters of the junction. The electrostatic simulations from DFT show the formation of an inhomogeneous Schottky barrier with a tendency towards charge transfer from metal and chalcogen atoms towards the C atoms. For low bias conditions, the ideality factor was calculated to be 1.1322 for MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT junction and 1.2526 for the WS{sub 2} NT-CNT junction. The Schottky barrier heights displayed significant bias dependent modulation and are calculated to be in the range 0.697-0.664 eV for MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT and 0.669-0.610 eV for the WS{sub 2} NT-CNT, respectively. (orig.)

  7. Addressing uncertainty in atomistic machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew A; Christensen, Rune; Khorshidi, Alireza

    2017-05-10

    Machine-learning regression has been demonstrated to precisely emulate the potential energy and forces that are output from more expensive electronic-structure calculations. However, to predict new regions of the potential energy surface, an assessment must be made of the credibility of the predictions. In this perspective, we address the types of errors that might arise in atomistic machine learning, the unique aspects of atomistic simulations that make machine-learning challenging, and highlight how uncertainty analysis can be used to assess the validity of machine-learning predictions. We suggest this will allow researchers to more fully use machine learning for the routine acceleration of large, high-accuracy, or extended-time simulations. In our demonstrations, we use a bootstrap ensemble of neural network-based calculators, and show that the width of the ensemble can provide an estimate of the uncertainty when the width is comparable to that in the training data. Intriguingly, we also show that the uncertainty can be localized to specific atoms in the simulation, which may offer hints for the generation of training data to strategically improve the machine-learned representation.

  8. Study of the machining process of nano-electrical discharge machining based on combined atomistic-continuum modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojun; Guo, Jianwen; Ming, Wuyi; Huang, Yu; Shao, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nano-electrical discharge machining (nano-EDM) is an attractive measure to manufacture parts with nanoscale precision, however, due to the incompleteness of its theories, the development of more advanced nano-EDM technology is impeded. In this paper, a computational simulation model combining the molecular dynamics simulation model and the two-temperature model for single discharge process in nano-EDM is constructed to study the machining mechanism of nano-EDM from the thermal point of view. The melting process is analyzed. Before the heated material gets melted, thermal compressive stress higher than 3 GPa is induced. After the material gets melted, the compressive stress gets relieved. The cooling and solidifying processes are also analyzed. It is found that during the cooling process of the melted material, tensile stress higher than 3 GPa arises, which leads to the disintegration of material. The formation of the white layer is attributed to the homogeneous solidification, and additionally, the resultant residual stress is analyzed.

  9. Influence of specific intermolecular interactions on the thermal and dielectric properties of bulk polymers: atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasheva, N V; Tolmachev, D A; Nazarychev, V M; Kenny, J M; Lyulin, S V

    2017-01-04

    Specific intermolecular interactions, in particular H-bonding, have a strong influence on the structural, thermal and relaxation characteristics of polymers. We report here the results of molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6 which provides an excellent example for the investigation of such an influence. To demonstrate the effect of proper accounting for H-bonding on bulk polymer properties, the AMBER99sb force field is used with two different parametrization approaches leading to two different sets of partial atomic charges. The simulations allowed the study of the thermal and dielectric properties in a wide range of temperatures and cooling rates. The feasibility of the use of the three methods for the estimation of the glass transition temperature not only from the temperature dependence of structural characteristics such as density, but also by using the electrostatic energy and dielectric constant is demonstrated. The values of glass transition temperatures obtained at different cooling rates are practically the same for the three methods. By proper accounting for partial charges in the simulations, a reasonable agreement between the results of our simulations and experimental data for the density, thermal expansion coefficient, static dielectric constant and activation energy of γ and β relaxations is obtained demonstrating the validity of the modeling approach reported.

  10. Concurrent multiscale modelling of atomistic and hydrodynamic processes in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markesteijn, Anton; Karabasov, Sergey; Scukins, Arturs; Nerukh, Dmitry; Glotov, Vyacheslav; Goloviznin, Vasily

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations of liquids at the scales where the hydrodynamic and atomistic descriptions overlap are considered. The importance of these fluctuations for atomistic motions is discussed and examples of their accurate modelling with a multi-space–time-scale fluctuating hydrodynamics scheme are provided. To resolve microscopic details of liquid systems, including biomolecular solutions, together with macroscopic fluctuations in space–time, a novel hybrid atomistic–fluctuating hydrodynamics approach is introduced. For a smooth transition between the atomistic and continuum representations, an analogy with two-phase hydrodynamics is used that leads to a strict preservation of macroscopic mass and momentum conservation laws. Examples of numerical implementation of the new hybrid approach for the multiscale simulation of liquid argon in equilibrium conditions are provided. PMID:24982246

  11. Effect of cation dopants in zirconia on interfacial properties in nickel/zirconia systems: an atomistic modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandarov, Albert M.; Ding, Yingna; Umeno, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    Cation doping is often used to stabilize the cubic or tetragonal phase of zirconia for enhanced thermomechanical and electrochemical properties. In the present paper we report a combined density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics study of the effect of Sc, Y, and Ce dopants on properties of Ni/\\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} interfaces and nickel sintering. First, we develop an MD model that is based on DFT data for various nickel/zirconia interfaces. Then, we employ the model to simulate Ni nanoparticles coalescing on a zirconia surface. The results show the possibility of particle migration by means of fast sliding over the surface when the work of separation is small (nanoparticle migration. DFT calculations for the interface revealed that dopants with a smaller covalent radius result in a larger energy barriers for Ni diffusion. We analyze this effect and discuss how it can be used to suppress nickel sintering by using the dopant selection.

  12. Terahertz Nanoscience of Multifunctional Materials: Atomistic Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on the project "Terahertz Nanoscience of Multifunctional Materials: Atomistic...non peer-reviewed journals: Final report on the project "Terahertz Nanoscience of Multifunctional Materials: Atomistic Exploration" Report Title In... nanoscience of multifunctional materials: atomistic exploration” PI:Inna Ponomareva We have accomplished the following. 1. We have developed a set of

  13. Atomistic Determination of Cross-Slip Pathway and Energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Leffers, Torben

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism for cross slip of a screw dislocation in Cu is determined by atomistic simulations that only presume the initial and final states of the process. The dissociated dislocation constricts in the primary plane and redissociates into the cross-slip plane while still partly in the primary...... plane. The transition state and activation energy for cross slip as well as the energies of the involved dislocation constrictions are determined. One constriction has a negative energy compared to parallel partials. The energy vs splitting width for recombination of parallel partials into a perfect...... dislocation is determined. The breakdown of linear elasticity theory for small splitting widths is studied. [S0031-9007(97)04444-X]....

  14. Addressing uncertainty in atomistic machine learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Andrew A.; Christensen, Rune; Khorshidi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Machine-learning regression has been demonstrated to precisely emulate the potential energy and forces that are output from more expensive electronic-structure calculations. However, to predict new regions of the potential energy surface, an assessment must be made of the credibility of the predi......Machine-learning regression has been demonstrated to precisely emulate the potential energy and forces that are output from more expensive electronic-structure calculations. However, to predict new regions of the potential energy surface, an assessment must be made of the credibility...... of the predictions. In this perspective, we address the types of errors that might arise in atomistic machine learning, the unique aspects of atomistic simulations that make machine-learning challenging, and highlight how uncertainty analysis can be used to assess the validity of machine-learning predictions. We...... suggest this will allow researchers to more fully use machine learning for the routine acceleration of large, high-accuracy, or extended-time simulations. In our demonstrations, we use a bootstrap ensemble of neural network-based calculators, and show that the width of the ensemble can provide an estimate...

  15. Phase field crystal modelling of the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition of metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Mi, J.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk metallic glass composites are a new class of metallic alloy systems that have very high tensile strength, ductility and fracture toughness. This unique combination of mechanical properties is largely determined by the presence of crystalline phases uniformly distributed within the glassy matrix. However, there have been very limited reports on how the crystalline phases are nucleated in the super-cooled liquid and their growth dynamics, especially lack of information on the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition across the crystalline-amorphous interface. In this paper, we use phase field crystal (PFC) method to study the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phases and the glass formation of the super cooled liquid of a binary alloy. The study is focused on understanding the order-to-disordered transition of atomistic configuration across the interface between the crystalline phases and amorphous matrix of different chemical compositions at different thermal conditions. The capability of using PFC to simulate the order-to-disorder atomistic transition in the bulk material or across the interface is discussed in details.

  16. Cascade defect evolution processes: Comparison of atomistic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haixuan, E-mail: xuh1@ornl.gov; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetsky, Yury N.

    2013-11-15

    Determining defect evolution beyond the molecular dynamics (MD) time scale is critical to bridging the gap between atomistic simulations and experiments. The recently developed self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method provides new opportunities to simulate long-term defect evolution with MD-like fidelity to the atomistic processes involved. To demonstrate this capability, three examples are presented in which SEAKMC has been used to investigate the evolution of typical radiation-induced defects in bcc iron. Depending on the particular example, SEAKMC results are compared with those obtained using two other on-the-fly KMC techniques, object KMC, and MD. The three examples are: (1) evolution of a vacancy-rich region similar to the core of a displacement cascade, (2) the stability of recently reported interstitial clusters with a structure similar to the C15 Laves phase, and (3) long-term aging of atomic displacement cascade debris. In the various examples, the SEAKMC approach provides better agreement with MD simulations, highlights the importance of the underlying atomistic processes, and provides new information on long-term defect evolution in iron.

  17. Atomistic study of the thermodynamic equilibrium of nano-sized helium cavities in {beta}SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couet, Adrien [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91991 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Crocombette, Jean-Paul, E-mail: jpcrocombette@cea.f [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, 91991 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Alain [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCP, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-09-01

    The estimation of the number of inert gas atoms contained at equilibrium in microscale bubbles in a solid usually relies on a well-known formula equilibrating the internal pressure of He to the surface energy of the bubble. This approach evidences a strong variation with temperature of He content for a given bubble. At the opposite, at the Angstrom scale, ab initio calculations for He contained in vacancy assemblies neglect temperature effects. In this work, empirical potential molecular dynamics simulations are used to study, in the case of helium inserted in cubic silicon carbide, the variation of the He content of sub-nanoscale cavities with temperature. To do so free energy for He atoms inserted in cavities made of a few vacancies (up to 29) are calculated. One then evidences the existence of a sub-surface segregation in interstitial sites close to the surface of the cavity. The variation of the He content with temperature is observed to be negligible at the nanoscale, thus validating the ab initio approach.

  18. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2013-10-28

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  19. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K.; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G.

    2013-10-01

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  20. Hybrid continuum-atomistic approach to model electrokinetics in nanofluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amani, Ehsan, E-mail: eamani@aut.ac.ir; Movahed, Saeid, E-mail: smovahed@aut.ac.ir

    2016-06-07

    In this study, for the first time, a hybrid continuum-atomistic based model is proposed for electrokinetics, electroosmosis and electrophoresis, through nanochannels. Although continuum based methods are accurate enough to model fluid flow and electric potential in nanofluidics (in dimensions larger than 4 nm), ionic concentration is too low in nanochannels for the continuum assumption to be valid. On the other hand, the non-continuum based approaches are too time-consuming and therefore is limited to simple geometries, in practice. Here, to propose an efficient hybrid continuum-atomistic method of modelling the electrokinetics in nanochannels; the fluid flow and electric potential are computed based on continuum hypothesis coupled with an atomistic Lagrangian approach for the ionic transport. The results of the model are compared to and validated by the results of the molecular dynamics technique for a couple of case studies. Then, the influences of bulk ionic concentration, external electric field, size of nanochannel, and surface electric charge on the electrokinetic flow and ionic mass transfer are investigated, carefully. The hybrid continuum-atomistic method is a promising approach to model more complicated geometries and investigate more details of the electrokinetics in nanofluidics. - Highlights: • A hybrid continuum-atomistic model is proposed for electrokinetics in nanochannels. • The model is validated by molecular dynamics. • This is a promising approach to model more complicated geometries and physics.

  1. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  2. Thermodynamic integration based on classical atomistic simulations to determine the Gibbs energy of condensed phases: Calculation of the aluminum-zirconium system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J.-P.; Gheribi, A. E.; Chartrand, P.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, an in silico procedure to generate a fully coherent set of thermodynamic properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is proposed. The procedure is applied to the Al-Zr system because of its importance in the development of high strength Al-Li alloys and of bulk metallic glasses. Cohesive energies of the studied condensed phases of the Al-Zr system (the liquid phase, the fcc solid solution, and various orthorhombic stoichiometric compounds) are calculated using the modified embedded atom model (MEAM) in the second-nearest-neighbor formalism (2NN). The Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is parameterized in this work using ab initio and experimental data found in the literature for the AlZr3-L12 structure, while its predictive ability is confirmed for several other solid structures and for the liquid phase. The thermodynamic integration (TI) method is implemented in a general MC algorithm in order to evaluate the absolute Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solutions. The entropy of mixing calculated from the TI method, combined to the enthalpy of mixing and the heat capacity data generated from MD/MC simulations performed in the isobaric-isothermal/canonical (NPT/NVT) ensembles are used to parameterize the Gibbs energy function of all the condensed phases in the Al-rich side of the Al-Zr system in a CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. The modified quasichemical model in the pair approximation (MQMPA) and the cluster variation method (CVM) in the tetrahedron approximation are used to define the Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solid solution respectively for their entire range of composition. Thermodynamic and structural data generated from our MD/MC simulations are used as input data to parameterize these thermodynamic models. A detailed analysis of the validity and transferability of the Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is presented throughout our work by comparing the predicted properties obtained

  3. Atomistic modeling and experimental studies of radiation damage in monazite-type LaPO4 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yaqi; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Neumeier, Stefan; Deissmann, Guido; Kulriya, Pawan K.; Gale, Julian D.

    2017-02-01

    We simulated the threshold displacement energies (Ed), the related displacement and defect formation probabilities, and the energy barriers in LaPO4 monazite-type ceramics. The obtained Ed values for La, P, O primary knock-on atoms (PKA) are 56 eV, 75 eV and 8 eV, respectively. We found that these energies can be correlated with the energy barriers that separate the defect from the initial states. The Ed values are about twice the values of energy barriers, which is explained through an efficient dissipation of the PKA kinetic energy in the considered system. The computed Ed were used in simulations of the extent of radiation damage in La0.2Gd0.8PO4 solid solution, investigated experimentally. We found that this lanthanide phosphate fully amorphises in the ion beam experiments for fluences higher than ∼1013 ions/cm2.

  4. In Silico Affinity Profiling of Neuroactive Polyphenols for Post-Traumatic Calpain Inactivation: A Molecular Docking and Atomistic Simulation Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-activated nonlysosomal neutral proteases, calpains, are believed to be early mediators of neuronal damage associated with neuron death and axonal degeneration after traumatic neural injuries. In this study, a library of biologically active small molecular weight calpain inhibitors was used for model validation and inhibition site recognition. Subsequently, two natural neuroactive polyphenols, curcumin and quercetin, were tested for their sensitivity and activity towards calpain’s proteolytic sequence and compared with the known calpain inhibitors via detailed molecular mechanics (MM, molecular dynamics (MD, and docking simulations. The MM and MD energy profiles (SJA6017 < AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < quercetin < leupeptin < PD150606 < curcumin < ALLN < ALLM < MDL-28170 < calpeptin and the docking analysis (AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < ALLN < PD150606 < curcumin < leupeptin < quercetin < calpeptin < SJA6017 < MDL-28170 < ALLM demonstrated that polyphenols conferred comparable calpain inhibition profiling. The modeling paradigm used in this study provides the first detailed account of corroboration of enzyme inhibition efficacy of calpain inhibitors and the respective calpain–calpain inhibitor molecular complexes’ energetic landscape and in addition stimulates the polyphenol bioactive paradigm for post-SCI intervention with implications reaching to experimental in vitro, in cyto, and in vivo studies.

  5. Protein Folding and Structure Prediction from the Ground Up: The Atomistic Associative Memory, Water Mediated, Structure and Energy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingchen; Lin, Xingcheng; Zheng, Weihua; Onuchic, José N; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-08-25

    The associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained force field with transferable tertiary interactions that incorporates local in sequence energetic biases using bioinformatically derived structural information about peptide fragments with locally similar sequences that we call memories. The memory information from the protein data bank (PDB) database guides proper protein folding. The structural information about available sequences in the database varies in quality and can sometimes lead to frustrated free energy landscapes locally. One way out of this difficulty is to construct the input fragment memory information from all-atom simulations of portions of the complete polypeptide chain. In this paper, we investigate this approach first put forward by Kwac and Wolynes in a more complete way by studying the structure prediction capabilities of this approach for six α-helical proteins. This scheme which we call the atomistic associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AAWSEM) amounts to an ab initio protein structure prediction method that starts from the ground up without using bioinformatic input. The free energy profiles from AAWSEM show that atomistic fragment memories are sufficient to guide the correct folding when tertiary forces are included. AAWSEM combines the efficiency of coarse-grained simulations on the full protein level with the local structural accuracy achievable from all-atom simulations of only parts of a large protein. The results suggest that a hybrid use of atomistic fragment memory and database memory in structural predictions may well be optimal for many practical applications.

  6. Structure of misfit dislocations in niobium-sapphire interfaces and strength of interfacial bonding: An atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, A.; Moebus, G.; Vitek, V.; Ruehle, M.; Tichy, G.

    1999-11-12

    The formation of networks of misfit dislocations is investigated at the (0001){sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{parallel}(111){sub Nb} interface using a recently proposed approach which employs a very simple pair-potential to describe interaction between the metal and the substrate that contains the strength of interfacial adhesion as a parameter. The calculations demonstrate how the strength of bonding between the two materials decides both the form of the network and the atomic structure of the cores of these dislocations. At the same time it reveals that diffusion is essential for the formation of the observed triangular network of 1/2{l{underscore}angle}111{r{underscore}angle} dislocations. The calculated structures are then used to investigate related high resolution electron microscope (HREM) images using a multislice technique. In these simulations translational symmetry along the electron beam was not assumed but for each slice of material along the beam different sub-structures were used. This allowed us to investigate fully the effect of the dislocation intersections upon the images of the dislocation cores. Their effect is, indeed, considerable if an intersection is in the region producing the image but if not, the images of the cores of misfit dislocations are affected only marginally and HREM can capture fine details of the core structure. A direct comparison of an experimental observation in Mayer and co-workers with the present simulations demonstrates this ability.

  7. Atomistic study on mixed-mode fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron interacting with coherent copper and nickel nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Motasem, Ahmed Tamer; Mai, Nghia Trong; Choi, Seung Tae; Posselt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The effect of copper and/or nickel nanoclusters, generally formed by neutron irradiation, on fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron was investigated by using molecular statics simulation. The equilibrium configuration of nanoclusters was obtained by using a combination of an on-lattice annealing based on Metropolis Monte Carlo method and an off-lattice relaxation by molecular dynamics simulation. Residual stress distributions near the nanoclusters were also calculated, since compressive or tensile residual stresses may retard or accelerate, respectively, the propagation of a crack running into a nanocluster. One of the nanoclusters was located in front of a straight crack in ferrite iron with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. Two crystallographic directions, of which the crack plane and crack front direction are (010)[001] and (111) [ 1 bar 10 ] , were considered, representing cleavage and non-cleavage orientations in ferrite iron, respectively. Displacements corresponding to pure opening-mode and mixed-mode loadings were imposed on the boundary region and the energy minimization was performed. It was observed that the fracture mechanisms of ferrite iron under the pure opening-mode loading are strongly influenced by the presence of nanoclusters, while under the mixed-mode loading the nanoclusters have no significant effect on the crack propagation behavior of ferrite iron.

  8. A multiscale approach for the deformation mechanism in pearlite microstructure: Atomistic study of the role of the heterointerface on ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawa, Tomotsugu, E-mail: simokawa@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [School of Mechanical Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Oguro, Takuma [Division of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaki; Higashida, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ohashi, Tetsuya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido 090-8507 Japan (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    The role of the ferrite/cementite heterointerface on the mechanical properties of heavily-drawn-pearlitic steel is investigated via tensile deformation tests of multilayered composite models with brittle and ductile virtual materials in a two-dimensional triangle-lattice system by using molecular dynamics simulations. The interface strength is controlled by introducing a heterointerface potential. The dominant role of heterointerface on the mechanical properties of multilayered composite models is influenced by the interface strength. In case of weak interface strength, the heterointerface acts as a strong barrier to dislocation motion in the ductile phase; hence, the multilayered composite model shows high strength but extremely low ductility. This tendency corresponds well to that of as-drawn pearlitic steel with cementite decomposition. In case of strong interface strength, the heterointerface acts as a dislocation source of the brittle phase by dislocation transmission through the heterointerface from the ductile to brittle phase; hence, the multilayered composite model shows good ductility with a small decrease in strength. This tendency corresponds well to annealed pearlitic steel recovered from cementite decomposition. These results suggest that cementite decomposition decreases the plastic deformation potential of the heterointerface. The conditions necessary for the heterointerface to simultaneously exhibit high strength and ductility are discussed on the basis of the results of atomic simulations.

  9. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  10. Computer simulation in materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, R.J.; Beeler, J.R.; Esterling, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers on the subject of modeling in materials science. Topics include thermodynamics of metallic solids and fluids, grain-boundary modeling, fracture from an atomistic point of view, and computer simulation of dislocations on an atomistic level.

  11. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  12. Molecular modeling and simulation of atactic polystyrene/amorphous silica nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, I.; Vogiatzis, G. G.; Tzoumanekas, C.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    The local structure, segmental dynamics, topological analysis of entanglement networks and mechanical properties of atactic polystyrene - amorphous silica nanocomposites are studied via molecular simulations using two interconnected levels of representation: (a) A coarse - grained level. Equilibration at all length scales at this level is achieved via connectivity - altering Monte Carlo simulations. (b) An atomistic level. Initial configurations for atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are obtained by reverse mapping well- equilibrated coarse-grained configurations. By analyzing atomistic MD trajectories, the polymer density profile is found to exhibit layering in the vicinity of the nanoparticle surface. The dynamics of polystyrene (in neat and filled melt systems) is characterized in terms of bond orientation. Well-equilibrated coarse-grained long-chain configurations are reduced to entanglement networks via topological analysis with the CReTA algorithm. Atomistic simulation results for the mechanical properties are compared to the experimental measurements and other computational works.

  13. The atomistic mechanism of hcp-to-bcc martensitic transformation in the Ti-Nb system revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, JiaHao; Liu, BaiXin

    2015-02-14

    Applying the constructed Ti-Nb potentials, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the martensitic transformation of Ti100-xNbx alloys (x = 5, 10…25) from the α' phase (hcp) to the β phase (bcc). It is found that the transformation involved four phases, i.e. α', α'', fco (face-centered orthorhombic), and β phases. The structures of the obtained phases exhibit consistency with experimental data, verifying the validity of atomic simulations. The simulations not only revealed the processes of atomic displacements during the transformation, but also elucidated the underlying mechanism of the martensitic transformation at the atomic level. The martensitic transformation incorporates three types of coinstantaneous deformations i.e. slide, shear as well as extension, and the subsequent lattice constant relaxation. Furthermore, according to the proposed mechanism, the crystallographic correlation between the initial α' phase and the final β phase has been deduced. The simulation results provide a clear landscape on the martensitic transformation mechanism, facilitating our comprehensive understanding on the phase transition in the Ti-Nb system.

  14. Atomistic Processes of Catalyst Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-27

    The purpose of this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sasol North America, Inc., and the oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to improve the stability of alumina-based industrial catalysts through the combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at ORNL and innovative sample preparation techniques at Sasol. Outstanding progress has been made in task 1, 'Atomistic processes of La stabilization'. STEM investigations provided structural information with single-atom precision, showing the lattice location of La dopant atoms, thus enabling first-principles calculations of binding energies, which were performed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. The stabilization mechanism turns out to be entirely due to a particularly strong binding energy of the La tom to the {gamma}-alumina surface. The large size of the La atom precludes incorporation of La into the bulk alumina and also strains the surface, thus preventing any clustering of La atoms. Thus highly disperse distribution is achieved and confirmed by STEM images. la also affects relative stability of the exposed surfaces of {gamma}-alumina, making the 100 surface more stable for the doped case, unlike the 110 surface for pure {gamma}-alumina. From the first-principles calculations, they can estimate the increase in transition temperature for the 3% loading of La used commercially, and it is in excellent agreement with experiment. This task was further pursued aiming to generate useable recommendations for the optimization of the preparation techniques for La-doped aluminas. The effort was primarily concentrated on the connection between the boehmitre-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transition (i.e. catalyst preparation) and the resulting dispersion of La on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. It was determined that the La distribution on boehmite was non-uniform and different from that on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and thus

  15. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  16. Accurate Three States Model for Amino Acids with Two Chemically Coupled Titrating Sites in Explicit Solvent Atomistic Constant pH Simulations and pKa Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Plamen; Donnini, Serena; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2017-01-10

    Correct protonation of titratable groups in biomolecules is crucial for their accurate description by molecular dynamics simulations. In the context of constant pH simulations, an additional protonation degree of freedom is introduced for each titratable site, allowing the protonation state to change dynamically with changing structure or electrostatics. Here, we extend previous approaches for an accurate description of chemically coupled titrating sites. A second reaction coordinate is used to switch between two tautomeric states of an amino acid with chemically coupled titratable sites, such as aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), and histidine (His). To this aim, we test a scheme involving three protonation states. To facilitate charge neutrality as required for periodic boundary conditions and Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) electrostatics, titration of each respective amino acid is coupled to a "water" molecule that is charged in the opposite direction. Additionally, a force field modification for Amber99sb is introduced and tested for the description of carboxyl group protonation. Our three states model is tested by titration simulations of Asp, Glu, and His, yielding a good agreement, reproducing the correct geometry of the groups in their different protonation forms. We further show that the ion concentration change due to the neutralizing "water" molecules does not significantly affect the protonation free energies of the titratable groups, suggesting that the three states model provides a good description of biomolecular dynamics at constant pH.

  17. On the atomistic origin of radiation-structural relaxation in chalcogenide glasses: the results of positron annihilation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, Ya. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Faculty of Electronics, Lviv (Ukraine); Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' , Lviv (Ukraine); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland); Ingram, A. [Institute of Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry, Opole Technical University (Poland); Filipecki, J.; Hyla, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2011-11-15

    Instability effects caused by high-energy {gamma}-irradiation are studied in (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub x}glasses (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, the results being treated within two-state trapping model in both normal and high-measurement statistics. The observed decrease in positron trapping rate of the glasses tested just after {gamma}-irradiation was explained due to renovation of destroyed covalent chemical bonds. This process was governed by monomolecular single-exponential relaxation kinetics agreed well with corresponding changes in the fundamental optical absorption edge. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. First Principles Based Reactive Atomistic Simulations to Understand the Effects of Molecular Hypervelocity Impact on Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, A.; Cheng, M-J; Cvicek, V.; Beegle, Luther W.; Hodyss, R.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the predicted impact of species such as ice-water, CO2, CH4, and NH3, on oxidized titanium, as well as HC species on diamond surfaces. These simulations provide the dynamics of product distributions during and after a hypervelocity impact event, ionization fractions, and dissociation probabilities for the various species of interest as a function of impact velocity (energy). We are using these results to determine the relevance of the fragmentation process to Cassini INMS results, and to quantify its effects on the observed spectra.

  19. Key role of water in proton transfer at the Q(o)-site of the cytochrome bc(1) complex predicted by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postila, P. A.; Kaszuba, K.; Sarewicz, M.

    2013-01-01

    on the simulations we are able to show the atom-level binding modes of two substrate forms: quinol (QH(2)) and quinone (Q). The QH(2) binding at the Q(o)-site involves a coordinated water arrangement that produces an exceptionally close and stable interaction between the cyt b and iron sulfur protein subunits....... In this arrangement water molecules are positioned suitably in relation to the hydroxyls of the QH(2) ring to act as the primary acceptors of protons detaching from the oxidized substrate. In contrast, water does not have a similar role in the Q binding at the Q(o)-site. Moreover, the coordinated water molecule...

  20. First principles molecular dynamics simulation of a task-specific ionic liquid based on silver-olefin complex: atomistic insight into separation process

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, De-en

    2008-01-01

    First principles molecular dynamics based on density functional theory is applied to a hypothetical ionic liquid whose cations and anions are silver-ethylene complex [Ag(C2H4)2+] and tetrafluoroborate [BF4-], respectively. This ionic liquid represents a group of task-specific silver complex-based ionic liquids synthesized recently. Molecular dynamics simulations at two temperatures are performed for five picoseconds. Events of association, dissociation, exchange, and recombination of ethylene with silver cation are observed. A mechanism of ethylene transfer similar to the Grotthus type of proton transfer in water is identified, where a silver cation accepts one ethylene molecule and donates another to a neighboring silver cation. This mechanism may contribute to fast transport of olefins through ionic liquid membranes based on silver complexes for olefin/paraffin separation.

  1. First principles molecular dynamics simulation of a task-specific ionic liquid based on silver-olefin complex: atomistic insights into a separation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-en; Dai, Sheng

    2008-08-21

    First principles molecular dynamics based on density functional theory is applied to a hypothetical ionic liquid whose cations and anions are silver-ethylene complex [Ag(C2H4)2+] and tetrafluoroborate [BF4-], respectively. This ionic liquid represents a group of task-specific silver complex-based ionic liquids synthesized recently. Molecular dynamics simulations at two temperatures are performed for five picoseconds. Events of association, dissociation, exchange, and recombination of ethylene with silver cation are found. A mechanism of ethylene transfer similar to the Grotthus type of proton transfer in water is identified, where a silver cation accepts one ethylene molecule and donates another to a neighboring silver cation. This mechanism may contribute to fast transport of olefins through ionic liquid membranes based on silver complexes for olefin/paraffin separation.

  2. Recovery of the poisoned topoisomerase II for DNA religation: coordinated motion of the cleavage core revealed with the microsecond atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2015-08-18

    Type II topoisomerases resolve topological problems of DNA double helices by passing one duplex through the reversible double-stranded break they generated on another duplex. Despite the wealth of information in the cleaving operation, molecular understanding of the enzymatic DNA ligation remains elusive. Topoisomerase poisons are widely used in anti-cancer and anti-bacterial therapy and have been employed to entrap the intermediates of topoisomerase IIβ with religatable DNA substrate. We removed drug molecules from the structure and conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the enzyme-mediated DNA religation. The drug-unbound intermediate displayed transitions toward the resealing-compliant configuration: closing distance between the cleaved DNA termini, B-to-A transformation of the double helix, and restoration of the metal-binding motif. By mapping the contact configurations and the correlated motions between enzyme and DNA, we identified the indispensable role of the linker preceding winged helix domain (WHD) in coordinating the movements of TOPRIM, the nucleotide-binding motifs, and the bound DNA substrate during gate closure. We observed a nearly vectorial transition in the recovery of the enzyme and identified the previously uncharacterized roles of Asn508 and Arg677 in DNA rejoining. Our findings delineate the dynamic mechanism of the DNA religation conducted by type II topoisomerases.

  3. Theinfluence of a hierarchical porous carbon network on the coherent dynamics of a nanoconfined room temperature ionic liquid: A neutron spin echo and atomistic simulation investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuelos, Jose Leo [ORNL; Feng, Guang [ORNL; Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Li, Song [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Arend, Nikolas [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The molecular-scale dynamic properties of the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, or [C4mim+ ][Tf2N ], confined in hierarchical microporous mesoporous carbon, were investigated using neutron spin echo (NSE) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both NSE and MD reveal pronounced slowing of the overall collective dynamics, including the presence of an immobilized fraction of RTIL at the pore wall, on the time scales of these approaches. A fraction of the dynamics, corresponding to RTIL inside 0.75 nm micropores located along the mesopore surfaces, are faster than those of RTIL in direct contact with the walls of 5.8 nm and 7.8 nm cylindrical mesopores. This behavior is ascribed to the near-surface confined-ion density fluctuations resulting from the ion ion and ion wall interactions between the micropores and mesopores as well as their confinement geometries. Strong micropore RTIL interactions result in less-coordinated RTIL within the micropores than in the bulk fluid. Increasing temperature from 296 K to 353 K reduces the immobilized RTIL fraction and results in nearly an order of magnitude increase in the RTIL dynamics. The observed interfacial phenomena underscore the importance of tailoring the surface properties of porous carbons to achieve desirable electrolyte dynamic behavior, since this impacts the performance in applications such as electrical energy storage devices.

  4. Simulation of ablation and plume dynamics under femtosecond double-pulse laser irradiation of aluminum: Comparison of atomistic and continual approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokin, Vladimir B.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2017-02-01

    We elaborated two numerical methods, two-temperature hydrodynamics and hybrid two-temperature molecular dynamics, which take into account basic mechanisms of a metal target response to ultrashort laser irradiation. The model used for the description of the electronic subsystem is identical for both approaches, while the ionic part is defined by an equation of state in hydrodynamics and by an interatomic potential in molecular dynamics. Since the phase diagram of the equation of state and corresponding potential match reasonably well, the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods is quite similar. This correspondence can be considered as a first step towards the development of a self-consistent combined model. Two important processes are highlighted in simulations of double-pulse ablation: (1) the crater depth decrease as a result of recoil flux formation in the nascent plume when the delay between the pulses increases; (2) the plume reheating by the second pulse that gives rise to two- three-fold growth of the electron temperature with the delay varying from 0 to 200 ps.

  5. Atomistic simulations of a solid/liquid interface: a combined force field and first principles approach to the structure and dynamics of acetonitrile near an anatase surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffmann, Florian; Hutter, Juerg; VandeVondele, Joost [Physical Chemistry Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-02-13

    The acetonitrile/anatase(101) interface can be considered a prototypical interface between an oxide and a polar aprotic liquid, and is common in dye sensitized solar cells. Using first principles molecular dynamics simulations of a slab of TiO{sub 2} in contact with neat acetonitrile (MeCN), the liquid structure near this interface has been characterized. Furthermore, in order to investigate properties that require extensive sampling, a classical force field to describe the MeCN/TiO{sub 2} interaction has been optimized, and we show that this force field accurately describes the structure near the interface. We find a surprisingly strong interaction of MeCN with TiO{sub 2}, which leads to an ordered first MeCN layer displaying a significantly enhanced molecular dipole. The strong dipolar interactions between solvent molecules lead to pronounced layering further away from the interface, each successive layer having an alternate orientation of the molecular dipoles. At least seven distinct solvent layers (approximately 12 A) can be discerned in the orientational distribution function. The observed structure also strongly suppresses diffusion parallel to the interface in the first nanometer of the liquid. These results show that the properties of the liquid near the interface differ from those in the bulk, which suggests that solvation near the interface will be distinctly different from solvation in the bulk.

  6. Atomistic simulation of point defects in face centered cubic metals using MAEAM potential%面心立方金属中点缺陷的MAEAM模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋祥磊; 张晓军; 张建民; 徐可为

    2005-01-01

    From the system energy minimization, the stable configuration and the rule of migration of mono-vacancy, di-vacancy and a single self-interstitial atom are analyzed using the modified analytical embedded atom method (MAEAM) combined with the molecular dynamics simulation in Al, Ni, Cu,Ag, Au and Pb. The results show that only the first-nearest neighbor di-vacancy is the stable configuration of di-vacancy. Compared with the mono-vacancy, the first-nearest neighbor di-vacancy is Ni, Cu, Ag and Au, but the body-centered configuration is favorable in Al and Pb. However compared with mono-vacancy, the single self-interstitial atom is also difficult to form.%将改进分析型嵌入原子法(MAEAM)模型与分子动力学模拟方法相结合,用能量最小化原理分析了面心立方金属Al、Ni、Cu、Ag、Au和Pb中的单空位、双空位及单自间隙原子3种点缺陷的稳定构型及其迁移规律.结果表明:最近邻双空位是双空位中惟一能够存在的构型,而且比单空位还容易迁移;尽管在4种构型的自间隙原子中,〈110〉哑铃状自间隙构型容易在Ni、Cu、Ag和Au中形成,体心自间隙构型也容易在Al和Pb中形成,但和单空位相比较还是较难形成的.

  7. Fully atomistic molecular-mechanical model of liquid alkane oils: Computational validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariev, Tsvetan K; Slavchov, Radomir I; Tadjer, Alia V; Ivanova, Anela N

    2014-04-15

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on liquid n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane to derive an atomistic model for middle-chain-length alkanes. All simulations were based on existing molecular-mechanical parameters for alkanes. The computational protocol was optimized, for example, in terms of thermo- and barostat, to reproduce properly the properties of the liquids. The model was validated by comparison of thermal, structural, and dynamic properties of the normal alkane liquids to experimental data. Two different combinations of temperature and pressure coupling algorithms were tested. A simple differential approach was applied to evaluate fluctuation-related properties with sufficient accuracy. Analysis of the data reveals a satisfactory representation of the hydrophobic systems behavior. Thermodynamic parameters are close to the experimental values and exhibit correct temperature dependence. The observed intramolecular geometry corresponds to extended conformations domination, whereas the intermolecular structure demonstrates all characteristics of liquid systems. Cavity size distribution function was calculated from coordinates analysis and was applied to study the solubility of gases in hexane and heptane oils. This study provides a platform for further in-depth research on hydrophobic solutions and multicomponent systems.

  8. Accelerating a hybrid continuum-atomistic fluidic model with on-the-fly machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Stephenson, David; Lockerby, Duncan A

    2016-01-01

    We present a hybrid continuum-atomistic scheme which combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with on-the-fly machine learning techniques for the accurate and efficient prediction of multiscale fluidic systems. By using a Gaussian process as a surrogate model for the computationally expensive MD simulations, we use Bayesian inference to predict the system behaviour at the atomistic scale, purely by consideration of the macroscopic inputs and outputs. Whenever the uncertainty of this prediction is greater than a predetermined acceptable threshold, a new MD simulation is performed to continually augment the database, which is never required to be complete. This provides a substantial enhancement to the current generation of hybrid methods, which often require many similar atomistic simulations to be performed, discarding information after it is used once. We apply our hybrid scheme to nano-confined unsteady flow through a high-aspect-ratio converging-diverging channel, and make comparisons between the new s...

  9. Simulations of boundary migration during recrystallization using molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Rasmus Brauner; Trautt, Z.T.; Upmanyu, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have applied an atomistic simulation methodology based on molecular dynamics to study grain boundary migration in crystalline materials, driven by the excess energy of dislocation arrangements. This method is used to simulate recrystallization in metals. The simulations reveal that the migration...

  10. A combined EPR and MD simulation study of a nitroxyl spin label with restricted internal mobility sensitive to protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Chami, Fatima; White, Gaye F.; Thomson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    EPR studies combined with fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and an MD-EPR simulation method provide evidence for intrinsic low rotameric mobility of a nitroxyl spin label, Rn, compared to the more widely employed label MTSL (R1). Both experimental and modelling results using two structurally different sites of attachment to Myoglobin show that the EPR spectra of Rn are more sensitive to the local protein environment than that of MTSL. This study reveals the potential of using the Rn spin label as a reporter of protein motions.

  11. 大规模并行原子模拟在钛合金界面行为研究中的应用%Implementing Large-Scale Parallel Atomistic Simulations in the Investigation of Interfacial Behaviors in Titanium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皞; 徐东生; 杨锐

    2013-01-01

    界面对钛合金的力学性能有至关重要的影响。界面行为的原子模拟涉及的原子数目庞大,必须借助大规模并行计算。本研究组开发了大规模并行分子动力学程序,并将其应用于钛合金中不同种类界面行为的模拟研究。本文以钛铝金属间化合物中的孪晶界和α钛中的特殊大角晶界为例,介绍研究组在钛合金晶界行为的计算模拟方面的近期研究成果。所模拟的体系尺寸达到微米级,所需 CPU 核数几十至几百不等。研究发现,钛铝模拟晶胞沿伪孪晶方向剪切变形时,等静压力下可产生 L11结构的伪孪晶形核长大,而等静张力下剪切可产生真孪晶的形核长大,提出钛铝中一种新的孪晶长大机制。在α钛中,特定取向的两个晶粒所形成的晶界与位错发生相互作用,裂纹形核依赖于加载外力的取向而发生在晶界处或硬取向晶粒内,从而可能导致疲劳断裂行为与加载取向相关。这些结果有助于理解钛合金的塑性变形行为,并为更高尺度的模拟研究提供了原子尺度细节。%The mechanical behavior of titanium alloys is often inlfuenced signiifcantly by interfaces. The atomistic investigation of interfaces corresponds with large numbers of atoms, hence requiring large-scale parallel simulations. A molecular dynamics code for such simulations is developed in our group, and used in the investigations of interfacial behaviors in titanium alloys. The present paper introduces our recent works on the simulations of interfacial behaviors in titanium alloys, with the coherent twin boundary in TiAl and a special large-angle grain boundary inα-titanium as two examples. The size of the simulated cells is around micrometers, using tens to hundreds of CPU cores. It is found that, in TiAl under shear along the pseudo-twin direction, pseudo-twin and true twin nucleates and grows under hydrostatic compression and tension respectively

  12. Simulation study of water and sugar dynamics in supercooled mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Valeria; Cagin, Tahir; Goddard, William A.

    2003-03-01

    Water dynamics in concentrated carbohydrate solutions is of utmost importance in food and pharmaceutical technology, where low water mobility is desirable to slow down chemical degradation and preserve biomolecules. We have studied the microscopic mechanism of water diffusion in binary and polydisperse malto-oligosaccharides and water mixtures by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The computations were performed with a coarse grain model (M3B), derived from atomistic simulations of water and malto-oligosaccharides. The use of the M3B model permits simulations of the order of 0.1 microsecond, thus allowing us to explore water dynamics from the liquid to the deep supercooled regime. The dynamics of water confined in the sugar matrix is slowed down with respect to bulk water. We found that at low moisture content and low temperature, ranslational diffusion of water and glucose rotation proceed through a hopping-diffusion mechanism. Moreover, we found water mobility to be heterogeneous: there is a broad distribution of time scales for different water molecules in the mixtures. We discuss whether there is a relationship between the heterogeneous structure of these mixtures in the sub-nanometer scale and the heterogeneous dynamics of water molecules.

  13. Peridynamics as a rigorous coarse-graining of atomistics for multiscale materials design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Aidun, John Bahram; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Sears, Mark P.; Kamm, James R.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes activities undertaken during FY08-FY10 for the LDRD Peridynamics as a Rigorous Coarse-Graining of Atomistics for Multiscale Materials Design. The goal of our project was to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. The goal of our project is to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. Our coarse-graining overcomes the intrinsic limitation of coupling atomistics with classical continuum mechanics via the FEM (finite element method), SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), or MPM (material point method); namely, that classical continuum mechanics assumes a local force interaction that is incompatible with the nonlocal force model of atomistic methods. Therefore FEM, SPH, and MPM inherit this limitation. This seemingly innocuous dichotomy has far reaching consequences; for example, classical continuum mechanics cannot resolve the short wavelength behavior associated with atomistics. Other consequences include spurious forces, invalid phonon dispersion relationships, and irreconcilable descriptions/treatments of temperature. We propose a statistically based coarse-graining of atomistics via peridynamics and so develop a first of a kind mesoscopic capability to enable consistent, thermodynamically sound, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale material simulation. Peridynamics (PD) is a microcontinuum theory that assumes nonlocal forces for describing long-range material interaction. The force interactions occurring at finite distances are naturally accounted for in PD. Moreover, PDs nonlocal force model is entirely consistent with those used by atomistics methods, in stark contrast to classical continuum mechanics. Hence, PD can be employed for mesoscopic phenomena that are beyond the realms of classical continuum mechanics and

  14. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  15. Software News and Update Reconstruction of Atomistic Details from Coarse-Grained Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; Schafer, Lars V.; Goga, Nicolae; Risselada, H. Jelger; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm to reconstruct atomistic structures from their corresponding coarse-grained (CG) representations and its implementation into the freely available molecular dynamics (MD) program package GROMACS. The central part of the algorithm is a simulated annealing MD simulation in which

  16. Atomistic modeling at experimental strain rates and timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Cao, Penghui; Tao, Weiwei; Sharma, Pradeep; Park, Harold S.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling physical phenomena with atomistic fidelity and at laboratory timescales is one of the holy grails of computational materials science. Conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable the elucidation of an astonishing array of phenomena inherent in the mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. However, conventional MD, with our current computational modalities, is incapable of resolving timescales longer than microseconds (at best). In this short review article, we briefly review a recently proposed approach—the so-called autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method—that in certain instances can provide valuable information on slow timescale processes. We provide a general summary of the principles underlying the ABC approach, with emphasis on recent methodological developments enabling the study of mechanically-driven processes at slow (experimental) strain rates and timescales. Specifically, we show that by combining a strong physical understanding of the underlying phenomena, kinetic Monte Carlo, transition state theory and minimum energy pathway methods, the ABC method has been found to be useful in a variety of mechanically-driven problems ranging from the prediction of creep-behavior in metals, constitutive laws for grain boundary sliding, void nucleation rates, diffusion in amorphous materials to protein unfolding. Aside from reviewing the basic ideas underlying this approach, we emphasize some of the key challenges encountered in our own personal research work and suggest future research avenues for exploration.

  17. Anisotropic solid-liquid interface kinetics in silicon: an atomistically informed phase-field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, S.; Albe, K.; Flegel, E.; Barragan-Yani, D. A.; Wagner, B.

    2017-09-01

    We present an atomistically informed parametrization of a phase-field model for describing the anisotropic mobility of liquid-solid interfaces in silicon. The model is derived from a consistent set of atomistic data and thus allows to directly link molecular dynamics and phase field simulations. Expressions for the free energy density, the interfacial energy and the temperature and orientation dependent interface mobility are systematically fitted to data from molecular dynamics simulations based on the Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential. The temperature-dependent interface velocity follows a Vogel-Fulcher type behavior and allows to properly account for the dynamics in the undercooled melt.

  18. M3B: A coarse grain model for the simulation of oligosaccharides and their water mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, William A.; Cagin, Tahir; Molinero, Valeria

    2003-03-01

    Water and sugar dynamics in concentrated carbohydrate solutions is of utmost importance in food and pharmaceutical technology. Water diffusion in concentrated sugar mixtures can be slowed down many orders of magnitude with respect to bulk water [1], making extremely expensive the simulation of these systems with atomistic detail for the required time-scales. We present a coarse grain model (M3B) for malto-oligosaccharides and their water mixtures. M3B speeds up molecular dynamics simulations about 500-1000 times with respect to the atomistic model while retaining enough detail to be mapped back to the atomistic structures with low uncertainty in the positions. The former characteristic allows the study of water and carbohydrate dynamics in supercooled and polydisperse mixtures with characteristic time scales above the nanosecond. The latter makes M3B well suited for combined atomistic-mesoscale simulations. We present the parameterization of M3B force field for water and a family of technologically relevant glucose oligosaccharides, the alpha-(1->4) glucans. The coarse grain force field is completely parameterized from atomistic simulations to reproduce the density, cohesive energy and structural parameters of amorphous sugars. We will show that M3B is capable to describe the helical character of the higher oligosaccharides, and that the water structure in low moisture mixtures shows the same features obtained with the atomistic and M3B models. [1] R Parker, SG Ring: Carbohydr. Res. 273 (1995) 147-55.

  19. Atomistic Investigation of Cu-Induced Misfolding in the Onset of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Francis; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2009-03-01

    A nucleation mechanism for the misfolding of α-synuclein, the protein implicated in Parkinson's Disease (PD), is investigated using computer simulations. Through a combination of ab initio and classical simulation techniques, the conformational evolution of copper-ion-initiated misfolding of α-synuclein is determined. Based on these investigations and available experimental evidence, an atomistic model detailing the nucleation-initiated pathogenesis of PD is proposed. Once misfolded, the proteins can assemble into fibrils, the primary structural components of the deleterious PD plaques. Our model identifies a process of structural modifications to an initially unfolded α-synuclein that results in a partially folded intermediate with a well defined nucleation site as a precursor to the fully misfolded protein. The identified pathway can enable studies of reversal mechanisms and inhibitory agents, potentially leading to the development of effective therapies.

  20. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  1. Comparisons and scaling rules between N+N2 and N2+N2 collision induced dissociation cross sections from atomistic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, F.; Garcia, E.; Laganà, A.

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of elementary processes involved in plasmas are key to successfully perform accurate kinetic simulations. The issue is the huge amount of data to treat, both in the dynamical calculation and in the kinetic simulation. The aim of this paper is to study the dissociation in atom–molecule (AM) and molecule–molecule (MM) collisions involving nitrogen, obtained by molecular dynamics calculations considering vibrational states in the range 10–50 and collision energy up to 10 eV, in order to formulate suitable scaling laws resulting in less expensive computational procedures and easier to handle treatments in kinetic simulations. It is shown that, while a direct substitution of MM dissociation cross sections with AM ones might be acceptable only at very high collision energy, scaling laws application allows to obtain quite good results on almost the whole energy range of interest.

  2. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  3. Simulation in International Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists have long worked to replicate real-world phenomena in their research and teaching environments. Unlike our biophysical science colleagues, we are faced with an area of study that is not governed by the laws of physics and other more predictable relationships. As a result, social scientists, and international studies scholars more…

  4. Predicting dislocation climb and creep from explicit atomistic details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Mukul; Lau, Timothy T; Rodney, David; Yip, Sidney; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2010-08-27

    Here we report kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of dislocation climb in heavily deformed, body-centered cubic iron comprising a supersaturation of vacancies. This approach explicitly incorporates the effect of nonlinear vacancy-dislocation interaction on vacancy migration barriers as determined from atomistic calculations, and enables observations of diffusivity and climb over time scales and temperatures relevant to power-law creep. By capturing the underlying microscopic physics, the calculated stress exponents for steady-state creep rates agree quantitatively with the experimentally measured range, and qualitatively with the stress dependence of creep activation energies.

  5. Atomistic Modelling of Si Nanoparticles Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Barcaro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon remains the most important material for electronic technology. Presently, some efforts are focused on the use of Si nanoparticles—not only for saving material, but also for improving the efficiency of optical and electronic devices, for instance, in the case of solar cells coated with a film of Si nanoparticles. The synthesis by a bottom-up approach based on condensation from low temperature plasma is a promising technique for the massive production of such nanoparticles, but the knowledge of the basic processes occurring at the atomistic level is still very limited. In this perspective, numerical simulations can provide fundamental information of the nucleation and growth mechanisms ruling the bottom-up formation of Si nanoclusters. We propose to model the low temperature plasma by classical molecular dynamics by using the reactive force field (ReaxFF proposed by van Duin, which can properly describe bond forming and breaking. In our approach, first-principles quantum calculations are used on a set of small Si clusters in order to collect all the necessary energetic and structural information to optimize the parameters of the reactive force-field for the present application. We describe in detail the procedure used for the determination of the force field and the following molecular dynamics simulations of model systems of Si gas at temperatures in the range 2000–3000 K. The results of the dynamics provide valuable information on nucleation rate, nanoparticle size distribution, and growth rate that are the basic quantities for developing a following mesoscale model.

  6. Computer Simulation and X-ray Diffraction of Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction of structure in nanocrystalline α-Fe and Cu was studied by atomistic simulation. Atomic position equilibrium was reached by using molecular dynamics method to simulate nanocrystalline structure with Finnis potentials to model interatomic interactions. lt was found that the boundary component exhibits short-range order, and the distortion in crystalline component increases with the decrease of grain size.

  7. Studying the Early Stages of Protein Aggregation Using Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Joan-Emma; Levine, Zachary A

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of protein aggregation poses several computational challenges due to the disparate time and lengths scales that are involved. This chapter focuses on the use of atomistically detailed simulations to probe the initial steps of aggregation, with an emphasis on the Tau peptide as a model system, run under a replica exchange molecular dynamics protocol.

  8. The atomistic representation of first strain-gradient elastic tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Marian, Jaime; Po, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    We derive the atomistic representations of the elastic tensors appearing in the linearized theory of first strain-gradient elasticity for an arbitrary multi-lattice. In addition to the classical second-Piola) stress and elastic moduli tensors, these include the rank-three double-stress tensor, the rank-five tensor of mixed elastic moduli, and the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. The atomistic representations are closed-form analytical expressions in terms of the first and second derivatives of the interatomic potential with respect to interatomic distances, and dyadic products of relative atomic positions. Moreover, all expressions are local, in the sense that they depend only on the atomic neighborhood of a lattice site. Our results emanate from the condition of energetic equivalence between continuum and atomistic representations of a crystal, when the kinematics of the latter is governed by the Cauchy-Born rule. Using the derived expressions, we prove that the odd-order tensors vanish if the lattice basis admits central-symmetry. The analytical expressions are implemented as a KIM compliant algorithm to compute the strain gradient elastic tensors for various materials. Numerical results are presented to compare representative interatomic potentials used in the literature for cubic crystals, including simple lattices (fcc Al and Cu and bcc Fe and W) and multi-lattices (diamond-cubic Si). We observe that central potentials exhibit generalized Cauchy relations for the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. In addition, this tensor is found to be indefinite for many potentials. We discuss the relationship between indefiniteness and material stability. Finally, the atomistic representations are specialized to central potentials in simple lattices. These expressions are used with analytical potentials to study the sensitivity of the elastic tensors to the choice of the cutoff radius.

  9. Atomistic modeling of two-dimensional electronic spectra and excited-state dynamics for a Light Harvesting 2 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vegte, C P; Prajapati, J D; Kleinekathöfer, U; Knoester, J; Jansen, T L C

    2015-01-29

    The Light Harvesting 2 (LH2) complex is a vital part of the photosystem of purple bacteria. It is responsible for the absorption of light and transport of the resulting excitations to the reaction center in a highly efficient manner. A general description of the chromophores and the interaction with their local environment is crucial to understand this highly efficient energy transport. Here we include this interaction in an atomistic way using mixed quantum-classical (molecular dynamics) simulations of spectra. In particular, we present the first atomistic simulation of nonlinear optical spectra for LH2 and use it to study the energy transport within the complex. We show that the frequency distributions of the pigments strongly depend on their positions with respect to the protein scaffold and dynamics of their local environment. Furthermore, we show that although the pigments are closely packed the transition frequencies of neighboring pigments are essentially uncorrelated. We present the simulated linear absorption spectra for the LH2 complex and provide a detailed explanation of the states responsible for the observed two-band structure. Finally, we discuss the energy transfer within the complex by analyzing population transfer calculations and 2D spectra for different waiting times. We conclude that the energy transfer from the B800 ring to the B850 ring is mediated by intermediate states that are delocalized over both rings, allowing for a stepwise downhill energy transport.

  10. Local stress and heat flux in atomistic systems involving three-body forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youping

    2006-02-01

    Local densities of fundamental physical quantities, including stress and heat flux fields, are formulated for atomistic systems involving three-body forces. The obtained formulas are calculable within an atomistic simulation, in consistent with the conservation equations of thermodynamics of continuum, and can be applied to systems with general two- and three-body interaction forces. It is hoped that this work may correct some misuse of inappropriate formulas of stress and heat flux in the literature, may clarify the definition of site energy of many-body potentials, and may serve as an analytical link between an atomistic model and a continuum theory. Physical meanings of the obtained formulas, their relation with virial theorem and heat theorem, and the applicability are discussed.

  11. The Ca(2+ influence on calmodulin unfolding pathway: a steered molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available The force-induced unfolding of calmodulin (CaM was investigated at atomistic details with steered molecular dynamics. The two isolated CaM domains as well as the full-length CaM were simulated in N-C-terminal pulling scheme, and the isolated N-lobe of CaM was studied specially in two other pulling schemes to test the effect of pulling direction and compare with relevant experiments. Both Ca(2+-loaded CaM and Ca(2+-free CaM were considered in order to define the Ca(2+ influence to the CaM unfolding. The results reveal that the Ca(2+ significantly affects the stability and unfolding behaviors of both the isolated CaM domains and the full-length CaM. In Ca(2+-loaded CaM, N-terminal domain unfolds in priori to the C-terminal domain. But in Ca(2+-free CaM, the unfolding order changes, and C-terminal domain unfolds first. The force-extension curves of CaM unfolding indicate that the major unfolding barrier comes from conquering the interaction of two EF-hand motifs in both N- and C- terminal domains. Our results provide the atomistic-level insights in the force-induced CaM unfolding and explain the observation in recent AFM experiments.

  12. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabaz, Fardin, E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu; Khare, Ketan S., E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu; Khare, Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Young’s modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  13. A fully atomistic model of the Cx32 connexon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Pantano

    Full Text Available Connexins are plasma membrane proteins that associate in hexameric complexes to form channels named connexons. Two connexons in neighboring cells may dock to form a "gap junction" channel, i.e. an intercellular conduit that permits the direct exchange of solutes between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and thus mediate cell-cell ion and metabolic signaling. The lack of high resolution data for connexon structures has hampered so far the study of the structure-function relationships that link molecular effects of disease-causing mutations with their observed phenotypes. Here we present a combination of modeling techniques and molecular dynamics (MD to infer side chain positions starting from low resolution structures containing only C alpha atoms. We validated this procedure on the structure of the KcsA potassium channel, which is solved at atomic resolution. We then produced a fully atomistic model of a homotypic Cx32 connexon starting from a published model of the C alpha carbons arrangement for the connexin transmembrane helices, to which we added extracellular and cytoplasmic loops. To achieve structural relaxation within a realistic environment, we used MD simulations inserted in an explicit solvent-membrane context and we subsequently checked predictions of putative side chain positions and interactions in the Cx32 connexon against a vast body of experimental reports. Our results provide new mechanistic insights into the effects of numerous spontaneous mutations and their implication in connexin-related pathologies. This model constitutes a step forward towards a structurally detailed description of the gap junction architecture and provides a structural platform to plan new biochemical and biophysical experiments aimed at elucidating the structure of connexin channels and hemichannels.

  14. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of gamma phase RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lee, Kibaek

    2017-01-01

    We describe the ignition of an explosive crystal of gamma-phase RDX due to a thermal hot spot with reactive molecular dynamics (RMD), with first-principles trained, reactive force field based molecular potentials that represents an extremely complex reaction network. The RMD simulation is analyzed by sorting molecular product fragments into high and low molecular weight groups, to represent identifiable components that can be interpreted by a continuum model. A continuum model based on a Gibbs formulation has a single temperature and stress state for the mixture. The continuum simulation that mirrors the atomistic simulation allows us to study the atomistic simulation in the familiar physical chemistry framework and provides an essential, continuum/atomistic link.

  15. Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Molecular Level Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay A Brandes

    2009-09-23

    This was a grant to support travel for scientists to present data and interact with others in their field. Specifically, speakers presented their data in a session entitled “Interfacial Phenomena: Linking Atomistic and Macroscopic Properties: Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Reactivity of Mineral Surfaces”. The session ran across three ½ day periods, March 30-31 2004. The session’s organizers were David J. Wesolowski andGordon E. Brown Jr. There were a total of 30 talks presented.

  16. Atomistic Method Applied to Computational Modeling of Surface Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of surface alloys is a growing research field that, in terms of the surface structure of multicomponent systems, defines the frontier both for experimental and theoretical techniques. Because of the impact that the formation of surface alloys has on surface properties, researchers need reliable methods to predict new surface alloys and to help interpret unknown structures. The structure of surface alloys and when, and even if, they form are largely unpredictable from the known properties of the participating elements. No unified theory or model to date can infer surface alloy structures from the constituents properties or their bulk alloy characteristics. In spite of these severe limitations, a growing catalogue of such systems has been developed during the last decade, and only recently are global theories being advanced to fully understand the phenomenon. None of the methods used in other areas of surface science can properly model even the already known cases. Aware of these limitations, the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has developed a useful, computationally economical, and physically sound methodology to enable the systematic study of surface alloy formation in metals. This tool has been tested successfully on several known systems for which hard experimental evidence exists and has been used to predict ternary surface alloy formation (results to be published: Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; and Mosca, H.: Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(100) Surface Alloy Formation. Surf. Sci., 2000 (in press); Mosca, H.; Garces J.E.; and Bozzolo, G.: Surface Ternary Alloys of (Cu,Au)/Ni(110). (Accepted for publication in Surf. Sci., 2000.); and Garces, J.E.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H.; and Abel, P.: A New Approach for Atomistic Modeling of Pd/Cu(110) Surface Alloy Formation. (Submitted to Appl. Surf. Sci.)). Ternary alloy formation is a field yet to be fully explored experimentally. The computational tool, which is based on

  17. Atomistic Conversion Reaction Mechanism of WO 3 in Secondary Ion Batteries of Li, Na, and Ca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15261 USA; Gu, Meng [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Xiao, Haiyan [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 China; Luo, Langli [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Shao, Yuyan [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Gao, Fei [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor MI 48109 USA; Du, Yingge [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Mao, Scott X. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15261 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-04-13

    Reversible insertion and extraction of ionic species into a host lattice governs the basic operating principle for both rechargeable battery (such as lithium batteries) and electrochromic devices (such as ANA Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner electrochromic window). Intercalation and/or conversion are two fundamental chemical processes for some materials in response to the ion insertion. The interplay between these two chemical processes has never been established. It is speculated that the conversion reaction is initiated by ion intercalation. However, experimental evidence of intercalation and subsequent conversion remains unexplored. Here, using in situ HRTEM and spectroscopy, we captured the atomistic conversion reaction processes during lithium, sodium and calcium ion insertion into tungsten trioxide (WO3) single crystal model electrodes. An intercalation step right prior to conversion is explicitly revealed at atomic scale for the first time for these three ion species. Combining nanoscale diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, it is found that, beyond intercalation, the inserted ion-oxygen bonding formation destabilized the transition-metal framework which gradually shrunk, distorted and finally collapsed to a pseudo-amorphous structure. This study provides a full atomistic picture on the transition from intercalation to conversion, which is of essential for material applications in both secondary ion batteries and electrochromic devices.

  18. Atomistic structure of the coherent Ni/Ni[sub 3]Al interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Campos, M.F. de; Souze, R.M. de; Goldenstein, H. (Escola Politecnica USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia)

    1994-02-01

    Most Ni-based superalloys are strengthened by the presence of coherent precipitates of an ordered fcc bases phase, known as [gamma][prime]. This phase is basically Ni[sub 3]Al. The precipitates are coherent up to a certain size and they present a cubic shape with faces oriented in the (100) planes of both matrix and precipitate. The detailed atomistic structure of this interface has not been studied. Interest in the use of ordered intermetallic compounds as possible structural materials has resulted in a large amount of work in Ni[sub 3]Al and in particular, the development of interatomic potentials for the Ni-Al system using the embedded atom technique. These potentials have been employed in the simulation of a variety of defects in Ni[sub 3]Al, including dislocation cores, grain boundaries and free surfaces. However, there is no simulation of the Ni/Ni[sub 3]Al interface structure using the embedded atom method. The objective of the present work is to carry out such a simulation. Besides the practical importance of the interface in superalloys, it is the simplest type of interface that can be modeled and it is a good starting point for interface work using the embedded atom technique.

  19. Theoretical modeling of zircon's crystal morphology according to data of atomistic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromalova, Natalia; Nikishaeva, Nadezhda; Eremin, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    Zircon is an essential mineral that is used in the U-Pb dating. Moreover, zircon is highly resistant to radioactive exposure. It is of great interest in solving both fundamental and applied problems associated with the isolation of high-level radioactive waste. There is significant progress in forecasting of the most energetically favorable crystal structures at the present time. Unfortunately, the theoretical forecast of crystal morphology at high technological level is under-explored nowadays, though the estimation of crystal equilibrium habit is extremely important in studying the physical and chemical properties of new materials. For the first time, the thesis about relation of the equilibrium shape of a crystal with its crystal structure was put forward in the works by O.Brave. According to it, the idealized habit is determined in the simplest case by a correspondence with the reticular densities Rhkl of individual faces. This approach, along with all subsequent corrections, does not take into account the nature of atoms and the specific features of the chemical bond in crystals. The atomistic calculations of crystal surfaces are commonly performed using the energetic characteristics of faces, namely, the surface energy (Esurf), which is a measure of the thermodynamic stability of the crystal face. The stable crystal faces are characterized by small positive values of Esurf. As we know from our previous research (Gromalova et al.,2015) one of the constitutive factors affecting the value of the surface energy in calculations is a choice of potentials model. In this regard, we studied several sets of parameters of atomistic interatomic potentials optimized previously. As the first test model («Zircon 1») were used sets of interatomic potentials of interaction Zr-O, Si-O and O-O in the form of Buckingham potentials. To improve playback properties of zircon additionally used Morse potential for a couple of Zr-Si, as well as the three-particle angular harmonic

  20. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Martin L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Talmage, Mellisa J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McDowell, David L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); West, Neil [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Gullett, Philip Michael [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Miller, David C. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Spark, Kevin [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Diao, Jiankuai [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Horstemeyer, Mark F. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Zimmerman, Jonathan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gall, K. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project

  1. Atomistic Failure Mechanism of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Small Diameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Dong; GAO Xiang; KONG Xiang-Yang; LI Jia-Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Single wall carbon nanotubes with small diameters (< 5.0 (A)) subjected to bending deformation are simulated by orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics approach. Based on the calculations of C-C bond stretching and breaking in the bending nanotubes, we elucidate the atomistic failure mechanisms of nanotube with small diameters. In the folding zone of bending nanotube, a large elongation of C-C bonds occurs, accounting for the superelastic behaviour.

  2. Atomistic-continuum modeling of ultrafast laser-induced melting of silicon targets

    OpenAIRE

    Lipp, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an atomistic-continuum model for simulations of ultrafast laser-induced melting processes in semiconductors on the example of silicon. The kinetics of transient non-equilibrium phase transition mechanisms is addressed with MD method on the atomic level, whereas the laser light absorption, strong generated electron-phonon nonequilibrium, fast heat conduction, and photo-excited free carrier diffusion are accounted for with a continuum TTM-like model (called nTTM). First...

  3. Molecular Simulation Studies of Covalently and Ionically Grafted Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bingbing

    Solvent-free covalently- or ionically-grafted nanoparticles (CGNs and IGNs) are a new class of organic-inorganic hybrid composite materials exhibiting fluid-like behaviors around room temperature. With similar structures to prior systems, e.g. nanocomposites, neutral or charged colloids, ionic liquids, etc, CGNs and IGNs inherit the functionality of inorganic nanopariticles, the facile processibility of polymers, as well as conductivity and nonvolatility from their constituent materials. In spite of the extensive prior experimental research having covered synthesis and measurements of thermal and dynamic properties, little progress in understanding of these new materials at the molecular level has been achieved, because of the lack of simulation work in this new area. Atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in this thesis to investigate the thermodynamics, structure, and dynamics of these systems and to seek predictive methods predictable for their properties. Starting from poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers (PEO) melts, we established atomistic models based on united-atom representations of methylene. The Green-Kubo and Einstein-Helfand formulas were used to calculate the transport properties. The simulations generate densities, viscosities, diffusivities, in good agreement with experimental data. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. Coupled with thermodynamic integration methods, the models give good predictions of pressure-composition-density relations for CO 2 + PEO oligomers. Water effects on the Henry's constant of CO 2 in PEO have also been investigated. The dependence of the calculated Henry's constants on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length. CGNs are modeled by the inclusion of solid-sphere nanoparticles into the atomistic

  4. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-01

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H2 + I2 ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H2 and I2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H2]eq and equilibrium constants Keq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H2] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  5. Atomistic Models of Amorphous Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is probably the best studied material, widely used by the semiconductor industry. The subject of this thesis is an intriguing form of this element namely amorphous silicon. It can contain a varying amount of hydrogen and is denoted as a-Si:H. It completely lacks the neat long

  6. Atomistic modeling of metal surfaces under electric fields: direct coupling of electric fields to a molecular dynamics algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Pohjonen, Aarne; Nordlund, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on metal surfaces is fairly well studied, resulting in numerous analytical models developed to understand the mechanisms of ionization of surface atoms observed at very high electric fields, as well as the general behavior of a metal surface in this condition. However, the derivation of analytical models does not include explicitly the structural properties of metals, missing the link between the instantaneous effects owing to the applied field and the consequent response observed in the metal surface as a result of an extended application of an electric field. In the present work, we have developed a concurrent electrodynamic–molecular dynamic model for the dynamical simulation of an electric-field effect and subsequent modification of a metal surface in the framework of an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The partial charge induced on the surface atoms by the electric field is assessed by applying the classical Gauss law. The electric forces acting on the partially...

  7. Using molecular dynamics for the refinement of atomistic models of GPCRs by homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupala, Cecylia S; Rasaeifar, Bahareh; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J

    2017-08-14

    Despite GPCRs sharing a common seven helix bundle, analysis of the diverse crystallographic structures available reveal specific features that might be relevant for ligand design. Despite the number of crystallographic structures of GPCRs steadily increasing, there are still challenges that hamper the availability of new structures. In the absence of a crystallographic structure, homology modeling remains one of the important techniques for constructing 3D models of proteins. In the present study we investigated the use of molecular dynamics simulations for the refinement of GPCRs models constructed by homology modeling. Specifically, we investigated the relevance of template selection, ligand inclusion as well as the length of the simulation on the quality of the GPCRs models constructed. For this purpose we chose the crystallographic structure of the rat muscarinic M3 receptor as reference and constructed diverse atomistic models by homology modeling, using different templates. Specifically, templates used in the present work include the human muscarinic M2; the more distant human histamine H1 and the even more distant bovine rhodopsin as shown in the GPCRs phylogenetic tree. We also investigated the use or not of a ligand in the refinement process. Hence, we conducted the refinement process of the M3 model using the M2 muscarinic as template with tiotropium or NMS docked in the orthosteric site and compared with the results obtained with a model refined without any ligand bound.

  8. Atomistic modeling of H absorption in Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruda, M., E-mail: ruda@cab.cnea.gov.a [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, U.N. Comahue (Argentina); Crespo, E.A., E-mail: crespo@uncoma.edu.a [Depto. de Fisica, Fac. de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Debiaggi, S. Ramos de, E-mail: ramos@uncoma.edu.a [Depto. de Fisica, Fac. de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina)

    2010-04-16

    Size affects the properties of absorption of H in Palladium nanoparticles. Because of their higher proportion of surface atoms compared to the bulk, the pressure-composition (P-C) isotherms of the nanoparticles are modified. We performed atomistic simulations for different-sized Pd nanoparticles and for the bulk at different H concentrations using the Monte Carlo technique in the TP{mu}N ensemble to calculate the P-C isotherms. The Pd-H interatomic potentials are of the Embedded Atom (EAM) type and have been recently developed by Zhou et al. . From the related van't Hoff equation we obtained |{Delta}H{sup o}| = (28 {+-} 7) kJ/0.5 mol of H{sub 2} and |{Delta}S{sup o}| = (71 {+-} 19) J/0.5 mol of H{sub 2}.K for the PdH formation in the bulk. For Pd nanoparticles previous simulations results based on a different set of EAM potentials showed that H was absorbed primarily in the surface before diffusing into the inside of small Pd clusters . Considering the better performance of Zhou's potentials for the bulk, in this work we analyzed the evolution of the equilibrium microstructure of Pd nanoparticles as a function of their size and H concentration. Our simulations predict enhanced hydrogen solubilities and vanishing plateaux when compared to the bulk and that H is absorbed in the subsurface of the nanoparticles.

  9. State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-08-12

    We propose a new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, using a finite atomistic model. The proposed method is motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the driven Liouville-von-Neumann equation approach of Sánchez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214708] and Subotnik et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 144105]. A key ingredient of our approach is a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to uniquely define the bias voltage across the system while maintaining a proper thermal electronic distribution within the finite lead models. Furthermore, it allows us to investigate complex molecular junctions, including multilead configurations. A heuristic derivation of our working equation leads to explicit expressions for the damping and driving terms, which serve as appropriate electron sources and sinks that effectively "open" the finite model system. Although the method does not forbid it, in practice we find neither violation of Pauli's exclusion principles nor deviation from density matrix positivity throughout our numerical simulations of various tight-binding model systems. We believe that the new approach offers a practical and physically sound route for performing atomistic time-dependent transport calculations in realistic molecular junction models.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  11. Atomistic evaluation of the stress concentration factor of graphene sheets having circular holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, S. K.; Beigrezaee, M. J.; Pugno, N. M.

    2017-09-01

    Stress concentration factor concept has been developed for single-layered graphene sheets (SLGSs) with circular holes through an atomistic point of view by the application of molecular structural mechanics (MSM) approach. In this approach the response of SLGSs against unidirectional tensile loading is matched to the response of a frame-like macro structure containing beam elements by making an equivalence between strain energies of beam elements in MSM and potential energies of chemical bonds of SLGSs. Both chirality and size effects are considered and the atomistic evaluation of stress concentration factor is performed for different sizes of circular holes. Also, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented to verify the existence and location of the predicted stress concentration. The results reveal that size effects and the diameters of circular holes have a significant influence on the stress concentration factor of SLGSs and armchair SLGSs show a larger value of stress concentration than zigzag ones.

  12. Atomistic modelling study of lanthanide incorporation in the crystal lattice of an apatite; Etude par modelisation atomistique de l'incorporation de lanthanides dans le reseau cristallin d'une apatite phosphocalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis-Achille, V

    1999-07-01

    Studies of natural and synthetic apatites allow to propose such crystals as matrix for nuclear waste storage. The neodymium substituted britholite, Ca{sub 9}Nd(PO{sub 4}){sub 5}(SiO{sub 4})F{sub 2}. is a model for the trivalent actinide storage Neodymium can be substituted in two types of sites. The aim of this thesis is to compare the chemical nature of this two sites in fluoro-apatite Ca{sub 9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 2} and then in britholite, using ab initio atomistic modeling. Two approaches are used: one considers the infinite crystals and the second considers clusters. The calculations of the electronic structure for both were performed using Kohn and Sham density functional theory in the local approximation. For solids, pseudopotentials were used, and wave functions are expanded in plane waves. For clusters, a frozen core approximation was used, and the wave functions are expanded in a linear combination of Slater type atomic orbitals. The pseudopotential is semi-relativistic for neodymium, and the Hamiltonian is scalar relativistic for the clusters. The validation of the solid approach is performed using two test cases: YPO{sub 4} and ScPO{sub 4}. Two numerical tools were developed to compute electronic deformation density map, and calculate partial density of stases. A full optimisation of the lattice parameters with a relaxation of the atomic coordinates leads to correct structural and thermodynamic properties for the fluoro-apatite, compared to experience. The electronic deformation density maps do not show any significant differences. between the two calcium sites. but Mulliken analysis on the solid and on the clusters point out the more ionic behavior of the calcium in site 2. A neodymium substituted britholite is then studied. Neodymium location only induces local modifications in; the crystalline structure and few changes in the formation enthalpy. The electronic study points out an increase of the covalent character the bonding involving neodymium

  13. Simulation Studies of Stratum Corneum Lipid Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Das, C; Noro, MG; Olmsted, PD

    2009-01-01

    We present atomistic molecular dynamics results for fully hydrated bilayers composed of ceramide NS-24:0, free fatty acid 24:0 and cholesterol, to address the effect of the different components in the stratum corneum (the outermost layer of skin) lipid matrix on its structural properties. Bilayers containing ceramide molecules show higher in-plane density and hence lower rate of passive transport compared to phospholipid bilayers. At physiological temperatures, for all composition ratios expl...

  14. The Development of Models to Optimize Selection of Nuclear Fuels through Atomic-Level Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. Simon Phillpot; Prof. Susan B. Sinnott; Prof. Hans Seifert; Prog. James Tulenko

    2009-01-26

    Demonstrated that FRAPCON can be modified to accept data generated from first principles studies, and that the result obtained from the modified FRAPCON make sense in terms of the inputs. Determined the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of single crystal UO2 from atomistic simulation.

  15. Simulating chemical systems : MPI and GPU parallelization of novel SD algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goga, N.

    Molecular dynamics is used for simulating chemical systems with the goal of studying a large range of phenomena starting from cell structures to the design of new materials, drugs, etc. A very important component of molecular dynamics is the use of well-suited atomistic and molecular modelling of

  16. Simulating chemical systems : MPI and GPU parallelization of novel SD algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goga, N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is used for simulating chemical systems with the goal of studying a large range of phenomena starting from cell structures to the design of new materials, drugs, etc. A very important component of molecular dynamics is the use of well-suited atomistic and molecular modelling of th

  17. Effective Transparency: A Test of Atomistic Laser-Cluster Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pandit, Rishi; Teague, Thomas; Hartwick, Zachary; Bigaouette, Nicolas; Ramunno, Lora; Ackad, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The effective transparency of rare-gas clusters, post-interaction with an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump pulse, is studied by using an atomistic hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics model. We find there is an intensity range in which an XUV probe pulse has no lasting effect on the average charge state of a cluster after being saturated by an XUV pump pulse: the cluster is effectively transparent to the probe pulse. The range of this phenomena increases with the size of the cluster and thus provides an excellent candidate for an experimental test of the effective transparency effect. We present predictions for the clusters at the peak of the laser pulse as well as the experimental time-of-flight signal expected along with trends which can be compared with. Significant deviations from these predictions would provide evidence for enhanced photoionization mechanism(s).

  18. Atomistic studies of helium trapping in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosson, J.Th.M. de (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands)); Caspers, L.; Veen, A. van (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1983-11-01

    The various levels of approximations of the following interatomic potentials are discussed: empirical potentials and ab initio potentials based on density functional theory. The discussion is primarily centered on the intrinsic merit of the potential functions considered and the realism of the results obtained using pair-wise interaction functions in the description of He clusters in Ni and Mo.

  19. Multiscale simulations of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene and hexa-n-dodecyl-hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megariotis, Grigorios; Ziogos, Orestis G.; Theodorou, Doros N. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou, Zografou Campus, Athens 15780 (Greece)

    2015-12-31

    This study concerns atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of two disk-shaped molecules in the crystalline phase. The coarse-grained models were developed by applying the Iterative Boltzmann Inversion method which is a systematic coarse-graining method. In particular, a set of radial distribution functions and intramolecular distributions are reproduced at the coarse-grained level. Before applying coarse-graining, a reliable atomistic model was developed to reproduce the main experimental properties of these molecules. The crystalline phases are analyzed in terms of the Saupe ordering tensor.

  20. Cold melting of beryllium: Atomistic view on Z-machine experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremov, V. V.; Rykounov, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Karavaev, A. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.; Ionov, G. V.; Ryzhkov, M. V.

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of phase diagram of beryllium at high pressures and temperatures obtained as a result of ab initio calculations and large scale classical molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium shock loading have shown that the so called cold melting takes place when shock wave propagates through polycrystalline samples. Comparison of ab initio calculation results on sound speed along the Hugoniot with experimental data obtained on Z-machine also evidences for possible manifestation of the cold melting. The last may explain the discrepancy between atomistic simulations and experimental data on the onset of the melting on the Hugoniot.

  1. Atomistic modeling of electronic structure and transport in disordered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, Neerav

    and illuminate the interesting physics of these disordered nanostructures that otherwise can not be explained using the traditional averaging methods such as the virtual crystal approximation. Finally, a multiscale modeling approach is employed, which combines the atomistic tight-binding method to compute the electronic structure and the real-space effective mass based quantum transport model including gate leakage to simulate the three terminal characteristics of III-V quantum well field effect transistors (QWFETs). The simulation methodology has been benchmarked against experimental data and it is then applied to investigate the logic performance of ultra-scaled III-V QWFETs with high mobility InAs channels.

  2. The injection of a screw dislocation into a crystal: Atomistics vs. continuum elastodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, J.; Gurrutxaga-Lerma, B.; Balint, D. S.; Dini, D.; Sutton, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    The injection (creation) process of a straight screw dislocation is compared atomistically with elastodynamic continuum theory. A method for injecting quiescent screw dislocations into a crystal of tungsten is simulated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The resulting stress fields are compared to the those of elastodynamic solutions for the injection of a quiescent screw dislocation. A number of differences are found: a plane wave emission is observed to emanate from the whole surface of the cut used to create the dislocation, affecting the displacement field along the dislocation line (z), and introducing displacement field components perpendicular to the line (along x and y). It is argued that, in part, this emission is the result of the finite time required to inject the dislocation, whereby the atoms in the cut surface must temporarily be displaced to unstable positions in order to produce the required slip. By modelling this process in the continuum it is shown that the displacements components normal to the dislocation line arise from transient displacements of atoms in the cut surface parallel to x and y. It is shown that once these displacements are included in the elastodynamic continuum formulation the plane wave emission in uz is correctly captured. A detailed comparison between the atomistic and continuum models is then offered, showing that the main atomistic features can also be captured in the continuum.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of Fcc-bcc Phase Transition in Single Crystal Al Under Uniform Deformation Compression%等变形压加载下单晶铝fcc-bcc相变的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭钰; 何凯; 李莉; 梁九卿

    2012-01-01

    By molecular dynamics simulations employing an embedded atom method potential, we simulate structural transformations in single crystal Al caused by high rate uniform strain loading. The simulations show that the phase transition takes place at about 270 GPa, corresponding to the reduced volume of 0. 55V0,in reasonable agreement with the calculated value through density functional theory.%采用EAM势,利用分子动力学方法模拟了单晶铝在高速率等变形压加载条件下的fcc-bcc的结构相变.模拟结果表明,在等变形压加载条件下,单晶铝在加压至270 GPa左右,体积缩小至0.55V0时,由面心立方结构转变为体心立方结构.这一结果与第一原理计算的结果大致符合.

  4. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  5. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  6. An atomistic investigation on the mechanism of machining nanostructures when using single tip and multi-tip diamond tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Zhen [Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XQ (United Kingdom); Centre for Precision Technologies, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liang, Yingchun [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Jiang, Xiangqian [Centre for Precision Technologies, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Luo, Xichun, E-mail: xichun.luo@strath.ac.uk [Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XQ (United Kingdom); Centre for Precision Technologies, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-30

    In our previous work, a scale-up fabrication approach to cost effectively manufacturing nano-gratings over large area has been developed through diamond turning by using a multi-tip diamond tool fabricated by Focused Ion Beam. The objective of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of machining nanostructures on single crystal copper through diamond turning when using a single tip and a multi-tip nanoscale diamond tool. For this purpose atomistic models of a single tip tool for multi-pass cutting and a multi-tip tool for single-pass cutting were built, respectively. The nature of the cutting chip formation, dislocation nucleation and propagation, cutting forces, and temperature distribution during nanometric cutting processes were studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Results show that nanostructure generation process at steady cutting stage was governed by a strong localization of the dislocation movement and the dynamic equilibrium of chip-tool contact area. Except the apparent improvement of machining efficiency that proportional to the tool tip numbers, the nano-grooves generated by multi-tip tool also have higher center symmetry than those machined by single tip tool. While the average tangential cutting force per tip were calculated all around 33.3 nN, a larger normal cutting force per tip being 54.1 nN was observed when using a multi-tip tool. A concept of atomistic equivalent temperature was proposed and used to analysis the important features of temperature distribution during the machining process. The advantage, disadvantage and applicability of diamond turning using multi-tip tool were discussed in comparison with those of using single-tip tool. The findings suggest that diamond turning using multi-tip tool might be more applicable than using single tip tool when apply to scale-up fabrication of periodic nanostructures.

  7. On Atomistic Models for Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Monticelli, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) is key to all life on earth, as it is constantly cycled via photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Substantial scientific effort has been devoted to understanding every part of this cycle. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study some of the key...... processes involved in cellular respiration: O2 permeation through alveolar monolayers and cellular membranes, its binding to hemoglobin during transport in the bloodstream, as well as its transport along optimal pathways toward its reduction sites in proteins. Moreover, MD simulations can help interpret...

  8. Dislocation climb models from atomistic scheme to dislocation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaohua; Luo, Tao; Lu, Jianfeng; Xiang, Yang

    2017-02-01

    We develop a mesoscopic dislocation dynamics model for vacancy-assisted dislocation climb by upscalings from a stochastic model on the atomistic scale. Our models incorporate microscopic mechanisms of (i) bulk diffusion of vacancies, (ii) vacancy exchange dynamics between bulk and dislocation core, (iii) vacancy pipe diffusion along the dislocation core, and (iv) vacancy attachment-detachment kinetics at jogs leading to the motion of jogs. Our mesoscopic model consists of the vacancy bulk diffusion equation and a dislocation climb velocity formula. The effects of these microscopic mechanisms are incorporated by a Robin boundary condition near the dislocations for the bulk diffusion equation and a new contribution in the dislocation climb velocity due to vacancy pipe diffusion driven by the stress variation along the dislocation. Our climb formulation is able to quantitatively describe the translation of prismatic loops at low temperatures when the bulk diffusion is negligible. Using this new formulation, we derive analytical formulas for the climb velocity of a straight edge dislocation and a prismatic circular loop. Our dislocation climb formulation can be implemented in dislocation dynamics simulations to incorporate all the above four microscopic mechanisms of dislocation climb.

  9. Primary and secondary modes of deformation twinning in HCP Mg based on atomistic simulations%基于原子尺度模拟研究HCP镁中的一次及二次孪生模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐泓鹭; 苏小明; 袁广银; 金朝晖

    2014-01-01

    通过分子动力学模拟(MD),研究在HCP镁中的一个对称倾斜晶界与基面滑移的位错相互作用而激发的变形孪晶,也就是孪晶形核与长大的过程(或者是孪晶界迁移,TBM)。{1121}孪晶在该过程中是最易被激发的孪生模式。一旦这样的孪晶形成了,它们就会不断长大。该种孪晶界迁移是由单纯的原子位置局域调整造成的。在模拟过程中同时也产生了二次孪晶{1122}。该二次孪晶模型的孪晶形核与长大需要克服的能垒与{1121}孪晶不同。同时,二次孪晶的孪晶界迁移过程是通过孪晶界上的锥形滑移而激发的。%Deformation twinning, i.e., twin nucleation and twin growth (or twin boundary migration, TBM) activated by impinged basal slip at a symmetrical tilt grain boundary in HCP Mg, was examined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that the {1 1 21}-type twinning acts as the most preferential mode of twinning. Once such twins are formed, they are almost ready to grow. The TBM of such twins is led by pure atomic shuffling events. A secondary mode of twinning can also occur in our simulations. The {1122} twinning is observed at 10 K as the secondary twin. This secondary mode of twinning shows different energy barriers for nucleation as well as for growth compared with the {1 1 21}-type twining. In particular, TBMs in this case is triggered intrinsically by pyramidal slip at its twin boundary.

  10. Solubility of cellulose in supercritical water studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Lasse K; Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin; Sixta, Herbert; Wohlert, Jakob

    2015-04-02

    The insolubility of cellulose in ambient water and most aqueous systems presents a major scientific and practical challenge. Intriguingly though, the dissolution of cellulose has been reported to occur in supercritical water. In this study, cellulose solubility in ambient and supercritical water of varying density (0.2, 0.7, and 1.0 g cm(-3)) was studied by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMM36 force field and TIP3P water. The Gibbs energy of dissolution was determined between a nanocrystal (4 × 4 × 20 anhydroglucose residues) and a fully dissociated state using the two-phase thermodynamics model. The analysis of Gibbs energy suggested that cellulose is soluble in supercritical water at each of the studied densities and that cellulose dissolution is typically driven by the entropy gain upon the chain dissociation while simultaneously hindered by the loss of solvent entropy. Chain dissociation caused density augmentation around the cellulose chains, which improved water-water bonding in low density supercritical water whereas the opposite occurred in ambient and high density supercritical water.

  11. Simulation Studies in Data Replication Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HarveyB.Newman; IosifC.Legrand

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the simulation studies in evaluating different data replication strategies between Regional Centers.The simulation Framework developed within the "Models of Networked Analysis at Rgional Centers”(MONARC) project,as a design and optimization tool for large scale distributed systems,has been used for these modeling studies.Remote client-serer access to database servers as well as ftp-like data transfers have been ralistically simulated and the performance and limitations are presented as a function of the characteristics of the protocol used and the network parameters.

  12. Strain Functionals for Characterizing Atomistic Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Edward; Rudin, Sven

    The development of a set of strain tensor functionals that are capable of characterizing arbitrarily ordered atomistic structures is described. This approach defines a Gaussian-weighted neighborhood around each atom and characterizes that local geometry in terms of n-th order strain tensors, which are equivalent to the moments of the neighborhood. Fourth order expansions can distinguish the cubic structures (and deformations thereof), but sixth order expansions are required to fully characterize hexagonal structures. Other methods used to characterize atomic structures, such as the Steinhardt parameters or the centrosymmetry metric, can be derived from this more general approach. These functions are continuous and smooth and much less sensitive to thermal fluctuations than other descriptors based on discrete neighborhoods. They allow material phases, deformations, and a large number of defect structures to be readily identified and classified. Applications to the analysis of shock-loaded samples of Cu, Ta and Ti will be presented. This strain functional basis can also then be used for developing interatomic potential functions, and an initial application to Cu will be presented.

  13. Crop micrometeorology : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, J.

    1977-01-01

    This monograph presents the results of a detailed study in micrometeorology; one of the sciences that play an important role in production ecology. The purpose is to explain the microweather as a function of the properties of plant and soil, and of the weather conditions prevalent at some

  14. Crop micrometeorology: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, J.

    1977-01-01

    This monograph presents the results of a detailed study in micrometeorology; one of the sciences that play an important role in production ecology. The purpose is to explain the microweather as a function of the properties of plant and soil, and of the weather conditions prevalent at some height abo

  15. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beyerlein, Irene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  16. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  17. Atomistic determinants of co-enzyme Q reduction at the Qi-site of the cytochrome bc1 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Kaszuba, Karol; Kuleta, Patryk; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    The cytochrome (cyt) bc1 complex is an integral component of the respiratory electron transfer chain sustaining the energy needs of organisms ranging from humans to bacteria. Due to its ubiquitous role in the energy metabolism, both the oxidation and reduction of the enzyme’s substrate co-enzyme Q has been studied vigorously. Here, this vast amount of data is reassessed after probing the substrate reduction steps at the Qi-site of the cyt bc1 complex of Rhodobacter capsulatus using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations suggest that the Lys251 side chain could rotate into the Qi-site to facilitate binding of half-protonated semiquinone – a reaction intermediate that is potentially formed during substrate reduction. At this bent pose, the Lys251 forms a salt bridge with the Asp252, thus making direct proton transfer possible. In the neutral state, the lysine side chain stays close to the conserved binding location of cardiolipin (CL). This back-and-forth motion between the CL and Asp252 indicates that Lys251 functions as a proton shuttle controlled by pH-dependent negative feedback. The CL/K/D switching, which represents a refinement to the previously described CL/K pathway, fine-tunes the proton transfer process. Lastly, the simulation data was used to formulate a mechanism for reducing the substrate at the Qi-site.

  18. Continuum Plate Theory and Atomistic Modeling to Find the Flexural Rigidity of a Graphene Sheet Interacting with a Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Roberts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of continuum modeling, atomistic simulations, and numerical optimization, we estimate the flexural rigidity of a graphene sheet. We consider a rectangular sheet that is initially parallel to a rigid substrate. The sheet interacts with the substrate by van der Waals forces and deflects in response to loading on a pair of opposite edges. To estimate the flexural rigidity, we model the graphene sheet as a continuum and numerically solve an appropriate differential equation for the transverse deflection. This solution depends on the flexural rigidity. We then use an optimization procedure to find the value of the flexural rigidity that minimizes the difference between the numerical solutions and the deflections predicted by atomistic simulations. This procedure predicts a flexural rigidity of 0.26 nN nm=1.62 eV.

  19. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  20. Comparison of atomistic and elasticity approaches for carbon diffusion near line defects in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, R.G.A., E-mail: rgaveiga@gmail.com [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Perez, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, UMR CNRS 8207, Bat. C6, F59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Clouet, E. [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Domain, C. [EDF, Recherche et Developpement, Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, F77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France)

    2011-10-15

    Energy barriers for carbon migration in the neighborhood of line defects in body-centered cubic iron have been obtained by atomistic simulations. For this purpose, molecular statics with an Fe-C interatomic potential, based on the embedded atom method, has been employed. Results of these simulations have been compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. The agreement is better for a carbon atom sitting on an octahedral site (energy minimum) than one on a tetrahedral site (saddle point). Absolute differences in the energy barriers obtained by the two methods are usually below 5 meV at distances larger than 1.5 nm from a screw dislocation and 2 nm (up to 4 nm in the glide plane) from the edge dislocation. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations performed at T = 300 K and additional analysis based on the activation energies obtained by both methods show that they are in good qualitative agreement, despite some important quantitative discrepancies due to the large absolute errors found near the dislocation cores.

  1. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.

  2. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments. PMID:28272524

  3. Diphenylhexatriene membrane probes DPH and TMA-DPH: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Canto, António M T M; Robalo, João R; Santos, Patrícia D; Carvalho, Alfredo J Palace; Ramalho, J P Prates; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-11-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy have been utilized as tools in membrane biophysics for decades now. Because phospholipids are non-fluorescent, the use of extrinsic membrane probes in this context is commonplace. Among the latter, 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) and its trimethylammonium derivative (TMA-DPH) have been extensively used. It is widely believed that, owing to its additional charged group, TMA-DPH is anchored at the lipid/water interface and reports on a bilayer region that is distinct from that of the hydrophobic DPH. In this study, we employ atomistic MD simulations to characterize the behavior of DPH and TMA-DPH in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and POPC/cholesterol (4:1) bilayers. We show that although the dynamics of TMA-DPH in these membranes is noticeably more hindered than that of DPH, the location of the average fluorophore of TMA-DPH is only ~3-4Å more shallow than that of DPH. The hindrance observed in the translational and rotational motions of TMA-DPH compared to DPH is mainly not due to significant differences in depth, but to the favorable electrostatic interactions of the former with electronegative lipid atoms instead. By revealing detailed insights on the behavior of these two probes, our results are useful both in the interpretation of past work and in the planning of future experiments using them as membrane reporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Water at an electrochemical interface - a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Adam; Reed, Stewart; Madden, Paul; Chandler, David

    2008-08-22

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the properties of water in an aqueous ionic solution close to an interface with a model metallic electrode are described. In the simulations the electrode behaves as an ideally polarizable hydrophilic metal, supporting image charge interactions with charged species, and it is maintained at a constant electrical potential with respect to the solution so that the model is a textbook representation of an electrochemical interface through which no current is passing. We show how water is strongly attracted to and ordered at the electrode surface. This ordering is different to the structure that might be imagined from continuum models of electrode interfaces. Further, this ordering significantly affects the probability of ions reaching the surface. We describe the concomitant motion and configurations of the water and ions as functions of the electrode potential, and we analyze the length scales over which ionic atmospheres fluctuate. The statistics of these fluctuations depend upon surface structure and ionic strength. The fluctuations are large, sufficiently so that the mean ionic atmosphere is a poor descriptor of the aqueous environment near a metal surface. The importance of this finding for a description of electrochemical reactions is examined by calculating, directly from the simulation, Marcus free energy profiles for transfer of charge between the electrode and a redox species in the solution and comparing the results with the predictions of continuum theories. Significant departures from the electrochemical textbook descriptions of the phenomenon are found and their physical origins are characterized from the atomistic perspective of the simulations.

  5. Computer Simulation Study of Bipolaron Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Lagendijk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer simulation techniques are used to study the formation of bipolarons on a lattice. The transition between the three possible states, extended, two-polaron, and bipolaron is studied. The phase diagram as a function of the strengths of the electron-phonon coupling and repulsive int

  6. Digital Simulation Games for Social Studies Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin-Scherer, Roberta; Sardone, Nancy B.

    2010-01-01

    Data from ten teacher candidates studying teaching methods were analyzed to determine perceptions toward digital simulation games in the area of social studies. This research can be used as a conceptual model of how current teacher candidates react to new methods of instruction and determine how education programs might change existing curricula…

  7. Voronoi Based Nanocrystalline Generation Algorithm for Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    with implementing ran- domly dispersed Voronoi tessellation algorithms for nanocrystalline construction is 1 Approved for public release; distribution...generate a list of grain centers that are populated with seeds —spherical groups of atoms extracted from a reference file. This method uses a single...the methods and code used to generate a nanocrystalline structure with a single reference file for seed extraction. Some of the code segments detailed

  8. Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states on a nanostructured surface: phase diagram, metastabilities, and transition mechanism by atomistic free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Alberto; Meloni, Simone; Chinappi, Mauro; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2012-07-24

    In this work, we study the wetting of a surface decorated with one nanogroove by a bulk Lennard-Jones liquid at various temperatures and densities. We used atomistic simulations aimed at computing the free energy of the stable and metastable states of the system, as well as the intermediate states separating them. We found that the usual description in terms of Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states is insufficient, as the system presents two states of the Cassie-Baxter type. These states are characterized by different curvatures of the meniscus. The measured free energy barrier separating the Cassie-Baxter from the Wenzel state (and vice versa) largely exceeds the thermal energy, attesting the existence of Cassie-Baxter/Wenzel metastabilities. Finally, we found that the Cassie-Baxter/Wenzel transition follows an asymmetric path, with the formation of a liquid finger on one side of the groove and a vapor bubble on the opposite side.

  9. New Developments in the Embedded Statistical Coupling Method: Atomistic/Continuum Crack Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saether, E.; Yamakov, V.; Glaessgen, E.

    2008-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain has been enhanced. The concurrent MD-FEM coupling methodology uses statistical averaging of the deformation of the atomistic MD domain to provide interface displacement boundary conditions to the surrounding continuum FEM region, which, in turn, generates interface reaction forces that are applied as piecewise constant traction boundary conditions to the MD domain. The enhancement is based on the addition of molecular dynamics-based cohesive zone model (CZM) elements near the MD-FEM interface. The CZM elements are a continuum interpretation of the traction-displacement relationships taken from MD simulations using Cohesive Zone Volume Elements (CZVE). The addition of CZM elements to the concurrent MD-FEM analysis provides a consistent set of atomistically-based cohesive properties within the finite element region near the growing crack. Another set of CZVEs are then used to extract revised CZM relationships from the enhanced embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM) simulation of an edge crack under uniaxial loading.

  10. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadić, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Walther, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow solvers, allowing for investigations into spatiotemporal scales inaccessible to atomistic simulations.

  11. Towards Automated Benchmarking of Atomistic Forcefields: Neat Liquid Densities and Static Dielectric Constants from the ThermoML Data Archive

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchamp, Kyle A; Rustenburg, Ariën S; Bayly, Christopher I; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Chodera, John D

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic molecular simulations are a powerful way to make quantitative predictions, but the accuracy of these predictions depends entirely on the quality of the forcefield employed. While experimental measurements of fundamental physical properties offer a straightforward approach for evaluating forcefield quality, the bulk of this information has been tied up in formats that are not machine-readable. Compiling benchmark datasets of physical properties from non-machine-readable sources require substantial human effort and is prone to accumulation of human errors, hindering the development of reproducible benchmarks of forcefield accuracy. Here, we examine the feasibility of benchmarking atomistic forcefields against the NIST ThermoML data archive of physicochemical measurements, which aggregates thousands of experimental measurements in a portable, machine-readable, self-annotating format. As a proof of concept, we present a detailed benchmark of the generalized Amber small molecule forcefield (GAFF) using t...

  12. SLUDGE BATCH 5 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; David Best, D; David Koopman, D

    2008-10-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing to Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in early fiscal year 2009. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB5 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2007-0007, Rev. 1 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB5 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB5 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the washing plan to prepare SB5 and the estimated SB4 heel mass. Nine DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using both a batch simulant (Tank 51 simulant after washing is complete) and a blend simulant (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). Each simulant had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (115%, 130%, 145% and 160%). One additional run was made using blend simulant at 130% acid that included additions of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) waste prior to acid addition and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) waste following SRAT dewatering. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB5 sludge: (1) This is the first batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution. (2) The sludge is high in mercury

  13. Study of Cardiac Defibrillation Through Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, J.; Marin, S.; Cherry, E. M.; Fenton, F. H.

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the defibrillation problem are presented. In particular, in this study we use the rabbit ventricular geometry as a realistic model system for evaluating the efficacy of defibrillatory shocks. Statistical data obtained from the simulations were analyzed in term of a dose-response curve. Good quantitative agreement between our numerical results and clinically relevant values is obtained. An electric field strength of about 6.6 V/cm indicates a fifty percent probability of successful defibrillation for a 12-ms monophasic shock. Our validated model will be useful for optimizing defibrillation protocols.

  14. Atomistic Mechanisms for Viscoelastic Damping in Inorganic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Raghavan

    Viscoelasticity, a ubiquitous material property, can be tuned to engineer a wide range of fascinating applications such as mechanical dampers, artificial tissues, functional foams and optoelectronics, among others. Traditionally, soft matter such as polymers and polymer composites have been used extensively for viscoelastic damping applications, owing to the inherent viscous nature of interactions between polymer chains. Although this leads to good damping characteristics, the stiffness in these materials is low, which in turn leads to limitations. In this context, hard inorganic materials and composites are promising candidates for enhanced damping, owing to their large stiffness and, in some cases large loss modulus. Viscoelasticity in these materials has been relatively unexplored and atomistic mechanisms responsible for damping are not apparent. Therefore, the overarching goal of this work is to understand mechanisms for viscoelastic damping in various classes of inorganic composites and alloys at an atomistic level from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that oscillatory shear deformation serves as a powerful probe to explain mechanisms for exceptional damping in hitherto unexplored systems. The first class of inorganic materials consists of crystalline phases of a stiff inclusion in a soft matrix. The two crystals within the composite, namely the soft and a stiff phase, individually show a highly elastic behavior and a very small loss modulus. On the other hand, a composite with the two phases is seen to exhibit damping that is about 20 times larger than predicted theoretical bounds. The primary reason for the damping is due to large anharmonicity in phonon-phonon coupling, resulting from the composite microstructure. A concomitant effect is the distribution of shear strain, which is observed to be highly inhomogeneous and mostly concentrated in the soft phase. Interestingly, the shear frequency at which the damping is greatest is observed to scale with

  15. Empathy Development Through Case Study and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennenga, Heidi A; Bassett, Susan; Pasquariello, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Because empathy is integral to the nurse-patient relationship, nurse educators are challenged to explore teaching strategies that may aid in the development of empathy among students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consistent exposure to a single patient through case study and simulation had an impact on empathy levels in senior-level baccalaureate nursing students. Results provide interesting conclusions for faculty members and offer a basis for ongoing discussion.

  16. Computer simulation of dislocation core structure of metastable left angle 111 right angle dislocations in NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.Y. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)); Vailhe, C. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)); Farkas, D. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The atomistic structure of dislocation cores of left angle 111 right angle dislocations in NiAl was simulated using embedded atom method potentials and molecular statics computer simulation. In agreement with previous simulation work and experimental observations, the complete left angle 111 right angle dislocation is stable with respect to the two superpartials of 1/2 left angle 111 right angle separated by an antiphase boundary. The structure of the latter configuration, though metastable, is of interest in the search for ways of improving ductility in this material. The structure of the complete dislocation and that of the metastable superpartials was studied using atomistic computer simulation. An improved visualization method was used for the representation of the resulting structures. The structure of the partials is different from that typical of 1/2 left angle 111 right angle dislocations in b.c.c. materials and that reported previously for the B2 structure using model pair potentials. (orig.)

  17. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.

  18. Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study of structure of liquid and amorphous Ni62Nb38 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Ashcraft, R.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-11-01

    The state-of-the-art experimental and atomistic simulation techniques were utilized to study the structure of the liquid and amorphous Ni62Nb38 alloy. First, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation was performed at rather high temperature where the time limitations of the AIMD do not prevent to reach the equilibrium liquid structure. A semi-empirical potential of the Finnis-Sinclair (FS) type was developed to almost exactly reproduce the AIMD partial pair correlation functions (PPCFs) in a classical molecular dynamics simulation. This simulation also showed that the FS potential well reproduces the bond angle distributions. The FS potential was then employed to elongate the AIMD PPCFs and determine the total structure factor (TSF) which was found to be in excellent agreement with X-ray TSF obtained within the present study demonstrating the reliability of the AIMD for the simulation of the structure of the liquid Ni-Nb alloys as well as the reliability of the developed FS potential. The glass structure obtained with the developed potential was also found to be in excellent agreement with the X-ray data. The analysis of the structure revealed that a network of the icosahedra clusters centered on Ni atoms is forming during cooling the liquid alloy down to Tg and the Nb Z14, Z15, and Z16 clusters are attached to this network. This network is the main feature of the Ni62Nb38 alloy and further investigations of the properties of this alloy should be based on study of the behavior of this network.

  19. Collective dynamics in atomistic models with coupled translational and spin degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dilina; Nicholson, Don M.; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Landau, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Using an atomistic model that simultaneously treats the dynamics of translational and spin degrees of freedom, we perform combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations to investigate the mutual influence of the phonons and magnons on their respective frequency spectra and lifetimes in ferromagnetic bcc iron. By calculating the Fourier transforms of the space- and time-displaced correlation functions, the characteristic frequencies and the linewidths of the vibrational and magnetic excitation modes were determined. Comparison of the results with that of the stand-alone molecular dynamics and spin dynamics simulations reveals that the dynamic interplay between the phonons and magnons leads to a shift in the respective frequency spectra and a decrease in the lifetimes. Moreover, in the presence of lattice vibrations, additional longitudinal magnetic excitations were observed with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonons.

  20. Atomistic and continuums modeling of cluster migration and coagulation in precipitation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, Piotr; Ženíšek, Jaroslav; Kozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-07-01

    The influence of vacancy preference towards one of the constituents in a binary system on the formation of precipitates was investigated by atomistic and continuums modeling techniques. In case of vacancy preference towards the solute atoms, we find that the mobility of individual clusters as well as entire atom clusters is significantly altered compared to the case of vacancy preference towards the solvent atoms. The increased cluster mobility leads to pronounced cluster collisions, providing a precipitate growth and coarsening mechanism competitive to that of pure solute evaporation and adsorption considered in conventional diffusional growth and Ostwald ripening. A modification of a numerical Kampmann-Wagner type continuum model for precipitate growth is proposed, which incorporates the influence of both mechanisms. The prognoses of the modified model are validated against the growth laws obtained with lattice Monte Carlo simulations and a growth simulation considering solely the coalescence mechanism.