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Sample records for atomistic molecular simulation

  1. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  2. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    CERN Document Server

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-01-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  3. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock Compressed Quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geom- etry optimised system of a polar slab in a 3-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under repres...

  4. Analysis of Twisting of Cellulose Nanofibrils in Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavilainen, S.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile, no sign......We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile......, no significant bending or stretching of nanocellulose is discovered. Considerations of atomic-scale interaction patterns bring about that the twisting arises from hydrogen bonding within and between the chains in a fibril....

  5. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks: An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation combined with a mapping/reverse mapping procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazutin, A. A.; Glagolev, M. K.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Khokhlov, A. R. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds RAS, Vavilova Str. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    An algorithm involving classical molecular dynamics simulations with mapping and reverse mapping procedure is here suggested to simulate the crosslinking of the polystyrene dissolved in dichloroethane by monochlorodimethyl ether. The algorithm comprises consecutive stages: molecular dynamics atomistic simulation of a polystyrene solution, the mapping of atomistic structure onto coarse-grained model, the crosslink formation, the reverse mapping, and finally relaxation of the structure dissolved in dichloroethane and in dry state. The calculated values of the specific volume and the elastic modulus are in reasonable quantitative correspondence with experimental data.

  6. Molecular cooperativity and compatibility via full atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan Yang, Kenny

    Civil engineering has customarily focused on problems from a large-scale perspective, encompassing structures such as bridges, dams, and infrastructure. However, present day challenges in conjunction with advances in nanotechnology have forced a re-focusing of expertise. The use of atomistic and molecular approaches to study material systems opens the door to significantly improve material properties. The understanding that material systems themselves are structures, where their assemblies can dictate design capacities and failure modes makes this problem well suited for those who possess expertise in structural engineering. At the same time, a focus has been given to the performance metrics of materials at the nanoscale, including strength, toughness, and transport properties (e.g., electrical, thermal). Little effort has been made in the systematic characterization of system compatibility -- e.g., how to make disparate material building blocks behave in unison. This research attempts to develop bottom-up molecular scale understanding of material behavior, with the global objective being the application of this understanding into material design/characterization at an ultimate functional scale. In particular, it addresses the subject of cooperativity at the nano-scale. This research aims to define the conditions which dictate when discrete molecules may behave as a single, functional unit, thereby facilitating homogenization and up-scaling approaches, setting bounds for assembly, and providing a transferable assessment tool across molecular systems. Following a macro-scale pattern where the compatibility of deformation plays a vital role in the structural design, novel geometrical cooperativity metrics based on the gyration tensor are derived with the intention to define nano-cooperativity in a generalized way. The metrics objectively describe the general size, shape and orientation of the structure. To validate the derived measures, a pair of ideal macromolecules

  7. Ultrathin Molecular-Layer-by-Layer Polyamide Membranes: Insights from Atomistic Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Sturnfield, James F; Colina, Coray M

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we present an atomistic simulation study of several physicochemical properties of polyamide (PA) membranes formed from interfacial polymerization or from a molecular-layer-by-layer (mLbL) on a silicon wafer. These membranes are composed of meta-phenylenediamine (MPD) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid chloride (TMC) for potential reverse osmosis (RO) applications. The mLbL membrane generation procedure and the force field models were validated, by comparison with available experimental data, for hydrated density, membrane swelling, and pore size distributions of PA membranes formed by interfacial polymerization. Physicochemical properties such as density, free volume, thickness, the degree of cross-linking, atomic compositions, and average molecular orientation (which is relevant for the mLbL membranes) are compared for these different processes. The mLbL membranes are investigated systematically with respect to TMC monomer growth rate per substrate surface area, MPD/TMC ratio, and the number of mLbL deposition cycles. Atomistic simulations show that the mLbL deposition generates membranes with a constant film growth if both the TMC monomer growth rate and MPD/TMC monomer ratio are kept constant. The film growth rate increases with TMC monomer growth rate or MPD/TMC ratio. Furthermore, it was found on one hand that the mLbL membrane density and free volume varies significantly with respect to the TMC monomer growth rate, while on the other hand the degree of cross-linking and the atomic composition varies considerably with the MPD/TMC ratio. Additionally, it was found that both TMC and MPD orient at a tilted angle with respect to the substrate surface, where their angular distribution and average angle orientation depend on both the TMC growth rate and the number of deposition cycles. This study illustrates that molecular simulations can play a crucial role in the understanding of structural properties that can empower the design of the next

  8. Atomistic simulations of nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Szlufarska

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of mechanics is pushed to its limit when the functionality of devices is controlled at the nanometer scale. A fundamental understanding of nanomechanics is needed to design materials with optimum properties. Atomistic simulations can bring an important insight into nanostructure-property relations and, when combined with experiments, they become a powerful tool to move nanomechanics from basic science to the application area. Nanoindentation is a well-established technique for studying mechanical response. We review recent advances in modeling (atomistic and beyond of nanoindentation and discuss how they have contributed to our current state of knowledge.

  9. Atomistic simulations of fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Embedded atom interaction potentials are used to simulate the atomistic aspects of the fracture process. Simulations are presented for the behavior of cracks in pure metals and intermetallics, near the Griffith condition. The materials considered include Fe, Cu, Ni as well as Fe, Ni, Co, and Ti aluminides. The work focuses on the comparative study of fracture behavior in the different materials. The role of the atomic relaxation at the crack tip and of lattice trapping phenomena is analyzed.

  10. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  12. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  13. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. PMID:27586285

  14. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA Minicircle Topoisomers: A Practical Guide to Setup, Performance, and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthibutpong, Thana; Noy, Agnes; Harris, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    While DNA supercoiling is ubiquitous in vivo, the structure of supercoiled DNA is more challenging to study experimentally than simple linear sequences because the DNA must have a closed topology in order to sustain superhelical stress. DNA minicircles, which are closed circular double-stranded DNA sequences typically containing between 60 and 500 base pairs, have proven to be useful biochemical tools for the study of supercoiled DNA mechanics. We present detailed protocols for constructing models of DNA minicircles in silico, for performing atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of supercoiled minicircle DNA, and for analyzing the results of the calculations. These simulations are computationally challenging due to the large system sizes. However, improvements in parallel computing software and hardware promise access to improve conformational sampling and simulation timescales. Given the concurrent improvements in the resolution of experimental techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo-electron microscopy, the study of DNA minicircles will provide a more complete understanding of both the structure and the mechanics of supercoiled DNA. PMID:27283311

  15. Atomistic simulations of highly conductive molecular transport junctions under realistic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.

    2013-01-01

    We report state-of-the-art atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe structure-conductance relationships in Au-benzenedithiolate (BDT)-Au junctions under elongation. Our results demonstrate that large increases in conductance are associated with the formation of monatomic chains (MACs) of Au atoms directly connected to BDT. An analysis of the electronic structure of the simulated junctions reveals that enhancement in the s-like states in Au MACs causes the increases in conductance. Other structures also result in increased conductance but are too short-lived to be detected in experiment, while MACs remain stable for long simulation times. Examinations of thermally evolved junctions with and without MACs show negligible overlap between conductance histograms, indicating that the increase in conductance is related to this unique structural change and not thermal fluctuation. These results, which provide an excellent explanation for a recently observed anomalous experimental result [Bruot et al., Nat. Nanotechnol., 2012, 7, 35-40], should aid in the development of mechanically responsive molecular electronic devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Numerical tools for atomistic simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, H. (Mississippi State University); Gullett, Philip Michael; Slepoy, Alexander (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University); Baskes, Michael I. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Wagner, Gregory John; Li, Mo (Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA)

    2004-01-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled 'Parallel Atomistic Computing for Failure Analysis of Micromachines' is presented. In this project, atomistic algorithms for parallel computers were developed to assist in quantification of microstructure-property relations related to weapon micro-components. With these and other serial computing tools, we are performing atomistic simulations of various sizes, geometries, materials, and boundary conditions. These tools provide the capability to handle the different size-scale effects required to predict failure. Nonlocal continuum models have been proposed to address this problem; however, they are phenomenological in nature and are difficult to validate for micro-scale components. Our goal is to separately quantify damage nucleation, growth, and coalescence mechanisms to provide a basis for macro-scale continuum models that will be used for micromachine design. Because micro-component experiments are difficult, a systematic computational study that employs Monte Carlo methods, molecular statics, and molecular dynamics (EAM and MEAM) simulations to compute continuum quantities will provide mechanism-property relations associated with the following parameters: specimen size, number of grains, crystal orientation, strain rates, temperature, defect nearest neighbor distance, void/crack size, chemical state, and stress state. This study will quantify sizescale effects from nanometers to microns in terms of damage progression and thus potentially allow for optimized micro-machine designs that are more reliable and have higher fidelity in terms of strength. In order to accomplish this task, several atomistic methods needed to be developed and evaluated to cover the range of defects, strain rates, temperatures, and sizes that a material may see in micro-machines. Therefore we are providing a complete set of tools for large scale atomistic simulations that include pre

  17. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  18. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Raffaini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a “bottom up” approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD, which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties.

  19. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a "bottom up" approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties. PMID:26734094

  20. Aggregation behaviour of amphiphilic cyclodextrins: the nucleation stage by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaglia, Antonino; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins may form various supramolecular aggregates. Here we report a theoretical study of the aggregation of a few amphiphilic cyclodextrins carrying hydrophobic thioalkyl groups and hydrophilic ethylene glycol moieties at opposite rims, focusing on the initial nucleation stage in an apolar solvent and in water. The study is based on atomistic molecular dynamics methods with a “bottom up” approach that can provide important information about the initial aggregates of few molecules. The focus is on the interaction pattern of amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD), which may interact by mutual inclusion of the substituent groups in the hydrophobic cavity of neighbouring molecules or by dispersion interactions at their lateral surface. We suggest that these aggregates can also form the nucleation stage of larger systems as well as the building blocks of micelles, vesicle, membranes, or generally nanoparticles thus opening new perspectives in the design of aggregates correlating their structures with the pharmaceutical properties. PMID:26734094

  1. Feature activated molecular dynamics: an efficient approach for atomistic simulation of solid-state aggregation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manish; Sinno, Talid

    2004-11-01

    An efficient approach is presented for performing efficient molecular dynamics simulations of solute aggregation in crystalline solids. The method dynamically divides the total simulation space into "active" regions centered about each minority species, in which regular molecular dynamics is performed. The number, size, and shape of these regions is updated periodically based on the distribution of solute atoms within the overall simulation cell. The remainder of the system is essentially static except for periodic rescaling of the entire simulation cell in order to balance the pressure between the isolated molecular dynamics regions. The method is shown to be accurate and robust for the Environment-Dependant Interatomic Potential (EDIP) for silicon and an Embedded Atom Method potential (EAM) for copper. Several tests are performed beginning with the diffusion of a single vacancy all the way to large-scale simulations of vacancy clustering. In both material systems, the predicted evolutions agree closely with the results of standard molecular dynamics simulations. Computationally, the method is demonstrated to scale almost linearly with the concentration of solute atoms, but is essentially independent of the total system size. This scaling behavior allows for the full dynamical simulation of aggregation under conditions that are more experimentally realizable than would be possible with standard molecular dynamics.

  2. Large-Scale Atomistic Simulations of Environmental Effects on the Formation and Properties of Molecular Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    French, William R.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Using an updated simulation tool, we examine molecular junctions comprised of benzene-1,4-dithiolate bonded between gold nanotips, focusing on the importance of environmental factors and inter-electrode distance on the formation and structure of bridged molecules. We investigate the complex relationship between monolayer density and tip separation, finding that the formation of multi-molecule junctions is favored at low monolayer density, while single-molecule junctions are favored at high de...

  3. Atomistic Simulations of Nanotube Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Belytschko, T; Schatz, G; Ruoff, R S

    2002-01-01

    The fracture of carbon nanotubes is studied by atomistic simulations. The fracture behavior is found to be almost independent of the separation energy and to depend primarily on the inflection point in the interatomic potential. The rangle of fracture strians compares well with experimental results, but predicted range of fracture stresses is marketly higher than observed. Various plausible small-scale defects do not suffice to bring the failure stresses into agreement with available experimental results. As in the experiments, the fracture of carbon nanotubes is predicted to be brittle. The results show moderate dependence of fracture strength on chirality.

  4. Derivatization and diffusive motion of molecular fullerenes: Ab initio and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdiyorov, G., E-mail: gberdiyorov@qf.org.qa; Tabet, N. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Hamad Ben Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Harrabi, K. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, 31261 Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Mehmood, U.; Hussein, I. A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, 31261 Dharan (Saudi Arabia); Peeters, F. M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Zhang, J. [Department of Materials and London Centre for Nanotechnology, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ London (United Kingdom); McLachlan, M. A. [Department of Materials and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-14

    Using first principles density functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, we study the effect of derivatization on the electronic and transport properties of C{sub 60} fullerene. As a typical example, we consider [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), which forms one of the most efficient organic photovoltaic materials in combination with electron donating polymers. Extra peaks are observed in the density of states (DOS) due to the formation of new electronic states localized at/near the attached molecule. Despite such peculiar behavior in the DOS of an isolated molecule, derivatization does not have a pronounced effect on the electronic transport properties of the fullerene molecular junctions. Both C{sub 60} and PCBM show the same response to finite voltage biasing with new features in the transmission spectrum due to voltage induced delocalization of some electronic states. We also study the diffusive motion of molecular fullerenes in ethanol solvent and inside poly(3-hexylthiophene) lamella using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the mobility of the fullerene reduces considerably due to derivatization; the diffusion coefficient of C{sub 60} is an order of magnitude larger than the one for PCBM.

  5. Scalable Atomistic Simulation Algorithms for Materials Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiichiro Nakano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A suite of scalable atomistic simulation programs has been developed for materials research based on space-time multiresolution algorithms. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms are presented for molecular dynamics (MD simulations and quantum-mechanical (QM calculations based on the density functional theory. Performance tests have been carried out on 1,088-processor Cray T3E and 1,280-processor IBM SP3 computers. The linear-scaling algorithms have enabled 6.44-billion-atom MD and 111,000-atom QM calculations on 1,024 SP3 processors with parallel efficiency well over 90%. production-quality programs also feature wavelet-based computational-space decomposition for adaptive load balancing, spacefilling-curve-based adaptive data compression with user-defined error bound for scalable I/O, and octree-based fast visibility culling for immersive and interactive visualization of massive simulation data.

  6. Atomistic Molecular Simulations Suggest a Kinetic Model for Membrane Translocation by Arginine-Rich Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Delin; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2015-11-12

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (ARCPPs) are known to quickly permeate cell membranes through a non-endocytotic pathway. Potential clinical applications of this facility have prompted enormous effort, both experimental and theoretical, to better understand how ARCPPs manage to overcome the prodigious thermodynamic cost of lipid bilayer permeation by these highly charged peptides. In this work we report the results of all-atom simulations, which suggest that a kinetic (rather than thermodynamic) mechanism may explain how ARCPPs are able to achieve this. Our simulations reveal that octaarginine significantly hinders the closing of membrane pores, either individually or via aggregation in the membrane pore, while octalysine (not an ARCPP) lacks this ability. Our proposed mechanism is an alternative to current attempts to explain pore-mediated translocation of ARCPPs. It asserts that ARCPPs need not lower the equilibrium thermodynamic cost of pore formation. Instead, they can achieve rapid bilayer translocation by instead slowing down the kinetics of naturally occurring thermal pores. Linking the pore lifetime to the characteristic time for peptide diffusion out of the pore, ARCPPs are able to cooperatively permeate the membrane pore. PMID:26485313

  7. HBP Builder: A Tool to Generate Hyperbranched Polymers and Hyperbranched Multi-Arm Copolymers for Coarse-grained and Fully Atomistic Molecular Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyang; Ma, Li; Li, Shanlong; Tan, Haina; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-01

    Computer simulation has been becoming a versatile tool that can investigate detailed information from the microscopic scale to the mesoscopic scale. However, the crucial first step of molecular simulation is model building, particularly for hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) and hyperbranched multi-arm copolymers (HBMCs) with complex and various topological structures. Unlike well-defined polymers, not only the molar weight of HBPs/HBMCs with polydispersity, but the HBPs/HBMCs with the same degree of polymerization (DP) and degree of branching (DB) also have many possible topological structures, thus making difficulties for user to build model in molecular simulation. In order to build a bridge between model building and molecular simulation of HBPs and HBMCs, we developed HBP Builder, a C language open source HBPs/HBMCs building toolkit. HBP Builder implements an automated protocol to build various coarse-grained and fully atomistic structures of HBPs/HBMCs according to user’s specific requirements. Meanwhile, coarse-grained and fully atomistic output structures can be directly employed in popular simulation packages, including HOOMD, Tinker and Gromacs. Moreover, HBP Builder has an easy-to-use graphical user interface and the modular architecture, making it easy to extend and reuse it as a part of other program.

  8. Atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Jacobsen, K.W.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper based on effective medium theory interatomic potentials. Results on screw dislocation structures and processes are reviewed with particular focus on point defect mobilities and processes involving cross slip. For example, the sta......We discuss atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper based on effective medium theory interatomic potentials. Results on screw dislocation structures and processes are reviewed with particular focus on point defect mobilities and processes involving cross slip. For example...

  9. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-14

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results. PMID:26658834

  10. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-14

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.

  11. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  12. Atomistic computer simulations a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brazdova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Many books explain the theory of atomistic computer simulations; this book teaches you how to run them This introductory ""how to"" title enables readers to understand, plan, run, and analyze their own independent atomistic simulations, and decide which method to use and which questions to ask in their research project. It is written in a clear and precise language, focusing on a thorough understanding of the concepts behind the equations and how these are used in the simulations. As a result, readers will learn how to design the computational model and which parameters o

  13. Parameterization of the prosthetic redox centers of the bacterial cytochrome bc(1) complex for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, K.; Postila, P. A.; Cramariuc, O.;

    2013-01-01

    studied in large-scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In part, this is due to lack of suitable force field parameters, centered atomic point charges in particular, for the complex's prosthetic redox centers. Accurate redox center charges are needed to depict realistically the inter...

  14. Quantum corrections to the `atomistic' MOSFET simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Asenov, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we study the influence of the quantum effects in the inversion layer on the parameter fluctuation in decanano MOSFETs. The quantum mechanical effects are incorporated in our previously published 3D 'atomistic' simulation approach using a full 3D implementation of the density gradient formalism. This results in a consistent, fully 3D, quantum mechanical picture which incorporates the vertical inversion layer quantization, lateral confinement effects associated with the current fi...

  15. Atomistic Simulations of Pore Formation and Closure in Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, W. F. Drew; Sapay, Nicolas; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membranes separate distinct aqueous compartments, but can be breached by transient hydrophilic pores. A large energetic cost prevents pore formation, which is largely dependent on the composition and structure of the lipid bilayer. The softness of bilayers and the disordered structure of pores make their characterization difficult. We use molecular-dynamics simulations with atomistic detail to study the thermodynamics, kinetics, and mechanism of pore formation and closure in DLPC, DM...

  16. Atomistic simulations of Mg-Cu metallic glasses: Mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms of plastic deformation in amorphous metals are far from being understood. We have derived potential parameters for molecular dynamics simulations of Mg-Cu amorphous alloys using the Effective Medium Theory. We have simulated the formation of alloys by cooling from the melt......, and have used these glassy configurations to carry out simulations of plastic deformation. These involved different compositions, temperatures (including zero), and types of deformation (uniaxial strain/pure shear), and yielded stress-strain curves and values of flow stress. Separate simulations were...

  17. Aggregation behavior of amphiphilic cyclodextrins in a nonpolar solvent: evidence of large-scale structures by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and solution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio; Mazzaglia, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified cyclodextrins carrying both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substituents may form supramolecular aggregates or nanostructures of great interest. These systems have been usually investigated and characterized in water for their potential use as nanocarriers for drug delivery, but they can also aggregate in apolar solvents, as shown in the present paper through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and dynamic light scattering measurements. The simulations, carried out with a large number of molecules in vacuo adopting an unbiased bottom-up approach, suggest the formation of bidimensional structures with characteristic length scales of the order of 10 nm, although some of these sizes are possibly affected by the assumed periodicity of the simulation cell, in particular at longer lengths. In any case, these nanostructures are stable at least from the kinetic viewpoint for relatively long times thanks to the large number of intermolecular interactions of dipolar and dispersive nature. The dynamic light scattering experiments indicate the presence of aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius of the order of 80 nm and a relatively modest polydispersity, even though smaller nanometer-sized aggregates cannot be fully ruled out. Taken together, these simulation and experimental results indicate that amphiphilically modified cyclodextrins do also form large-scale nanoaggregates even in apolar solvents. PMID:26877809

  18. Effect of initial ion positions on the interactions of monovalent and divalent ions with a DNA duplex as revealed with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Timothy J; Wang, Yongmei

    2013-01-01

    Monovalent (Na(+)) and divalent (Mg(2+)) ion distributions around the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer were studied by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with AMBER molecular modeling software. Different initial placements of ions were tried and the resulting effects on the ion distributions around DNA were investigated. For monovalent ions, results were found to be nearly independent of initial cation coordinates. However, Mg(2+) ions demonstrated a strong initial coordinate dependent behavior. While some divalent ions initially placed near the DNA formed essentially permanent direct coordination complexes with electronegative DNA atoms, Mg(2+) ions initially placed further away from the duplex formed a full, nonexchanging, octahedral first solvation shell. These fully solvated cations were still capable of binding with DNA with events lasting up to 20 ns, and in comparison were bound much longer than Na(+) ions. Force field parameters were also investigated with modest and little differences arising from ion (ions94 and ions08) and nucleic acid description (ff99, ff99bsc0, and ff10), respectively. Based on known Mg(2+) ion solvation structure, we conclude that in most cases Mg(2+) ions retain their first solvation shell, making only solvent-mediated contacts with DNA duplex. The proper way to simulate Mg(2+) ions around DNA duplex, therefore, should begin with ions placed in the bulk water.

  19. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelkmar, Pär; Niemelä, Perttu S; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how...... transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements...... process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros). Together with lipids binding in matching positions...

  20. Atomistic simulations of plasma-wall interactions in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic computer simulations, especially molecular dynamics, but also kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and electronic structure calculations, have proven to be a valuable tool for studying radiation effects in fusion reactor materials. In this paper, I will first review a few cases where these methods have given additional insights into the interaction between a fusion plasma and the first wall of a reactor. Then I will, in the spirit of the workshop theme of 'new directions in plasma-wall interactions' discuss some possible future avenues of research

  1. From beta-relaxation to alpha-decay: Atomistic picture from molecular dynamics simulations for glass-forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In glass-forming melts the decay of structural fluctuation shows the well known transition from beta-relaxation (von-Schweidler law with exponent b) to alpha-decay (KWW law with exponent beta). Here we present results from molecular dynamics simulations for a metallic glass forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 model aimed at giving an understanding of this transition on the atomistic scale. At the considered temperature below mode coupling Tc, the dynamics of the system can be interpreted by residence of the particles in their neighbour cages and escape from the cages as rare processes. Our analysis yields that the fraction of residing particles is characterized by a hierarchical law in time, with von-Schweidler b explicitly related to the exponent of this law. In the alpha-decay regime the stretching exponent reflects, in addition, floating of the cages due to strain effects of escaped particles. Accordingly, the change from beta-relaxation to alpha-decay indicates the transition from low to large fraction of escaped particles.

  2. Atomistic simulations of the Fe K-edge EXAFS in FeF3 using molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonane, Inga; Timoshenko, Janis; Kuzmin, Alexei

    2016-10-01

    Atomistic simulations of the experimental Fe K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of rhombohedral (space group R\\bar{3}c) FeF3 at T = 300 K were performed using classical molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) methods. The use of two complementary theoretical approaches allowed us to account accurately for thermal disorder effects in EXAFS and to validate the developed force-field model, which was constructed as a sum of two-body Buckingham-type (Fe-F and F-F), three-body harmonic (Fe-F-Fe) and Coulomb potentials. We found that the shape of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectrum of FeF3 is a more sensitive probe for the determination of potential parameters than the values of structural parameters (a, c, x(F)) available from diffraction studies. The best overall agreement between the experimental and theoretical EXAFS spectra calculated using ab initio multiple-scattering approach was obtained for the iron effective charge q(Fe) = 1.71. The RMC method coupled with the evolutionary algorithm was used for more elaborate analysis of the EXAFS data. The obtained results suggest that our force-field model slightly underestimates the amplitude of thermal vibrations of fluorine atoms in the direction perpendicular to the Fe-F bonds.

  3. A State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, using a finite atomistic model. The proposed method is motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the driven Liouville von-Neumann equation approach of S\\'anchez et al. [J. Chem. Phys., 124, 214708 (2006)]. A key ingredient of our approach is a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to uniquely defi...

  4. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified Through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2007-01-12

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process. We also discuss a technique for optimizing the calculation of fine-scale information on the fly for use in a coarse-scale simulation, and discuss the specific case of a fine-scale model that calculates void growth explicitly feeding into a coarse-scale mechanics model to study damage localization.

  5. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  6. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the structure of symmetric Polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelle in salt-free aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockalingam, Rajalakshmi; Natarajan, Upendra

    2014-03-01

    The structure of a symmetric polystyrene- b - poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b - PAA) micelle in salt-free aqueous solution as a function of degree-of-neutralization (or ionization, f) of the PAA is studied via explicit-atom-ion MD simulations, for the first time for a polyelectrolyte block copolymer in a polar solvent. Micelle size increases with fin agreement with experimental observations in literature, due to extension of PAA at higher ionization. Pair RDF's with respect to water oxygens show that corona-water interaction becomes stronger with f due to an increase in number density of carboxylate (COO-) groups on the chain. Water-PAA coordination (carboxylate O's) increases with ionization. H-bonding between PAA and water increases with f due to greater extent of corona-water affinity. With increase in f, atom and counter-ion ρ profiles confirm extension of corona blocks and micelle existing in the ``osmotic regime,'' and a decrease in scattering peak intensity, in agreement with neutron scattering experiments and mean-field theory in literature. Inter-chain distance in PS core is found to decrease with ionization. Macromolecular Simulation and Modeling Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036.

  7. Atomistic Mechanisms of Chemical Mechanical Polishing of a Cu Surface in Aqueous H2O2: Tight-Binding Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Takuya; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2016-05-11

    We applied our original chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) simulator based on the tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics (TB-QCMD) method to clarify the atomistic mechanism of CMP processes on a Cu(111) surface polished with a SiO2 abrasive grain in aqueous H2O2. We reveal that the oxidation of the Cu(111) surface mechanically induced at the friction interface is a key process in CMP. In aqueous H2O2, in the first step, OH groups and O atoms adsorbed on a nascent Cu surface are generated by the chemical reactions of H2O2 molecules. In the second step, at the friction interface between the Cu surface and the abrasive grain, the surface-adsorbed O atom intrudes into the Cu bulk and dissociates the Cu-Cu bonds. The dissociation of the Cu-Cu back-bonds raises a Cu atom from the surface that is mechanically sheared by the abrasive grain. In the third step, the raised Cu atom bound to the surface-adsorbed OH groups is removed from the surface by the generation and desorption of a Cu(OH)2 molecule. In contrast, in pure water, there are no geometrical changes in the Cu surface because the H2O molecules do not react with the Cu surface, and the abrasive grain slides smoothly on the planar Cu surface. The comparison between the CMP simulations in aqueous H2O2 and pure water indicates that the intrusion of a surface-adsorbed O atom into the Cu bulk is the most important process for the efficient polishing of the Cu surface because it induces the dissociation of the Cu-Cu bonds and generates raised Cu atoms that are sheared off by the abrasive grain. Furthermore, density functional theory calculations show that the intrusion of the surface-adsorbed O atoms into the Cu bulk has a high activation energy of 28.2 kcal/mol, which is difficult to overcome at 300 K. Thus, we suggest that the intrusion of surface-adsorbed O atoms into the Cu bulk induced by abrasive grains at the friction interface is a rate-determining step in the Cu CMP process. PMID:27092706

  8. Atomistic simulations of caloric effects in ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenkov, Sergey; Ponomareva, Inna

    2013-03-01

    The materials that exhibit large caloric effects have emerged as promising candidates for solid-state refrigeration which is an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional refrigeration technology. However, despite recent ground breaking discoveries of giant caloric effects in some materials they appear to remain one of nature's rarities. Here we use atomistic simulations to study electrocaloric and elastocaloric effects in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 and PbTiO3 ferroelectrics. Our study reveals the intrinsic features of such caloric effects in ferroelectrics and their potential to exhibit giant caloric effects. Some of the findings include the coexistence of negative and positive electrocaloric effects in one material and an unusual field-driven transition between them as well as the coexistence of multiple giant caloric effects in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 alloys. These findings could potentially lead to new paradigms for cooling devices. This work is partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under award DE-SC0005245.

  9. Atomistic simulations of material damping in amorphous silicon nanoresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sankha; Song, Jun; Vengallatore, Srikar

    2016-06-01

    Atomistic simulations using molecular dynamics (MD) are emerging as a valuable tool for exploring dissipation and material damping in nanomechanical resonators. In this study, we used isothermal MD to simulate the dynamics of the longitudinal-mode oscillations of an amorphous silicon nanoresonator as a function of frequency (2 GHz–50 GHz) and temperature (15 K–300 K). Damping was characterized by computing the loss tangent with an estimated uncertainty of 7%. The dissipation spectrum displays a sharp peak at 50 K and a broad peak at around 160 K. Damping is a weak function of frequency at room temperature, and the loss tangent has a remarkably high value of ~0.01. In contrast, at low temperatures (15 K), the loss tangent increases monotonically from 4× {{10}-4} to 4× {{10}-3} as the frequency increases from 2 GHz to 50 GHz. The mechanisms of dissipation are discussed.

  10. Atomistic simulation of mineral surfaces: Their structure, hydration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, we have used atomistic simulation techniques to investigate the surface structure and stability of the biomineral barium sulfate and a number of important iron oxides, namely hematite, magnetite and goethite. We have studied the effect of the molecular adsorption of water on the surface structures and stabilities of all four minerals, and dissociative adsorption of water on the iron oxides. In addition, we have investigated the segregation of foreign ions to the surfaces of barium sulfate. Chapter 1 gives an overview of some previous studies of surfaces, employing both atomistic simulations and electronic structure calculations. Also discussed are some popular experimental analysis techniques used in surface characterisation. Chapter 2 describes the theoretical methods used in atomistic simulations and the mathematical methods used in the calculations, including the evaluation of surface energies. Chapter 3 introduces the potential model and discusses their reliability and transferability between structures. The potential parameters used in chapters 4-7 are given and where possible, compared with experiment. Chapter 4 describes the structures and stabilities of the pure surfaces of barium sulfate, and after the overgrowth of segregation of a layer of impurity ions at the surface. The modified crystal morphologies are discussed. Chapter 5 follows the work in the previous chapter by discussing the effect of the molecular adsorption of water at different coverages on the structure and stabilities of barium sulfate surfaces. The hydrated energies and surface energies are calculated. The second section of chapter 5 investigates structural influences on the growth of barium sulfate. In Chapter 6, the pure surfaces of hematite, magnetite and goethite are described. The surface relaxation are studied and equilibrium crystal morphologies compared with experimental findings. The surface structure of Fe2O3(00.1) under reducing conditions is also investigated

  11. Computer Science Techniques Applied to Parallel Atomistic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    1998-03-01

    Recent developments in parallel processing technology and multiresolution numerical algorithms have established large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a new research mode for studying materials phenomena such as fracture. However, this requires large system sizes and long simulated times. We have developed: i) Space-time multiresolution schemes; ii) fuzzy-clustering approach to hierarchical dynamics; iii) wavelet-based adaptive curvilinear-coordinate load balancing; iv) multilevel preconditioned conjugate gradient method; and v) spacefilling-curve-based data compression for parallel I/O. Using these techniques, million-atom parallel MD simulations are performed for the oxidation dynamics of nanocrystalline Al. The simulations take into account the effect of dynamic charge transfer between Al and O using the electronegativity equalization scheme. The resulting long-range Coulomb interaction is calculated efficiently with the fast multipole method. Results for temperature and charge distributions, residual stresses, bond lengths and bond angles, and diffusivities of Al and O will be presented. The oxidation of nanocrystalline Al is elucidated through immersive visualization in virtual environments. A unique dual-degree education program at Louisiana State University will also be discussed in which students can obtain a Ph.D. in Physics & Astronomy and a M.S. from the Department of Computer Science in five years. This program fosters interdisciplinary research activities for interfacing High Performance Computing and Communications with large-scale atomistic simulations of advanced materials. This work was supported by NSF (CAREER Program), ARO, PRF, and Louisiana LEQSF.

  12. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  13. An object oriented Python interface for atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynninen, T.; Himanen, L.; Parkkinen, V.; Musso, T.; Corander, J.; Foster, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Programmable simulation environments allow one to monitor and control calculations efficiently and automatically before, during, and after runtime. Environments directly accessible in a programming environment can be interfaced with powerful external analysis tools and extensions to enhance the functionality of the core program, and by incorporating a flexible object based structure, the environments make building and analysing computational setups intuitive. In this work, we present a classical atomistic force field with an interface written in Python language. The program is an extension for an existing object based atomistic simulation environment.

  14. Hierarchical approach to 'atomistic' 3-D MOSFET simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Asenov, A.; Brown, A. R.; J. H. Davies; S Saini

    1999-01-01

    We present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled sub-0.1-μm MOSFETs. These devices are so small that their characteristics depend on the precise location of dopant atoms within them, not just on their average density. A full-scale three-dimensional drift-diffusion atomistic simulation approach is first described and used to verify more economical, but restricted, options. To reduce processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage, we have de...

  15. Definition and detection of contact in atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2015-01-01

    In atomistic simulations, contact depends on the accurate detection of contacting atoms as well as their contact area. While it is common to define contact between atoms based on the so-called ‘contact distance’ where the interatomic potential energy reaches its minimum, this discounts, for example,

  16. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-01-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coa

  17. Atomistic simulation of nanoformed metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng-Da, E-mail: nanowu@cycu.edu.tw

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • STZ forms at substrate surface underneath punch. • Atoms underneath punch have higher speeds at larger mold displacement. • Stick-slip phenomenon becomes more obvious with increasing imprint speed. • Great pattern transfer is obtained with unloading at low temperatures. - Abstract: The effects of forming speed and temperature on the forming mechanism and mechanics of Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 25}Ti{sub 25} metallic glass are studied using molecular dynamics simulations based on the second-moment approximation of the many-body tight-binding potential. These effects are investigated in terms of atomic trajectories, flow field, slip vectors, internal energy, radial distribution function, and elastic recovery of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) patterns. The simulation results show that a shear transformation zone (STZ) forms at the substrate surface underneath the mold during the forming process. The STZ area increases with mold displacement (D). The movement speed of substrate atoms underneath the mold increases with increasing D value. The movement directions of substrate atoms underneath the mold are more agreeable for a larger D value. The stick-slip phenomenon becomes more obvious with increasing D value and imprint speed. The substrate energy increases with increasing imprint speed and temperature. Great NIL pattern transfer is obtained with unloading at low temperatures (e.g., room temperature)

  18. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  19. Structure identification methods for atomistic simulations of crystalline materials

    OpenAIRE

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We discuss existing and new computational analysis techniques to classify local atomic arrangements in large-scale atomistic computer simulations of crystalline solids. This article includes a performance comparison of typical analysis algorithms such as Common Neighbor Analysis, Centrosymmetry Analysis, Bond Angle Analysis, Bond Order Analysis, and Voronoi Analysis. In addition we propose a simple extension to the Common Neighbor Analysis method that makes it suitable for multi-phase systems...

  20. In silico affinity profiling of neuroactive polyphenols for post-traumatic calpain inactivation: a molecular docking and atomistic simulation sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Pillay, Viness

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated nonlysosomal neutral proteases, calpains, are believed to be early mediators of neuronal damage associated with neuron death and axonal degeneration after traumatic neural injuries. In this study, a library of biologically active small molecular weight calpain inhibitors was used for model validation and inhibition site recognition. Subsequently, two natural neuroactive polyphenols, curcumin and quercetin, were tested for their sensitivity and activity towards calpain's proteolytic sequence and compared with the known calpain inhibitors via detailed molecular mechanics (MM), molecular dynamics (MD), and docking simulations. The MM and MD energy profiles (SJA6017 < AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < quercetin < leupeptin < PD150606 < curcumin < ALLN < ALLM < MDL-28170 < calpeptin) and the docking analysis (AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < ALLN < PD150606 < curcumin < leupeptin < quercetin < calpeptin < SJA6017 < MDL-28170 < ALLM) demonstrated that polyphenols conferred comparable calpain inhibition profiling. The modeling paradigm used in this study provides the first detailed account of corroboration of enzyme inhibition efficacy of calpain inhibitors and the respective calpain-calpain inhibitor molecular complexes' energetic landscape and in addition stimulates the polyphenol bioactive paradigm for post-SCI intervention with implications reaching to experimental in vitro, in cyto, and in vivo studies. PMID:25546626

  1. In Silico Affinity Profiling of Neuroactive Polyphenols for Post-Traumatic Calpain Inactivation: A Molecular Docking and Atomistic Simulation Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-activated nonlysosomal neutral proteases, calpains, are believed to be early mediators of neuronal damage associated with neuron death and axonal degeneration after traumatic neural injuries. In this study, a library of biologically active small molecular weight calpain inhibitors was used for model validation and inhibition site recognition. Subsequently, two natural neuroactive polyphenols, curcumin and quercetin, were tested for their sensitivity and activity towards calpain’s proteolytic sequence and compared with the known calpain inhibitors via detailed molecular mechanics (MM, molecular dynamics (MD, and docking simulations. The MM and MD energy profiles (SJA6017 < AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < quercetin < leupeptin < PD150606 < curcumin < ALLN < ALLM < MDL-28170 < calpeptin and the docking analysis (AK275 < AK295 < PD151746 < ALLN < PD150606 < curcumin < leupeptin < quercetin < calpeptin < SJA6017 < MDL-28170 < ALLM demonstrated that polyphenols conferred comparable calpain inhibition profiling. The modeling paradigm used in this study provides the first detailed account of corroboration of enzyme inhibition efficacy of calpain inhibitors and the respective calpain–calpain inhibitor molecular complexes’ energetic landscape and in addition stimulates the polyphenol bioactive paradigm for post-SCI intervention with implications reaching to experimental in vitro, in cyto, and in vivo studies.

  2. First principles molecular dynamics simulation of a task-specific ionic liquid based on silver-olefin complex: atomistic insight into separation process

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, De-en

    2008-01-01

    First principles molecular dynamics based on density functional theory is applied to a hypothetical ionic liquid whose cations and anions are silver-ethylene complex [Ag(C2H4)2+] and tetrafluoroborate [BF4-], respectively. This ionic liquid represents a group of task-specific silver complex-based ionic liquids synthesized recently. Molecular dynamics simulations at two temperatures are performed for five picoseconds. Events of association, dissociation, exchange, and recombination of ethylene with silver cation are observed. A mechanism of ethylene transfer similar to the Grotthus type of proton transfer in water is identified, where a silver cation accepts one ethylene molecule and donates another to a neighboring silver cation. This mechanism may contribute to fast transport of olefins through ionic liquid membranes based on silver complexes for olefin/paraffin separation.

  3. First principles molecular dynamics simulation of a task-specific ionic liquid based on silver-olefin complex: atomistic insights into a separation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-en; Dai, Sheng

    2008-08-21

    First principles molecular dynamics based on density functional theory is applied to a hypothetical ionic liquid whose cations and anions are silver-ethylene complex [Ag(C2H4)2+] and tetrafluoroborate [BF4-], respectively. This ionic liquid represents a group of task-specific silver complex-based ionic liquids synthesized recently. Molecular dynamics simulations at two temperatures are performed for five picoseconds. Events of association, dissociation, exchange, and recombination of ethylene with silver cation are found. A mechanism of ethylene transfer similar to the Grotthus type of proton transfer in water is identified, where a silver cation accepts one ethylene molecule and donates another to a neighboring silver cation. This mechanism may contribute to fast transport of olefins through ionic liquid membranes based on silver complexes for olefin/paraffin separation.

  4. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    . We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule......, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential...

  5. Rotational viscosity of a liquid crystal mixture:a fully atomistic molecular dynamics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ran; Peng Zeng-Hui; Liu Yong-Gang; Zheng Zhi-Gang; Xuan Li

    2009-01-01

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics(MD)simulations at 293, 303 and 313 K have been performed for the four. component liquid crystal mixture, E7, using the software package Material Studio. Order parameters and orientational time correlation functions(TCFs)were calculated from MD trajectories. The rotational viscosity coefficients(RVCs)of the mixture were ca]culated using the Nemtsov-Zakharov and Fialkowski methods based on statistical-mechanical approaches. Temperature dependences of RVC and density were discussed in detall. Reasonable agreement between the simulated and experimental values was found.

  6. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  7. Atomistic resolution structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers in simulations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Pabst, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Accurate details on the sampled atomistic resolution structures of lipid bilayers can be experimentally obtained by measuring C-H bond order parameters, spin relaxation rates and scattering form factors. These parameters can be also directly calculated from the classical atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and compared to the experimentally achieved results. This comparison measures the simulation model quality with respect to 'reality'. If agreement is sufficient, the simulation model gives an atomistic structural interpretation of the acquired experimental data. Significant advance of MD models is made by jointly interpreting different experiments using the same structural model. Here we focus on phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers, which out of all model membranes have been studied mostly by experiments and simulations, leading to the largest available dataset. From the applied comparisons we conclude that the acyl chain region structure and rotational dynamics are generally well described in simulation models. Also changes with temperature, dehydration and cholesterol concentration are qualitatively correctly reproduced. However, the quality of the underlying atomistic resolution structural changes is uncertain. Even worse, when focusing on the lipid bilayer properties at the interfacial region, e.g. glycerol backbone and choline structures, and cation binding, many simulation models produce an inaccurate description of experimental data. Thus extreme care must be applied when simulations are applied to understand phenomena where the interfacial region plays a significant role. This work is done by the NMRlipids Open Collaboration project running at https://nmrlipids.blogspot.fi and https://github.com/NMRLipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26809025

  8. Nanostructured surfaces described by atomistic simulation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three separate simulation techniques have been applied to study different problems involving nanostructured surfaces. In the first investigation the bonding of fullerene molecules on silicon and Ag adatoms and dimers on graphite are investigated using the PLATO density functional code. It is shown that in the first case there are strong covalent bonds formed whereas in the latter there are relatively weak bonds with small energy barriers between adjacent sites. Classical MD is used to show how energetic (∼ keV) Ag clusters can be pinned on or implanted into a graphite surface and that the pinning thresholds and implantation depths agree with experiment. Finally a Monte Carlo model for cluster motion over a surface is described and related to pattern formation in the early stages of thin film growth

  9. Nuclear wasteform materials: Atomistic simulation case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alex.chroneos@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Institute of Materials Science, NCSR Demokritos, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Rushton, M.J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, C. [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Tsoukalas, L.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ever increasing global energy demand combined with a requirement to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions has rekindled an interest in nuclear power generation. In order that nuclear energy remains publicly acceptable and therefore a sustainable source of power it is important that nuclear waste is dealt with in a responsible manner. To achieve this, improved materials for the long-term immobilisation of waste should be developed. The extreme conditions experienced by nuclear wasteforms necessitate the detailed understanding of their properties and the mechanisms acting within them at the atomic scale. This latter issue is the focus of the present review. Atomic scale simulation techniques can accelerate the development of new materials for nuclear wasteform applications and provide detailed information on their physical properties that cannot be easily accessed by experiment. The present article introduces examples of how atomic scale, computational modelling techniques have led to an improved understanding of current nuclear wasteform materials and also suggest how they may be used in the development of new wasteforms.

  10. Atomistic simulation of the structural and elastic properties of magnesite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZI-JIANG LIU; XIAO-WEI SUN; TING SONG; YUAN GUO; CAI-RONG ZHANG; ZHENG-RONG ZHANG

    2016-09-01

    Atomistic simulation was carried out to study the structural and elastic properties of MgCO$_3$ magnesite within the pressure range of the Earth’s mantle based on a novel force field. The lattice parameters and elasticconstants as a function of pressure up to 150 GPa are calculated. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and previous theoretical results, showing no phase transition over the pressure range of interest. We also found that magnesite exhibits a strong anisotropy throughout the lower mantle and that the nature of the anisotropy changes significantly with depth.

  11. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E.M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-01-01

    continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is...... usually employed to remedy this situation.We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of...

  12. Applications of Atomistic Simulation to Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Glass Formulation Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-03-01

    Glass formulation development depends on an understanding of the effects of glass composition on its processibility and product quality. Such compositional effects on properties in turn depend on the microscopic structure of the glass. Historically, compositional effects on macroscopic properties have been explored empirically, e.g., by measuring viscosity at various glass compositions. The relationship of composition to structure has been studied by microstructural experimental methods. More recently, computer simulation has proved a fruitful complement to these more traditional methods of study. By simulating atomic interaction over a period of time using the molecular dynamics method, a direct picture of the glass structure and dynamics is obtained which can verify existing concepts as well as permit ``measurement`` of quantities inaccessible to experiment. Atomistic simulation can be of particular benefit in the development of waste glasses. As vitrification is being considered for an increasing variety of waste streams, process and product models are needed to formulate compositions for an extremely wide variety of elemental species and composition ranges. The demand for process and product models which can predict over such a diverse composition space requires mechanistic understanding of glass behavior; atomistic simulation is ideally suited for providing this understanding. Moreover, while simulation cannot completely eliminate the need for treatability studies, it can play a role in minimizing the experimentation on (and therefore contact handling of) such materials. This paper briefly reviews the molecular dynamics method, which is the primary atomistic simulation tool for studying glass structure. We then summarize the current state of glass simulation, emphasizing areas of importance for waste glass process/product modeling. At SRS, glass process and product models have been formulated in terms of glass structural concepts.

  13. Atomistic Simulation of High-Density Uranium Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Garcés

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply an atomistic modeling approach to deal with interfacial phenomena in high-density uranium fuels. The effects of Si, as additive to Al or as U-Mo-particles coating, on the behavior of the Al/U-Mo interface is modeled by using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS method for alloys. The basic experimental features characterizing the real system are identified, via simulations and atom-by-atom analysis. These include (1 the trend indicating formation of interfacial compounds, (2 much reduced diffusion of Al into U-Mo solid solution due to the high Si concentration, (3 Si depletion in the Al matrix, (4 an unexpected interaction between Mo and Si which inhibits Si diffusion to deeper layers in the U-Mo solid solution, and (5 the minimum amount of Si needed to perform as an effective diffusion barrier. Simulation results related to alternatives to Si dispersed in the Al matrix, such as the use of C coating of U-Mo particles or Zr instead of the Al matrix, are also shown. Recent experimental results confirmed early theoretical proposals, along the lines of the results reported in this work, showing that atomistic computational modeling could become a valuable tool to aid the experimental work in the development of nuclear fuels.

  14. Atomistic simulation of static magnetic properties of bit patterned media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeláez-Echeverri, O. D.; Agudelo-Giraldo, J. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a new design of Co based bit pattern media with out-of-plane uni-axial anisotropy induced by interface effects. Our model features the inclusion of magnetic impurities in the non-magnetic matrix. After the material model was refined during three iterations using Monte Carlo simulations, further simulations were performed using an atomistic integrator of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with Langevin dynamics to study the behavior of the system paying special attention to the super-paramagnetic limit. Our model system exhibits three magnetic phase transitions, one due to the magnetically doped matrix material and the weak magnetic interaction between the nano-structures in the system. The different magnetic phases of the system as well as the features of its phase diagram are explained.

  15. Fully atomistic molecular-mechanical model of liquid alkane oils: Computational validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariev, Tsvetan K; Slavchov, Radomir I; Tadjer, Alia V; Ivanova, Anela N

    2014-04-15

    Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on liquid n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane to derive an atomistic model for middle-chain-length alkanes. All simulations were based on existing molecular-mechanical parameters for alkanes. The computational protocol was optimized, for example, in terms of thermo- and barostat, to reproduce properly the properties of the liquids. The model was validated by comparison of thermal, structural, and dynamic properties of the normal alkane liquids to experimental data. Two different combinations of temperature and pressure coupling algorithms were tested. A simple differential approach was applied to evaluate fluctuation-related properties with sufficient accuracy. Analysis of the data reveals a satisfactory representation of the hydrophobic systems behavior. Thermodynamic parameters are close to the experimental values and exhibit correct temperature dependence. The observed intramolecular geometry corresponds to extended conformations domination, whereas the intermolecular structure demonstrates all characteristics of liquid systems. Cavity size distribution function was calculated from coordinates analysis and was applied to study the solubility of gases in hexane and heptane oils. This study provides a platform for further in-depth research on hydrophobic solutions and multicomponent systems.

  16. Visualization and analysis of atomistic simulation data with OVITO-the Open Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Open Visualization Tool (OVITO) is a new 3D visualization software designed for post-processing atomistic data obtained from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. Unique analysis, editing and animations functions are integrated into its easy-to-use graphical user interface. The software is written in object-oriented C++, controllable via Python scripts and easily extendable through a plug-in interface. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://ovito.sourceforge.net/.

  17. Predicting growth of graphene nanostructures using high-fidelity atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, Keven F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zhou, Xiaowang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, Donald K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schultz, Peter A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bartelt, Norman Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this project we developed t he atomistic models needed to predict how graphene grows when carbon is deposited on metal and semiconductor surfaces. We first calculated energies of many carbon configurations using first principles electronic structure calculations and then used these energies to construct an empirical bond order potentials that enable s comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of growth. We validated our approach by comparing our predictions to experiments of graphene growth on Ir, Cu and Ge. The robustness of ou r understanding of graphene growth will enable high quality graphene to be grown on novel substrates which will expand the number of potential types of graphene electronic devices.

  18. A hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach for simulating surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, John L; Morton, Seth M; Moore, Justin E; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-01-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a technique that has broad implications for biological and chemical sensing applications by providing the ability to simultaneously detect and identify a single molecule. The Raman scattering of molecules adsorbed on metal nanoparticles can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude. These enhancements stem from a twofold mechanism: an electromagnetic mechanism (EM), which is due to the enhanced local field near the metal surface, and a chemical mechanism (CM), which is due to the adsorbate specific interactions between the metal surface and the molecules. The local field near the metal surface can be significantly enhanced due to the plasmon excitation, and therefore chemists generally accept that the EM provides the majority of the enhancements. While classical electrodynamics simulations can accurately simulate the local electric field around metal nanoparticles, they offer few insights into the spectral changes that occur in SERS. First-principles simulations can directly predict the Raman spectrum but are limited to small metal clusters and therefore are often used for understanding the CM. Thus, there is a need for developing new methods that bridge the electrodynamics simulations of the metal nanoparticle and the first-principles simulations of the molecule to facilitate direct simulations of SERS spectra. In this Account, we discuss our recent work on developing a hybrid atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical approach to simulate SERS. This hybrid method is called the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanics (DIM/QM) method and consists of an atomistic electrodynamics model of the metal nanoparticle and a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) description of the molecule. In contrast to most previous work, the DIM/QM method enables us to retain a detailed atomistic structure of the nanoparticle and provides a natural bridge between the electronic structure methods and the macroscopic

  19. Atomistic simulations of jog migration on extended screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Leffers, T.; Pedersen, O.B.;

    2001-01-01

    We have performed large-scale atomistic simulations of the migration of elementary jogs on dissociated screw dislocations in Cu. The local crystalline configurations, transition paths. effective masses. and migration barriers for the jogs are determined using an interatomic potential based...... on the Effective Medium Theory, The minimum energy path through configuration space and the corresponding transition state energy are obtained using the Nudged Elastic Band path technique. We find very similar migration properties for elementary jogs on the (110){110} octahedral slip systems and the (110){110} non......-octahedral slip systems. with energy barriers in the 15-19 meV range. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  20. Quantum-based Atomistic Simulation of Transition Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, J A; Benedict, L X; Glosli, J N; Hood, R Q; Orlikowski, D A; Patel, M V; Soderlind, P; Streitz, F H; Tang, M; Yang, L H

    2005-08-29

    First-principles generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT) provides a fundamental basis for transferable multi-ion interatomic potentials in d-electron transition metals within density-functional quantum mechanics. In mid-period bcc metals, where multi-ion angular forces are important to structural properties, simplified model GPT or MGPT potentials have been developed based on canonical d bands to allow analytic forms and large-scale atomistic simulations. Robust, advanced-generation MGPT potentials have now been obtained for Ta and Mo and successfully applied to a wide range of structural, thermodynamic, defect and mechanical properties at both ambient and extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. Recent algorithm improvements have also led to a more general matrix representation of MGPT beyond canonical bands allowing increased accuracy and extension to f-electron actinide metals, an order of magnitude increase in computational speed, and the current development of temperature-dependent potentials.

  1. Atomistic simulations for multiscale modeling in bcc metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belak, J.; Moriarty, J.A.; Soderlind, P.; Xu, W.; Yang, L.H.; Zhu

    1998-09-25

    Quantum-based atomistic simulations are being used to study fundamental deformation and defect properties relevant to the multiscale modeling of plasticity in bcc metals at both ambient and extreme conditions. Ab initio electronic-structure calculations on the elastic and ideal-strength properties of Ta and Mo help constrain and validate many-body interatomic potentials used to study grain boundaries and dislocations. The predicted C(capital Sigma)5 (310)[100] grain boundary structure for Mo has recently been confirmed in HREM measurements. The core structure, (small gamma) surfaces, Peierls stress, and kink-pair formation energies associated with the motion of a/2(111) screw dislocations in Ta and Mo have also been calculated. Dislocation mobility and dislocation junction formation and breaking are currently under investigation.

  2. Comparative study of embedded atom potentials for atomistic simulations of fracture in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic simulations play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of the crack-tip processes that take place during fracture of semi-brittle materials like α-iron. As with all atomistic simulations, the results of such simulations however depend critically on the underlying atomic interaction model. Here, we present a systematic study of eight α-iron embedded atom method potentials used to model cracks subjected to plane strain mode-I loading conditions in six different crystal orientations. Molecular statics simulations are used to determine the fracture behavior (cleavage, dislocation emission, twinning) and the critical stress intensity factor KIc. The structural transformations in front of the crack tips, and in particular the occurrence of {1 1 0} planar faults, are analyzed in detail and related to the strain-dependent generalized stacking fault energy curve. The simulation results are discussed in terms of theoretical fracture criteria and compared to recent experimental data. The different potentials are ranked according to their capability to model the experimentally observed fracture behavior. (paper)

  3. First Principles Based Reactive Atomistic Simulations to Understand the Effects of Molecular Hypervelocity Impact on Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, A.; Cheng, M-J; Cvicek, V.; Beegle, Luther W.; Hodyss, R.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the predicted impact of species such as ice-water, CO2, CH4, and NH3, on oxidized titanium, as well as HC species on diamond surfaces. These simulations provide the dynamics of product distributions during and after a hypervelocity impact event, ionization fractions, and dissociation probabilities for the various species of interest as a function of impact velocity (energy). We are using these results to determine the relevance of the fragmentation process to Cassini INMS results, and to quantify its effects on the observed spectra.

  4. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  5. Key role of water in proton transfer at the Q(o)-site of the cytochrome bc(1) complex predicted by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postila, P. A.; Kaszuba, K.; Sarewicz, M.;

    2013-01-01

    on the simulations we are able to show the atom-level binding modes of two substrate forms: quinol (QH(2)) and quinone (Q). The QH(2) binding at the Q(o)-site involves a coordinated water arrangement that produces an exceptionally close and stable interaction between the cyt b and iron sulfur protein subunits....... In this arrangement water molecules are positioned suitably in relation to the hydroxyls of the QH(2) ring to act as the primary acceptors of protons detaching from the oxidized substrate. In contrast, water does not have a similar role in the Q binding at the Q(o)-site. Moreover, the coordinated water molecule...... is also a prime candidate to act as a structural element, gating for short-circuit suppression at the Q(o)-site. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  7. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  8. Nano sculpt: A methodology for generating complex realistic configurations for atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A; Hummel, M; Schmauder, S; Bitzek, E

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic simulations have now become commonplace in the study of the deformation and failure of materials. Increase in computing power in recent years has made large-scale simulations with billions, or even trillions, of atoms a possibility. Most simulations to-date, however, are still performed with quasi-2D geometries or rather simplistic 3D setups. Although controlled studies on such well-defined structures are often required to obtain quantitative information from atomistic simulations, for qualitative studies focusing on e.g. the identification of mechanisms, researchers would greatly benefit from a methodology that helps realize more realistic configurations. The ideal scenario would be a one-on-one reconstruction of experimentally observed structures. To this end, we propose a new method and software tool called nano sculpt with the following features:•The method allows for easy sample generation for atomistic simulations from any arbitrarily shaped 3D enclosed volume.•The tool can be used to build atomistic samples from artificial geometries, including CAD geometries and structures obtained from simulation methods other than atomistic simulations.•The tool enables the generation of experimentally informed atomistic samples, by e.g. digitization of micrographs or usage of tomography data.

  9. Nano sculpt: A methodology for generating complex realistic configurations for atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A; Hummel, M; Schmauder, S; Bitzek, E

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic simulations have now become commonplace in the study of the deformation and failure of materials. Increase in computing power in recent years has made large-scale simulations with billions, or even trillions, of atoms a possibility. Most simulations to-date, however, are still performed with quasi-2D geometries or rather simplistic 3D setups. Although controlled studies on such well-defined structures are often required to obtain quantitative information from atomistic simulations, for qualitative studies focusing on e.g. the identification of mechanisms, researchers would greatly benefit from a methodology that helps realize more realistic configurations. The ideal scenario would be a one-on-one reconstruction of experimentally observed structures. To this end, we propose a new method and software tool called nano sculpt with the following features:•The method allows for easy sample generation for atomistic simulations from any arbitrarily shaped 3D enclosed volume.•The tool can be used to build atomistic samples from artificial geometries, including CAD geometries and structures obtained from simulation methods other than atomistic simulations.•The tool enables the generation of experimentally informed atomistic samples, by e.g. digitization of micrographs or usage of tomography data. PMID:27054098

  10. Prediction of Material Properties of Nanostructured Polymer Composites Using Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Clancy, T.C.; Frankland, S.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic models of epoxy polymers were built in order to assess the effect of structure at the nanometer scale on the resulting bulk properties such as elastic modulus and thermal conductivity. Atomistic models of both bulk polymer and carbon nanotube polymer composites were built. For the bulk models, the effect of moisture content and temperature on the resulting elastic constants was calculated. A relatively consistent decrease in modulus was seen with increasing temperature. The dependence of modulus on moisture content was less consistent. This behavior was seen for two different epoxy systems, one containing a difunctional epoxy molecule and the other a tetrafunctional epoxy molecule. Both epoxy structures were crosslinked with diamine curing agents. Multifunctional properties were calculated with the nanocomposite models. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the carbon nanotube and the surrounding epoxy matrix. These estimated values were used in a multiscale model in order to predict the thermal conductivity of a nanocomposite as a function of the nanometer scaled molecular structure.

  11. Atomistic Simulations of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Surfactants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-03-01

    The amphiphilic polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) displays a sharp phase transition at its LCST around 32 °C, which results from competing interactions of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups with water. This thermoresponsive behavior can be exploited in more complex architectures, such as block copolymers or surfactants, to provide responsive PNIPAM head groups. In these systems, however, changes to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance can alter the transition behavior. In this work, we perform atomistic simulations of PNIPAM-alkyl surfactants to study the temperature dependence of their structures. A single chain of the surfactant does not show temperature-responsive behavior. Instead, below and above the LCST of PNIPAM, the surfactant folds to bring the hydrophobic alkyl tail in contact with the PNIPAM backbone, shielding it from water. In addition to single chains, we explore the self-assembly of multiple surfactants into micelles and how the temperature-dependent behavior is changed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Fracture toughness from atomistic simulations: Brittleness induced by emission of sessile dislocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-08-04

    Using atomistic simulations of crack response for intermetallic materials the author shows that when the emitted dislocations are sessile and stay in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip the emitted dislocations can actually lead to brittle failure. She present the results of an atomistic simulation study of the simultaneous dislocation emission and crack propagation process in this class of materials. She used a molecular statics technique with embedded atom (EAM) potentials developed for NiAl. The crystal structure of NiAl is the CsCl type (B2) with a lattice parameter of 0.287 nm, which is reproduced by the potential together with the cohesive energy and elastic constants. The compound stays ordered up to the melting point, indicating a strong tendency towards chemical ordering with a relatively high energy of the antiphase boundary (APB). As a result of this relatively large energy the dislocations of 1/2<111> type Burgers vectors imply a high energy and the deformation process occurs via the larger <100> type dislocations.

  13. Atomistic mechanisms of amorphization during nanoindentation of SiC: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2005-05-01

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC crystal has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations on parallel computers. The calculated load-displacement curve consists of a series of load drops, corresponding to plastic deformation, in addition to a shoulder at a smaller displacement, which is fully reversible upon unloading. The peaks in the load-displacement curve are shown to reflect the crystalline structure and dislocation activities under the surface. The evolution of indentation damage and defect accumulation are also discussed in terms of bond angles, local pressure, local shear stress, and spatial rearrangements of atoms. These structural analyses reveal that the defect-stimulated growth and coalescence of dislocation loops are responsible for the crystalline-to-amorphous transition. The shortest-path-ring analysis is effectively employed to characterize nanoindentation-induced structural transformations and dislocation activities.

  14. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  15. Insights from Micro-second Atomistic Simulations of Melittin in Thin Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Sanjay K; Wang, Yukun; Zhao, Tangzhen; Ulmschneider, Jakob P

    2015-06-01

    The membrane disruption and pore-forming mechanism of melittin has been widely explored by experiments and computational studies. However, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic, and further study is required to turn antimicrobial peptides into future promising drugs against microbes. In this study, unbiased microsecond (µs) time scale (total 17 µs) atomistic molecular dynamics simulation were performed on multiple melittin systems in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane to capture the various events during the membrane disorder produced by melittin. We observed bent U-shaped conformations of melittin, penetrated deeply into the membrane in all simulations, and a special double U-shaped structure. However, no peptide transmembrane insertion, nor pore formation was seen, indicating that these processes occur on much longer timescales, and suggesting that many prior computational studies of melittin were not sufficiently unbiased. PMID:25963936

  16. Frozen-density embedding theory with average solvent charge densities from explicit atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laktionov, Andrey; Chemineau-Chalaye, Emilie; Wesolowski, Tomasz A

    2016-08-21

    Besides molecular electron densities obtained within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (ρB(r)) to represent the environment, the ensemble averaged density (〈ρB〉(r)) is also admissible in frozen-density embedding theory (FDET) [Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A, 2008, 77, 11444]. This makes it possible to introduce an approximation in the evaluation of the solvent effect on quantum mechanical observables consisting of replacing the ensemble averaged observable by the observable evaluated at ensemble averaged ρB(r). This approximation is shown to affect negligibly the solvatochromic shift in the absorption of hydrated acetone. The proposed model provides a continuum type of representation of the solvent, which reflects nevertheless its local structure, and it is to be applied as a post-simulation analysis tool in atomistic level simulations. PMID:26984532

  17. Atomistic-Continuum Hybrid Simulation of Heat Transfer between Argon Flow and Copper Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Yijin; Chen, C L

    2016-01-01

    A simulation work aiming to study heat transfer coefficient between argon fluid flow and copper plate is carried out based on atomistic-continuum hybrid method. Navier-Stokes equations for continuum domain are solved through the Pressure Implicit with Splitting of Operators (PISO) algorithm, and the atom evolution in molecular domain is solved through the Verlet algorithm. The solver is validated by solving Couette flow and heat conduction problems. With both momentum and energy coupling method applied, simulations on convection of argon flows between two parallel plates are performed. The top plate is kept as a constant velocity and has higher temperature, while the lower one, which is modeled with FCC copper lattices, is also fixed but has lower temperature. It is found that, heat transfer between argon fluid flow and copper plate in this situation is much higher than that at macroscopic when the flow is fully developed.

  18. Linking Atomistic and Mesoscale Simulations of Water Soluble Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. L.

    2003-03-01

    There exist a range of techniques for studying surfactants and polymers in the mesoscale regime. One of the challenges is to link mesoscale theories and simulations to other calculation methods which address different length scales of the system. We introduce some mesoscale methods of calculation for polymers and surfactants and then present a case study of where mesoscale modelling is used for mechanistic understanding, by linking the method to high throughput in-silico screening methods. We look at the adsorption onto silica of ethylene oxide (EO)/ propylene oxide (PO) block copolymers (lutrols) which have been modified by end-grafting of short, cationic dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA)chains. Given that the silica surface is negatively charged, it is remarkable that in some circumstances, polymers with longercationic chains have a lower adsorption. The effect is attributed to a competition between strong adsorption of the cationic DMAEMA groups driven by electrostatics, and weaker adsorption of the more numerous EO groups. This then raises the question of how we produce the values for the mesoscale parameters in these models and in the second part of the talk we describe a calculation method for doing this for water soluble polymers. The most promising route, but notoriously costly, is based on free energy calculations at the atomistic level. Free energy calculations are computationally intensive in general, but in an aqueous system one is also faced with the additional problem of using complex continuum models and/or accurate interaction potentials for water. Here we show how potential of mean force (PMF)calculations offer a practical alternative which avoids these drawbacks, though one is still faced with extremely long simulations.

  19. Atomistic simulations of fracture in the B2 phase of the Nb-Ti-Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Computer Simulation Lab.

    1998-06-30

    Atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration in the B2 phase of Nb-rich alloys in the Nb-Ti-Al are presented. The alloy compositions studied are Nb-16Al-16Ti and Nb-16Al-33Ti. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and empirical embedded atom method (EAM) potentials for the ternary system developed in previous work. The behavior of a semi-infinite crack was studied under mode I loading for different crack tip geometries. The crack was embedded in a simulation cell with periodic boundary conditions along the direction parallel to the crack front and fixed boundary conditions along the periphery of the simulation cell. The quasi-static simulations were carried out using a molecular statics relaxation technique to obtain the minimum energy configuration of the atoms starting from their initial elastic positions, under increasingly higher stress intensities. The competition between dislocation emission and cleavage was studied in these alloys as a function of Ti content. Cracks along {l_brace}110{r_brace}-type planes with crack fronts oriented along different directions were studied. The alloys showed increased ductility with increased Ti content. The simulations show more ductile behavior than other intermetallics, due to easier dislocation emission processes at the crack tip. (orig.) 30 refs.

  20. Long-time atomistic simulations with the Parallel Replica Dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Danny

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) -- the numerical integration of atomistic equations of motion -- is a workhorse of computational materials science. Indeed, MD can in principle be used to obtain any thermodynamic or kinetic quantity, without introducing any approximation or assumptions beyond the adequacy of the interaction potential. It is therefore an extremely powerful and flexible tool to study materials with atomistic spatio-temporal resolution. These enviable qualities however come at a steep computational price, hence limiting the system sizes and simulation times that can be achieved in practice. While the size limitation can be efficiently addressed with massively parallel implementations of MD based on spatial decomposition strategies, allowing for the simulation of trillions of atoms, the same approach usually cannot extend the timescales much beyond microseconds. In this article, we discuss an alternative parallel-in-time approach, the Parallel Replica Dynamics (ParRep) method, that aims at addressing the timescale limitation of MD for systems that evolve through rare state-to-state transitions. We review the formal underpinnings of the method and demonstrate that it can provide arbitrarily accurate results for any definition of the states. When an adequate definition of the states is available, ParRep can simulate trajectories with a parallel speedup approaching the number of replicas used. We demonstrate the usefulness of ParRep by presenting different examples of materials simulations where access to long timescales was essential to access the physical regime of interest and discuss practical considerations that must be addressed to carry out these simulations. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  1. Hybrid simulations: combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J

    2011-06-14

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. In this work we introduce a straightforward scheme to perform hybrid simulations, making use of virtual sites to couple the two levels of resolution. With the help of these virtual sites interactions between molecules at different levels of resolution, i.e. between CG and atomistic molecules, are treated the same way as the pure CG-CG interactions. To test our method, we combine the Gromos atomistic force field with a number of coarse-grained potentials, obtained through several approaches that are designed to obtain CG potentials based on an existing atomistic model, namely iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and a potential of mean force subtraction procedure (SB). We also explore the use of the MARTINI force field for the CG potential. A simple system, consisting of atomistic butane molecules dissolved in CG butane, is used to study the performance of our hybrid scheme. Based on the potentials of mean force for atomistic butane in CG solvent, and the properties of 1:1 mixtures of atomistic and CG butane which should exhibit ideal mixing behavior, we conclude that the MARTINI and SB potentials are particularly suited to be combined with the atomistic force field. The MARTINI potential is subsequently used to perform hybrid simulations of atomistic dialanine peptides in both CG butane and water. Compared to a fully atomistic description of the system, the hybrid description gives similar results provided that the dielectric screening of water is accounted for. Within the field of biomolecules, our method appears ideally suited to study e.g. protein-ligand binding, where the active site and ligand are modeled in atomistic detail and the rest of the protein

  2. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro, E-mail: strachan@purdue.edu [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices.

  3. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: Atomistic battery discharge simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each ...

  4. Atomistic simulations of mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical behavior of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulation results showed that GNRs behave nonlinear elastically under tensile loads. When the strain exceeds 18%, the stress stiffening causes an increase in the Young's modulus. The width of a GNR has slight effects on the Young modulus and fracture strength. The maximum strain at which fracture occurs can reach 30.26% with an intrinsic strength of about 0.175 TPa. The excellent flexibility is attributed to the elongation of the C-C bonds and the variations of the bond angles.

  5. Thermal stability of silicon nanowires:atomistic simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wen-Liang; Zhang Kai-Wang; Zhong Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential model, we investigate the thermal stability of pristine silicon nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the structural evolutions and the Lindemann indices of silicon nanowires at different temperatures in order to unveil atomic-level melting behaviour of silicon nanowires.The simulation results show that silicon nanowires with surface reconstructions have higher thermal stability than those without surface reconstructions, and that silicon nanowires with perpendicular dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces have somewhat higher thermal stability than nanowires with parallel dimmer rows on the two (100) surfaces. Furthermore, the melting temperature of silicon nanowires increases as their diameter increases and reaches a saturation value close to the melting temperature of bulk silicon. The value of the Lindemann index for melting silicon nanowires is 0.037.

  6. Atomistic simulation of detonation initiation by ultra-short impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzov, S. A.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of the classical molecular dynamics simulation of detonation initiation in simple AB model of a high explosive compressed by ultra-short shock wave (SW). The simplified reactive empirical bond order potential (REBO) defines interatomic forces in the AB model explosive made up of diatomic AB molecules. Simulation of ultra-short piston-driven compression of AB explosive with duration of picoseconds represents an indirect initiation via a thin metal foil irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. We studied transition of SW to a detonation wave (DW), including evolution of calculated pressure profile in a sample. A run distance to detonation of such AB explosive film, which is required for detonation initiation, was obtained. Variation of loading time and piston velocity gives a 2D region of transition from SW to DW. The influence of pores on detonation initiation threshold is discussed.

  7. Atomistic Simulations of Material Properties under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi

    Extreme conditions involve low or high temperatures (> 1500 K), high pressures (> 30 MPa), high strains or strain rates, high radiation fluxes (> 100 dpa), and high electromagnetic fields (> 15T). Material properties under extreme conditions can be extremely different from those under normal conditions. Understanding material properties and performance under extreme conditions, including their dynamic evolution over time, plays an essential role in improving material properties and developing novel materials with desired properties. To understand material properties under extreme conditions, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with recently developed reactive force fields (ReaxFF) and traditional embedded atom methods (EAM) potentials to examine various materials (e.g., energetic materials and binary liquids) and processes. The key results from the simulations are summarized below. Anisotropic sensitivity of RDX crystals: Based on the compress-and-shear reactive dynamics (CS-RD) simulations of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) crystals, we predict that for mechanical shocks between 3 and 7 GPa, RDX is the most sensitive to shocks perpendicular to the (100) and (210) planes, while it is insensitive to those perpendicular to the (120), (111), and (110) planes. The simulations demonstrate that the molecular origin of anisotropic shock sensitivity is the steric hindrance to shearing of adjacent slip planes. Mechanisms of hotspot formation in polymer bonded explosives (PBXs): The simulations of a realistic model of PBXs reveal that hotspots may form at the nonplanar interfaces where shear relaxation leads to a dramatic temperature increase that persists long after the shock front has passed the interface. For energetic materials this temperature increase is coupled to chemical reactions that eventually lead to detonation. We show that decreasing the density of the binder eliminates the hotspots or reduces the sensitivity. Cavitation in binary metallic liquids

  8. A Metascalable Computing Framework for Large Spatiotemporal-Scale Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, K; Seymour, R; Wang, W; Kalia, R; Nakano, A; Vashishta, P; Shimojo, F; Yang, L H

    2009-02-17

    A metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel computing framework has been developed for large spatiotemporal-scale atomistic simulations of materials based on spatiotemporal data locality principles, which is expected to scale on emerging multipetaflops architectures. The framework consists of: (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms for high complexity problems; (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, while introducing multiple parallelization axes; and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these O(N) algorithms onto a multicore cluster based on hybrid implementation combining message passing and critical section-free multithreading. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving: (1) inter-node parallel efficiency well over 0.95 for 218 billion-atom molecular-dynamics and 1.68 trillion electronic-degrees-of-freedom quantum-mechanical simulations on 212,992 IBM BlueGene/L processors (superscalability); (2) high intra-node, multithreading parallel efficiency (nanoscalability); and (3) nearly perfect time/ensemble parallel efficiency (eon-scalability). The spatiotemporal scale covered by MD simulation on a sustained petaflops computer per day (i.e. petaflops {center_dot} day of computing) is estimated as NT = 2.14 (e.g. N = 2.14 million atoms for T = 1 microseconds).

  9. A Metascalable Computing Framework for Large Spatiotemporal-Scale Atomistic Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel computing framework has been developed for large spatiotemporal-scale atomistic simulations of materials based on spatiotemporal data locality principles, which is expected to scale on emerging multipetaflops architectures. The framework consists of: (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms for high complexity problems; (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, while introducing multiple parallelization axes; and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these O(N) algorithms onto a multicore cluster based on hybrid implementation combining message passing and critical section-free multithreading. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving: (1) inter-node parallel efficiency well over 0.95 for 218 billion-atom molecular-dynamics and 1.68 trillion electronic-degrees-of-freedom quantum-mechanical simulations on 212,992 IBM BlueGene/L processors (superscalability); (2) high intra-node, multithreading parallel efficiency (nanoscalability); and (3) nearly perfect time/ensemble parallel efficiency (eon-scalability). The spatiotemporal scale covered by MD simulation on a sustained petaflops computer per day (i.e. petaflops · day of computing) is estimated as NT = 2.14 (e.g. N = 2.14 million atoms for T = 1 microseconds).

  10. Rotational relaxation in ortho-terphenyl: using atomistic simulations to bridge theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Michael P; Chitra, Tarun; Jumper, John M; Palmo, Kim; Pan, Albert C; Shaw, David E

    2013-10-24

    Understanding the nature of the glass transition--the dramatic slowing of dynamics and eventual emergence of a disordered solid from a cooling liquid--is a fundamental challenge in physical science. A central characteristic of glass-forming liquids is a non-exponential main relaxation process. The extent of deviation from exponential relaxation typically becomes more pronounced on cooling. Theories that predict a growth of spatially heterogeneous dynamics as temperature is lowered can explain these observations. In apparent contradiction to these theories, however, some experiments suggest that certain substances--notably including the intensely studied molecular glass-former ortho-terphenyl (OTP)--have a main relaxation process whose shape is essentially temperature independent, even though other observables predicted to be correlated with the degree of dynamical heterogeneity are temperature dependent. Here we report the first simulations based on an atomistic model of OTP that reach equilibrium at temperatures well into the supercooled regime. We first show that the results of these simulations are in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental data for several basic properties over a wide range of temperatures. We then focus on rotational relaxation, finding nearly exponential behavior at high temperatures with clearly increasing deviations as temperature is lowered. The much weaker temperature dependence observed in light-scattering experiments also emerges from the same simulation data when we calculate correlation functions similar to those probed experimentally; this highlights the diversity of temperature dependencies that can be obtained with different probes. Further analysis suggests that the temperature insensitivity observed in the light-scattering experiments stems from the dependence of these measurements on internal as well as rotational molecular motion. Within the temperature range of our OTP simulations, our results strongly suggest that

  11. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Atomistic simulation of diffusion of hydrocarbons in carbon nano tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text:As an important research direction in nano science and nano technology, carbon nano tubes have aroused great interest, due to their unique structure and stability. This project deals with the transport of hydrocarbons inside Single Wall Carbon Nano tubes, which can be imagined to be rolled up rectangular strips of hexagonal graphite. We will present a simulation of diffusion of methane molecules inside carbon nano tubes using the Dual Control Volume Grand Canonical Molecular Dynamics method, in which a steady state chemical potential gradient is applied over the tube that enables us to calculate the transport diffusion coefficients Dt according to Fick Law. The trajectory of the particles allows the calculation of self diffusion coefficients, Ds , which are given by Einstein's relation. We used Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics to determine Ds of methane molecules taking into account their tetrahedral structure, modeled using the Bond Order Empirical Potential (Brenner potential). Transport phenomena in carbon depend on the pore size, the pore network structure, the molecule dimensions, the temperature of the gas and the interaction between the transported gas and the tube. Selections of these parameters were made for different runs, in order to explore their significance. The Atomic Visualization program was used to animate diffusion of hydrocarbons inside the carbon nano tube, in order to observe typical features. For example we observed that small pores lead to single file diffusion

  13. Simulations of boundary migration during recrystallization using molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Rasmus Brauner; Trautt, Z.T.; Upmanyu, M.;

    2007-01-01

    We have applied an atomistic simulation methodology based on molecular dynamics to study grain boundary migration in crystalline materials, driven by the excess energy of dislocation arrangements. This method is used to simulate recrystallization in metals. The simulations reveal that the migrati...

  14. Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure study and atomistic simulation of Ge/Si nanoislands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katcho, N.A. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, c. Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); ICMA, Dep. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Richard, M.-I. [Aix-Marseille Universite, IM2NP-CNRS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Proietti, M.G., E-mail: proietti@unizar.es [ICMA, Dep. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Renevier, H., E-mail: hubert.renevier@grenoble-inp.fr [LMGP, Grenoble INP - Minatec, Grenoble (France); Leclere, C. [LMGP, Grenoble INP - Minatec, Grenoble (France); Favre-Nicolin, V. [CEA-UJF, INAC, SP2M, Grenoble (France); Zhang, J.J.; Bauer, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter - und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz (Austria)

    2012-08-01

    We applied Grazing Incidence Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure to the study of the structure of Ge dome-shaped nanoislands, grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Si (0 0 1) substrates at a temperature of 650 Degree-Sign C. We determined the vertical composition of the islands showing the presence of a strong Ge/Si intermixing that is nearly constant from bottom to top. In particular, an abrupt change is found at the substrate interface where the composition switches from pure Si to Ge{sub 0.6}Si{sub 0.4}. The analysis of the Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure oscillations of the spectra is crucial to obtain the true composition profile. We performed atomistic simulations to investigate the role of the strained substrate underneath the dome on the diffraction results and to quantify the resolution of our method. Anomalous Diffraction spectra and Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure oscillations have been simulated for a real size and real shape cluster including faceting, giving a more detailed data interpretation and understanding of the Ge-Si intermixing mechanism.

  15. Atomistic simulations of swift ion tracks in diamond and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to study ion tracks in diamond and graphite. Tracks are included using a thermal spike model, i.e. a certain number of atoms within an initial track radius are given an initial excitation energy. The total energy given to the excited atoms and the length of the track determine an 'effective' stopping power dE/dx. Electronic excitations in semiconductors and semimetals like diamond and graphite can diffuse far from each other or be quenched before they couple to the lattice. This effect is included by varying the number of atoms that are effectively energized within the track. We use an initial track radius of 3 nm and we find that full amorphization of this region during the first few ps only occurs when the 'effective' dE/dx is larger than 6 ± 0.9 keV/nm for graphite and 10.5 ± 1.5 keV/nm for diamond. Since the 'effective' dE/dx depends on the electron-phonon coupling, our simulations set bounds on the efficiency of the coupling between the electronic excitations and the lattice in this highly non-equilibrium scenario

  16. Can pyrene probes be used to measure lateral pressure profiles of lipid membranes? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franova, M. D.; Vattulainen, I.; Ollila, O. H. S.

    2014-01-01

    simulations, since established methods to measure the lateral pressure profile experimentally have not been available. The only experiments that have attempted to gauge the lateral pressure profile have been done by using di-pyrenyl-phosphatidylcholine (di-pyr-PC) probes. In these experiments, the excimer......The lateral pressure profile of lipid bilayers has gained a lot of attention, since changes in the pressure profile have been suggested to shift the membrane protein conformational equilibrium. This relation has been mostly studied with theoretical methods, especially with molecular dynamics....../monomer fluorescence ratio has been assumed to represent the lateral pressure in the location of the pyrene moieties. Here, we consider the validity of this assumption through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in a DOPC (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine) membrane, which hosts di-pyr-PC probes with different acyl...

  17. Atomistic modeling of metal surfaces under electric fields: direct coupling of electric fields to a molecular dynamics algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Pohjonen, Aarne; Nordlund, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on metal surfaces is fairly well studied, resulting in numerous analytical models developed to understand the mechanisms of ionization of surface atoms observed at very high electric fields, as well as the general behavior of a metal surface in this condition. However, the derivation of analytical models does not include explicitly the structural properties of metals, missing the link between the instantaneous effects owing to the applied field and the consequent response observed in the metal surface as a result of an extended application of an electric field. In the present work, we have developed a concurrent electrodynamic–molecular dynamic model for the dynamical simulation of an electric-field effect and subsequent modification of a metal surface in the framework of an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The partial charge induced on the surface atoms by the electric field is assessed by applying the classical Gauss law. The electric forces acting on the partially...

  18. Efficient parallelization of analytic bond-order potentials for large-scale atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, C.; Hammerschmidt, T.; Drautz, R.; Sutmann, G.

    2016-07-01

    Analytic bond-order potentials (BOPs) provide a way to compute atomistic properties with controllable accuracy. For large-scale computations of heterogeneous compounds at the atomistic level, both the computational efficiency and memory demand of BOP implementations have to be optimized. Since the evaluation of BOPs is a local operation within a finite environment, the parallelization concepts known from short-range interacting particle simulations can be applied to improve the performance of these simulations. In this work, several efficient parallelization methods for BOPs that use three-dimensional domain decomposition schemes are described. The schemes are implemented into the bond-order potential code BOPfox, and their performance is measured in a series of benchmarks. Systems of up to several millions of atoms are simulated on a high performance computing system, and parallel scaling is demonstrated for up to thousands of processors.

  19. Atomistic simulations to micro-mechanisms of adhesion in automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Fatih Gurcag

    This study aimed at depicting atomistic and microstructural aspects of adhesion and friction that appear in different automotive applications and manufacturing processes using atomistic simulations coupled with tribological tests and surface characterization experiments. Thin films that form at the contact interfaces due to chemical reactions and coatings that are developed to mitigate or enhance adhesion were studied in detail. The adhesion and friction experiments conducted on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings against Al indicated that F incorporation into DLC decreased the coefficient of friction (COF) by 30% -with respect to H-DLC that is known to have low COF and anti-adhesion properties against Al- to 0.14 owing to formation of repulsive F-F interactions at the sliding interface as shown by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. F atoms transferred to the Al surface with an increase in the contact pressure, and this F transfer led to the formation of a stable AlF3 compound at the Al surface as confirmed by XPS and cross-sectional FIB-TEM. The incorporation of Si and O in a F-containing DLC resulted in humidity independent low COF of 0.08 due to the hydration effect of the Si-O-Si chains in the carbonaceous tribolayers that resulted in repulsive OH-OH interactions at the contact interface. At high temperatures, adhesion of Al was found to be enhanced as a result of superplastic oxide fibers on the Al surface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tensile deformation of Al nanowires in oxygen carried out with ReaxFF showed that native oxide of Al has an oxygen deficient, low density structure and in O2, the oxygen diffusion in amorphous oxide healed the broken Al-O bonds during applied strain and resulted in the superplasticity. The oxide shell also provided nucleation sites for dislocations in Al crystal. In fuel cell applications, where low Pt/carbon adhesion is causing durability problems, spin-polarized DFT showed that metals with unfilled d

  20. Analytical potential for atomistic simulations of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Paul; Albe, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical bond-order potential for silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide that has been optimized by a systematic fitting scheme. The functional form is adopted from a preceding work [Phys. Rev. B 65, 195124 (2002)] and is built on three independently fitted potentials for SiSi , CC , and SiC interaction. For elemental silicon and carbon, the potential perfectly reproduces elastic properties and agrees very well with first-principles results for high-pressure phases. The formation enthalpies of point defects are reasonably reproduced. In the case of silicon stuctural features of the melt agree nicely with data taken from literature. For silicon carbide the dimer as well as the solid phases B1, B2, and B3 were considered. Again, elastic properties are very well reproduced including internal relaxations under shear. Comparison with first-principles data on point defect formation enthalpies shows fair agreement. The successful validation of the potentials for configurations ranging from the molecular to the bulk regime indicates the transferability of the potential model and makes it a good choice for atomistic simulations that sample a large configuration space.

  1. Atomistic simulation of CO 2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2013-10-02

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide) dimethyl ether, CH3O(CH 2CH2O)nCH3 (PEO for short) is a widely applied physical solvent that forms the major organic constituent of a class of novel nanoparticle-based absorbents. Good predictions were obtained for pressure-composition-density relations for CO2 + PEO oligomers (2 ≤ n ≤ 12), using the Potoff force field for PEO [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044514 (2012)] together with the TraPPE model for CO2 [AIChE J. 47, 1676 (2001)]. Water effects on Henrys constant of CO2 in PEO have also been investigated. Addition of modest amounts of water in PEO produces a relatively small increase in Henrys constant. Dependence of the calculated Henrys constant on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Single asperity nanocontacts: Comparison between molecular dynamics simulations and continuum mechanics models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Using classical molecular dynamics, atomic scale simulations of normal contact between a nominally flat substrate and different atomistic and non-atomistic spherical particles were performed to investigate the applicability of classical contact theories at the nanoscale, and further elucida

  3. Electron transfer, decoherence, and protein dynamics: insights from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narth, Christophe; Gillet, Natacha; Cailliez, Fabien; Lévy, Bernard; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2015-04-21

    Electron transfer in biological systems drives the processes of life. From cellular respiration to photosynthesis and enzymatic catalysis, electron transfers (ET) are chemical processes on which essential biological functions rely. Over the last 40 years, scientists have sought understanding of how these essential processes function in biology. One important breakthrough was the discovery that Marcus theory (MT) of electron transfer is applicable to biological systems. Chemists have experimentally collected both the reorganization energies (λ) and the driving forces (ΔG°), two parameters of Marcus theory, for a large variety of ET processes in proteins. At the same time, theoretical chemists have developed computational approaches that rely on molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry calculations to access numerical estimates of λ and ΔG°. Yet another crucial piece in determining the rate of an electron transfer is the electronic coupling between the initial and final electronic wave functions. This is an important prefactor in the nonadiabatic rate expression, since it reflects the probability that an electron tunnels from the electron donor to the acceptor through the intervening medium. The fact that a protein matrix supports electron tunneling much more efficiently than vacuum is now well documented, both experimentally and theoretically. Meanwhile, many chemists have provided examples of the rich physical chemistry that can be induced by protein dynamics. This Account describes our studies of the dynamical effects on electron tunneling. We present our analysis of two examples of natural biological systems through MD simulations and tunneling pathway analyses. Through these examples, we show that protein dynamics sustain efficient tunneling. Second, we introduce two time scales: τcoh and τFC. The former characterizes how fast the electronic coupling varies with nuclear vibrations (which cause dephasing). The latter reflects the time taken by the system

  4. Fatigue mechanisms in an austenitic steel under cyclic loading: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations on the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 (AISI – 347) and concomitant atomistic simulations of a FeNi nanocrystalline model system have been performed in order to understand the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage under cyclic loading. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the influence of deformation induced martensitic transformation and NbC size distribution on the fatigue crack formation has been demonstrated. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∼1 µm sized) differently oriented grains. The atomistic simulations show the role of regions of a high density of stacking faults for the martensitic transformation

  5. Fatigue mechanisms in an austenitic steel under cyclic loading: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, E.A., E-mail: ewa.soppa@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Kohler, C., E-mail: christopher.kohler@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Roos, E., E-mail: eberhard.roos@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-03-01

    Experimental investigations on the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 (AISI – 347) and concomitant atomistic simulations of a FeNi nanocrystalline model system have been performed in order to understand the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage under cyclic loading. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the influence of deformation induced martensitic transformation and NbC size distribution on the fatigue crack formation has been demonstrated. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∼1 µm sized) differently oriented grains. The atomistic simulations show the role of regions of a high density of stacking faults for the martensitic transformation.

  6. Permittivity of oxidized ultra-thin silicon films from atomistic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Penazzi, G.; KWOK, YH; Aradi, B.; Pecchia, A.; Frauenheim, T.; Chen, G.; Markov, SN

    2015-01-01

    We establish the dependence of the permittivity of oxidized ultra-thin silicon films on the film thickness by means of atomistic simulations within the density-functional-based tight-binding theory (DFTB). This is of utmost importance for modeling ultra- and extremely-thin silicon-on-insulator MOSFETs, and for evaluating their scaling potential. We demonstrate that electronic contribution to the dielectric response naturally emerges from the DFTB Hamiltonian when coupled to Poisson equation s...

  7. Evidence of thin-film precursors formation in hydrokinetic and atomistic simulations of nano-channel capillary filling

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, S; Diotallevi, F; Succi, S; Binder, K; Milchev, A; Dimitrov, D; Girardo, S; Pisignano, D

    2008-01-01

    We present hydrokinetic Lattice Boltzmann and Molecular Dynamics simulations of capillary filling of high-wetting fluids in nano-channels, which provide clear evidence of the formation of thin precursor films, moving ahead of the main capillary front. The dynamics of the precursor films is found to obey the Lucas-Washburn law as the main capillary front, z2(t) proportional to t, although with a larger prefactor, which we find to take the same value for both geometries under inspection. Both hydrokinetic and Molecular Dynamics approaches indicate a precursor film thickness of the order of one tenth of the capillary diameter. The quantitative agreement between the hydrokinetic and atomistic methods indicates that the formation and propagation of thin precursors can be handled at a mesoscopic/hydrokinetic level, thereby opening the possibility of using hydrokinetic methods to space-time scales and complex geometries of direct experimental relevance.

  8. Atomistic simulation of grain boundary structure in a series of B2 intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutasa, B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1996-08-01

    Using molecular statics and interatomic potentials of the embedded atom type, the relaxed atomistic grain boundary structures in B2 aluminides were investigated in order to study trends in a series of B2 compounds. The compounds studied: FeAl, NiAl and CoAl show increasing anti-phase boundary energies. The atomistic structure of the {Sigma}=5(310)[100] and {Sigma}=5(210)[100] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in these compounds was studied considering possible variations of local chemical composition on grain boundary energetics. The structures obtained for the three alloys are very similar. A discussion of the trends in energetics across this series of compounds is entered into. (orig.)

  9. Protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics from atomistic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piana, Stefano; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Shaw, David E.

    2012-01-01

    simulations of spontaneous folding and unfolding can provide direct access to thermodynamic and kinetic quantities such as folding rates, free energies, folding enthalpies, heat capacities, Φ-values, and temperature-jump relaxation profiles. The quantitative comparison of simulation results with various...

  10. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In general

  11. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-03-24

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In

  12. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  13. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications. PMID:26555179

  14. Insights into prion protein function from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations are a powerful tool for studies of biological systems. They have often been used to study prion protein (PrP), a protein responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, which include "mad cow disease" in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans. An important aspect of the prion protein is its interaction with copper ion, which is thought to be relevant for PrP's yet undetermined function and also potentially play a role in prion diseases. for studies of copper attachment to the prion protein, computer simulations have often been used to complement experimental data and to obtain binding structures of Cu-PrP complexes. This paper summarizes the results of recent ab initio calculations of copper-prion protein interactions focusing on the recently discovered concentration-dependent binding modes in the octarepeat region of this protein. In addition to determining the binding structures, computer simulations were also used to make predictions about PrP's function and the role of copper in prion diseases. The results demonstrate the predictive power and applicability of ab initio simulations for studies of metal-biomolecular complexes. PMID:20118658

  15. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature Tg in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that Tg increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition Tg in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that Tg is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment

  16. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeloth, Michael; Sugii, Taisuke; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature Tg in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that Tg increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition Tg in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that Tg is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  17. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich Weiss Straße 4, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Sugii, Taisuke, E-mail: taisuke.sugii.zs@hitachi.com [Center for Technology Innovation – Mechanical Engineering, Research & Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T{sub g} in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T{sub g} increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T{sub g} in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T{sub g} is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  18. Atomistic simulations of methane interactions with an atmospheric moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galashev, Alexander Y

    2013-09-28

    Methane is an extremely effective absorber of radiation, i.e., it is a relatively potent greenhouse gas, and the increased concentration of methane in the atmosphere must influence earth's radiation balance. The adsorption of one to six methane molecules by water clusters is studied by the method of molecular dynamics under near-atmospheric conditions. The capture of methane molecules by water clusters produces an increase in the integrated intensity of IR absorbance and the reflection coefficient. The Raman spectrum of the system is considerably depleted due to the addition of methane molecules to the disperse water system. The observed emission power of a dispersed aqueous system with adsorbed methane molecules has appreciably increased relative to the analogous characteristics of the pure water cluster system. The Voronoi polyhedra and simplified ones constructed within the framework of molecular-dynamic model of clusters are used for the analysis of the structure changes occurring with increasing the number of adsorbed CH4 molecules. PMID:24089763

  19. Atomistic Simulation of Protein Encapsulation in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Tianwei; van der Spoel, David

    2016-01-28

    Fabrication of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with large apertures triggers a brand-new research area for selective encapsulation of biomolecules within MOF nanopores. The underlying inclusion mechanism is yet to be clarified however. Here we report a molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of protein encapsulation in MOFs. Evaluation for the binding of amino acid side chain analogues reveals that van der Waals interaction is the main driving force for the binding and that guest size acts as a key factor predicting protein binding with MOFs. Analysis on the conformation and thermodynamic stability of the miniprotein Trp-cage encapsulated in a series of MOFs with varying pore apertures and surface chemistries indicates that protein encapsulation can be achieved via maintaining a polar/nonpolar balance in the MOF surface through tunable modification of organic linkers and Mg-O chelating moieties. Such modifications endow MOFs with a more biocompatible confinement. This work provides guidelines for selective inclusion of biomolecules within MOFs and facilitates MOF functions as a new class of host materials and molecular chaperones. PMID:26730607

  20. Atomistic Simulation of Protein Encapsulation in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Tianwei; van der Spoel, David

    2016-01-28

    Fabrication of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with large apertures triggers a brand-new research area for selective encapsulation of biomolecules within MOF nanopores. The underlying inclusion mechanism is yet to be clarified however. Here we report a molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of protein encapsulation in MOFs. Evaluation for the binding of amino acid side chain analogues reveals that van der Waals interaction is the main driving force for the binding and that guest size acts as a key factor predicting protein binding with MOFs. Analysis on the conformation and thermodynamic stability of the miniprotein Trp-cage encapsulated in a series of MOFs with varying pore apertures and surface chemistries indicates that protein encapsulation can be achieved via maintaining a polar/nonpolar balance in the MOF surface through tunable modification of organic linkers and Mg-O chelating moieties. Such modifications endow MOFs with a more biocompatible confinement. This work provides guidelines for selective inclusion of biomolecules within MOFs and facilitates MOF functions as a new class of host materials and molecular chaperones.

  1. Dislocation pinning effects on fracture behavior: Atomistic and dislocation dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, S. J.; Farkas, D.

    2002-10-01

    We introduce an approach in which results from atomistic simulations are combined with discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of crack-tip plasticity. The method is used to study the effects of dislocation pinning due to grain boundaries or secondary particles on the fracture behavior of aluminum. We find that the fracture resistance is reduced with decreasing pinning distance. The results show that the pinning of the dislocations causes a net decrease in the shear stress projected on the slip plane, preventing further dislocation emission. Semibrittle cleavage occurs after a certain number of dislocations is emitted.

  2. Atomistic Simulation of He Clustering and Defects Produced in Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ti-Jiang; WANG Yue-Xia; PAN Zheng-Ying; JIANG Xiao-Mei; ZHOU Liang; ZHU Jing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the molecular dynamics method, the stability of small He-vacancy clusters is studied under the condition of the high He and low vacancy densities. The result shows that there is a competition between He atoms detrapped and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) emitted during the clustering of He atoms. When the He number is above a critical value of 9, the SIA emission is predominant. The SIA emission can result in deep capture of He atoms since the binding energy of He to a He-vacancy cluster is increased with the number of SIAs created. The cluster thus grows up. In addition, more SIAs are created when the temperature is elevated. The average volume of a He atom is increased. The cluster expansion takes place at high temperature.

  3. Insights into prion protein function from atomistic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations are a powerful tool for studies of biological systems. They have often been used to study prion protein (PrP), a protein responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, which include “mad cow disease” in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans. An important aspect of the prion protein is its interaction with copper ion, which is thought to be relevant for PrP’s yet undetermined function and also potentially play a role in prion diseases. For studies of copper attachmen...

  4. Using atomistic simulations to model cadmium telluride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Kenny, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to conduct research on how defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. On-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the CdTe thin film growth on the (1 1 1) surfaces. The results show that on the (1 1 1) surfaces the growth mechanisms on surfaces which are terminated by Cd or Te are quite different, regardless of the deposition energy (0.1∼ 10 eV). On the Te-terminated (1 1 1) surface the deposited clusters first form a single mixed species layer, then the Te atoms in the mixed layer moved up to form a new layer. Whilst on the Cd-terminated (1 1 1) surface the new Cd and Te layers are formed at the same time. Such differences are probably caused by stronger bonding between ad-atoms and surface atoms on the Te layer than on the Cd layer.

  5. Membrane pore formation in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Sonja A; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-10-01

    Biological cells and their organelles are protected by ultra thin membranes. These membranes accomplish a broad variety of important tasks like separating the cell content from the outer environment, they are the site for cell-cell interactions and many enzymatic reactions, and control the in- and efflux of metabolites. For certain physiological functions e.g. in the fusion of membranes and also in a number of biotechnological applications like gene transfection the membrane integrity needs to be compromised to allow for instance for the exchange of polar molecules across the membrane barrier. Mechanisms enabling the transport of molecules across the membrane involve membrane proteins that form specific pores or act as transporters, but also so-called lipid pores induced by external fields, stress, or peptides. Recent progress in the simulation field enabled to closely mimic pore formation as supposed to occur in vivo or in vitro. Here, we review different simulation-based approaches in the study of membrane pores with a focus on lipid pore properties such as their size and energetics, poration mechanisms based on the application of external fields, charge imbalances, or surface tension, and on pores that are induced by small molecules, peptides, and lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26748016

  6. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Tucker, Garritt J. (Drexel University)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled "Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations." During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel computers

  7. Improved Angle Potentials for Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulacu, Monica; Goga, Nicolae; Zhao, Wei; Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca; Periole, Xavier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Potentials routinely used in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are not always suitable for modeling systems at coarse-grained resolution. For example, in the calculation of traditional torsion angle potentials, numerical instability is often encountered in the case of very flexible molecules.

  8. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  9. Molecular simulation of realistic membrane models of alkylated PEEK membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Tocci, Elena; Pullumbi, Pluton

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Atomistic molecular modelling has proven to be a useful tool for the investigation of transport properties of small gas molecules in polymer membrane matrices. The quality of the predictions of these properties based on molecular simulation depends principally on the quality of the membrane model. The predicted gas transport properties of small gas molecules in the same glassy polymer membrane show often a large scatter in gas diffusion and solubility simulated values. In ...

  10. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

  11. Atomistic Simulation of Intrinsic Defects and Trivalent and Tetravalent Ion Doping in Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. S. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed in order to investigate key issues related to intrinsic defects and a variety of dopants from trivalent and tetravalent ions. The most favorable intrinsic defect is determined to be a scheme involving calcium and hydroxyl vacancies. It is found that trivalent ions have an energetic preference for the Ca site, while tetravalent ions can enter P sites. Charge compensation is predicted to occur basically via three schemes. In general, the charge compensation via the formation of calcium vacancies is more favorable. Trivalent dopant ions are more stable than tetravalent dopants.

  12. Investigations on the mechanical behavior of nanowires with twin boundaries by atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xia, E-mail: tianxia@lsec.cc.ac.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, HoHai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Atomistic simulations are used to study the deformation behavior of twinned Cu nanowires with a <111> growth orientation under tension. Due to the existence of the twin boundaries, the strength of the twinned nanowires is higher than that of the twin-free nanowire and the yielding stress of twinned nanowires is inversely proportional to the spacings of the twin boundaries. Moreover, The ductility of the twin-free nanowire is the highest of all and it grows with the increasing spacings of the twin boundaries for twinned nanowires. Besides, we find that the twin boundaries can be served as dislocation sources as well as the free surfaces and grain boundaries.

  13. Molecular modeling and simulation of atactic polystyrene/amorphous silica nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, I.; Vogiatzis, G. G.; Tzoumanekas, C.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    The local structure, segmental dynamics, topological analysis of entanglement networks and mechanical properties of atactic polystyrene - amorphous silica nanocomposites are studied via molecular simulations using two interconnected levels of representation: (a) A coarse - grained level. Equilibration at all length scales at this level is achieved via connectivity - altering Monte Carlo simulations. (b) An atomistic level. Initial configurations for atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are obtained by reverse mapping well- equilibrated coarse-grained configurations. By analyzing atomistic MD trajectories, the polymer density profile is found to exhibit layering in the vicinity of the nanoparticle surface. The dynamics of polystyrene (in neat and filled melt systems) is characterized in terms of bond orientation. Well-equilibrated coarse-grained long-chain configurations are reduced to entanglement networks via topological analysis with the CReTA algorithm. Atomistic simulation results for the mechanical properties are compared to the experimental measurements and other computational works.

  14. The challenges of understanding glycolipid functions: An open outlook based on molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, M.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2014-01-01

    Glycolipids are the most complex lipid type in cell membranes, characterized by a great diversity of different structures and functions. The underlying atomistic/molecular interactions and mechanisms associated with these functions are not well understood. Here we discuss how atomistic and molecu......, and the significant added value that one would gain by bridging molecular simulations with experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Coupling Lattice Boltzmann with Atomistic Dynamics for the multiscale simulation of nano-biological flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We describe a recent multiscale approach based on the concurrent coupling of constrained molecular dynamics for long biomolecules with a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann treatment of solvent hydrodynamics. The multiscale approach is based on a simple scheme of exchange of space-time information between the atomistic and mesoscopic scales and is capable of describing self-consistent hydrodynamic effects on molecular motion at a computational cost which scales linearly with both solute size and solvent volume. For an application of our multiscale method, we consider the much studied problem of biopolymer translocation through nanopores: we find that the method reproduces with remarkable accuracy the statistical scaling behavior of the translocation process and provides valuable insight into the cooperative aspects of biopolymer and hydrodynamic motion.

  16. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.

  17. Atomistic simulation studies on the dynamics and thermodynamics of nonpolar molecules within the zeolite imidazolate framework-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Pazzona, Federico G; Megariotis, Gregory; Papadopoulos, George K

    2010-02-25

    Statistical-mechanics-based simulation studies at the atomistic level of argon (Ar), methane (CH(4)), and hydrogen (H(2)) sorbed in the zeolite imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) are reported. ZIF-8 is a product of a special kind of chemical process, recently termed as reticular synthesis, which has generated a class of materials of critical importance as molecular binders. In this work, we explore the mechanisms that govern the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of nonpolar sorbates possessing different sizes and strength of interactions with the metal-organic framework to understand the outstanding properties of this novel class of sorbents, as revealed by experiments published elsewhere. For this purpose, we have developed an in-house modeling procedure involving calculations of sorption isotherms, partial internal energies, various probability density functions, and molecular dynamics for the simulation of the sorbed phase over a wide range of occupancies and temperatures within a digitally reconstructed unit cell of ZIF-8. The results showed that sorbates perceive a marked energetic inhomogeneity within the atomic framework of the metal-organic material under study, resulting in free energy barriers that give rise to inflections in the sorption isotherms and guide the dynamics of guest molecules.

  18. Atomistic computer simulations of FePt nanoparticles. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M.

    2007-12-20

    In the present dissertation, a hierarchical multiscale approach for modeling FePt nanoparticles by atomistic computer simulations is developed. By describing the interatomic interactions on different levels of sophistication, various time and length scales can be accessed. Methods range from static quantum-mechanic total-energy calculations of small periodic systems to simulations of whole particles over an extended time by using simple lattice Hamiltonians. By employing these methods, the energetic and thermodynamic stability of non-crystalline multiply twinned FePt nanoparticles is investigated. Subsequently, the thermodynamics of the order-disorder transition in FePt nanoparticles is analyzed, including the influence of particle size, composition and modified surface energies by different chemical surroundings. In order to identify processes that reduce or enhance the rate of transformation from the disordered to the ordered state, the kinetics of the ordering transition in FePt nanoparticles is finally investigated by assessing the contributions of surface and volume diffusion. (orig.)

  19. Diffusive-to-ballistic transition in grain boundary motion studied by atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adapted simulation method is used to systematically study grain boundary motion at velocities and driving forces across more than five orders of magnitude. This analysis reveals that grain boundary migration can occur in two modes, depending upon the temperature (T) and applied driving force (P). At low P and T, grain boundary motion is diffusional, exhibiting the kinetics of a thermally activated system controlled by grain boundary self-diffusion. At high P and T, grain boundary migration exhibits the characteristic kinetic scaling behavior of a ballistic process. A rather broad transition range in both P and T lies between the regimes of diffusive and ballistic grain boundary motion, and is charted here in detail. The recognition and delineation of these two distinct modes of grain boundary migration also leads to the suggestion that many prior atomistic simulations might have probed a different kinetic regime of grain boundary motion (ballistic) as compared to that revealed in most experimental studies (diffusional).

  20. Development of Force Field Parameters for Molecular Simulation of Polylactide

    OpenAIRE

    McAliley, James H.; Bruce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Polylactide is a biodegradable polymer that is widely used for biomedical applications, and it is a replacement for some petroleum based polymers in applications that range from packaging to carpeting. Efforts to characterize and further enhance polylactide based systems using molecular simulations have to this point been hindered by the lack of accurate atomistic models for the polymer. Thus, we present force field parameters specifically suited for molecular modeling of PLA. The model, whic...

  1. Insights on the atomistic origin of X and W photoluminescence lines in c-Si from ab initio simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used atomistic simulations to identify and characterize interstitial defect cluster configurations candidate for W and X photoluminescence centers in crystalline Si. The configurational landscape of small self-interstitial defect clusters has been explored through nanosecond annealing and implantation recoil simulations using classical molecular dynamics. Among the large collection of defect configurations obtained, we have selected those defects with the trigonal symmetry of the W center, and the tetrahedral and tetragonal symmetry of the X center. These defect configurations have been characterized using ab initio simulations in terms of their donor levels, their local vibrational modes, the defect induced modifications of the electronic band structure, and the transition amplitudes at band edges. We have found that the so-called I 3-V is the most likely candidate for the W PL center. It has a donor level and local vibrational modes in better agreement with experiments, a lower formation energy, and stronger transition amplitudes than the so-called I 3-I, which was previously proposed as the W center. With respect to defect candidates for the X PL center, our calculations have shown that none of the analyzed defect candidates match all of the experimental characteristics of the X center. Although the Arai tetra-interstitial configuration previously proposed as the X center cannot be excluded, the other defect candidates for the X center found, I 3-C and I 3-X, cannot be discarded either. (paper)

  2. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work be

  3. Solid solution hardening in face centered binary alloys: Gliding statistics of a dislocation in random solid solution by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glide of edge and screw dislocation in solid solution is modeled through atomistic simulations in two model alloys of Ni(Al) and Al(Mg) described within the embedded atom method. Our approach is based on the study of the elementary interaction between dislocations and solutes to derive solid solution hardening of face centered cubic binary alloys. We identify the physical origins of the intensity and range of the interaction between a dislocation and a solute atom. The thermally activated crossing of a solute atom by a dislocation is studied at the atomistic scale. We show that hardening of edge and screw segments are similar. We develop a line tension model that reproduces quantitatively the atomistic calculations of the flow stress. We identify the universality class to which the dislocation depinning transition in solid solution belongs. (author)

  4. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  5. Structures, nanomechanics, and disintegration of single-walled GaN nanotubes: atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    We have investigated the structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of single-walled GaN nanotubes by using atomistic simulations and a Tersoff-type potential. The Tersoff potential for GaN effectively describes the properties of GaN nanotubes. The nanomechanics of GaN nanotubes under tensile and compressive loadings have also been investigated, and Young's modulus has been calculated. The caloric curves of single-walled GaN nanotubes can be divided into three regions corresponding to nanotubes, the disintegrating range, and vapor. Since the stability or the stiffness of a tube decreases with increasing curving sheet-to-tube strain energy, the disintegration temperatures of GaN nanotubes are closely related to the curving sheet-to-tube strain energy.

  6. Atomistic simulations of surface coverage effects in anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosalvez, M.A.; Foster, A.S.; Nieminen, R.M

    2002-12-30

    Atomistic simulations of anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon have been performed in order to determine the dependence of the etch rates of different crystallographic orientations on surface coverage and clustering of OH radicals. We show that the etch rate is a non-monotonic function of OH coverage and that there always exists a coverage value at which the etch rate reaches a maximum. The dependence of the anisotropy of the etching process on coverage, including the dependence of the fastest-etched plane orientation, is implicitly contained in the model and predictions of convex corner under-etching structures are made. We show that the whole etching process is controlled by only a few surface configurations involving a particular type of next-nearest neighbours. The relative value of the removal probabilities of these confitions determines the balance in the occurrence of step propagation and etch pitting for all surface orientations.

  7. Lipid exchange mechanism of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein clarified by atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artturi Koivuniemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the mechanisms associated with the CETP-mediated lipid exchange. To this end we used both atomistic and coarse-grained models whose results were consistent with each other. We found CETP to bind to the surface of high density lipoprotein (HDL -like lipid droplets through its charged and tryptophan residues. Upon binding, CETP rapidly (in about 10 ns induced the formation of a small hydrophobic patch to the phospholipid surface of the droplet, opening a route from the core of the lipid droplet to the binding pocket of CETP. This was followed by a conformational change of helix X of CETP to an open state, in which we found the accessibility of cholesteryl esters to the C-terminal tunnel opening of CETP to increase. Furthermore, in the absence of helix X, cholesteryl esters rapidly diffused into CETP through the C-terminal opening. The results provide compelling evidence that helix X acts as a lid which conducts lipid exchange by alternating the open and closed states. The findings have potential for the design of novel molecular agents to inhibit the activity of CETP.

  8. Temperature-sensitive gating of TRPV1 channel as probed by atomistic simulations of its trans- and juxtamembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Anton O; Volynsky, Pavel E; Krylov, Nikolay A; Nolde, Dmitry E; Efremov, Roman G

    2016-01-01

    Heat-activated transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is one of the most studied eukaryotic proteins involved in temperature sensation. Upon heating, it exhibits rapid reversible pore gating, which depolarizes neurons and generates action potentials. Underlying molecular details of such effects in the pore region of TRPV1 is of a crucial importance to control temperature responses of the organism. Despite the spatial structure of the channel in both open (O) and closed (C) states is known, microscopic nature of channel gating and mechanism of thermal sensitivity are still poorly understood. In this work, we used unrestrained atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of TRPV1 (without N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains) embedded into explicit lipid bilayer in its O- and C-states. We found that the pore domain with its neighboring loops undergoes large temperature-dependent conformational transitions in an asymmetric way, when fragments of only one monomer move with large amplitude, freeing the pore upon heating. Such an asymmetrical gating looks rather biologically relevant because it is faster and more reliable than traditionally proposed "iris-like" symmetric scheme of channel opening. Analysis of structural, dynamic, and hydrophobic organization of the pore domain revealed entropy growth upon TRPV1 gating, which is in line with current concepts of thermal sensitivity. PMID:27612191

  9. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B4C ), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (˜200 000 atoms /cell ) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B4C , using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001 )/⟨10 1 ¯ 0 ⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (01 1 ¯ 1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101 ⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B4C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B4C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  10. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  11. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2015-09-01

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B(4)C), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (∼200,000  atoms/cell) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B(4)C, using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001)/⟨101̅0⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (011̅1̅)/⟨1̅101⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B(4)C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B(4)C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  12. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  13. Atomistic simulations of thermal transport in Si and SiGe based materials: From bulk to nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    It has been recently proposed that Si and SiGe based nanostructured materials may exhibit low thermal conductivity and overall promising properties for thermoelectric applications. Hence there is a considerable interest in developing accurate theoretical and computational methods which can help interpret recent measurements, identify the physical origin of the reduced thermal conductivity, as well as shed light on the interplay between disorder and nanostructuring in determining a high figure of merit. In this work, we investigate the capability of an atomistic Green's function method [1] to describe phonon transport in several types of Si and SiGe based systems: amorphous Si, SiGe alloys, planar and nanodot Si/SiGe multilayers. We compare our results with experimental data [2,3], and with the findings of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on the Boltzmann transport equation. [1] I. Savic, N. Mingo, and D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 165502 (2008). [2] S.-M. Lee, D. G. Cahill, and R. Venkatasubramanian, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 2957 (1997). [3] G. Pernot et al., submitted.

  14. Atomistic Simulations of High-intensity XFEL Pulses on Diffractive Imaging of Nano-sized System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phay; Knight, Christopher; Bostedt, Christoph; Young, Linda; Tegze, Miklos; Faigel, Gyula

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a large-scale atomistic computational method based on a combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics (MC/MD) method to simulate XFEL-induced radiation damage dynamics of complex materials. The MD algorithm is used to propagate the trajectories of electrons, ions and atoms forward in time and the quantum nature of interactions with an XFEL pulse is accounted for by a MC method to calculate probabilities of electronic transitions. Our code has good scalability with MPI/OpenMP parallelization, and it has been run on Mira, a petascale system at the Argonne Leardership Computing Facility, with particle number >50 million. Using this code, we have examined the impact of high-intensity 8-keV XFEL pulses on the x-ray diffraction patterns of argon clusters. The obtained patterns show strong pulse parameter dependence, providing evidence of significant lattice rearrangement and diffuse scattering. Real-space electronic reconstruction was performed using phase retrieval methods. We found that the structure of the argon cluster can be recovered with atomic resolution even in the presence of considerable radiation damage. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  15. Large-scale atomistic simulations of helium-3 bubble growth in complex palladium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lucas M; Zimmerman, Jonathan A; Wong, Bryan M

    2016-05-21

    Palladium is an attractive material for hydrogen and hydrogen-isotope storage applications due to its properties of large storage density and high diffusion of lattice hydrogen. When considering tritium storage, the material's structural and mechanical integrity is threatened by both the embrittlement effect of hydrogen and the creation and evolution of additional crystal defects (e.g., dislocations, stacking faults) caused by the formation and growth of helium-3 bubbles. Using recently developed inter-atomic potentials for the palladium-silver-hydrogen system, we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to examine the defect-mediated mechanisms that govern helium bubble growth. Our simulations show the evolution of a distribution of material defects, and we compare the material behavior displayed with expectations from experiment and theory. We also present density functional theory calculations to characterize ideal tensile and shear strengths for these materials, which enable the understanding of how and why our developed potentials either meet or confound these expectations. PMID:27208963

  16. Self-consistent simulations of nanowire transistors using atomistic basis sets

    OpenAIRE

    NEOPHYTOU, Neophytos; Paul, Abhijeet; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    As device sizes shrink towards the nanoscale, CMOS development investigates alternative structures and devices. Existing CMOS devices will evolve from planar to 3D non-planar devices at nanometer sizes. These devices will operate under strong confinement and strain, regimes where atomistic effects are important. This work investigates atomistic effects in the transport properties of nanowire devices by using a nearest-neighbor tight binding model (sp3s*d5-SO) for electronic structure calculat...

  17. Unfolding proteins with mechanical forces: From toy models to atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii

    2011-03-01

    The remarkable combination of strength and toughness, displayed by certain biological materials (e.g. spider silk) and often unmatched by artificial materials, is believed to originate from the mechanical response of individual load-bearing protein domains. Single-molecule pulling experiments carried out during the last decade showed that those proteins, when loaded, respond in a non-equilibrium fashion and can dissipate large amounts of energy though the breaking of sacrificial bonds. In my talk, I will discuss what structural properties correlate with mechanical strength and toughness at the single-molecule level, how thermodynamic stability is related to the mechanical stability, and why both atomistic simulations and simple models seem to fail to reconcile the mechanical responses of the same proteins measured under varied loading regimes. I will further discuss whether it is easier to unfold a protein mechanically by pulling at its ends or by threading it through a narrow pore. The latter process is believed to commonly occur in living organisms as an intermediate step in protein degradation. Supported by the NSF and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  18. Engineering molecular mechanics: an efficient static high temperature molecular simulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Arun K; Sun, C T

    2008-07-16

    Inspired by the need for an efficient molecular simulation technique, we have developed engineering molecular mechanics (EMM) as an alternative molecular simulation technique to model high temperature (T>0 K) phenomena. EMM simulations are significantly more computationally efficient than conventional techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations. The advantage of EMM is achieved by converting the dynamic atomistic system at high temperature (T>0 K) into an equivalent static system. Fundamentals of the EMM methodology are derived using thermal expansion to modify the interatomic potential. Temperature dependent interatomic potentials are developed to account for the temperature effect. The efficiency of EMM simulations is demonstrated by simulating the temperature dependence of elastic constants of copper and nickel and the thermal stress developed in a confined copper system.

  19. Accelerated molecular dynamics and equation-free methods for simulating diffusion in solids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jie; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Brown, William Michael (Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, TN); Plimpton, Steven James; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Wagner, Gregory John; Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2011-09-01

    Many of the most important and hardest-to-solve problems related to the synthesis, performance, and aging of materials involve diffusion through the material or along surfaces and interfaces. These diffusion processes are driven by motions at the atomic scale, but traditional atomistic simulation methods such as molecular dynamics are limited to very short timescales on the order of the atomic vibration period (less than a picosecond), while macroscale diffusion takes place over timescales many orders of magnitude larger. We have completed an LDRD project with the goal of developing and implementing new simulation tools to overcome this timescale problem. In particular, we have focused on two main classes of methods: accelerated molecular dynamics methods that seek to extend the timescale attainable in atomistic simulations, and so-called 'equation-free' methods that combine a fine scale atomistic description of a system with a slower, coarse scale description in order to project the system forward over long times.

  20. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5080 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  1. Molecular and intermolecular effects in collagen fibril mechanics: a multiscale analytical model compared with atomistic and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Both atomistic and experimental studies reveal the dependence of collagen fibril mechanics on biochemical and biophysical features such as, for instance, cross-link density, water content and protein sequence. In order to move toward a multiscale structural description of biological tissues, a novel analytical model for collagen fibril mechanics is herein presented. The model is based on a multiscale approach that incorporates and couples: thermal fluctuations in collagen molecules; the uncoiling of collagen triple helix; the stretching of molecular backbone; the straightening of the telopeptide in which covalent cross-links form; slip-pulse mechanisms due to the rupture of intermolecular weak bonds; molecular interstrand delamination due to the rupture of intramolecular weak bonds; the rupture of covalent bonds within molecular strands. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with available atomistic results and experimental data, highlighting the importance of cross-link density in tuning collagen fibril mechanics. The typical three-region shape and hysteresis behavior of fibril constitutive response, as well as the transition from a yielding-like to a brittle-like behavior, are recovered with a special insight on the underlying nanoscale mechanisms. The model is based on parameters with a clear biophysical and biochemical meaning, resulting in a promising tool for analyzing the effect of pathological or pharmacological-induced histochemical alterations on the functional mechanical response of collagenous tissues.

  2. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  3. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebarchov, D; Schulze, T P; Hendy, S C

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level. PMID:24559357

  4. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schebarchov, D., E-mail: Dmitri.Schebarchov@gmail.com [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Schulze, T. P., E-mail: schulze@math.utk.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1300 (United States); Hendy, S. C. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  5. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  6. Atomistic simulations of electrolyte solutions and hydrogels with explicit solvent models

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Jonathan; Reiser, Steffen; Horsch, Martin; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Two of the most challenging tasks in molecular simulation consist in capturing the properties of systems with long-range interactions (e.g. electrolyte solutions) as well as systems containing large molecules such as hydrogels. For the development and optimization of molecular force fields and models, a large number of simulation runs have to be evaluated to obtain the sensitivity of the target properties with respect to the model parameters. The present work discusses force field development for electrolytes regarding thermodynamic properties of their aqueous solutions. Furthermore, simulations are conducted for the volume transition of hydrogels in the presence of electrolytes. It is shown that the properties of these complex systems can be captured by molecular simulation.

  7. Multiscale molecular simulations of proteins in cell-like conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiotakis, Antonios

    Proteins are the workhorses of all living organisms, performing a broad range of functions in the crowded cellular interior. However, little is known about how proteins function in cell-like conditions since most studies focus in dilute aqueous environments. In order to address this problem we incorporated molecular simulations and coarse-grained models that capture the protein dynamics in the cellular interior. We study the macromolecular crowding effects of cell-like environments on protein Borrelia Burgdorferi VlsE (variable major protein-like sequence-expressed), an aspherical membrane protein, and the enzyme Phosphoglycerate kinase. We show that protein conformation can be significantly perturbed under crowded cell-like conditions which, in turn, can have dramatic effects to the proteins' function. In addition, we look into the effects of mutations in the folding pathways of the topologically frustrated protein apoflavodoxin while correlation with experiments is also achieved. We further developed a multiscale simulation scheme that combines the sampling efficiency of low-resolution models with the detail of all-atomistic simulations. An algorithm that reconstructs all-atomistic conformations from coarse-grained representations was developed, in addition to an energy function that accounts for chemical interference based on the Boltzamn inversion method. The multiscale simulation scheme manages to sample all-atomistic structures of the protein Trp-cage that match very well with experiments. The folding kinetic behavior of Trp-cage was also studied in the combined presence of urea denaturant and macromolecular crowding.

  8. Thermodynamic and mechanical properties of copper precipitates in α-iron from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Paul; Marian, Jaime; Sadigh, Babak

    2013-07-01

    Precipitate hardening is commonly used in materials science to control strength by acting on the number density, size distribution, and shape of solute precipitates in the hardened matrix. The Fe-Cu system has attracted much attention over the last several decades due to its technological importance as a model alloy for Cu steels. In spite of these efforts several aspects of its phase diagram remain unexplained. Here we use atomistic simulations to characterize the polymorphic phase diagram of Cu precipitates in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and establish a consistent link between their thermodynamic and mechanical properties in terms of thermal stability, shape, and strength. The size at which Cu precipitates transform from BCC to a close-packed 9R structure is found to be strongly temperature dependent, ranging from approximately 4 nm in diameter (˜2700atoms) at 200 K to about 8 nm (˜22800atoms) at 700 K. These numbers are in very good agreement with the interpretation of experimental data given Monzen [Philos. Mag. APMAADG0141-861010.1080/01418610008212077 80, 711 (2000)]. The strong temperature dependence originates from the entropic stabilization of BCC Cu, which is mechanically unstable as a bulk phase. While at high temperatures the transition exhibits first-order characteristics, the hysteresis, and thus the nucleation barrier, vanish at temperatures below approximately 300 K. This behavior is explained in terms of the mutual cancellation of the energy differences between core and shell (wetting layer) regions of BCC and 9R nanoprecipitates, respectively. The proposed mechanism is not specific for the Fe-Cu system but could generally be observed in immiscible systems, whenever the minority component is unstable in the lattice structure of the host matrix. Finally, we also study the interaction of precipitates with screw dislocations as a function of both structure and orientation. The results provide a coherent picture of precipitate strength that unifies

  9. Thermodynamics of low-temperature phyllosilicates: from a macroscopic perspective towards achieving atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    suggest several improvements to these methods. We used atomistic simulation to calculate the mixing enthalpy along two solid solutions binaries of interest in low-temperature petrology. Results are in agreement with observations in natural systems and confirm the importance of hydration in clay minerals stability. (author)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid crystals at interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shield, M

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of an atomistic model of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) were performed for thin films of 8CB on solid substrates (a pseudopotential representation of the molecular topography of the (100) crystal surface of polyethylene (PE), a highly ordered atomistic model of a pseudo-crystalline PE surface and an atomistic model of a partially orientated film of PE), free standing thin films of 8CB and 8CB droplets in a hexagonal pit. The systems showed strong homeotropic anchoring at the free volume interface and planar anchoring at the solid interface whose strength was dependent upon the surface present. The free volume interface also demonstrated weak signs of smectic wetting of the bulk. Simulations of thin free standing films of liquid crystals showed the ordered nature of the liquid crystals at the two free volume interfaces can be adopted by the region of liquid crystal molecules between the homeotropic layer at each interface only if there is a certain number of liquid crystal mole...

  11. Molecular Simulations of Dewetting

    OpenAIRE

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the breakup and subsequent fluid flow in very thin films of partially wetting liquid on solid substrates, using molecular dynamics simulations. The liquid is made of short chain molecules interacting with Lennard-Jones interactions, and the solid is modeled as a clean crystal lattice whose atoms have thermal oscillations. Films below a critical thickness are found to exhibit a spontaneous spinodal-like instability leading to dry patches, as predicted theoretically and observed...

  12. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France); Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  13. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water

  14. Scalability of a Low-Cost Multi-Teraflop Linux Cluster for High-End Classical Atomistic and Quantum Mechanical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Scalability of a low-cost, Intel Xeon-based, multi-Teraflop Linux cluster is tested for two high-end scientific applications: Classical atomistic simulation based on the molecular dynamics method and quantum mechanical calculation based on the density functional theory. These scalable parallel applications use space-time multiresolution algorithms and feature computational-space decomposition, wavelet-based adaptive load balancing, and spacefilling-curve-based data compression for scalable I/O. Comparative performance tests are performed on a 1,024-processor Linux cluster and a conventional higher-end parallel supercomputer, 1,184-processor IBM SP4. The results show that the performance of the Linux cluster is comparable to that of the SP4. We also study various effects, such as the sharing of memory and L2 cache among processors, on the performance.

  15. Atomistic simulation of Cu-Ta thin film deposition and other phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, T.P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a metal with good properties to act as a diffusion barrier material in computer chips, where it should prevent the mixing of Cu into Si and SiO. The deposition of thin Cu films onto various Ta substrates has been studied through molecular dynamics simulations, using either empirical

  16. Atomistic study of crack propagation and dislocation emission in Cu-Ni multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinedinst, J.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-09-01

    The authors present atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration in multilayered Cu-Ni materials. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and EAM potentials. The atomistic structure of the interface was studied first for a totally coherent structure. Cracks were simulated near a Griffith condition in different possible configurations of the crack plane and front with respect to the axis of the layers. Results show that interface effects predominantly control the mechanical behavior of the system studied.

  17. Thermal Motions of the E. Coli Glucose-Galactose Binding Protein Studied Using Well-Sampled Semi-Atomistic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cashman, Derek J; Bhatt, Divesh; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    The E. coli glucose-galactose chemosensory receptor is a 309 residue, 32 kDa protein consisting of two distinct structural domains. In this computational study, we studied the protein's thermal fluctuations, including both the large scale interdomain movements that contribute to the receptor's mechanism of action, as well as smaller scale motions, using two different computational methods. We employ extremely fast, "semi-atomistic" Library-Based Monte Carlo (LBMC) simulations, which include all backbone atoms but "implicit" side chains. Our results were compared with previous experiments and an all-atom Langevin dynamics simulation. Both LBMC and Langevin dynamics simulations were performed using both the apo and glucose-bound form of the protein, with LBMC exhibiting significantly larger fluctuations. The LBMC simulations are also in general agreement with the disulfide trapping experiments of Careaga & Falke (JMB, 1992; Biophys. J., 1992), which indicate that distant residues in the crystal structure (i...

  18. Atomistic simulation of laser-pulse surface modification: Predictions of models with various length and time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikov, Sergey V., E-mail: starikov@ihed.ras.ru; Pisarev, Vasily V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-07

    In this work, the femtosecond laser pulse modification of surface is studied for aluminium (Al) and gold (Au) by use of two-temperature atomistic simulation. The results are obtained for various atomistic models with different scales: from pseudo-one-dimensional to full-scale three-dimensional simulation. The surface modification after laser irradiation can be caused by ablation and melting. For low energy laser pulses, the nanoscale ripples may be induced on a surface by melting without laser ablation. In this case, nanoscale changes of the surface are due to a splash of molten metal under temperature gradient. Laser ablation occurs at a higher pulse energy when a crater is formed on the surface. There are essential differences between Al ablation and Au ablation. In the first step of shock-wave induced ablation, swelling and void formation occur for both metals. However, the simulation of ablation in gold shows an additional athermal type of ablation that is associated with electron pressure relaxation. This type of ablation takes place at the surface layer, at a depth of several nanometers, and does not induce swelling.

  19. Fracture simulations via massively parallel molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holian, B.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Abraham, F.F. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States). Almaden Research Center; Ravelo, R. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Fracture simulations at the atomistic level have heretofore been carried out for relatively small systems of particles, typically 10,000 or less. In order to study anything approaching a macroscopic system, massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) must be employed. In two spatial dimensions (2D), it is feasible to simulate a sample that is 0.1 {mu}m on a side. We report on recent MD simulations of mode I crack extension under tensile loading at high strain rates. The method of uniaxial, homogeneously expanding periodic boundary conditions was employed to represent tensile stress conditions near the crack tip. The effects of strain rate, temperature, material properties (equation of state and defect energies), and system size were examined. We found that, in order to mimic a bulk sample, several tricks (in addition to expansion boundary conditions) need to be employed: (1) the sample must be pre-strained to nearly the condition at which the crack will spontaneously open; (2) to relieve the stresses at free surfaces, such as the initial notch, annealing by kinetic-energy quenching must be carried out to prevent unwanted rarefactions; (3) sound waves emitted as the crack tip opens and dislocations emitted from the crack tip during blunting must be absorbed by special reservoir regions. The tricks described briefly in this paper will be especially important to carrying out feasible massively parallel 3D simulations via MD.

  20. Ice Formation on Kaolinite: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even via state-of-the-art experimental techniques. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long timescales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaol...

  1. Atomistic Mechanisms of Fatigue in Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; Willemann, M.; Hyde, B.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the mechanisms of fatigue behavior in nanocrystalline metals at the atomic scale using empirical force laws and molecular level simulations. A combination of molecular statics and molecular dynamics was used to deal with the time scale limitations of molecular dynamics. We show that the main atomistic mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in these materials is the formation of nanovoids ahead of the main crack. The results obtained for crack advance as a function of stress intensity amplitude are consistent with experimental studies and a Paris law exponent of about 2.

  2. Computational Investigations on Polymerase Actions in Gene Transcription and Replication Combining Physical Modeling and Atomistic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We keep away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while address only statistical physics modeling approach and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation approach. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single-subunit T7 RNA poly...

  3. Atomistic simulation of ion solvation in water explains surface preference of halides

    OpenAIRE

    Caleman, C.; Hub, J. S.; van Maaren, P.; van der Spoel, D

    2011-01-01

    Water is a demanding partner. It strongly attracts ions, yet some halide anions—chloride, bromide, and iodide—are expelled to the air/water interface. This has important implications for chemistry in the atmosphere, including the ozone cycle. We present a quantitative analysis of the energetics of ion solvation based on molecular simulations of all stable alkali and halide ions in water droplets. The potentials of mean force for Cl-, Br-, and I- have shallow minima near the surface. We demons...

  4. Experimental approach and atomistic simulations to investigate the radiation tolerance of complex oxides: Application to the amorphization of pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattonnay, G.; Thomé, L.; Sellami, N.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Legros, C.; Tetot, R.

    2014-05-01

    Both experimental approach and atomistic simulations are performed in order to investigate the influence of the composition of pyrochlores on their radiation tolerance. Therefore, Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 were irradiated with 4 MeV Au and 92 MeV Xe ions in order to study the structural changes induced by low and high-energy irradiations. XRD results show that, for both irradiations, the structural modifications are strongly dependent on the sample composition: Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized, whereas Gd2Zr2O7 is transformed into a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure. Using atomistic simulations with new interatomic potentials derived from the SMTB-Q model, the lattice properties and the defect formation energies were calculated in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7. Calculations show that titanates have a more covalent character than zirconates. Moreover, in Gd2Ti2O7 the formation of cation antisite defects leads to strong local distortions around Ti-defects and to a decrease of the Ti coordination number, which are not observed in Gd2Zr2O7. Thus, the radiation resistance is related to the defect stability: the accumulation of structural distortions around Ti-defects could drive the Gd2Ti2O7 amorphization induced by irradiation.

  5. An atomistic geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration for DNA-radiation interaction simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, M. A.; Sikansi, D.; Cavalcante, F.; Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V.; Francis, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an atomistic geometrical model for the B-DNA configuration is explained. This model accounts for five organization levels of the DNA, up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. However, fragments of this fiber can be used to construct the whole genome. The algorithm developed in this work is capable to determine which is the closest atom with respect to an arbitrary point in space. It can be used in any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed, for instance, in investigations related to the effects of ionizing radiations on the human genetic material. Successful consistency checks were carried out to test the proposed model. Catalogue identifier: AEPZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6574 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN. Computer: Any. Operating system: Multi-platform. RAM: 2 Gb Classification: 3. Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the interaction of ionizing radiation with the human genetic material in order to determine DNA damage yields per unit absorbed dose. To accomplish this task, an algorithm to determine if a given energy deposition lies within a given target is needed. This target can be an atom or any other structure of the genetic material. Solution method: This is a stand-alone subroutine describing an atomic-resolution geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration. It is able to determine the closest atom to an arbitrary point in space. This model accounts for five organization levels of the human genetic material, from the nucleotide pair up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. This subroutine carries out a series of coordinate transformations

  6. Non-periodic molecular dynamics simulations of coarse grained lipid bilayer in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Hanasaki, I.; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiscale algorithm that couples coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with continuum solver. The coupling requires the imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions on the coarse grained Molecular Dynamics which, when not properly enforced, may result in spurious fluctuations of...... the material properties of the system represented by CGMD. In this paper we extend a control algorithm originally developed for atomistic simulations [3], to conduct simulations involving coarse grained water molecules without periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate the applicability of our...... method in simulating more complex systems by performing a non-periodic Molecular Dynamics simulation of a DPPC lipid in liquid coarse grained water....

  7. Atomistic and Molecular Effects in Electric Double Layers at High Surface Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan W; Mani, Ali; Templeton, Jeremy A

    2015-07-14

    The Poisson-Boltzmann theory for electrolytes near a charged surface is known to be invalid due to unaccounted physics associated with high ion concentration regimes. To investigate this regime, fluids density functional theory (f-DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to determine electric surface potential as a function of surface charge. Based on these detailed computations, for electrolytes with nonpolar solvent, the surface potential is shown to depend quadratically on the surface charge in the high charge limit. We demonstrate that modified Poisson-Boltzmann theories can model this limit if they are augmented with atomic packing densities provided by MD. However, when the solvent is a highly polar molecule, water in this case, an intermediate regime is identified in which a constant capacitance is realized. Simulation results demonstrate the mechanism underlying this regime, and for the salt water system studied here, it persists throughout the range of physically realistic surface charge densities so the potential's quadratic surface charge dependence is not obtained. PMID:26079793

  8. Accelerating atomistic simulations through self-learning bond-boost hyperdynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    By altering the potential energy landscape on which molecular dynamics are carried out, the hyperdynamics method of Voter enables one to significantly accelerate the simulation state-to-state dynamics of physical systems. While very powerful, successful application of the method entails solving the subtle problem of the parametrization of the so-called bias potential. In this study, we first clarify the constraints that must be obeyed by the bias potential and demonstrate that fast sampling of the biased landscape is key to the obtention of proper kinetics. We then propose an approach by which the bond boost potential of Miron and Fichthorn can be safely parametrized based on data acquired in the course of a molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we introduce a procedure, the Self-Learning Bond Boost method, in which the parametrization is step efficiently carried out on-the-fly for each new state that is visited during the simulation by safely ramping up the strength of the bias potential up to its optimal value. The stability and accuracy of the method are demonstrated.

  9. Lubricant characterization by molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.D.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have reported the calculation of the kinematic viscosity index of squalane from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This represents the first accurate quantitative prediction of this measure of lubricant performance by molecular simulation. Using the same general alkane potential model, this computational approach offers the possibility of predicting the performance of potential lubricants prior to synthesis. Consequently, molecular simulation is poised to become an important tool for future lubricant development.

  10. Atomistic simulations of the tensile and melting behavior of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yuhang; Meng Qingyuan; Zhao Wei

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Stillinger-Weber potential are used to study the tensile and melting behavior of single-crystalline silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The tensile tests show that the tensile behavior of the SiNWs is strongly dependent on the simulation temperature, the strain rate, and the diameter of the nanowires.For a given diameter, the critical load significantly decreases as the temperature increases and also as the strain rate decreases. Additionally, the critical load increases as the diameter increases. Moreover, the melting tests demonstrate that both melting temperature and melting heat of the SiNWs decrease with decreasing diameter and length, due to the increase in surface energy. The melting process of SiNWs with increasing temperature is also investigated.

  11. Octadecahedral and dodecahedral iron nanoparticles: An atomistic simulation on stability and shape evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ning; Huang, Rao; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Fe nanoparticles have attracted great interest due to their potent magnetic and catalytic properties which strongly depend on the structures and morphologies. In this article, molecular dynamic simulations were employed to investigate structural and thermal stabilities of body-centered cubic Fe nanoparticles with octadecahedral, dodecahedral and spherical shapes. Size-dependent structural stability was firstly examined. Subsequently, computer simulations on the heating process of octadecahedral Fe nanoparticle discovered that {100} facets premelt earlier than {110} ones. As a result, the dodecahedral nanoparticle enclosed by {110} facets exhibited a better thermal stability than the octadecahedral one terminated by both {110} and {100} facets. Nevertheless, it was found that the octadecahedron presented a better shape stability than the dodecahedron by monitoring the shape factor and statistical radius during continuous heating. This study provides a significant insight not only into the experimental preparation of polyhedral Fe nanoparticles but also into their utilization in high-temperature environments.

  12. Radiation tolerance of ceramics—Insights from atomistic simulation of damage accumulation in pyrochlores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Gale, Julian D.

    2010-10-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effects of radiation damage accumulation in two pyrochlore-structured ceramics, namely Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7. It is well known from experiment that the titanate is susceptible to radiation-induced amorphization, while the zirconate does not go amorphous under prolonged irradiation. Our simulations show that cation Frenkel pair accumulation eventually leads to amorphization of Gd2Ti2O7. Anion disorder occurs with cation disorder. The amorphization is accompanied by a density decrease of about 12.7% and a decrease of about 50% in the elastic modulus. In Gd2Zr2O7, amorphization does not occur, because the residual damage is not sufficiently energetic to drive the material amorphous. Subtle differences in damage accumulation and annealing between the two pyrochlores lead to drastically different radiation response as the damage accumulates.

  13. Oligomer Formation of Toxic and Functional Amyloid Peptides Studied with Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Pacheco, Martín; Ismail, Ahmed E; Strodel, Birgit

    2015-07-30

    Amyloids are associated with diseases, including Alzheimer's, as well as functional roles such as storage of peptide hormones. It is still unclear what differences exist between aberrant and functional amyloids. However, it is known that soluble oligomers formed during amyloid aggregation are more toxic than the final fibrils. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide Aβ25-35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Although the three peptides have similar primary sequences, tachykinin peptides, in contrast to Aβ25-35, form nontoxic amyloids. Our simulations reveal that the charge of the C-terminus is essential to controlling the aggregation process. In particular, when the kassinin C-terminus is not amidated, the aggregation kinetics decreases considerably. In addition, we observe that the monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. PMID:26130191

  14. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-05-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core-shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core-shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals.

  15. Atomistic Simulations of Fluid Flow through Graphene Channels and Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton E.;

    2015-01-01

    The transport of aqueous solutions in artificial nanopores is of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, carbon nano-structured materials (fullerenes) have attracted a great deal of attention in nanotechnology. In fact, due to their large specific surface area, high thermal...... conductivity, extremely low surface friction and superior mechanical properties, graphene channels and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates to be implemented as fluid conduits in nanosystems. Performing Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the transport of water...... fields, electro-osmosis and thermal gradients are evaluated. We conduct a detailed analysis of the transport efficiency of each system to impose similar volumetric flow rates. From the simulations, we extract density and velocity profiles to study the liquid structure, wall slippage and flow enhancement...

  16. Understanding Sodium Channel Function and Modulation Using Atomistic Simulations of Bacterial Channel Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, C; Allen, T W

    2016-01-01

    Sodium channels are chief proteins involved in electrical signaling in the nervous system, enabling critical functions like heartbeat and brain activity. New high-resolution X-ray structures for bacterial sodium channels have created an opportunity to see how these proteins operate at the molecular level. An important challenge to overcome is establishing relationships between the structures and functions of mammalian and bacterial channels. Bacterial sodium channels are known to exhibit the main structural features of their mammalian counterparts, as well as several key functional characteristics, including selective ion conduction, voltage-dependent gating, pore-based inactivation and modulation by local anesthetic, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs. Simulations have begun to shed light on each of these features in the past few years. Despite deviations in selectivity signatures for bacterial and mammalian channels, simulations have uncovered the nature of the multiion conduction mechanism associated with Na(+) binding to a high-field strength site established by charged glutamate side chains. Simulations demonstrated a surprising level of flexibility of the protein, showing that these side chains are active participants in the permeation process. They have also uncovered changes in protein structure, leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate that have been proposed to correspond to inactivated structures. These observations offer the potential to examine the mechanisms of state-dependent drug activity, focusing on pore-blocking and pore-based slow inactivation in bacterial channels, without the complexities of inactivation on multiple timescales seen in eukaryotic channels. Simulations have provided molecular views of the interactions of drugs, consistent with sites predicted in mammalian channels, as well as a wealth of other sites as potential new drug targets. In this chapter, we survey the new insights into sodium channel function that

  17. Solubility of gases and solvents in silicon polymers: Molecular simulation and equation of state modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Economou, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The solubility of n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes, noble gases and light gases in four elastomer polymers containing silicon is examined based on molecular simulation and macroscopic equation of state modelling. Polymer melt samples generated from Molecular Dynamics (MD) are used for the calculation of gas and solvent solubilities using the test particle insertion method of Widom. Polymer chains are modelled using recently developed realistic atomistic force fields. Calcula...

  18. Molecular Simulations in Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Schweighofer, Karl; Chipot, Christophe; New, Michael H.; Vincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the main goals of astrobiology is to understand the origin of cellular life. In the absence of any record of the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells, protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of their characteristics is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts, currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program, are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs of molecules that are capable of performing protocellular functions. Many of these functions, such as importing nutrients, capturing and storing energy, and responding to changes in the environment, are carried out by proteins bound to membranes. We use computer simulations to address the following, questions about these proteins: (1) How do small proteins (peptides) organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes? (2) How do peptides aggregate to form membrane-spannin(y structures (e.g., channels)? (3) By what mechanisms do such aggregates perform their functions? The simulations are performed using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. In this method, Newton's equations of motion for each atom in the system are solved iteratively. At each time step, the forces exerted on each atom by the remaining atoms are evaluated by dividing them into two parts. Short-range forces are calculated directly in real space while long-range forces are evaluated in reciprocal space, usually using a particle-mesh algorithm which is of order O(NlnN). Currently, a time step of 2 femtoseconds is typically used, thereby making studies of problems occurring on multi-nanosecond time scales (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 8) time steps) accessible. To address a broader range of problems, simulations need to be extended by three orders of magnitude. Such an extension requires both algorithmic improvements and codes scalable to a large number of parallel

  19. Atomistic Simulation of Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xujun; Marchi, Massimo; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi; Abel, Stéphane

    2016-04-19

    Solubilization of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), naphthalene (NAP, 2-benzene-ring PAH) and pyrene (PYR, 4-benzene-ring PAH), into a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle was studied through all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that NAP as well as PYR could move between the micelle shell and core regions, contributing to their distribution in both regions of the micelle at any PAH concentration. Moreover, both NAP and PYR prefer to stay in the micelle shell region, which may arise from the greater volume of the micelle shell, the formation of hydrogen bonds between NAP and water, and the larger molecular volume of PYR. The PAHs are able to form occasional clusters (from dimer to octamer) inside the micelle during the simulation time depending on the PAH concentration in the solubilization systems. Furthermore, the micelle properties (i.e., size, shape, micelle internal structure, alkyl chain conformation and orientation, and micelle internal dynamics) are found to be nearly unaffected by the solubilized PAHs, which is irrespective of the properties and concentrations of PAHs.

  20. Atomistic simulations of the effect of reactor-relevant parameters on be sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, E.; Björkas, C.; Lasa, A.; Nordlund, K.; Sukuba, I.; Probst, M.

    2015-08-01

    Beryllium (Be) is the main plasma-facing material in the present day fusion reactor JET as well as in the upcoming ITER. Thus, the Be erosion plays a key role in predicting the life-time and viability of the reactors. In this work, Be surface erosion and morphology changes due to deuterium (D) irradiation are studied by using molecular dynamics simulations, varying key parameters such as particle flux, surface temperature and impact energy. At low temperatures, the main molecular species among the sputtered particles is BeD due to a low D surface concentration, as the incoming D projectiles cluster beneath the surface. At higher temperatures, the D surface concentration increases and larger species (BeD2, BeD3) dominate the molecular erosion, lowering the BeD to Be ratio. When approaching the Be melting point, D desorbs from the surface, increasing the fraction of Be eroded as BeD. The larger molecules will dissociate as soon as entering the edge plasma, with only a minor contribution to the BeD formation. These findings correlate well with observations at JET. The effect of the incoming D flux on the results is negligible.

  1. Atomistic details of the molecular recognition of DNA-RNA hybrid duplex by ribonuclease H enzyme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gorle Suresh; U Deva Priyakumar

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus halodurans (ℎ) ribonuclease H (RNase H) belongs to the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal ion (Mg2+ or Mn2+) catalysis to cleave nucleic acids. Long timescale molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the ℎRNase H-DNA-RNA hybrid complex and the respective monomers to understand the recognition mechanism, conformational preorganization, active site dynamics and energetics involved in the complex formation. Several structural and energetic analyses were performed and significant structural changes are observed in enzyme and hybrid duplex during complex formation. Hybrid molecule binding to RNase H enzyme leads to conformational changes in the DNA strand. The ability of the DNA strand in the hybrid duplex to sample conformations corresponding to typical A- and B-type nucleic acids and the characteristic minor groove width-seem to be crucial for efficient binding. Sugar moieties in certain positions interacting with the protein structure undergo notable conformational transitions. The water coordination and arrangement around the metal ions in active site region are quite stable, suggesting their important role in enzymatic catalysis. Details of key interactions found at the interface of enzyme-nucleic acid complex that are responsible for its stability are discussed.

  2. Computational investigations on polymerase actions in gene transcription and replication: Combining physical modeling and atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases are protein enzymes that move along nucleic acid chains and catalyze template-based polymerization reactions during gene transcription and replication. The polymerases also substantially improve transcription or replication fidelity through the non-equilibrium enzymatic cycles. We briefly review computational efforts that have been made toward understanding mechano-chemical coupling and fidelity control mechanisms of the polymerase elongation. The polymerases are regarded as molecular information motors during the elongation process. It requires a full spectrum of computational approaches from multiple time and length scales to understand the full polymerase functional cycle. We stay away from quantum mechanics based approaches to the polymerase catalysis due to abundant former surveys, while addressing statistical physics modeling approaches along with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies. We organize this review around our own modeling and simulation practices on a single subunit T7 RNA polymerase, and summarize commensurate studies on structurally similar DNA polymerases as well. For multi-subunit RNA polymerases that have been actively studied in recent years, we leave systematical reviews of the simulation achievements to latest computational chemistry surveys, while covering only representative studies published very recently, including our own work modeling structure-based elongation kinetic of yeast RNA polymerase II. In the end, we briefly go through physical modeling on elongation pauses and backtracking activities of the multi-subunit RNAPs. We emphasize on the fluctuation and control mechanisms of the polymerase actions, highlight the non-equilibrium nature of the operation system, and try to build some perspectives toward understanding the polymerase impacts from the single molecule level to a genome-wide scale. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 11275022).

  3. Using Markov models to simulate electron spin resonance spectra from molecular dynamics trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Deniz; Freed, Jack H.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Simulating electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra directly from molecular dynamics simulations of a spin labeled protein necessitates a large number (hundreds or thousands) of relatively long (hundreds of ns) trajectories. To meet this challenge, we explore the possibility of constructing accurate stochastic models of the spin label dynamics from atomistic trajectories. A systematic, two-step procedure, based on the probabilistic framework of hidden Markov models, is developed to build a discr...

  4. Atomistic Simulations of Orientation and Shock Velocity Dependences on Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan; Wixom, Ryan; Mattsson, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Predicting the behavior of energetic materials requires a detailed description of how chemical reaction, energy and pressure fronts propagate during initial stages of detonation. In this talk, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to examine orientation and shock velocity dependences in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). This work utilizes an empirical, variable charge reactive force field (ReaxFF) that is implemented in the LAMMPS package with a time-averaged bond-order method for on-the-fly chemical species identification. The accuracy of ReaxFF is validated by comparisons of activation barriers for dissociation of a single PETN molecule along various dissociation channels with higher-fidelity, but more expensive, density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The response of single-crystal PETN to shock compression is simulated using the multi-scale shock technique (MSST) along the insensitive (100) directions, as well as the sensitive (001) and (110) directions, at steady shock velocities ranging from 6-10 km/s. Hugoniot curves, particle velocities of shocked molecules, and evolution of reaction products with time from MD simulations with ReaxFF will be discussed and compared to that from DFT calculations.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Filled With Metal Nanowires By Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Daniel; Keblinski, Pawel; Pulickel, Ajayan; Nayak, Saroj

    2002-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we studied mechanical behavior of (10,10) carbon nanotubes filled with a crystalline fcc metal wires. The interatomic interactions were described by a combination of Terfoff’s bond-order potential for carbon, embedded atom method (EAM) potential for metal and pair potential for carbon-metal interactions. The elastic properties, as well as failure mechanism were determined by simulating three point bending test, by pressing the center and the ends of relatively long tube in determined relatively small ring areas. We observed that following elastic response, at larger deformation, the metal wire yields well before the carbon bonding is affected. The behavior of filled tubes was compared with that of hollow tubes. Interesting is thet the hollow carbon (10,10) nanotube is more strong elastically than the same tube filled with Au-metal nanowire. We also simulated indentation of filled tubes residing on a hard flat surface. Similarly as in the bending test, metal wire yields first, is cut in between hard cylinder and hard plane and pushed away from under the indenter. Upon further increase of the indentation force, carbon tube is broken and forms two open ends that are rapidly zipped around the cut metal wire. Remarkably, the shape of the zipped tube ends strong depend of the speed of the punching of the tube. This result imply a possibility of designing tubes with various closed end shapes with applicationusing in the nanoscale manipulation procedures used for production.

  6. Multiscale atomistic simulation of metal-oxygen surface interactions: methodological development, theoretical investigation, and correlation with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Judith C. [University of Pittsburgh

    2015-01-09

    The purpose of this grant is to develop the multi-scale theoretical methods to describe the nanoscale oxidation of metal thin films, as the PI (Yang) extensive previous experience in the experimental elucidation of the initial stages of Cu oxidation by primarily in situ transmission electron microscopy methods. Through the use and development of computational tools at varying length (and time) scales, from atomistic quantum mechanical calculation, force field mesoscale simulations, to large scale Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) modeling, the fundamental underpinings of the initial stages of Cu oxidation have been elucidated. The development of computational modeling tools allows for accelerated materials discovery. The theoretical tools developed from this program impact a wide range of technologies that depend on surface reactions, including corrosion, catalysis, and nanomaterials fabrication.

  7. Thermochemistry of organic reactions in microporous oxides by atomistic simulations: benchmarking against periodic B3LYP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleken, Francesca; Svelle, Stian; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Olsbye, Unni; Arstad, Bjørnar; Swang, Ole

    2010-07-15

    The methylation of ethene by methyl chloride and methanol in the microporous materials SAPO-34 and SSZ-13 has been studied using different periodic atomistic modeling approaches based on density functional theory. The RPBE functional, which earlier has been used successfully in studies of surface reactions on metals, fails to yield a qualitatively correct description of the transition states under study. Employing B3LYP as functional gives results in line with experimental data: (1) Methanol is adsorbed more strongly than methyl chloride to the acid site. (2) The activation energies for the methylation of ethene are slightly lower for SSZ-13. Furthermore, the B3LYP activation energies are lower for methyl chloride than for methanol. PMID:20557090

  8. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  9. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states. PMID:27218609

  10. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  11. Atomistic simulations of the load dependant friction force between silicon tip and diamond substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Hao; Chen, Yunfei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the load dependence on the interfacial friction between a cubic silicon tip and diamond substrate was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. With the increase of the applied load, the sliding process experiences the states of superlubricity, single slip instability, double slip instability and plastic stage. The transitions from one state to the next one occur at the contact pressure 5.3 GPa, 8.0 GPa and 10.8 GPa, sequentially. In the superlubricity state, both friction and dissipated energy approach zero, independent of the load. However, in the single slip state the friction has a linear relationship with load, while the double slip mode induces decreased frictional force and lower damping. The coupling of the structure and forces in the plastic regime leads to the reduction of friction. These behaviors show good agreement with the recent experimental observations and theoretical predictions. PMID:21137969

  12. Structure Based Modeling of Small Molecules Binding to the TLR7 by Atomistic Level Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gentile

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Toll-Like Receptors (TLR are a large family of proteins involved in the immune system response. Both the activation and the inhibition of these receptors can have positive effects on several diseases, including viral pathologies and cancer, therefore prompting the development of new compounds. In order to provide new indications for the design of Toll-Like Receptor 7 (TLR7-targeting drugs, the mechanism of interaction between the TLR7 and two important classes of agonists (imidazoquinoline and adenine derivatives was investigated through docking and Molecular Dynamics simulations. To perform the computational analysis, a new model for the dimeric form of the receptors was necessary and therefore created. Qualitative and quantitative differences between agonists and inactive compounds were determined. The in silico results were compared with previous experimental observations and employed to define the ligand binding mechanism of TLR7.

  13. Orientation and Rate Dependence of Wave Propagation in Shocked Beta-SiC from Atomistic Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qin; WU Heng-An; WANG Yu; WANG Xiu-Xi

    2009-01-01

    The orientation dependence of planax wave propagation in beta-SiC is studied via the molecular dynamics (MD) method. Simulations axe implemented under impact loadings in four main crystal directions, i.e., , ,, and . The dispersion of stress states in different directions increases with rising impact velocity, which implies the anisotropic characteristic of shock wave propagation for beta-SiC materials. We also obtain the Hugoniot relations between the shock wave velocity and the impact velocity, and find that the shock velocity falls into a plateau above a threshold of impact velocity. The shock velocity of the plateaux is dependent on the shock directions, while and can be regarded as equivalent directions as they almost reach the same plateau.A comparison between the atomic stress from MD and the stress from Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions is also made, and it is found that they agree with each other very well.

  14. The configurations of nanoalloy by impact deposition: atomistic simulation on Ni–Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jianfeng, E-mail: hnjftang@aliyun.com [Hunan Agricultural University, Department of Applied Physics (China); Yang, Jianyu, E-mail: hnieyjy@aliyun.com [Hunan Institute of Engineering (China)

    2013-11-15

    The use of energetic particles can change the growth mode and provide control of nanoalloy morphology and properties. The impact deposition of Ni (or Al) on the truncated octahedral nanoparticle of Al (or Ni) is studied. The embedded atom method is used for the description of the interatomic interactions in combination with molecular dynamics method for the growth simulation. Three configurations of Ni–Al nanoparticle are obtained depending on incident energy and deposition sequence. A perfect core–shell nanoparticle with Ni-core/Al-shell is obtained as Al atoms are deposited over Ni nanoparticle. For the deposition of Ni atoms on Al nanoparticle, an onion-like nanoparticle at smaller incident energy, and a configuration with Al-shell and alloyed Ni–Al core at larger incident energy are observed, respectively. The formation energies show that the latter is energetically favorable.

  15. Investigation of the thermal stability of Cu nanowires using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granberg, F.; Parviainen, S., E-mail: stefan.parviainen@helsinki.fi; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2014-06-07

    We present a method for determining the melting point of copper nanowires based on classical molecular dynamics simulations and use it to investigate the dependence of the melting point on wire diameter. The melting point is determined as the temperature at which there is a significant change in the fraction of liquid atoms in the wire, according to atomic bond angle analysis. The results for the wires with diameters in the range 1.5 nm to 20 nm show that the melting point is inversely proportional to the diameter while the cross-sectional shape of the wire does not have a significant impact. Comparison of results obtained using different potentials show that while the absolute values of the melting points may differ substantially, the melting point depression is similar for all potentials. The obtained results are consistent with predictions based on the semi-empirical liquid drop model.

  16. Force-Field Derivation and Atomistic Simulation of HMX/Graphite Interface and Polycrystal Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙瑶; 刘永刚; 聂福德; 陈军

    2012-01-01

    Interface is the key issue to understand the performance of composite materials. In this work, we study the interface between octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and graphite, try to find out its contribution to mixture explosives. The work starts from the force-field derivation. We get ab initio based pair potentials across the interface, and then use them to study the interface structural and mechanical properties. A series of large scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The structure evolution, energy variation and elastic/plastic transformation of interface and polycrystal systems are calculated. The desensitizing mechanism of graphite to HMX is discussed.

  17. Integrating molecular dynamics simulations with chemical probing experiments using SHAPE-FIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Hennelly, Scott P.; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, Jose N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2016-01-01

    Integration and calibration of molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data remains a challenging endeavor. We have developed a novel method to integrate chemical probing experiments with molecular simulations of RNA molecules by using a native structure-based model. Selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation by primer extension (SHAPE) characterizes the mobility of each residue in the RNA. Our method, SHAPE-FIT, automatically optimizes the potential parameters of the forcefield according to measured reactivities from SHAPE. The optimized parameter set allows simulations of dynamics highly consistent with SHAPE probing experiments. Such atomistic simulations, thoroughly grounded in experiment, can open a new window on RNA structure-function relations. PMID:25726467

  18. Atomistic simulation of the homogeneous nucleation and of the growth of N2 crystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyssale, Jean-Marc; Delhommelle, Jerome; Millot, Claude

    2005-03-01

    We report on a computer simulation study of the early stages of the crystallization of molecular nitrogen. First, we study how homogeneous nucleation takes place in supercooled liquid N(2) for a moderate degree of supercooling. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we determine the free energy barrier of formation for a critical nucleus of N(2). We show that, in accord with Ostwald's rule of stages, the structure of the critical nucleus is predominantly that of a metastable polymorph (alpha-N(2) for the state point investigated). We then monitor the evolution of several critical nuclei through a series of unbiased molecular dynamics trajectories. The growth of N(2) crystallites is accompanied by a structural evolution toward the stable polymorph beta-N(2). The microscopic mechanism underlying this evolution qualitatively differs from that reported previously. We do not observe any dissolution or reorganization of the alpha-like core of the nucleus. On the contrary, we show that alpha-like and beta-like blocks coexist in postcritical nuclei. We relate the structural evolution to a greater adsorption rate of beta-like molecules on the surface and show that this transition actually starts well within the precritical regime. We also carefully investigate the effect of the system size on the height of the free energy barrier of nucleation and on the structure and size of the critical nucleus. PMID:15836335

  19. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  20. Harnessing atomistic simulations to predict the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroukhani, S.; Nguyen, L. D.; Leung, K. W. K.; Singh, C. V.; Warner, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the rate at which dislocations overcome obstacles is key to understanding the microscopic features that govern the plastic flow of modern alloys. In this spirit, the current manuscript examines the rate at which an edge dislocation overcomes an obstacle in aluminum. Predictions were made using different popular variants of Harmonic Transition State Theory (HTST) and compared to those of direct Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The HTST predictions were found to be grossly inaccurate due to the large entropy barrier associated with the dislocation-obstacle interaction. Considering the importance of finite temperature effects, the utility of the Finite Temperature String (FTS) method was then explored. While this approach was found capable of identifying a prominent reaction tube, it was not capable of computing the free energy profile along the tube. Lastly, the utility of the Transition Interface Sampling (TIS) approach was explored, which does not need a free energy profile and is known to be less reliant on the choice of reaction coordinate. The TIS approach was found capable of accurately predicting the rate, relative to direct MD simulations. This finding was utilized to examine the temperature and load dependence of the dislocation-obstacle interaction in a simple periodic cell configuration. An attractive rate prediction approach combining TST and simple continuum models is identified, and the strain rate sensitivity of individual dislocation obstacle interactions is predicted.

  1. Atomistic simulation of point defects and diffusion in B2 NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishin, Y.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-08-04

    NiAl is a strongly ordered compound with a large atomic size difference between the components. Due to these features it demonstrates the so-called triple-defect mechanism of compositional disorder with Ni anti-structural atoms in Ni-rich compositions and Ni vacancies in Al-rich compositions. Diffusion mechanisms in triple-defect compounds are more involved than in antisite disorder compounds. Because every Ni atom in the B2 structure is surrounded by Al atoms and vise versa, every nearest-neighbor (NN) jump of a vacancy induces local disorder, which is very unfavorable. The authors therefore have to consider diffusion of Ni and Al along their own sublattices by next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) vacancy jumps. Alternatively, one can think of cycled mechanisms in which the crystal order is destroyed only locally and temporarily, but is totally restored when the diffusion cycle is complete. In this study the authors apply molecular statics simulations to evaluate the energetics of the point defect formation and migration in NiAl by different mechanisms. The goal of their simulations is to predict the mechanisms that are the easiest, thus dominating, at different alloy compositions.

  2. Wettability alteration properties of fluorinated silica nanoparticles in liquid-loaded pores: An atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrinia, Kazem; Mohammadi, Aliasghar

    2016-05-01

    Control over the wettability of reservoir rocks is of crucial importance for enhancing oil and gas recovery. In order to develop chemicals for controlling the wettability of reservoir rocks, we present a study of functionalized silica nanoparticles as candidates for wettability alteration and improved gas recovery applications. In this paper, properties of fluorinated silica nanoparticles were investigated in water or decane-loaded pores of mineral silica using molecular dynamics simulation. Trifluoromethyl groups as water and oil repellents were placed on the nanoparticles. Simulating a pore in the presence of trapped water or decane molecules leads to liquid bridging for both of the liquids. Adsorption of nanoparticles on the pore wall reduces the density of liquid molecules adjacent to the wall. The density of liquid molecules around the nanoparticles decreases significantly with increasing the number of trifluoromethyl groups on the nanoparticles' surfaces. An increased hydrophobicity of the pore wall was observed in the presence of adsorbed fluorinated silica nanoparticles. Also, it is observed that increasing the number of the trifluoromethyl groups results in weakening of liquid bridges. Moreover, the free energy of adsorption on mineral surface was evaluated to be more favorable than that of aggregation of nanoparticles, which suggests nanoparticles adsorb preferably on mineral surface.

  3. Atomistic simulations of aromatic polyurea and polyamide for capacitive energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Rui; Ranjan, V.; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco; Bernholc, J.

    2015-07-01

    Materials for capacitive energy storage with high energy density and low loss are desired in many fields. We investigate several polymers with urea and amide functional groups using density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics simulations. For aromatic polyurea (APU) and para-aramid (PA), we find several nearly energetically degenerate ordered structures, while meta-aromatic polyurea (mAPU) tends to be rotationally disordered along the polymer chains. Simulated annealing of APU and PA structures results in the formation of hydrogen-bonded sheets, highlighting the importance of dipole-dipole interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding does not play a significant role in mAPU, hence the propensity to disorder. We find that the disordered structures with misaligned chains have significantly larger dielectric constants, due to significant increase in the free volume, which leads to easier reorientation of dipolar groups in the presence of an electric field. Large segment motion is still not allowed below the glass transition temperature, which explains the experimentally observed very low loss at high field and elevated temperature. However, the degree of disorder needs to be controlled, because highly entangled structures diminish the free dipoles and decrease permittivity. Among the considered materials, mAPU is the most promising dielectric for capacitive energy storage, but the concept of increasing permittivity while maintaining low loss through disorder-induced free volume increase is generally applicable and provides an alternative pathway for the design of high-performance dielectrics for capacitive energy storage.

  4. Micron-scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Void Collapse and Hotspot Growth in PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Material defects and other heterogeneities such as dislocations, micro-porosity, and grain boundaries play key roles in the shock-induced initiation of detonation in energetic materials. We performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effect of nanoscale voids on hotspot growth and initiation in micron-scale pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) crystals under weak shock loading (Up = 1.25 km/s; Us = 4.5 km/s). We used the ReaxFF potential implemented in LAMMPS. We built a pseudo-2D PETN crystal with dimensions 0.3 μm × 0.22 μm × 1.3 nm containing a 20 nm cylindrical void. Once the initial shockwave traversed the entire sample, the shock-front absorbing boundary condition was applied, allowing the simulation to continue beyond 1 nanosecond. Results show an exponentially increasing hotspot growth rate. The hotspot morphology is initially symmetric about the void axis, but strong asymmetry develops at later times, due to strong coupling between exothermic chemistry, temperature, and divergent secondary shockwaves emanating from the collapsing void. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  6. MULTISCALE ATOMISTIC SIMULATION OF METAL-OXYGEN SURFACE INTERACTIONS: METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT, THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION, AND CORRELATION WITH EXPERIMENT - FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: Yang, Judith C., Mechanical Eng. & Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh; Co-PI: McGaughey, Alan, Mechanical Eng., Carnegie Mellon University; Sinnott, Susan and Phillpot, Simon, Materials Science & Eng., University of Florida

    2007-09-30

    , and calculations of these values are part of the ongoing effort with University of Florida (UF) and proposed activity with Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Brief highlights of our progress to date are summarized below: - Development of TFOx-2D, a versatile kinetic Monte Carlo code that can simulate atomistic transport, nucleation and growth, and includes potential gradients to simulate medium-range substrate mediated effects (e.g., strain). - Systematic study of TFOx-2D input parameters to reveal a variety of nano-structures that resemble those seen experimentally. - Parallelization of the Streitz-Mintmire potential and Rappe-Goddard approach for determining dynamic charge transfer at a metal-oxide interface, which is the critical step required for molecular dynamic simulations of oxygen-metal interactions. - Benchmark calculations of Cu and Cu2O physical properties to determine the most accurate electronic structure approach. - Demonstration of the greater universality of the Tersoff-Tromp elastic strain relief model of nano-rod formation to a gas-surface reaction. Hence, we have established the ground work for a truly comprehensive and multi-scale theoretical tool that can simulate any gas-surface reaction, including oxidation, from the atomic level to the mesoscale, from first principles. The direct comparison between these simulations and in situ experiments of metal nano-oxidation will lead to new knowledge of this important surface reaction.

  7. Modeling of Temperature Dependence of Magnetization in TbFe Films — An Atomistic Spin Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiankai; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we performed spin simulations at atomistic level to study the temperature dependent properties of perpendicularly magnetized TbFe thin films. The crystallographically amorphous feature of TbFe ferrimagnetic alloys is modeled by using a lattice system with disordered site occupation of rare earth (RE) and transition metal (TM) spins. The simulated Curie temperature (TC) is consistent well with the mean-field approximation theory. With the increase of Tb concentration, the TC decreases almost linearly, whereas the magnetization compensation temperature (TM) increases gradually until the TC value is reached. The inter-sublattice exchange coupling strength JTM-RE between the RE and TM atoms can significantly affect TM, but has less impact on TC. With the increase of Tb concentration, the TbFe sample of high JTM-RE exhibits a much faster increase in TM than the sample with low JTM-RE. Moreover, we have tested the simulation code to model the laser pulse induced ultrafast nonequilibrium spin dynamics. As an example, the femto-second pulse laser induced demagnetization and recovery process is clearly reproduced. These features are in a good agreement with the experiments, indicating that the simulation model can capture the basic physics in describing the high temperature dependent magnetic property as well as the ultrafast spin dynamics.

  8. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulations on the influence of sulphur during high-temperature decarburization of molten iron-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a Monte Carlo simulation study of the molten Fe-C-S system with the aim of developing a theoretical understanding of the influence of sulphur during decarburization reactions in Fe-C alloys. Focussing specifically on the role played by free surfaces, computer simulations were based on the hexagonal atomistic model of Fe-C-S system using isotropic atomic interaction parameters; free surfaces were characterized by a missing layer of atoms. Three geometrical configurations, namely a liquid bath, a prismatic block and a spherical droplet, were investigated. Simulations were carried out as a function of melt carbon and sulphur concentration, temperatures and surface/volume ratios of the simulation cell. Sulphur atoms were found to preferentially concentrate in the top few layers, with the second layer showing the highest amounts of sulphur; very little sulphur was observed in the bulk liquid. This trend was observed in all three simulation configurations over a wide carbon/sulphur concentration range and temperatures. Significant levels of iron were observed in the top surface layer. The influence of free surfaces on atomic concentration profiles was found to be a strong function of the surface/volume ratio. The surface segregation of S was more pronounced for small exposed surfaces and was much smaller for liquids with large exposed surfaces. The presence of surface-active sulphur resulted in a major re-distribution of carbon. Carbon tended to concentrate deeper in the bulk, with the surface region being severely depleted of carbon. In addition to several new findings and a better understanding of liquid surfaces, these simulations have helped overcome major limitations of Sain and Belton's model. Key experimental results on decarburization have been explained within the framework of our simulations. These simulation results have significant implications for surface decarburization reactions and carbon-boil phenomena in smelting technologies.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Iron — A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, C. P.; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Yongbing; Zhou, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a technique of atomistic simulation which has facilitated scientific discovery of interactions among particles since its advent in the late 1950s. Its merit lies in incorporating statistical mechanics to allow for examination of varying atomic configurations at finite temperatures. Its contributions to materials science from modeling pure metal properties to designing nanowires is also remarkable. This review paper focuses on the progress of MD in understanding the behavior of iron — in pure metal form, in alloys, and in composite nanomaterials. It also discusses the interatomic potentials and the integration algorithms used for simulating iron in the literature. Furthermore, it reveals the current progress of MD in simulating iron by exhibiting some results in the literature. Finally, the review paper briefly mentions the development of the hardware and software tools for such large-scale computations.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Miscibility in Several Polymer Blends

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2009-01-01

    The miscibility in several polymer blend mixtures (polymethylmethacrylate/polystyrene, (1,4-cis) polyisoprene/polystyrene, and polymethylmethacrylate/polyoxyethylene) has been investigated using Molecular Dynamics simulations for atomistic representations of the polymer chains. The trajectories obtained from simulation boxes representing the mixtures have been analyzed in terms of the collective scattering structure function. The Flory-Huggins parameter is determined from fits of the simulation results for this function to the random phase approximation expression. The numerical values of this parameter and its variation with temperature obtained with this procedure show a general qualitative and quantitative agreement with existing experimental data for the different systems. These results together with those previously obtained for the polyvylmethylether/polystyrene blends with the same method are compared with data yielded by other computational simpler approaches.

  11. Atomistic simulation of martensite-austenite phase transition in nanoscale nickel-titanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kexel, Christian; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-09-01

    Shape-memory (SM) alloys can, after initial inelastic deformation, reconstruct their pristine lattice structure upon heating. The underlying phenomenon is the structural solid-solid phase transition from low-temperature lower-symmetry martensite to the high-temperature higher-symmetry austenite. Conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi) with near-equiatomic concentration already possesses an eminent importance for many applications, whereas the nanostructured equivalent can exhibit yet enhanced thermomechanical properties. However, no plausible microscopic theory of the SM effect in NiTi exists, especially for nanoscale systems. We investigate the thermally induced martensite-austenite phase transition in free equiatomic nanocrystals, comprising up to approximately 40 000 atoms, by means of molecular-dynamics simulations (MD) using a classical Gupta-type many-body scheme. Thereby we complement and extend a previously published study [D. Mutter, P. Nielaba, Eur. Phys. J. B 84, 109 (2011)]. The structural transition, revealing features of a first-order phase transition, is demonstrated. It is contrasted with the melting phase transition, a quantum solid model and bulk experimental findings. Moreover, a nucleation-growth process is observed as well as the irreversibility of the transition upon cooling.

  12. Atomistic simulation of the point defects in TaW ordered alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhong-Liang Lin; Jian-Min Zhang; Yan Zhang; Vincent Ji

    2011-01-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with modified analytic embeddedatom method (MAEAM), the formation, migration and activation energies of the point defects for six-kind migration mechanisms in B2-type TaW alloy have been investigated. The results showed that the anti-site defects TaW and WTa were easier to form than Ta and W vacancies owing to their lower formation energies. Comparing the migration and activation energies needed for six-kind migration mechanisms of a Ta (or W) vacancy, we found that one nearest-neighbour jump (1NNJ) was the most favourable because of its lowest migration and activation energies, but it would lead to a disorder in the alloy. One next-nearest-neighbour jump (1NNNJ) and one third-nearest-neighbour jump (1TNNJ) could maintain the ordered property of the alloy but required higher migration and activation energies. So the 1NNNJ and 1TNNJ should be replaced by straight [100] six nearestneighbor cyclic jumps (S[100]6NNCJ) (especially) or bent [100] six nearest-neighbour cyclic jumps (B[100]6NNCJ) and [110] six nearest-neighbor cyclic jumps ([110]6NNCJ), respectively.

  13. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alan [The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harlen, Oliver G. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Harris, Sarah A., E-mail: s.a.harris@leeds.ac.uk [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lonsdale, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Mulholland, Adrian J. [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Pearson, Arwen R. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The current computational techniques available for biomolecular simulation are described, and the successes and limitations of each with reference to the experimental biophysical methods that they complement are presented. Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  14. Room Temperature Deformation Mechanisms of Alumina Particles Observed from In Situ Micro-compression and Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. The identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation: A tool for exploration and discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    The exploratory and didactic aspects of science both benefit from the ever-growing role played by computer simulation. One particularly important simulational approach is the molecular dynamics method, used for studying the nature of matter from the molecular to much larger scales. The effectiveness of molecular dynamics can be enhanced considerably by employing visualization and interactivity during the course of the computation and afterwards, allowing the modeler not only to observe the detailed behavior of the systems simulated in different ways, but also to steer the computations in alternative directions by manipulating parameters that govern the actual behavior. This facilitates the creation of potentially rich simulational environments for examining a multitude of complex phenomena, as well as offering an opportunity for enriching the learning process. A series of relatively advanced examples involving molecular dynamics will be used to demonstrate the value of this approach, in particular, atomistic simulations of spontaneously emergent structured fluid flows (the classic Rayleigh--B'enard and Taylor--Couette problems), supramolecular self-assembly of highly symmetric shell structures (involved in the formation of viral capsids), and that most counterintuitive of phenomena, granular segregation (e.g., axial and radial separation in a rotating cylinder).

  16. The Glycan Role in the Glycopeptide Immunogenicity Revealed by Atomistic Simulations and Spectroscopic Experiments on the Multiple Sclerosis Biomarker CSF114(Glc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Agostino; Scrima, Mario; Novellino, Ettore; D'Errico, Gerardino; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-03-01

    Glycoproteins are often recognized as not-self molecules by antibodies triggering the onset of severe autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Thus, the development of antigen-mimicking biomarkers represents an attractive strategy for an early diagnosis of the disease. An example is the synthetic glycopeptide CSF114(Glc), which was designed and tested as MS biomarker and whose clinical application was limited by its reduced ability to detect autoantibodies in MS patients. In the attempt to improve the efficacy of CSF114(Glc), we have characterized all the events leading to the final binding of the biomarker to the autoantibody using atomistic simulations, ESR and NMR experiments. The glycosydic moiety plays a primary role in the whole process. In particular, in an environment mimicking that used in the clinical tests the glycopeptide assumes a α-helix structure that is functional for the interaction with the antibody. In this conformation CSF114(Glc) binds the monoclonal antibody mAb8-18C5 similarly to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG, which is a known MS auto-antigen, thus explaining its diagnostic activity. Our study offers new molecular bases to design more effective biomarkers and provides a most valid protocol to investigate other systems where the environment effect is determinant for the biological activity.

  17. Meaningful timescales from Monte Carlo simulations of molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Liborio I

    2016-01-01

    A new Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for simulating the dynamics of molecular systems with atomistic detail is introduced. In contrast to traditional Kinetic Monte Carlo approaches, where the state of the system is associated with minima in the energy landscape, in the proposed method, the state of the system is associated with the set of paths traveled by the atoms and the transition probabilities for an atom to be displaced are proportional to the corresponding velocities. In this way, the number of possible state-to-state transitions is reduced to a discrete set, and a direct link between the Monte Carlo time step and true physical time is naturally established. The resulting rejection-free algorithm is validated against event-driven molecular dynamics: the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard disks converge to the exact results with decreasing displacement size.

  18. Enhancing protein adsorption simulations by using accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mücksch

    Full Text Available The atomistic modeling of protein adsorption on surfaces is hampered by the different time scales of the simulation ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]s and experiment (up to hours, and the accordingly different 'final' adsorption conformations. We provide evidence that the method of accelerated molecular dynamics is an efficient tool to obtain equilibrated adsorption states. As a model system we study the adsorption of the protein BMP-2 on graphite in an explicit salt water environment. We demonstrate that due to the considerably improved sampling of conformational space, accelerated molecular dynamics allows to observe the complete unfolding and spreading of the protein on the hydrophobic graphite surface. This result is in agreement with the general finding of protein denaturation upon contact with hydrophobic surfaces.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanfang LIU; Danling ZENG; Qin LI; Hong GAO

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was performed on water to calculate its diffusivity by adopting different potential models. The results show that the potential models have great influence on the simulated results. In addition, the diffusivities obtained by the SPCE model conform well to the experimental values.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchan, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Robinson, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K. [Physics and Materials Research Centre, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Marks, N. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of a single stranded (ss) DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Thakur, Siddarth; Burin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop an understanding of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to assist the development of new DNA-based biosensors. A ssDNA model containing twelve bases was constructed from the 130-145 codon sequence of the p53 gene. Various thermodynamic macroscopic observables such as temperature, energy distributions, as well as root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the nucleic acid backbone of the ssDNA were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The AMBER program was used for building the structural model of the ssDNA, and atomistic MD simulations in three different ensembles were carried out using the NAMD program. The microcanonical (NVE), conical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles were employed to compare the equilibrium characteristics of ssDNA in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the conformational stability of the ssDNA is dependent on the thermodynamic conditions.

  3. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  4. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  5. Industrial Applications of Molecular Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Meunier, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The field of quantum and molecular simulations has experienced strong growth since the time of the early software packages. A recent study, showed a large increase in the number of people publishing papers based on ab initio methods from about 3,000 in 1991 to roughly 20,000 in 2009, with particularly strong growth in East Asia. Looking to the future, the question remains as to how these methods can be further integrated into the R&D value chain, bridging the gap from engineering to manufacturing. Using successful case studies as a framework, Industrial Applications of Molecular Simulations de

  6. Atomistic simulation of dislocation core structures in ordered TiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panova, J.; Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Interatomic potentials of the Embedded Atom type were used in the simulation of the dislocation core structures in TiAl. Different orientations of the dislocation line were simulated for the most commonly observed TiAl slip systems. Low-temperature dislocation behavior is interpreted in terms of ordinary dislocation motion. The effect of applied stress on the shape of the dislocation core and its mobility is examined as well. For the superdislocations several possible types of dissociations were studied.

  7. Atomistic simulation of the motion of dislocations in metals under phonon drag conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuksin, A. Yu; Yanilkin, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The mobility of dislocations in the over-barrier motion in different metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mo) has been investigated using the molecular dynamics method. The phonon drag coefficients have been calculated as a function of the pressure and temperature. The results obtained are in good agreement with the

  8. Characterization of the flexibility of the peripheral stalk of prokaryotic rotary A-ATPases by atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Kostas; Muench, Stephen P; Paci, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    Rotary ATPases are involved in numerous physiological processes, with the three distinct types (F/A/V-ATPases) sharing functional properties and structural features. The basic mechanism involves the counter rotation of two motors, a soluble ATP hydrolyzing/synthesizing domain and a membrane-embedded ion pump connected through a central rotor axle and a stator complex. Within the A/V-ATPase family conformational flexibility of the EG stators has been shown to accommodate catalytic cycling and is considered to be important to function. For the A-ATPase three EG structures have been reported, thought to represent conformational states of the stator during different stages of rotary catalysis. Here we use long, detailed atomistic simulations to show that those structures are conformers explored through thermal fluctuations, but do not represent highly populated states of the EG stator in solution. We show that the coiled coil tail domain has a high persistence length (∼100 nm), but retains the ability to adapt to different conformational states through the presence of two hinge regions. Moreover, the stator network of the related V-ATPase has been suggested to adapt to subunit interactions in the collar region in addition to the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic domain. The MD simulations reported here, reinforce this observation showing that the EG stators have enough flexibility to adapt to significantly different structural re-arrangements and accommodate structural changes in the catalytic domain whilst resisting the large torque generated by catalytic cycling. These results are important to understand the role the stators play in the rotary-ATPase mechanism. Proteins 2016; 84:1203-1212. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27177595

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid crystals at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations of an atomistic model of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) were performed for thin films of 8CB on solid substrates (a pseudopotential representation of the molecular topography of the (100) crystal surface of polyethylene (PE), a highly ordered atomistic model of a pseudo-crystalline PE surface and an atomistic model of a partially orientated film of PE), free standing thin films of 8CB and 8CB droplets in a hexagonal pit. The systems showed strong homeotropic anchoring at the free volume interface and planar anchoring at the solid interface whose strength was dependent upon the surface present. The free volume interface also demonstrated weak signs of smectic wetting of the bulk. Simulations of thin free standing films of liquid crystals showed the ordered nature of the liquid crystals at the two free volume interfaces can be adopted by the region of liquid crystal molecules between the homeotropic layer at each interface only if there is a certain number of liquid crystal molecules present. The perpendicular anchoring imposed by the free volume interface and the solid interface for the thin films on the solid substrates resulted in some evidence for the liquid crystal director undergoing a continual rotation at low temperatures and a definite discontinuous change at higher temperatures. The liquid crystal alignment imparted by these substrates was found to depend upon the topography of the surface and not the direction of the polymer chains in the substrate. The liquid crystal was found to order via an epitaxy-like mechanism. The perpendicular anchoring results in a drop in the order - disorder transition temperature for the molecules in the region between the homeotropic layer at the free volume interface and the planar layers at the solid interface. An increase in the size of this region does not alter the transition temperature. The shape of the liquid crystal molecules is dependent upon the degree of order and thus the nematic

  10. "Like-charge attraction" between anionic polyelectrolytes: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Ferenc; Rieger, Jens

    2005-01-18

    "Like-charge attraction" is a phenomenon found in many biological systems containing DNA or proteins, as well as in polyelectrolyte systems of industrial importance. "Like-charge attraction" between polyanions is observed in the presence of mobile multivalent cations. At a certain limiting concentration of cations, the negatively charged macroions cease to repel each other and even an attractive force between the anions is found. With classical molecular dynamics simulations it is possible to elucidate the processes that govern the attractive behavior with atomistic resolution. As an industrially relevant example we study the interaction of negatively charged carboxylate groups of sodium polyacrylate molecules with divalent cationic Ca2+ counterions. Here we show that Ca2+ ions initially associate with single chains of polyacrylates and strongly influence sodium ion distribution; shielded polyanions approach each other and eventually "stick" together (precipitate), contrary to the assumption that precipitation is initially induced by intermolecular Ca2+ bridging. PMID:15641856

  11. Controlling the long-range corrections in atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of two-phase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Florent; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2015-10-13

    The long-range correction to the surface tension can amount to up to 55% of the calculated value of the surface tension for cutoffs in the range of 2.1-6.4 σ. The calculation of the long-range corrections to the surface tension and to the configurational energy in two-phase systems remains an active area of research. In this work, we compare the long-range corrections methods proposed by Guo and Lu ( J. Chem. Phys. 1997 , 106 , 3688 - 3695 ) and Janeček ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2006 , 110 , 6264 - 6269 ) for the calculation of the surface tension and of the coexisting densities in Monte Carlo simulations of the truncated Lennard-Jones potential and the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones potential models. These methods require an estimate of the long-range correction at each step in the Monte Carlo simulation. We apply the full version of the Guo and Lu method, which involves the calculation of a double integral that contains a series of density differences, and we compare these results with the simplified version of the method which is routinely used in two-phase simulations. We conclude that the cutoff dependencies of the surface tension and coexisting densities are identical for the full versions of Guo and Lu and Janeček methods. We show that it is possible to avoid applying the long-range correction at every step by using the truncated Lennard-Jones potential with a cutoff rc ≥ 5 σ. The long-range correction can then be applied at the end of the simulation. The limiting factor in the accurate calculation of this final correction is an accurate estimate of the coexisting densities. Link-cell simulations performed using a cutoff rc = 5.5 σ require twice as much computing time as those with a more typical cutoff of rc = 3.0 σ. The application of the Janeček correction increases the running time of the simulation by less than 10%, and it can be profitably applied with the shorter cutoff. PMID:26574249

  12. Analytic bond-order potential for atomistic simulations of zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, Paul [Institut fuer Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Juslin, Niklas [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki, PO Box 43, FIN-00014 (Finland); Goy, Oliver [Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen und Geodaesie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 1, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nordlund, Kai [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki, PO Box 43, FIN-00014 (Finland); Mueller, Ralf [Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen und Geodaesie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 1, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Albe, Karsten [Institut fuer Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-07-26

    An interatomic potential for zinc oxide and its elemental constituents is derived based on an analytical bond-order formalism. The model potential provides a good description of the bulk properties of various solid structures of zinc oxide including cohesive energies, lattice parameters, and elastic constants. For the pure elements zinc and oxygen the energetics and structural parameters of a variety of bulk phases and in the case of oxygen also molecular structures are reproduced. The dependence of thermal and point defect properties on the cutoff parameters is discussed. As exemplary applications the irradiation of bulk zinc oxide and the elastic response of individual nanorods are studied.

  13. Atomistic simulation in powder technology: from growth control and dispersion stabilization to segregation at doped interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Aschauer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Despite many years of intensive research there still remain many unresolved questions in powder and ceramic technology. A majority of these issues are linked to interfacial phenomena of atomic scale origin, which makes their experimental investigation very difficult due to limitations in the spatial resolution of the available analysis techniques. Computer simulations at the atomic scale provide with the advent of more and more advanced methods and increasing computer power an ever more power...

  14. Atomistic spin model simulation of magnetic reversal modes near the Curie point

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Joe; Evans, Richard Francis L.; Chantrell, Roy W.; Hinzke, Denise; Nowak, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    The so-called linear reversal mode is demonstrated in spin model simulations of the high anisotropy material L10 FePt. Reversal of the magnetization is found to readily occur in the linear regime despite an energy barrier (KV/kBT) that would conventionally ensure stability on this timescale. The timescale for the reversal is also established with a comparison to the Landau Lifshitz Bloch equation showing good agreement.

  15. Atomistic simulation study of the shear-band deformation mechanism in Mg-Cu metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated plastic deformation of a model Mg-Cu metallic glass in order to study shear banding. In uniaxial tension, we find a necking instability occurs rather than shear banding. We can force the latter to occur by deforming in plane strain, forbidding the change of length in one...... of the transverse directions. Furthermore, in most of the simulations a notch is used to initiate shear bands, which lie at a 45 degrees angle to the tensile loading direction. The shear bands are characterized by the Falk and Langer local measure of plastic deformation D-min(2), averaged here over volumes...... containing many atoms. The D-min(2) profile has a peak whose width is around 10 nm; this width is largely independent of the strain rate. Most of the simulations were, at least nominally, at 100 K, about T-g/3 for this system. The development of the shear bands takes a few tens of ps, once plastic flow has...

  16. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provide a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  17. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  18. Atomistic Simulation of Properties of Ultra-thin Layer of Liquid Argon Compressed Between Diamond Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the method of classical molecular dynamics we investigate the properties of ultrathin film of liquid argon, which consists of one or two layers of molecules and is confined by two atomically smooth crystalline diamond surfaces. The aim of the research is validating the use of rigid surfaces and one of the available models of the argon molecule. We study the behavior of the equilibrium and dynamic characteristics of the system. It is shown that at increasing external load the transition of film in the solid-like state occurs, which is indicated by the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function of argon molecules, reduction of the magnitude of the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity increase. The organization of molecules in layers and the presence of their in-plane ordering are revealed. The dependences of the kinetic friction force on time and load are obtained. The results are compared with experimental data.

  19. Atomistic simulations of pristine and defective hexagonal BN and SiC sheets under uniaxial tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Minh-Quy, E-mail: quy.leminh@hust.edu.vn [Department of Mechanics of Materials and Structures, School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, No. 1, Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam); International Institute for Computational Science and Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, No. 1, Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Danh-Truong [Department of Mechanics of Materials and Structures, School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, No. 1, Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-10-06

    The uniaxial tensile mechanical properties of pristine and defective hexagonal boron nitride (BN) and silicon carbide (SiC) sheets are investigated through a molecular dynamics finite element method with Tersoff and Tersoff-like potentials. 2-Atom vacancy and 2 types of Stone–Wales defects are considered. It is found that uniaxial tensile stress–strain curves of defective and pristine sheets are almost identical up to fracture points. A centered single defect reduces significantly fracture stress and fracture strain from those of the corresponding pristine sheet. In contrast, Young's modulus is nearly unchanged by a single defect. One 2-atom vacancy in the sheet's center reduces 15–18% and 16–25% in fracture stress, and 32–34% and 32–48% in fracture strain of BN and SiC sheets, respectively. Reduction in fracture properties depends on the tensile direction as well as the orientation of Stone–Wales defects.

  20. Conformational dynamics of dry lamellar crystals of sugar based lipids: an atomistic simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan ManickamAchari

    Full Text Available The rational design of a glycolipid application (e.g. drug delivery with a tailored property depends on the detailed understanding of its structure and dynamics. Because of the complexity of sugar stereochemistry, we have undertaken a simulation study on the conformational dynamics of a set of synthetic glycosides with different sugar groups and chain design, namely dodecyl β-maltoside, dodecyl β-cellobioside, dodecyl β-isomaltoside and a C12C10 branched β-maltoside under anhydrous conditions. We examined the chain structure in detail, including the chain packing, gauche/trans conformations and chain tilting. In addition, we also investigated the rotational dynamics of the headgroup and alkyl chains. Monoalkylated glycosides possess a small amount of gauche conformers (∼20% in the hydrophobic region of the lamellar crystal (LC phase. In contrast, the branched chain glycolipid in the fluid Lα phase has a high gauche population of up to ∼40%. Rotational diffusion analysis reveals that the carbons closest to the headgroup have the highest correlation times. Furthermore, its value depends on sugar type, where the rotational dynamics of an isomaltose was found to be 11-15% and more restrained near the sugar, possibly due to the chain disorder and partial inter-digitation compared to the other monoalkylated lipids. Intriguingly, the present simulation demonstrates the chain from the branched glycolipid bilayer has the ability to enter into the hydrophilic region. This interesting feature of the anhydrous glycolipid bilayer simulation appears to arise from a combination of lipid crowding and the amphoteric nature of the sugar headgroups.

  1. Accelerated path integral methods for atomistic simulations at ultra-low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Felix; Marx, Dominik; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-08-01

    Path integral methods provide a rigorous and systematically convergent framework to include the quantum mechanical nature of atomic nuclei in the evaluation of the equilibrium properties of molecules, liquids, or solids at finite temperature. Such nuclear quantum effects are often significant for light nuclei already at room temperature, but become crucial at cryogenic temperatures such as those provided by superfluid helium as a solvent. Unfortunately, the cost of converged path integral simulations increases significantly upon lowering the temperature so that the computational burden of simulating matter at the typical superfluid helium temperatures becomes prohibitive. Here we investigate how accelerated path integral techniques based on colored noise generalized Langevin equations, in particular the so-called path integral generalized Langevin equation thermostat (PIGLET) variant, perform in this extreme quantum regime using as an example the quasi-rigid methane molecule and its highly fluxional protonated cousin, CH5 (+). We show that the PIGLET technique gives a speedup of two orders of magnitude in the evaluation of structural observables and quantum kinetic energy at ultralow temperatures. Moreover, we computed the spatial spread of the quantum nuclei in CH4 to illustrate the limits of using such colored noise thermostats close to the many body quantum ground state. PMID:27497533

  2. Early and transient stages of Cu oxidation: Atomistic insights from theoretical simulations and in situ experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Zou, Lianfeng; Zhou, Guangwen; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Judith C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of metal oxidation is critical to corrosion control, catalysis synthesis, and advanced materials engineering. Although, metal oxidation process is rather complicated, different processes, many of them coupled, are involved from the onset of reaction. Since first introduced, there has been great success in applying heteroepitaxial theory to the oxide growth on a metal surface as demonstrated in the Cu oxidation experiments. In this paper, we review the recent progress in experimental findings on Cu oxidation as well as the advances in the theoretical simulations of the Cu oxidation process. We focus on the effects of defects such as step edges, present on realistic metal surfaces, on the oxide growth dynamics. We show that the surface steps can change the mass transport of both Cu and O atoms during oxide growth, and ultimately lead to the formation of different oxide morphology. We also review the oxidation of Cu alloys and explore the effect of a secondary element to the oxide growth on a Cu surface. From the review of the work on Cu oxidation, we demonstrate the correlation of theoretical simulations at multiple scales with various experimental techniques.

  3. Accelerated path integral methods for atomistic simulations at ultra-low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Felix; Marx, Dominik; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-08-01

    Path integral methods provide a rigorous and systematically convergent framework to include the quantum mechanical nature of atomic nuclei in the evaluation of the equilibrium properties of molecules, liquids, or solids at finite temperature. Such nuclear quantum effects are often significant for light nuclei already at room temperature, but become crucial at cryogenic temperatures such as those provided by superfluid helium as a solvent. Unfortunately, the cost of converged path integral simulations increases significantly upon lowering the temperature so that the computational burden of simulating matter at the typical superfluid helium temperatures becomes prohibitive. Here we investigate how accelerated path integral techniques based on colored noise generalized Langevin equations, in particular the so-called path integral generalized Langevin equation thermostat (PIGLET) variant, perform in this extreme quantum regime using as an example the quasi-rigid methane molecule and its highly fluxional protonated cousin, CH5+. We show that the PIGLET technique gives a speedup of two orders of magnitude in the evaluation of structural observables and quantum kinetic energy at ultralow temperatures. Moreover, we computed the spatial spread of the quantum nuclei in CH4 to illustrate the limits of using such colored noise thermostats close to the many body quantum ground state.

  4. Simulating surface-enhanced Raman optical activity using atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    Raman optical activity has proven to be a powerful tool for probing the geometry of small organic and biomolecules. It has therefore been expected that the same mechanisms responsible for surface-enhanced Raman scattering may allow for similar enhancements in surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA). However, SEROA has proved to be an experimental challenge and mirror-image SEROA spectra of enantiomers have so far not been measured. There exists a handful of theories to simulate SEROA, all of which treat the perturbed molecule as a point-dipole object. To go beyond these approximations, we present two new methods to simulate SEROA: the first is a dressed-tensors model that treats the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object; the second method is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which considers the entire charge density of the molecule. We show that although the first method is acceptable for small molecules, it fails for a medium-sized one such as 2-bromohexahelicene. We also show that the SEROA mode intensities and signs are highly sensitive to the nature of the local electric field and gradient, the orientation of the molecule, and the surface plasmon frequency width. Our findings give some insight into why experimental SEROA, and in particular observing mirror-image SEROA for enantiomers, has been difficult.

  5. Atomistic simulation of the structural, thermodynamic, and elastic properties of Li2TiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium-based ceramics, such as lithium metatitanate, have been proposed for adoption in the breeder blanket region of a fusion reactor. In this article, we report a combination of empirical and density functional theory (DFT) simulations employing 'on-the-fly' pseudopotentials for Li2TiO3. The smoothing parameters of the plane-wave pseudopotentials were optimized to ensure an appropriate level of precision for determination of structural, thermodynamic, and elastic properties. As the elastic properties of lithium metatitanate are not well-known, the efficacy of the DFT simulations employing the new pseudopotentials was explored using Li2O and TiO2 where experimental data are available. These pseudopotentials are then used to investigate the three intermediate temperature Phases of Li2TiO3 (i.e., C2/c, C2/m, and P3112). Finally we examine the elastic properties of Li2TiO3 using both DFT and an empirical potential model and find it to be, irrespective of space group, more resistant to deformation than other promising ceramic breeder materials. (authors)

  6. Accelerated path integral methods for atomistic simulations at ultra-low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Felix; Marx, Dominik; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-08-01

    Path integral methods provide a rigorous and systematically convergent framework to include the quantum mechanical nature of atomic nuclei in the evaluation of the equilibrium properties of molecules, liquids, or solids at finite temperature. Such nuclear quantum effects are often significant for light nuclei already at room temperature, but become crucial at cryogenic temperatures such as those provided by superfluid helium as a solvent. Unfortunately, the cost of converged path integral simulations increases significantly upon lowering the temperature so that the computational burden of simulating matter at the typical superfluid helium temperatures becomes prohibitive. Here we investigate how accelerated path integral techniques based on colored noise generalized Langevin equations, in particular the so-called path integral generalized Langevin equation thermostat (PIGLET) variant, perform in this extreme quantum regime using as an example the quasi-rigid methane molecule and its highly fluxional protonated cousin, CH5 (+). We show that the PIGLET technique gives a speedup of two orders of magnitude in the evaluation of structural observables and quantum kinetic energy at ultralow temperatures. Moreover, we computed the spatial spread of the quantum nuclei in CH4 to illustrate the limits of using such colored noise thermostats close to the many body quantum ground state.

  7. Melittin Aggregation in Aqueous Solutions: Insight from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenyi; Esai Selvan, Myvizhi; Zhao, Jun; Slimovitch, Jonathan L; Schneebeli, Severin T; Shelley, Mee; Shelley, John C; Li, Jianing

    2015-08-20

    Melittin is a natural peptide that aggregates in aqueous solutions with paradigmatic monomer-to-tetramer and coil-to-helix transitions. Since little is known about the molecular mechanisms of melittin aggregation in solution, we simulated its self-aggregation process under various conditions. After confirming the stability of a melittin tetramer in solution, we observed—for the first time in atomistic detail—that four separated melittin monomers aggregate into a tetramer. Our simulated dependence of melittin aggregation on peptide concentration, temperature, and ionic strength is in good agreement with prior experiments. We propose that melittin mainly self-aggregates via a mechanism involving the sequential addition of monomers, which is supported by both qualitative and quantitative evidence obtained from unbiased and metadynamics simulations. Moreover, by combining computer simulations and a theory of the electrical double layer, we provide evidence to suggest why melittin aggregation in solution likely stops at the tetramer, rather than forming higher-order oligomers. Overall, our study not only explains prior experimental results at the molecular level but also provides quantitative mechanistic information that may guide the engineering of melittin for higher efficacy and safety. PMID:26208115

  8. Impacts of Atomistic Coating on Thermal Conductivity of Germanium Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that thermal conductivity of Germanium nanowires can be reduced more than 25% at room temperature by atomistic coating. There is a critical coating thickness beyond which thermal conductivity of the coated nanowire is larger than that of the host nanowire. The diameter dependent critical coating thickness and minimum thermal conductivity are explored. Moreover, we found that interface roughness can induce further reducti...

  9. Accelerating a hybrid continuum-atomistic fluidic model with on-the-fly machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Stephenson, David; Lockerby, Duncan A

    2016-01-01

    We present a hybrid continuum-atomistic scheme which combines molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with on-the-fly machine learning techniques for the accurate and efficient prediction of multiscale fluidic systems. By using a Gaussian process as a surrogate model for the computationally expensive MD simulations, we use Bayesian inference to predict the system behaviour at the atomistic scale, purely by consideration of the macroscopic inputs and outputs. Whenever the uncertainty of this prediction is greater than a predetermined acceptable threshold, a new MD simulation is performed to continually augment the database, which is never required to be complete. This provides a substantial enhancement to the current generation of hybrid methods, which often require many similar atomistic simulations to be performed, discarding information after it is used once. We apply our hybrid scheme to nano-confined unsteady flow through a high-aspect-ratio converging-diverging channel, and make comparisons between the new s...

  10. The elastic properties and energy characteristics of Au nanowires: an atomistic simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shan-Shan; Wen Yu-Hua; Zhu Zi-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    This paper have performed molecular static calculations with the quantum corrected Sutten-Cben type many body potential to study size effects on the elastic modulus of Au nanowires with [100], [110] and [111] crystallographic directions, and to explore the preferential growth orientation of Au nanowires. The main focus of this work is the size effects on their surface characteristics. Using the common neighbour analysis, this paper deduces that surface region approximately consists of two layer atoms. Further, it extracts the elastic modulus of surface, and calculate surface energy of nanowire. The results show that for all three directions the Young's modulus of nanowire increases as the diameter increases. Similar trend has been observed for the Young's modulus of surface. However, the atomic average potential energy of nanowire shows an opposite change. Both the potential and surface energy of [110] nanowire are the lowest among all three orientational nanowires, which helps to explain why Au nanowires possess a [110] preferred orientation during the experimental growth proceeds.

  11. Atomistic simulations of thiol-terminated modifiers for hybrid photovoltaic interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloci, G. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Unità di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy); Petrozza, A. [Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Mattoni, A., E-mail: mattoni@iom.cnr.it [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Unità di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    Small aromatic molecules such as benzene or pyridine derivatives are often used as interface modifiers (IMs) at polymer/metal oxide hybrid interfaces. We performed a theoretical investigation on prototypical thiol-terminated IMs aimed at improving the photovoltaic performances of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/TiO{sub 2} devices. By means of first-principles calculations in the framework of the density functional theory we investigate 3-furanthiol (3FT), 4-mercaptobenzoicacid (4MB), and 6-isoquinolinethiol (6QT) molecules. We discuss the role of these molecules as modifiers alternative to 4-mercaptopyridine (4MP) which has recently shown to induce a large improvement in the overall power conversion efficiency of mesoporous films of TiO{sub 2} infiltrated by poly(3-hexylthiophene). The IMs investigated are expected to keep the beneficial features of 4MP giving at the same time the possibility to further tune the interlayer properties (e.g., its thickness, stability, and density). Dense interlayers of 6QT turn out to be slightly unstable since the titania substrate induces a compressive strain in the molecular film. On the contrary, we predict very stable films for both 3FT and 4MB molecules, which makes them interesting candidates for future experimental investigations. - Highlights: • We performed a theoretical investigation on thiol-terminated interface modifiers. • We investigate 3-furanthiol (3FT), 4-mercaptobenzoicacid (4MB), and 6-isoquinolinethiol molecules. • We discuss the role of these molecules as modifiers alternative to 4-mercaptopyridine. • Dense interlayers of 6-isoquinolinethiol turn out to be slightly unstable. • We predict very stable self-assembled thin-films for both 3FT and 4MB molecules.

  12. Simulation of complex molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined evolution of the electronic structure softwares and computational capabilities makes quantum molecular dynamics simulations available for increasingly complex systems, up to several hundred atoms. Among the various ab initio techniques, Density Functional Theory (DFT) is very successful due to its important computational efficiency with respect to Hartree-Fock type approaches. Its combination with empirical treatments of the weak van der Waals interactions allows the simulation of equilibrium or dynamics properties of numerous systems of interest for the nuclear and defense industry. We present 3 direct applications of quantum molecular dynamics: the determination of the structure of the complex Pu(DTPA) ion where DTPA means diethylen-triamine-penta-acid, the calculation of the equation of state and the Hugoniot curve of TATB monocrystal. (authors)

  13. Atomistic Simulation Studies of the Bulk Lithiated TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoepe, Phuti; Matshaba, Malili; Sayle, Dean

    2013-03-01

    TiO2 has been confirmed as a safe anode material in lithium ion batteries due to its higher Li-insertion potential, (1.5V) in comparison with commercialised carbon anode materials. In the current study, amorphisation recrystallization method is used to produce bulk TiO2 with a brookite structure and lithium is inserted at different concentrations. In accordance with pair distribution function experiments, it is found that lithiation tends to amorphise the structures. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns are produced from such structures and compared with the experimental XRDs. Microstructures of TiO2 are generated and are found to be highly twinned hence forming straight and zigzag tunnels. The microstructures of lithiated TiO2 display limited twinning and tunnels with less pathways available for lithium transport. The microstructures are compared with those of nanostructural TiO2 and suggestions for the preference of the latter in anodes are put forward. SARChI Chair, under the National Research Foundation, Pretoria

  14. Microchemical effects in irradiated Fe–Cr alloys as revealed by atomistic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malerba, L., E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D. [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Zhurkin, E.E. [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, K-89, Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hou, M. [Physique des Solides Irradiés et des Nanostructures CP234, Faculté des Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Vörtler, K.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Neutron irradiation produces evolving nanostructural defects in materials, that affect their macroscopic properties. Defect production and evolution is expected to be influenced by the chemical composition of the material. In turn, the accumulation of defects in the material results in microchemical changes, which may induce further changes in macroscopic properties. In this work we review the results of recent atomic-level simulations conducted in Fe–Cr alloys, as model materials for high-Cr ferritic–martensitic steels, to address the following questions: 1. Is the primary damage produced in displacement cascades influenced by the Cr content? If so, how? 2. Does Cr change the stability of radiation-produced defects? 3. Is the diffusivity of cascade-produced defects changed by Cr content? 4. How do Cr atoms redistribute under irradiation inside the material under the action of thermodynamic driving forces and radiation-defect fluxes? It is found that the presence of Cr does not influence the type of damage created by displacement cascades, as compared to pure Fe, while cascades do contribute to redistributing Cr, in the same direction as thermodynamic driving forces. The presence of Cr does change the stability of point-defects: the effect is weak in the case of vacancies, stronger in the case of self-interstitials. In the latter case, Cr increases the stability of self-interstitial clusters, especially those so small to be invisible to the electron microscope. Cr reduces also significantly the diffusivity of self-interstitials and their clusters, in a way that depends in a non-monotonic way on Cr content, as well as on cluster size and temperature; however, the effect is negligible on the mobility of self-interstitial clusters large enough to become visible dislocation loops. Finally, Cr-rich precipitate formation is favoured in the tensile region of edge dislocations, while it appears not to be influenced by screw dislocations; prismatic dislocation loops

  15. Peridynamics as a rigorous coarse-graining of atomistics for multiscale materials design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Aidun, John Bahram; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Sears, Mark P.; Kamm, James R.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes activities undertaken during FY08-FY10 for the LDRD Peridynamics as a Rigorous Coarse-Graining of Atomistics for Multiscale Materials Design. The goal of our project was to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. The goal of our project is to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. Our coarse-graining overcomes the intrinsic limitation of coupling atomistics with classical continuum mechanics via the FEM (finite element method), SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), or MPM (material point method); namely, that classical continuum mechanics assumes a local force interaction that is incompatible with the nonlocal force model of atomistic methods. Therefore FEM, SPH, and MPM inherit this limitation. This seemingly innocuous dichotomy has far reaching consequences; for example, classical continuum mechanics cannot resolve the short wavelength behavior associated with atomistics. Other consequences include spurious forces, invalid phonon dispersion relationships, and irreconcilable descriptions/treatments of temperature. We propose a statistically based coarse-graining of atomistics via peridynamics and so develop a first of a kind mesoscopic capability to enable consistent, thermodynamically sound, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale material simulation. Peridynamics (PD) is a microcontinuum theory that assumes nonlocal forces for describing long-range material interaction. The force interactions occurring at finite distances are naturally accounted for in PD. Moreover, PDs nonlocal force model is entirely consistent with those used by atomistics methods, in stark contrast to classical continuum mechanics. Hence, PD can be employed for mesoscopic phenomena that are beyond the realms of classical continuum mechanics and

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of a binary mixture near the lower critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousaneh, Faezeh; Edholm, Olle; Maciołek, Anna

    2016-07-01

    2,6-lutidine molecules mix with water at high and low temperatures but in a wide intermediate temperature range a 2,6-lutidine/water mixture exhibits a miscibility gap. We constructed and validated an atomistic model for 2,6-lutidine and performed molecular dynamics simulations of 2,6-lutidine/water mixture at different temperatures. We determined the part of demixing curve with the lower critical point. The lower critical point extracted from our data is located close to the experimental one. The estimates for critical exponents obtained from our simulations are in a good agreement with the values corresponding to the 3D Ising universality class.

  17. Application of bi-Helmholtz nonlocal elasticity and molecular simulations to the dynamical response of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsoumaris, C. Chr.; Tsamasphyros, G. J. [School of Applied Mathematical and Physical Sciences National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) 5 Iroon Polytechniou Str., Zografou, Zografou Campus, Athens, GR-157 73 (Greece); Vogiatzis, G. G.; Theodorou, D. N. [School of Chemical Engineering National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) 5 Iroon Polytechniou Str., Zografou, Zografou Campus, Athens, GR-157 73 (Greece)

    2015-12-31

    The nonlocal theory of elasticity is employed for the study of the free vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT). For the first time, a bi-Helmholtz operator has been used instead of the standard Helmholtz operator in a nonlocal beam model. Alongside the continuum formulation and its numerical solution, atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted in order to directly evaluate the eigenfrequencies of vibrating CNTs with a minimum of adjustable parameters. Our results show that the bi-Helmholtz operator is the most appropriate one to fit MD simulation results. However, the estimation of vibration eigenfrequencies from molecular simulations still remains an open (albeit well-posed) problem.

  18. Application of bi-Helmholtz nonlocal elasticity and molecular simulations to the dynamical response of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlocal theory of elasticity is employed for the study of the free vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT). For the first time, a bi-Helmholtz operator has been used instead of the standard Helmholtz operator in a nonlocal beam model. Alongside the continuum formulation and its numerical solution, atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted in order to directly evaluate the eigenfrequencies of vibrating CNTs with a minimum of adjustable parameters. Our results show that the bi-Helmholtz operator is the most appropriate one to fit MD simulation results. However, the estimation of vibration eigenfrequencies from molecular simulations still remains an open (albeit well-posed) problem

  19. Molecular Simulation of the Free Energy for the Accurate Determination of Phase Transition Properties of Molecular Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Michael; Lisal, Martin; Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the ability of a molecular model to accurately represent a real material is crucial to model development and use. When the model simulates materials in extreme conditions, one such property worth evaluating is the phase transition point. However, phase transitions are often overlooked or approximated because of difficulty or inaccuracy when simulating them. Techniques such as super-heating or super-squeezing a material to induce a phase change suffer from inherent timescale limitations leading to ``over-driving,'' and dual-phase simulations require many long-time runs to seek out what frequently results in an inexact location of phase-coexistence. We present a compilation of methods for the determination of solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transition points through the accurate calculation of the chemical potential. The methods are applied to the Smith-Bharadwaj atomistic potential's representation of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) to accurately determine its melting point (Tm) and the alpha to gamma solid phase transition pressure. We also determine Tm for a coarse-grain model of RDX, and compare its value to experiment and atomistic counterpart. All methods are employed via the LAMMPS simulator, resulting in 60-70 simulations that total 30-50 ns. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.

  20. Multiscale Simulations Using Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore

    We are developing particle methods as a general framework for large scale simulations of discrete and continuous systems in science and engineering. The specific application and research areas include: discrete element simulations of granular flow, smoothed particle hydrodynamics and particle...... vortex methods for problems in continuum fluid dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics for flow at the meso scale, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidic systems. We employ multiscale techniques to breach the atomistic and continuum scales to study fundamental problems in fluid...

  1. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, F.; Ohmura, S.; Nakano, A.; Kalia, R. K.; Vashishta, P.

    2011-05-01

    A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC) scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for an aluminum particle in water based on the conventional DFT, as a target system for large-scale DC-DFT simulations. A pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the aluminum surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production in a low activation-barrier mechanism found in the simulations

  2. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashishta P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT. This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for an aluminum particle in water based on the conventional DFT, as a target system for large-scale DC-DFT simulations. A pair of Lewis acid and base sites on the aluminum surface preferentially catalyzes hydrogen production in a low activation-barrier mechanism found in the simulations

  3. Encapsulated membrane proteins: A simplified system for molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah C; Khalid, Syma; Pollock, Naomi L; Knowles, Tim J; Edler, Karen; Rothnie, Alice J; R T Thomas, Owen; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 50years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of biomolecular interactions at an atomic level. This in turn has allowed molecular simulation methods employing full atomistic modelling at ever larger scales to develop. However, some challenging areas still remain where there is either a lack of atomic resolution structures or where the simulation system is inherently complex. An area where both challenges are present is that of membranes containing membrane proteins. In this review we analyse a new practical approach to membrane protein study that offers a potential new route to high resolution structures and the possibility to simplify simulations. These new approaches collectively recognise that preservation of the interaction between the membrane protein and the lipid bilayer is often essential to maintain structure and function. The new methods preserve these interactions by producing nano-scale disc shaped particles that include bilayer and the chosen protein. Currently two approaches lead in this area: the MSP system that relies on peptides to stabilise the discs, and SMALPs where an amphipathic styrene maleic acid copolymer is used. Both methods greatly enable protein production and hence have the potential to accelerate atomic resolution structure determination as well as providing a simplified format for simulations of membrane protein dynamics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946242

  4. Large-scale atomistic simulations of nanostructured materials based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishta P.; Kalia R. K.; Shimojo F.; Ohmura S.; Nakano A.

    2011-01-01

    A linear-scaling algorithm based on a divide-and-conquer (DC) scheme is designed to perform large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, in which interatomic forces are computed quantum mechanically in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). This scheme is applied to the thermite reaction at an Al/Fe2O3 interface. It is found that mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface are enhanced by a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism. Preliminary simulations are carried out for ...

  5. Atomistic aspects of crack propagation along high angle grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The author presents atomistic simulations of the crack tip configuration near a high angle {Sigma} = 5 [001](210) symmetrical tilt grain boundary in NiAl. The simulations were carried out using molecular statics and embedded atom (EAM) potentials. The cracks are stabilized near a Griffith condition involving the cohesive energy of the grain boundary. The atomistic configurations of the tip region are different in the presence of the high angle grain boundary than in the bulk. Three different configurations of the grain boundary were studied corresponding to different local compositions. It was found that in ordered NiAl, cracks along symmetrical tilt boundaries show a more brittle behavior for Al rich boundaries than for Ni-rich boundaries. Lattice trapping effects in grain boundary fracture were found to be more significant than in the bulk.

  6. General continuum boundary conditions for miscible binary fluids from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Colin; Robbins, Mark O

    2006-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the flow behavior and diffusion of miscible fluids near solid surfaces. The solid produces deviations from bulk fluid behavior that decay over a distance of the order of the fluid correlation length. Atomistic results are mapped onto two types of continuum model: Mesoscopic models that follow this decay and conventional sharp interface boundary conditions for the stress and velocity. The atomistic results, and mesoscopic models derived from them, are consistent with the conventional Marangoni stress boundary condition. However, there are deviations from the conventional Navier boundary condition that states that the slip velocity between wall and fluid is proportional to the strain rate. A general slip boundary condition is derived from the mesoscopic model that contains additional terms associated with the Marangoni stress and diffusion, and is shown to describe the atomistic simulations. The additional terms lead to strong flows when there is a concentration gradient. The potential for using this effect to make a nanomotor or pump is evaluated. PMID:17166010

  7. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM ...

  8. Revealing structural and dynamical properties of high density lipoproteins through molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    essentially atomistic considerations of HDL particles over microsecond time scales, thereby proving substantial added value to experimental research. In this article, we discuss recent highlights concerning the structure and dynamics of HDL particles as revealed by atomistic and coarse-grained molecular...

  9. Understanding molecular simulation from algorithms to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frenkel, Daan

    2001-01-01

    Understanding Molecular Simulation: From Algorithms to Applications explains the physics behind the ""recipes"" of molecular simulation for materials science. Computer simulators are continuously confronted with questions concerning the choice of a particular technique for a given application. A wide variety of tools exist, so the choice of technique requires a good understanding of the basic principles. More importantly, such understanding may greatly improve the efficiency of a simulation program. The implementation of simulation methods is illustrated in pseudocodes and their practic

  10. Accelerating molecular simulations of proteins using Bayesian inference on weak information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L.; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein molecules are too computationally expensive to predict most native structures from amino acid sequences. Here, we integrate “weak” external knowledge into folding simulations to predict protein structures, given their sequence. For example, we instruct the computer “to form a hydrophobic core,” “to form good secondary structures,” or “to seek a compact state.” This kind of information has been too combinatoric, nonspecific, and vague to help guide MD simulations before. Within atomistic replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), we develop a statistical mechanical framework, modeling using limited data with coarse physical insight(s) (MELD + CPI), for harnessing weak information. As a test, we apply MELD + CPI to predict the native structures of 20 small proteins. MELD + CPI samples to within less than 3.2 Å from native for all 20 and correctly chooses the native structures (<4 Å) for 15 of them, including ubiquitin, a millisecond folder. MELD + CPI is up to five orders of magnitude faster than brute-force MD, satisfies detailed balance, and should scale well to larger proteins. MELD + CPI may be useful where physics-based simulations are needed to study protein mechanisms and populations and where we have some heuristic or coarse physical knowledge about states of interest. PMID:26351667

  11. Assessment of hardening due to dislocation loops in bcc iron: Overview and analysis of atomistic simulations for edge dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Elena, J.; Zinovev, A.; Minov, B.; Zhurkin, E. E.

    2016-05-01

    Upon irradiation, iron based steels used for nuclear applications contain dislocation loops of both and ½ type. Both types of loops are known to contribute to the radiation hardening and embrittlement of steels. In the literature many molecular dynamics works studying the interaction of dislocations with dislocation loops are available. Recently, based on such studies, a thermo-mechanical model to threat the dislocation - dislocation loop (DL) interaction within a discrete dislocation dynamics framework was developed for ½ loops. In this work, we make a literature review of the dislocation - DL interaction in bcc iron. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations to derive the stress-energy function for loops. As a result we deliver the function of the activation energy versus activation stress for loops that can be applied in a discrete dislocation dynamics framework.

  12. Evidence of thin-film precursors formation in hydrokinetic and atomistic simulations of nano-channel capillary filling

    OpenAIRE

    Chibbaro, S.; BIFERALE, L.; Diotallevi, F.; Succi, S.; Binder, K.; Milchev, A.; Dimitrov, D.; Girardo, S.; Pisignano, D.

    2008-01-01

    We present hydrokinetic Lattice Boltzmann and Molecular Dynamics simulations of capillary filling of high-wetting fluids in nano-channels, which provide clear evidence of the formation of thin precursor films, moving ahead of the main capillary front. The dynamics of the precursor films is found to obey the Lucas-Washburn law as the main capillary front, z2(t) proportional to t, although with a larger prefactor, which we find to take the same value for both geometries under inspection. Both h...

  13. Atomistic simulations of grain boundary segregation in nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia and gadolinia-doped ceria solid oxide electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid Monte Carlo–molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study defect distributions near Σ5(3 1 0)/[0 0 1] pure tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia and gadolinia-doped ceria. The simulations predict equilibrium distributions of dopant cations and oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the GBs where both materials display considerable amounts of dopant segregation. The predictions are in qualitative agreement with various experimental observations. Further analyses show that the degree of dopant segregation increases with the doping level and applied pressure in both materials. The equilibrium segregation profiles are also strongly influenced by the microscopic structure of the GBs. The high concentration of oxygen vacancies at the GB interface due to lower vacancy formation energies triggers the dopant segregation, and the final segregation profiles are largely determined by the dopant–vacancy interaction

  14. An Angstrom Sized Window on the Origin of Water in the Inner Solar System: Atomistic Simulation of Adsorption of Water on Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpfl, M.; Walker, A. M.; Drake, M. J.; Deymier, P.

    2005-12-01

    Ther'e is no consensus on the origin of water in the inner solar system. One group of theories envisages the delivery of water to the Earth by means of comets and asteroids after the planet acquired about 85% of its mass formation. However, isotopic and geochemical fingerprints seem to indicate that comets and asteroids alone could not have been the principal source of water for the Earth (Morbidelli et al. 2000; Kleine et al. 2002). These discrepancies could be avoided if the Earth acquired its water locally. We explore the role of adsorption onto grains prior to planetary accretion as a possible new mechanism that could bring water to the Earth. Atomistic simulation can be employed to investigate the interaction between volatiles and materials found in the nebula. We have been exploring how water adsorbs on olivine with the goal of understanding the energetic involved in this process. Volatiles (including water) and fine grained dust coexisted in the nebula for millions of years, opening the possibility for these two components to interact. The importance of characterizing the interaction between water gas and the surface of olivine lies in the possibility of explaining the presence of water in the inner solar system due to adsorption of water onto the nebular dust before accretion. Monte Carlo simulation of adsorption onto a flat surface showed that this mechanism can store up to 3 times the Earth's oceans on dust grains in the pre-accretion disk (Stimpfl et al. 2004). This model, however, did not take into account the specific surface interactions between water gas and the crystalline surface, nor did it rigorously investigate the role of porosity. To fill this gap, we are currently performing energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulations of the system water and olivine using the code GULP and DLpOLY, respectively. Bulk olivine is modelled using periodic boundary conditions and a well tested parameterized potential model for the short ranged repulsion

  15. 3D 'atomistic' simulations of dopant induced variability in nanoscale implant free In0.75Ga0.25As MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, N.; Aldegunde, M.; García-Loureiro, A.; Valin, R.; Kalna, K.

    2012-03-01

    A detailed simulation study of the impact of quantum effects on random dopant induced fluctuations in a 15 nm gate length, implant free In0.75Ga0.25As MOSFET is carried out using parallel 3D finite-element drift-diffusion (DD) device simulations and a mesh with atomistic resolution. The DD device simulations are calibrated against finite element heterostructure ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. Three figures of merit for the off-state have been investigated: threshold voltage, off-current, and sub-threshold slope. Quantum confinement effects are taken into account through the density gradient approximation meticulously calibrating carrier density in the channel against 1D Poisson-Schrödinger solutions. We have shown that the net result of including quantum effects, while considering statistical dopant fluctuations, is a decrease in both threshold voltage fluctuations and threshold voltage shift. These results show the opposite trend generally seen in bulk Si MOSFETs simulated using 3D quantum corrected DD simulations with random discrete dopants in the channel region.

  16. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.;

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... of the zwitterionic lipids and nanoparticle side groups in the contact area, giving rise to the initial stage of pore formation on the membrane surface. Such behavior is not seen on the cytosolic side, where AuNP+ is spontaneously captured by the negatively charged phosphatidylserine lipids that diffuse to enrich...

  17. Systematic Structural Change in Selected Rare Earth Oxide Pyrochlores as Determined by Wide-Angle CBED and a Comparison with the Results of Atomistic Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Yasunori; Withers, Ray L.; Minervini, Licia; Grimes, Robin W.

    2000-08-01

    An unknown oxygen atom fractional co-ordinate characteristic of the pyrochlore structure type has been determined for selected rare earth zirconate and titanate pyrochlores via a systematic row wide-angle CBED technique and shown to vary systematically with rare earth ion size. In the case of the titanate pyrochlore Gd2Ti2O7, the obtained results contrast with previously published X-ray results. Atomistic computer simulation is used to predict the value of the same parameter for a wide range of oxide pyrochlores. Comparison of calculated values with experimentally determined values shows that the general trends are correctly predicted although there appears to be systematic underestimation of both the observed values (by approximately 0.007) as well as their rate of change with rare earth ion size. Cation anti-site disorder is proposed as the origin of these discrepancies.

  18. Unification of box shapes in molecular simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.

    1997-01-01

    In molecular simulations with periodic boundary conditions the computational box may have five different shapes: triclinic; the hexagonal prism; two types of dodecahedrons; and the truncated octahedron. In this article, we show that every molecular simulation, formulated in one of these boxes, can b

  19. Investigation of the role of polysaccharide in the dolomite growth at low temperature by using atomistic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Zhizhang; Szlufarska, Izabela; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration of water from surface Mg2+ is most likely the rate-limiting step in the dolomite growth at low temperature. Here, we investigate the role of polysaccharide in this step using classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Free energy (potential of mean force, PMF) calculations have been performed for water molecules leaving the first two hydration layers above the dolomite (104) surface under the following three conditions: without catalyst, with monosaccharide (mannose) and with oligosaccharide (three units of mannose). MD simulations reveal that there is no obvious effect of monosaccharide in lowering the dehydration barrier for surface Mg2+. However, we found that there are metastable configurations of oligosaccharide, which can decrease the dehydration barrier of surface Mg2+ by about 0.7-1.1 kcal/mol. In these configurations, the molecule lies relatively flat on the surface and forms a bridge shape. The hydrophobic space near the surface created by the non-polar -CH groups of the oligosaccha...

  20. Atomistic Simulations of Displacement Cascades in Fused Silica: It is Compared with Different Concentration of H in the Bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous Silica is one of candidate materials for both final focusing optics of lasers for NIF and future inertial fusion reactors and diagnostics of the Safety and Control Systems of the ITER machine as well as DEMO magnetic fusion reactors. In operation, these materials will be exposed to high neutron irradiation fluxes and it can result in point defect and vary the optical absorption, that is, degradation of the optical properties. In this paper we present molecular dynamic simulation of displacement cascade due to energetic recoils in amorphous silica without hydrogen atoms and with 1% of hydrogen atoms trying to identify defects formation. We have made a statistics of the different kind of defects at different energy of primary knock-on atoms (PKA). The range of studied PKA energies are from 400 eV to 3.5 keV and it is made to both component of this material Silicon and Oxygen. (authors)

  1. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabaz, Fardin, E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu; Khare, Ketan S., E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu; Khare, Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh.khare@ttu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Young’s modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  2. Strain-Rate Dependence of Material Strength: Large-Scale Atomistic Simulations of Defective Cu and Ta Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardhana, M.; Vasquez, A.; Gaglione, J.; Germann, T. C.; Ravelo, R.

    2015-06-01

    Large-Scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to model shock wave (SW) and quasi-isentropic compression (QIC) in defective copper and tantalum crystals. The atomic interactions were modeled employing embedded-atom method (EAM) potentials. In the QIC simulations, the MD equations of motion are modified by incorporating a collective strain rate function in the positions and velocities equations, so that the change in internal energy equals the PV work on the system. We examined the deformation mechanisms and material strength for strain rates in the 109-1012 s-1 range For both Cu and Ta defective crystals, we find that the strain rate dependence of the flow stress in this strain rate regime, follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.40. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0476. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Atomistic simulations of pH-dependent self-assembly of micelle and bilayer from fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2012-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the self-assembly and phase behavior of pH-sensitive surfactants has implications in areas such as targeted drug delivery. Here we present a study of the formation of micelle and bilayer from lauric acids using a state-of-the-art simulation technique, continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) with conformational sampling in explicit solvent and the pH-based replica-exchange protocol. We find that at high pH conditions a spherical micelle is formed, while at low pH conditions a bilayer is formed with a considerable degree of interdigitation. The mid-point of the phase transition is in good agreement with experiment. Preliminary investigation also reveals that the effect of counterions and salt screening shifts the transition mid-point and does not change the structure of the surfactant assembly. Based on these data we suggest that CpHMD simulations may be applied to computational design of surfactant-based nano devices in the future.

  4. Influences of Zr, Ce and Ba fission products on the surface properties of UO2: Atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Tian, Xiaofeng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a shell-core model have been carried out to investigate the influences of Zr, Ce and Ba fission products on the surface properties of UO2. Simulation results indicate that (i) the presence of these fission products will change the surface energy of three low-index surfaces in UO2; (ii) the individual addition of Ce has no significant effect on the surface energy, while the individual addition of Ba will dramatically decrease the surface energy of UO2 by approximately 18% on (100) surface, 7% on (110) surface and 9% on (111) surface with the Ba contents ranging from 0 to 12.5 mol% at 300 K, which is obviously contrary to the Zr; (iii) the combined additions of Zr, Ce and Ba fission products will continuously increase the surface energy of UO2 (100), (110) and (111) surfaces; (iv) the structures of the three low-index surfaces in pure UO2 as well as U0.8(Zr, Ce, Ba)0.2O2 are dramatically disturbed after the free relaxation; (v) The nearest O atoms move towards the Zr and Ce atoms center by about 0.21 Å and 0.12 Å but move away from the Ba atom center by about 0.27 Å.

  5. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali [Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meloni, Simone, E-mail: simone.meloni@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Chemistry and Biochemistry, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Università La Sapienza, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Ciccotti, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  6. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  7. The inhibitory mechanism of a fullerene derivative against amyloid-β peptide aggregation: an atomistic simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunxiang; Qian, Zhenyu; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-05-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the pathological self-assembly of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into β-sheet enriched fibrillar aggregates. Aβ dimers formed in the initial step of Aβ aggregation were reported to be the smallest toxic species. Inhibiting the formation of β-sheet-rich oligomers and fibrils is considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Previous studies reported that fullerene derivatives strongly inhibit Aβ fibrillation. However, the underlying inhibitory mechanism remains elusive. As a first step to understand fullerene-modulated full-length Aβ aggregation, we investigated the conformational ensemble of the Aβ1-42 dimer with and without 1,2-(dimethoxymethano)fullerene (DMF) - a more water-soluble fullerene derivative - by performing a 340 ns explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Our simulations show that although disordered states are the most abundant conformations of the Aβ1-42 dimer, conformations containing diverse extended β-hairpins are also populated. The first most-populated β-hairpins involving residues L17-D23 and A30-V36 strongly resemble the engineered β-hairpin which is a building block of toxic Aβ oligomers. We find that the interaction of DMFs with Aβ peptides greatly impedes the formation of such β-hairpins and inter-peptide β-sheets. Binding energy analyses demonstrate that DMF preferentially binds not only to the central hydrophobic motif LVFFA of the Aβ peptide as suggested experimentally, but also to the aromatic residues including F4 and Y10 and the C-terminal hydrophobic region I31-V40. This study reveals a complete picture of the inhibitory mechanism of full-length Aβ1-42 aggregation by fullerenes, providing theoretical insights into the development of drug candidates against AD. PMID:27091578

  8. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  9. Dissociation dynamics of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomistic mechanism of dissociative adsorption of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. The activation free energy to dehydrogenate an ethylene molecule on the Ni cluster and the corresponding reaction rate is estimated. A remarkable finding is that the adsorption energy of ethylene molecules on the Ni cluster is considerably larger than the activation free energy, which explains why the actual reaction rate is faster than the value estimated based on only the activation free energy. It is also found from the dynamic simulations that hydrogen molecules and an ethane molecule are formed from the dissociated hydrogen atoms, whereas some exist as single atoms on the surface or in the interior of the Ni cluster. On the other hand, the dissociation of the C-C bonds of ethylene molecules is not observed. On the basis of these simulation results, the nature of the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth is discussed. (paper)

  10. Atomistic simulations of ammonium-based protic ionic liquids: steric effects on structure, low frequency vibrational modes and electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, Anurag Prakash; Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-02-14

    Protic ionic liquids (PILs) are of great interest as electrolytes in various energy applications. Molecular dynamics simulations of trialkylammonium (with varying alkyl group such as methyl, ethyl, and n-propyl) triflate PILs are performed to characterize the influence of the alkyl group on the acidic site (N-H) of the ammonium cation. Spatial distribution function of anions over this site on the cation reveals significant influence of the length of alkyl tail on intermolecular structure. Vibrational density of states and normal modes are calculated for bulk liquids to probe atomic displacements in the far infrared region. The observed N-H···O hydrogen bond stretching vibration in 155-165 cm(-1) frequency region agrees well with experiments. Trends in electrical conductivity calculated using Nernst-Einstein and Green-Kubo relation are in qualitative agreement with experiments. The self-diffusion coefficient and the electrical conductivity is highest for N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium triflate ([N112][TfO]) and is lowest for N,N-di-n-propyl-N-methylammonium triflate ([N133][TfO]) IL. PMID:25585541

  11. Evidence for faster etching at the mask-substrate interface: atomistic simulation of complex cavities at the micron-/submicron-scale by the continuous cellular automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Ferrando, N.; Fedoryshyn, Y.; Leuthold, J.; McPeak, K. M.

    2016-04-01

    We combine experiments and simulations to study the acceleration of anisotropic etching of crystalline silicon at the mask-substrate interface, as a function of the coordination number of the substrate atoms located at the junction between obtuse-angled {1 1 1} facets and the mask layer. Atomistic simulations based on the use of the continuous cellular automaton (CCA) conclude that the interface atoms react faster with the etchant, thus initiating a step flow process that results in increased etch rates for the obtuse facets. By generating a wide range of complex cavities on high-index silicon wafers with a single-side, single-step etching, the comparison of the experimental and simulated results strongly indicates that the CCA method is suitable for accurately describing not only the development of micron-scaled structures but also, for the first time, the formation of submicron shapes. The study also describes the acceleration of obtuse facets formed through double-side etching, obtaining results in good agreement with previous experiments.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion induced defect recovery in SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, Marie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Toulemonde, Marcel [CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-University of Caen, FRANCE; Pakarinen, Olli H [University of Helsinki; Juslin, Niklas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Debelle, Aurelien [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.

  13. Introduction to Molecular Simulation and Statistical Thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, T.J.H.; Van der Eerden, J.P.J.M.; Dijkstra, M.; Smit, B.; Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical Thermodynamics and Molecular Simulation aim at describing the properties of systems that consist of many individual particles (atoms, molecules). Although the properties of the complete system follow directly from the properties and interactions of the individual particles, usually these

  14. Examining the mechanical equilibrium of microscopic stresses in molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan Manuel; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic stress field provides a unique connection between atomistic simulations and mechanics at the nanoscale. However, its definition remains ambiguous. Rather than a mere theoretical preoccupation, we show that this fact acutely manifests itself in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. We find that popular definitions of the microscopic stress violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium, and we propose an unambiguous a...

  15. Molecular Dynamic Simulation on High Performance Infrastrucutres

    OpenAIRE

    Bergant, Anže

    2016-01-01

    This thesis covers comparison between different computer platforms of high performance computing while performing molecular dynamics simulations, which falls under very complex problems and needs lots of processing power. Our goal was to critically evaluate different platforms while solving molecular dynamics, so we used 1 to 16 processor cores on a computer cluster and one and two graphics processing units (GPU) for simulations. The results will be used while planning on buying new computer ...

  16. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...

  17. Multiscale modeling for ferroelectric materials: identification of the phase-field model’s free energy for PZT from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Benjamin; Landis, Chad M.; Kamlah, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Within a knowledge-based multiscale simulation approach for ferroelectric materials, the atomic level can be linked to the mesoscale by transferring results from first-principles calculations into a phase-field model. A recently presented routine (Völker et al 2011 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 23 435-51) for adjusting the Helmholtz free energy coefficients to intrinsic and extrinsic ferroelectric material properties obtained by DFT calculations and atomistic simulations was subject to certain limitations: caused by too small available degrees of freedom, an independent adjustment of the spontaneous strains and piezoelectric coefficients was not possible, and the elastic properties could only be considered in cubic instead of tetragonal symmetry. In this work we overcome such restrictions by expanding the formulation of the free energy function, i.e. by motivating and introducing new higher-order terms that have not appeared in the literature before. Subsequently we present an improved version of the adjustment procedure for the free energy coefficients that is solely based on input parameters from first-principles calculations performed by Marton and Elsässer, as documented in Völker et al (2011 Contin. Mech. Thermodyn. 23 435-51). Full sets of adjusted free energy coefficients for PbTiO3 and tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 are presented, and the benefits of the newly introduced higher-order free energy terms are discussed.

  18. Solubility of gases and solvents in silicon polymers: molecular simulation and equation of state modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Economou, Ioannis; Makrodimitri, Zoi A.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios;

    2007-01-01

    The solubility of n-alkanes, perfluoroalkanes, noble gases and light gases in four elastomer polymers containing silicon is examined based on molecular simulation and macroscopic equation of state modelling. Polymer melt samples generated from molecular dynamics ( MD) are used for the calculation...... of gas and solvent solubilities using the test particle insertion method of Widom. Polymer chains are modelled using recently developed realistic atomistic force fields. Calculations are performed at various temperatures and ambient pressure. A crossover in the temperature dependence of solubility...... as a function of the gas/solvent critical temperature is observed for all polymers. A macroscopic model based on the simplified perturbed chain-statistical associating fluid theory ( sPC-SAFT) is used for the prediction and correlation of solubilities in poly( dimethylsilamethylene) and poly( dimethylsiloxane...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  20. Molecular Simulation of Adsorption in Microporous Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yiannourakou M.; Ungerer P.; Leblanc B.; Rozanska X.; Saxe P.; Vidal-Gilbert S.; Gouth F.; Montel F.

    2013-01-01

    The development of industrial software, the decreasing cost of computing time, and the availability of well-tested forcefields make molecular simulation increasingly attractive for chemical engineers. We present here several applications of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques, applied to the adsorption of fluids in microporous solids such as zeolites and model carbons (pores < 2 nm). Adsorption was computed in the Grand Canonical ensemble ...

  1. Nanoscale finite element models for vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes:atomistic versus continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R ANSARI; S ROUHI; M ARYAYI

    2013-01-01

    By the atomistic and continuum finite element models, the free vibration behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied. In the atomistic finite element model, the bonds and atoms are modeled by the beam and point mass elements, respectively. The molecular mechanics is linked to structural mechanics to determine the elastic properties of the mentioned beam elements. In the continuum finite element approach, by neglecting the discrete nature of the atomic structure of the nanotubes, they are modeled with shell elements. By both models, the natural frequencies of SWCNTs are computed, and the effects of the geometrical parameters, the atomic structure, and the boundary conditions are investigated. The accuracy of the utilized methods is verified in comparison with molecular dynamic simulations. The molecular structural model leads to more reliable results, especially for lower aspect ratios. The present analysis provides valuable information about application of continuum models in the investigation of the mechanical behaviors of nanotubes.

  2. Is the microscopic stress computed from molecular simulations in mechanical equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    The microscopic stress field connects atomistic simulations with the mechanics of materials at the nano-scale through statistical mechanics. However, its definition remains ambiguous. In a recent work we showed that this is not only a theoretical problem, but rather that it greatly affects local stress calculations from molecular simulations. We find that popular definitions of the local stress, which are continuously being employed to understand the mechanics of various systems at the nanoscale, violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium. We exemplify these facts in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. Furthermore, we propose a new physical and sound definition of the microscopic stress that satisfies the continuum equations of balance, irrespective of the many-body nature of the inter-atomic potential. Thus, our proposal provides an unambiguous link between discrete-particle models and continuum mechanics at the nanoscale.

  3. Atomistic Failure Mechanism of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Small Diameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Dong; GAO Xiang; KONG Xiang-Yang; LI Jia-Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Single wall carbon nanotubes with small diameters (< 5.0 (A)) subjected to bending deformation are simulated by orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics approach. Based on the calculations of C-C bond stretching and breaking in the bending nanotubes, we elucidate the atomistic failure mechanisms of nanotube with small diameters. In the folding zone of bending nanotube, a large elongation of C-C bonds occurs, accounting for the superelastic behaviour.

  4. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Thin Film Growth Stress Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haifeng

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing demand for thin films across a wide range of technology, especially in electronic and magnetic applications, controlling the stresses in deposited thin films has become one of the more important challenges in modern engineering. It is well known that large intrinsic stress---in the magnitude of several gigapascals---can result during the thin film preparation. The magnitude of stress depends on the deposition technique, film thickness, types and structures of materials used as films and substrates, as well as other factors. Such large intrinsic stress may lead to film cracking and peeling in case of tensile stress, and delamination and blistering in case of compression. However it may also have beneficial effects on optoelectronics and its applications. For example, intrinsic stresses can be used to change the electronic band gap of semiconducting materials. The far-reaching fields of microelectronics and optoelectronics depend critically on the properties, behavior, and reliable performance of deposited thin films. Thus, understanding and controlling the origins and behavior of such intrinsic stresses in deposited thin films is a highly active field of research. In this study, on-going tensile stress evolution during Volmer-Weber growth mode was analyzed through numerical methods. A realistic model with semi-cylinder shape free surfaces was used and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted. Simulations were at room temperature (300 K), and 10 nanometer diameter of islands were used. A deposition rate that every 3 picoseconds deposit one atom was chosen for simulations. The deposition energy was and lattice orientation is [0 0 1]. Five different random seeds were used to ensure average behaviors. In the first part of this study, initial coalescence stress was first calculated by comparing two similar models, which only differed in the distance between two neighboring islands. Three different substrate thickness systems were analyzed to

  5. Atomistic mechanisms of fatigue in nanotwinned metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the fatigue behavior of nanotwinned Cu using a combination of molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulations. The presence of nanoscale twins is found to enhance fatigue crack growth resistance. For the twin-free nanocrystalline samples, the fatigue crack propagates by linking the nanovoids that are formed ahead of the crack tip. In the case of the nanotwinned samples, however, it advances as the crack tip alternately blunts and re-sharpens due to dislocation emission and slip. Both detwinning and crack closure are observed in the path of the fatigue crack in nanotwinned samples with a high density of twin boundaries. As the twin number per grain (quantified by the ratio of the mean grain size to the twin boundary spacing d/λ) increases, detwinning increases the dissipated energy of fatigue cracking, leading to enhanced fatigue resistance. The atomistic simulations show that fatigue crack growth in nanotwinned Cu conforms to Paris’ law. In conjunction with the experimental results, we obtain a quantitative estimation of the Paris’ law exponent (∼4.0), which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions from the damage accumulation model

  6. Surface structure of (10(-)10) and (11(-)20) surfaces of ZnO with density functional theory and atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, David J; Marmier, Arnaud; Parker, Stephen C

    2006-04-20

    We have calculated the stability of two of the low-index surfaces known to dominate the morphology of ZnO as a function of stoichiometry. These two surfaces are (10(-)10) and (11(-)20). In each case, two terminations only are stable for a significant range of oxygen and hydrogen chemical potential: the pure stoichiometric surface and a surface covered in a monolayer of water. The mode by which the water adsorbs is however different for the two surfaces considered. On the (10(-)10) surface the close proximity of the water molecules means hydrogen bonding can occur between adjacent chemiabsorbed water molecules and hence there is little difference in the stability of the hydrated and hydroxylated surface, and in fact the most stable surface occurs with a combination of dissociated and undissociated water adsorption. In the case of the (11(-)20) surface, it is only when full dissociation has occurred that a hydrogen-bonding network can form. Our results also show good agreement between DFT and atomistic simulations, suggesting that potential based methods can usefully be applied to ZnO. PMID:16610898

  7. Molecular Simulations using Spherical Harmonics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI, Wen-Sheng; XU, Jia-Wei; SHAO, Xue-Guang; MAIGRET, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design is to develop a chemical that binds to a target macromolecule known to play a key role in a disease state. In recognition of ligands by their protein receptors,molecular surfaces are often used because they represent the interacting part of molecules and they should reflex the complementarity between ligand and receptor. However, assessing the surface complementarity by searching all relative position of two surfaces is often computationally expensive. The complementarity of lobe-hole is very important in protein-ligand interactions. Spherical harmonic models based on expansions of spherical harmonic functions were used as a fingerprint to approximate the binding cavity and the ligand, respectively. This defines a new way to identify the complementarity between lobes and holes. The advantage of this method is that two spherical harmonic surfaces to be compared can be defined separately. This method can be used as a filter to eliminate candidates among a large number of conformations, and it will speed up the docking procedure. Therefore, it is possible to select complementary ligands or complementary conformations of a ligand and the macromoleeules, by comparing their fingerprints previously stored in a database.

  8. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  9. The Ca(2+ influence on calmodulin unfolding pathway: a steered molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available The force-induced unfolding of calmodulin (CaM was investigated at atomistic details with steered molecular dynamics. The two isolated CaM domains as well as the full-length CaM were simulated in N-C-terminal pulling scheme, and the isolated N-lobe of CaM was studied specially in two other pulling schemes to test the effect of pulling direction and compare with relevant experiments. Both Ca(2+-loaded CaM and Ca(2+-free CaM were considered in order to define the Ca(2+ influence to the CaM unfolding. The results reveal that the Ca(2+ significantly affects the stability and unfolding behaviors of both the isolated CaM domains and the full-length CaM. In Ca(2+-loaded CaM, N-terminal domain unfolds in priori to the C-terminal domain. But in Ca(2+-free CaM, the unfolding order changes, and C-terminal domain unfolds first. The force-extension curves of CaM unfolding indicate that the major unfolding barrier comes from conquering the interaction of two EF-hand motifs in both N- and C- terminal domains. Our results provide the atomistic-level insights in the force-induced CaM unfolding and explain the observation in recent AFM experiments.

  10. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C. Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions.

  11. Atomistic simulation of tantalum nanoindentation: Effects of indenter diameter, penetration velocity, and interatomic potentials on defect mechanisms and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruestes, C.J., E-mail: cjruestes@hotmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Stukowski, A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 (Germany); Tang, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tramontina, D.R. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Erhart, P. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Gothenburg 41296 (Sweden); Remington, B.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Urbassek, H.M. [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Meyers, M.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Bringa, E.M. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2014-09-08

    Nanoindentation simulations are a helpful complement to experiments. There is a dearth of nanoindentation simulations for bcc metals, partly due to the lack of computationally efficient and reliable interatomic potentials at large strains. We carry out indentation simulations for bcc tantalum using three different interatomic potentials and present the defect mechanisms responsible for the creation and expansion of the plastic deformation zone: twins are initially formed, giving rise to shear loop expansion and the formation of sequential prismatic loops. The calculated elastic constants as function of pressure as well as stacking fault energy surfaces explain the significant differences found in the defect structures generated for the three potentials investigated in this study. The simulations enable the quantification of total dislocation length and twinning fraction. The indenter velocity is varied and, as expected, the penetration depth for the first pop-in (defect emission) event shows a strain rate sensitivity m in the range of 0.037–0.055. The effect of indenter diameter on the first pop-in is discussed. A new intrinsic length-scale model is presented based on the profile of the residual indentation and geometrically necessary dislocation theory.

  12. Atomistic simulations indicate cardiolipin to have an integral role in the structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poyry, S.; Cramariuc, O.; Postila, P. A.;

    2013-01-01

    the description of the role of the surrounding lipid environment: in addition to the specific CL-protein interactions, we observe the protein domains on the positive side of the membrane to settle against the lipids. Altogether, the simulations discussed in this article provide novel views into the dynamics...

  13. Crystal Nucleation in Liquids: Open Questions and Future Challenges in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Chen, Ji; Cox, Stephen J; Fitzner, Martin; Pedevilla, Philipp; Zen, Andrea; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-06-22

    The nucleation of crystals in liquids is one of nature's most ubiquitous phenomena, playing an important role in areas such as climate change and the production of drugs. As the early stages of nucleation involve exceedingly small time and length scales, atomistic computer simulations can provide unique insights into the microscopic aspects of crystallization. In this review, we take stock of the numerous molecular dynamics simulations that, in the past few decades, have unraveled crucial aspects of crystal nucleation in liquids. We put into context the theoretical framework of classical nucleation theory and the state-of-the-art computational methods by reviewing simulations of such processes as ice nucleation and the crystallization of molecules in solutions. We shall see that molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into diverse nucleation scenarios, ranging from colloidal particles to natural gas hydrates, and that, as a result, the general applicability of classical nucleation theory has been repeatedly called into question. We have attempted to identify the most pressing open questions in the field. We believe that, by improving (i) existing interatomic potentials and (ii) currently available enhanced sampling methods, the community can move toward accurate investigations of realistic systems of practical interest, thus bringing simulations a step closer to experiments. PMID:27228560

  14. Bridging Atomistic/Continuum Scales in Solids with Moving Dislocations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shao-Qiang; LIU Wing K.; KARPOV Eduard G.; HOU Thomas Y.

    2007-01-01

    @@ We propose a multiscale method for simulating solids with moving dislocations. Away from atomistic subdomains where the atomistic dynamics are fully resolved, a dislocation is represented by a localized jump profile, superposed on a defect-free field. We assign a thin relay zone around an atomistic subdomain to detect the dislocation profile and its propagation speed at a selected relay time. The detection technique utilizes a lattice time history integral treatment. After the relay, an atomistic computation is performed only for the defect-free field. The method allows one to effectively absorb the fine scale fluctuations and the dynamic dislocations at the interface between the atomistic and continuum domains. In the surrounding region, a coarse grid computation is adequate.

  15. Sulfation effect on levan polysaccharide chains structure with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskunkan, Binnaz; Turgut, Deniz; Rende, Deniz; Malta, Seyda; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi; Toksoy-Oner, Ebru

    Diversity in conformations and structural heterogeneity make polysaccharides the most challenging biopolymer type for experimental and theoretical characterization studies. Levan is a biopolymer chain that consists of fructose rings with β(2-6) linkages. It is a glycan that has great potential as a functional biopolymer in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Sulfated polysaccharides are group of macromolecules with sulfated groups in their hydroxyl parts with a range of important biological properties. Sulfate groups and their positions have a major effect on anticoagulant activity. It is reported that sulfate modified levan has anticoagulant activity such as heparin. In the current study, the effect of sulfation on the structure and dynamics of unmodified and sulfate modified levan are investigated via fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations in aqueous media and varying salt concentrations at 310 K. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  16. Liquid but Durable: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Explain the Unique Properties of Archaeal-Like Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal plasma membranes appear to be extremely durable and almost impermeable to water and ions, in contrast to the membranes of Bacteria and Eucaryota. Additionally, they remain liquid within a temperature range of 0-100°C. These are the properties that have most likely determined the evolutionary fate of Archaea, and it may be possible for bionanotechnology to adopt these from nature. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to assess at the atomistic level the structure and dynamics of a series of model archaeal membranes with lipids that have tetraether chemical nature and ``branched'' hydrophobic tails. We conclude that the branched structure defines dense packing and low water permeability of archaeal-like membranes, while at the same time ensuring a liquid-crystalline state, which is vital for living cells. This makes tetraether lipid systems promising in bionanotechnology and material science, namely for design of new and unique membrane nanosystems.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of poly (ethylene oxide) hydration and conformation in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Udaya; Dormidontova, Elena

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most actively used polymers, especially in biomedical applications due to its high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and potency to inhibit protein adsorption. PEO solubility and conformation in water depends on its capability to form hydrogen bonds. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigated the details of water packing around PEO chain and characterized the type and lifetime of hydrogen bonds in aqueous and mixed solvent solutions. The observed polymer chain conformation varies from an extended coil in pure water to collapsed globule in hexane and a helical-like conformation in pure isobutyric acid or isobutyric acid -water mixture in agreement with experimental observations. We'll discuss the implications of protic solvent arrangement and stability of hydrogen bonds on PEO chain conformation and mobility. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  18. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  19. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    Full Text Available The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design.

  20. Reactive atomistic simulations of shock-induced initiation processes in mixtures of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium nitrate mixed with fuel oil (ANFO) is a commonly used blasting agent. In this paper we investigated the shock properties of pure ammonium nitrate (AN) and two different mixtures of ammonium nitrate and n-dodecane by characterizing their Hugoniot states. We simulated shock compression of pure AN and ANFO mixtures using the Multi-scale Shock Technique, and observed differences in chemical reaction. We also performed a large-scale explicit sub-threshold shock of AN crystal with a 10 nm void filled with 4.4 wt% of n-dodecane. We observed the formation of hotspots and enhanced reactivity at the interface region between AN and n-dodecane molecules.

  1. Mass transfer properties of nanoconfined fluids at solid-liquid interfaces: from atomistic simulations to continuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Matteo; Fasano, Matteo; Nold, Andreas; Correia Braga, Carlos; Yatsyshin, Petr; Sibley, David; Goddard, Benjamin; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro; Kalliadasis, Serafim; multi-Scale ModeLing Laboratory Team; Complex Multiphase Systems Team

    2015-11-01

    At the nanoscale, traditional continuum models are not sufficient to describe fluid flow. For example, the no-slip assumption may not be valid for nanoscale flows, where interface effects dominate transport phenomena. Hence, classic boundary conditions should take into account possible interplays between fluid velocity, shear stress, surface chemistry and roughness. Unlike hydrodynamics, in molecular dynamics (MD), the boundary conditions are not specified a priori but arise naturally from computations. Here, mass transfer properties for a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a nanochannel are studied by MD. Density, stress and velocity profiles within the fluid are evaluated with different nanoconfined conditions, shear rates and surface hydrophilicity. Our results show a strong anisotropic behavior of fluid properties along the channel section. Shear rates and velocity profiles allow calculating the spatial distribution of viscosity along the channel. We also observe that hydrophilic surfaces lead to increased viscosity. Our findings may have a potential impact on the design of nanofluidic devices for either engineering or biomedical applications.

  2. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DLCGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be provided by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si

  3. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant.

  4. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level

  5. Molecular physiology of rhodopsin: Computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fel'Dman, T. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation is used for comparative investigation of the molecular dynamics of rhodopsin containing the chromophore group (11- cis-retinal) and free opsin. Molecular dynamics is traced within a time interval of 3000 ps; 3 × 106 discrete conformational states of rhodopsin and opsin are obtained and analyzed. It is demonstrated that the presence of the chromophore group in the chromophore center of opsin influences considerably the nearest protein environment of 11- cis-retinal both in the region of the β-ionone ring and in the region of the protonated Schiff base bond. Based on simulation results, a possible intramolecular mechanism of keeping rhodopsin as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the inactive state, i.e., the chromophore function as an efficient ligand antagonist, is discussed.

  6. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  7. Computer simulation of molecular sorption in zeolites

    CERN Document Server

    Calmiano, M D

    2001-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis encompasses the computer simulation of molecular sorption. In Chapter 1 we outline the aims and objectives of this work. Chapter 2 follows in which an introduction to sorption in zeolites is presented, with discussion of structure and properties of the main zeolites studied. Chapter 2 concludes with a description of the principles and theories of adsorption. In Chapter 3 we describe the methodology behind the work carried out in this thesis. In Chapter 4 we present our first computational study, that of the sorption of krypton in silicalite. We describe work carried out to investigate low energy sorption sites of krypton in silicalite where we observe krypton to preferentially sorb into straight and sinusoidal channels over channel intersections. We simulate single step type I adsorption isotherms and use molecular dynamics to study the diffusion of krypton and obtain division coefficients and the activation energy. We compare our results to previous experimental and computat...

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal. PMID:22304055

  9. Simulating granular flow with molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ristow, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    We investigate by means of Molecular Dynamics simulations an assembly of spheres to model a granular medium flowing from an upper rectangular chamber through a hole into a lower chamber. Two different two dimensional models are discussed one of them including rotations of the individual spheres. The outflow properties are investigated and compared to experimental data. The qualitative agreement suggests that our models contain the necessary ingredients to describe the outflow properties of gr...

  10. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Coura, P Z; Costa, B V

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  11. Dynamics of Nanoscale Grain-Boundary Decohesion in Aluminum by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Phillips, D. R.; Glaessegen, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics and energetics of intergranular crack growth along a flat grain boundary in aluminum is studied by a molecular-dynamics simulation model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions. Using the ability of the molecular-dynamics simulation to identify atoms involved in different atomistic mechanisms, it was possible to identify the energy contribution of different processes taking place during crack growth. The energy contributions were divided as: elastic energy, defined as the potential energy of the atoms in fcc crystallographic state; and plastically stored energy, the energy of stacking faults and twin boundaries; grain-boundary and surface energy. In addition, monitoring the amount of heat exchange with the molecular-dynamics thermostat gives the energy dissipated as heat in the system. The energetic analysis indicates that the majority of energy in a fast growing crack is dissipated as heat. This dissipation increases linearly at low speed, and faster than linear at speeds approaching 1/3 the Rayleigh wave speed when the crack tip becomes dynamically unstable producing periodic dislocation bursts until the crack is blunted.

  12. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  13. Hybrid continuum–atomistic modelling of swift heavy ion radiation damage in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of germanium to swift heavy ion irradiation is simulated using a hybrid continuum–atomistic approach. The continuum part of the model, which characterises the electronic excitations is an extension of the inelastic thermal spike based on an approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation; while the atomistic part is represented with molecular dynamics. This integrated method can realistically account for the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in band-gap materials under irradiation, unlike earlier developments based on the two-temperature approach. The model is used to obtain temporal and spatial evolution of carrier density, electronic temperature and lattice temperature for germanium irradiated with carbon cluster ions. Good agreement with experimental data of amorphised latent track radii for different stopping powers is obtained by fitting a constant value for the electron–phonon coupling strength – the only parameter treated as free in the model

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  15. Rigidity and soft percolation in the glass transition of an atomistic model of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate, from molecular dynamics simulations—Existence of infinite overlapping networks in a fragile ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habasaki, Junko, E-mail: habasaki.j.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Ngai, K. L. [CNR-IPCF Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-04-28

    The typical ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate (EMIM-NO{sub 3}), was examined by molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atomistic model to show the characteristics of networks of cages and/or bonds in the course of vitrification of this fragile glass-former. The system shows changes of dynamics at two characteristic temperatures, T{sub B} (or T{sub c}) and the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, found in other fragile glass forming liquids [K. L. Ngai and J. Habasaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 114502 (2014)]. On decreasing temperature, the number of neighboring cation-anion pairs, N{sub B}, within the first minimum of the pair correlation function, g(r){sub min}, increases. On crossing T{sub B} (>T{sub g}), the system volume and diffusion coefficient both show changes in temperature dependence, and as usual at T{sub g}. The glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, is characterized by the saturation of the total number of “bonds,” N{sub B} and the corresponding decrease in degree of freedom, F = [(3N − 6) − N{sub B}], of the system consisting of N particles. Similar behavior holds for the other ion-ion pairs. Therefore, as an alternative, the dynamics of glass transition can be interpreted conceptually by rigidity percolation. Before saturation occurring at T{sub g}, the number of bonds shows a remarkable change at around T{sub B}. This temperature is associated with the disappearance of the loosely packed coordination polyhedra of anions around cation (or vice versa), related to the loss of geometrical freedom of the polyhedra, f{sub g}, of each coordination polyhedron, which can be defined by f{sub g} = [(3N{sub V} − 6) − N{sub b}]. Here, 3N{sub v} is the degree of freedom of N{sub V} vertices of the polyhedron, and N{sub b} is number of fictive bonds. The packing of polyhedra is characterized by the soft percolation of cages, which allows further changes with decreasing temperature. The power spectrum of displacement of the central ion

  16. Multiscale Molecular Simulation of Solution Processing of SMDPPEH: PCBM Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2016-08-17

    Solution-processed small-molecule organic solar cells are a promising renewable energy source because of their low production cost, mechanical flexibility, and light weight relative to their pure inorganic counterparts. In this work, we developed a coarse-grained (CG) Gay-Berne ellipsoid molecular simulation model based on atomistic trajectories from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of smaller system sizes to systematically study the nanomorphology of the SMDPPEH/PCBM/solvent ternary blend during solution processing, including the blade-coating process by applying external shear to the solution. With the significantly reduced overall system degrees of freedom and computational acceleration from GPU, we were able to go well beyond the limitation of conventional all-atom molecular simulations with a system size on the order of hundreds of nanometers with mesoscale molecular detail. Our simulations indicate that, similar to polymer solar cells, the optimal blending ratio in small-molecule organic solar cells must provide the highest specific interfacial area for efficient exciton dissociation, while retaining balanced hole/electron transport pathway percolation. We also reveal that blade-coating processes have a significant impact on nanomorphology. For given donor/acceptor blending ratios, applying an external shear force can effectively promote donor/acceptor phase segregation and stacking in the SMDPPEH domains. The present study demonstrated the capability of an ellipsoid-based coarse-grained model for studying the nanomorphology evolution of small-molecule organic solar cells during solution processing/blade-coating and provided links between fabrication protocols and device nanomorphologies.

  17. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  18. Structural characterization of interfacial n-octanol and 3-octanol using molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleon, Raeanne L; Moore, Preston B

    2006-03-01

    Structurally isomeric octanol interfacial systems, water/vapor, 3-octanol/vapor, n-octanol/vapor, 3-octanol/water, and n-octanol/water are investigated at 298 K using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The present study is intended to investigate strongly associated liquid/liquid interfaces and probe the atomistic structure of these interfaces. The octanol and water molecules were initially placed randomly into a box and were equilibrated using constant pressure techniques to minimize bias within the initial conditions as well as to fully sample the structural conformations of the interface. An interface formed via phase separation during equilibration and resulted in a slab geometry with a molecularly sharp interface. However, some water molecules remained within the octanol phase with a mole fraction of 0.12 after equilibration. The resulting "wet" octanol interfaces were analyzed using density profiles and orientational order parameters. Our results support the hypothesis of an ordered interface only 1 or 2 molecular layers deep before bulk properties are reached for both the 3-octanol and water systems. However, in contrast to most other interfacial systems studied by molecular dynamics simulations, the n-octanol interface extends for several molecular layers. The octanol hydroxyl groups form a hydrogen-bonding network with water which orders the surface molecules toward a preferred direction and produces a hydrophilic/hydrophobic layering. The ordered n-octanol produces an oscillating low-high density of oxygen atoms out of phase with a high-low density of carbon atoms, consistent with an oscillating dielectric. In contrast, the isomeric 3-octanol has only a single carbon-rich layer directly proximal to the interface, which is a result of the different molecular topology. Both 3-octanol and n-octanol roughen the water interface with respect to the water/vapor interface. The "wet" octanol phases, in the octanol/water systems reach bulk properties in a

  19. Molecular Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Valentini, P.; Tump, P.

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale conventional time-driven molecular dynam- ics (MD) simulations of normal shock waves are performed for monatomic argon and argon-helium mixtures. For pure argon, near perfect agreement between MD and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results using the variable-hard-sphere model are found for density and temperature profiles as well as for velocity distribution functions throughout the shock. MD simulation results for argon are also in excellent agreement with experimental shock thickness data. Preliminary MD simulation results for argon-helium mixtures are in qualitative agreement with experimental density and temperature profile data, where separation between argon and helium density profiles due to disparate atomic mass is observed. Since conventional time-driven MD simulation of di- lute gases is computationally inefficient, a combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven MD algorithm is presented. The ED/TD-MD algorithm computes impending collisions and advances molecules directly to their next collision while evaluating the collision using conventional time-driven MD with an arbitrary interatomic potential. The method timestep thus approaches the mean-collision- time in the gas, while also detecting and simulating multi- body collisions with a small approximation. Extension of the method to diatomic and small polyatomic molecules is detailed, where center-of-mass velocities and extended cutoff radii are used to advance molecules to impending collisions. Only atomic positions are integrated during collisions and molecule sorting algorithms are employed to determine if atoms are bound in a molecule after a collision event. Rotational relaxation to equilibrium for a low density diatomic gas is validated by comparison with large-scale conventional time-driven MD simulation, where the final rotational distribution function is verified to be the correct Boltzmann rotational energy distribution.

  20. Atomistic spin dynamics and surface magnons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic spin dynamics simulations have evolved to become a powerful and versatile tool for simulating dynamic properties of magnetic materials. It has a wide range of applications, for instance switching of magnetic states in bulk and nano-magnets, dynamics of topological magnets, such as skyrmions and vortices and domain wall motion. In this review, after a brief summary of the existing investigation tools for the study of magnons, we focus on calculations of spin-wave excitations in low-dimensional magnets and the effect of relativistic and temperature effects in such structures. In general, we find a good agreement between our results and the experimental values. For material specific studies, the atomistic spin dynamics is combined with electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory from which the required parameters are calculated, such as magnetic exchange interactions, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya vectors. (topical review)

  1. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Burkert, U., Allinger, N. L., Molecular Mechanics, York: Maple Press Company, 1982.[2]Daw, M. S. , Baskes, M. I., Embedded-atom method: derivation and application to impurities, surface and other defects in metals, Phys. Rev. B, 1984, 29: 6443-6453.[3]Frenke, D., Smit, B., Understanding Molecular Simulation, San Diego: Academic Press, 1996, 60-67, 125-140.[4]Granick, S., Motions and relaxation of confined liquids, Science, 1991, 253: 1374-1379.[5]Koplik, J., Banavar, J., Willemsen, J., Molecular dynamics of Poisewulle flow and moving contact line, Phys. Rev.Lett., 1988, 60: 1282-1285.[6]Hu, Y. Z., Wang, H., Guo, Y. et al., Simulation of lubricant rheology in thin film lubrication, Part I: simulation of Poiseuille flow, Wear, 1996, 196: 243-259.[7]Zou, K., Li, Z. J, Leng, Y. S. et al. , Surface force apparatus and its application in the study of solid contacts, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1999, 44: 268-271.[8]Stevens, M. , Mondello, M., Grest, G. et al. , Comparison of shear flow of hexadecane in a confined geometry and in bulk,J. Chem. Phys., 1997, 106: 7303-7314.[9]Huang, P., Luo, J. B., Wen, S. Z., Theoretical study on the lubrication failure for tthe lubricants with a limiting shear stress, Tribology International, 1999, 32: 421-426.[10]Ryckaert, J. P. , Bellemans. , A molecular dynamics of alkanes, Faraday Soc. , 1978, 66: 95-106.[11]Wang, H. , Hu, Y. Z., A molecular dynamics study on slip phenomenon at solid-liquid interface, in Proceedings of tthe First AICT, Beijing: Tsinghua University Press, 1998, 295-299.[12]Landman, U., Luedtke, W., Burnham, N. et al., Mechanisms and dynamics of adhesion, nanoindentation, and fracture, Science, 1990, 248: 454-461.[13]Leng, Y. S., Hu, Y. Z., Zheng, L. Q., Adhesive contact of flat-ended wedges: theory and computer experiments, Journal of Tribology, 1999, 121: 128-132.

  2. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylasa, S.B., E-mail: skylasa@purdue.edu [Department of Elec. and Comp. Eng., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Aktulga, H.M., E-mail: hmaktulga@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50F-1650, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grama, A.Y., E-mail: ayg@cs.purdue.edu [Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors.

  3. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  5. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧; 胡元中; 邹鲲; 冷永胜

    2001-01-01

    The solidification and interfacial slip in nanometer-scale lubricating films as well as the contact and adhesion of metal crystals have been studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the critical pressure for the solid-liquid transition declines as the film thickness decreases, in-dicating that the lubricant in the thin films may exist in a solid-like state. It is also found that the interfa-cial slip may occur in thin films at relatively low shear rate, and there is a good correlation between the slip phenomenon and the lubricant solidification. The simulations reveal that a micro-scale adhesion may take place due to the atomic jump during the process of approaching or separating of two smooth crystal surfaces, which provides important information for understanding the origin of interfacial friction.

  6. Theoretical modeling of the PEMFC catalyst layer: A review of atomistic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews recent progress in the catalyst layer modeling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Theoretical modeling is important to understand the basic chemical, and physical phenomena at the atomistic level in materials and relating these fundamentals to the properties and performance of the catalyst layer. Two fundamentally important theoretical methods have been chosen to represent atomistic models, namely density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics. In addition, some reactive force field models are highlighted, and the mathematical framework is sufficiently described. The literature review includes important contributions that help to understand the oxygen reduction reaction including gas-phase reaction trends, and the solvation effects are also presented. Moreover, the electric field effect is discussed along with the recently established double reference method in the DFT framework. Using two atomistic simulations based on different axiomatic theories, the production of current density in the molecular junctions is considered with respect to voltage, elucidating applications to simple systems. The models of water transportation via polymer electrolyte membrane, as well as the catalyst and support oxidation are described. Epoxidized carbon support, oxidizable metal-oxide support and electron localization function analysis have provided insights for improving catalyst support material and enable characterization of the bonding between the catalyst and support. Conclusions and future outlook are outlined at the end. Thus the present work enlightens the future of the catalyst modeling towards more realistic models

  7. Molecular Simulation of Adsorption in Microporous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannourakou M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of industrial software, the decreasing cost of computing time, and the availability of well-tested forcefields make molecular simulation increasingly attractive for chemical engineers. We present here several applications of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques, applied to the adsorption of fluids in microporous solids such as zeolites and model carbons (pores < 2 nm. Adsorption was computed in the Grand Canonical ensemble with the MedeA®-GIBBS software, using energy grids to decrease computing time. MedeA®-GIBBS has been used for simulations in the NVT or NPT ensembles to obtain the density and fugacities of fluid phases. Simulation results are compared with experimental pure component isotherms in zeolites (hydrocarbon gases, water, alkanes, aromatics, ethanethiol, etc., and mixtures (methane-ethane, n-hexane-benzene, over a large range of temperatures. Hexane/benzene selectivity inversions between silicalite and Na-faujasites are well predicted with published forcefields, providing an insight on the underlying mechanisms. Also, the adsorption isotherms in Na-faujasites for light gases or ethane-thiol are well described. Regarding organic adsorbents, models of mature kerogen or coal were built in agreement with known chemistry of these systems. Obtaining realistic kerogen densities with the simple relaxation approach considered here is encouraging for the investigation of other organic systems. Computing excess sorption curves in qualitative agreement with those recently measured on dry samples of gas shale is also favorable. Although still preliminary, such applications illustrate the strength of molecular modeling in understanding complex systems in conditions where experiments are difficult.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the adsorption of a fibronectin module on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2004-04-13

    We report atomistic simulations of the adsorption of a fibronectin type I module on a hydrophobic graphite surface. This module comprises only beta-sheets, unlike the albumin fragments previously investigated by us which contained only alpha-helices (Raffaini, G.; Ganazzoli, F. Langmuir 2003, 19, 3403-3412). As done in the latter case, most simulations are carried out in an effective dielectric medium by energy minimizations and molecular dynamics (MD). Further optimizations and MD runs in the explicit presence of water are also performed to assess the stability of the geometries found and to describe the solvation of the adsorbed fibronectin module. The initial adsorption is accompanied by local rearrangements of the strands in contact with the surface, but the overall molecular structure is largely preserved. Much larger rearrangements take place at longer times as found through the MD runs, with the molecule spreading as much as possible so as to maximize the surface coverage, hence the interaction energy, despite a significant strain energy. Energetic aspects of adsorption together with the concomitant size change are discussed in comparison with our previous results for two albumin fragments.

  9. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-10-13

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million-atom biological systems scale well up to ∼30k cores, producing ∼30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach. PMID:26631792

  10. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Phosphorene: Design Rules from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sresht, Vishnu; Pádua, Agílio A H; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2015-08-25

    The liquid-phase exfoliation of phosphorene, the two-dimensional derivative of black phosphorus, in the solvents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), isopropyl alcohol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone is investigated using three molecular-scale "computer experiments". We modeled solvent-phosphorene interactions using an atomistic force field, based on ab initio calculations and lattice dynamics, that accurately reproduces experimental mechanical properties. We probed solvent molecule ordering at phosphorene/solvent interfaces and discovered that planar molecules such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone preferentially orient parallel to the interface. We subsequently measured the energy required to peel a single phosphorene monolayer from a stack of black phosphorus and analyzed the role of "wedges" of solvent molecules intercalating between phosphorene sheets in initiating exfoliation. The exfoliation efficacy of a solvent is enhanced when either molecular planarity "sharpens" this molecular wedge or strong phosphorene-solvent adhesion stabilizes the newly exposed phosphorene surfaces. Finally, we examined the colloidal stability of exfoliated flakes by simulating their aggregation and showed that dispersion is favored when the cohesive energy between the molecules in the solvent monolayer confined between the phosphorene sheets is high (as with DMSO) and is hindered when the adhesion between these molecules and phosphorene is strong; the molecular planarity in solvents like DMF enhances the cohesive energy. Our results are consistent with, and provide a molecular context for, experimental exfoliation studies of phosphorene and other layered solids, and our molecular insights into the significant role of solvent molecular geometry and ordering should complement prevalent solubility-parameter-based approaches in establishing design rules for effective nanomaterial exfoliation media.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  13. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsäss, H.

    2012-09-01

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 × 106 atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between ˜12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp3 to sp2 bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp3 contribution.

  14. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 × 106 atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between ∼12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp3 to sp2 bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp3 contribution.

  15. Reactive molecular dynamics simulation and chemical kinetic modeling of pyrolysis and combustion of n-dodecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quan-De [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wang, Jing-Bo; Li, Juan-Qin; Tan, Ning-Xin; Li, Xiang-Yuan [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2011-02-15

    The initiation mechanisms and kinetics of pyrolysis and combustion of n-dodecane are investigated by using the reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulation and chemical kinetic modeling. From ReaxFF MD simulations, we find the initiation mechanisms of pyrolysis of n-dodecane are mainly through two pathways, (1) the cleavage of C-C bond to form smaller hydrocarbon radicals, and (2) the dehydrogenation reaction to form an H radical and the corresponding n-C{sub 12}H{sub 25} radical. Another pathway is the H-abstraction reactions by small radicals including H, CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, which are the products after the initiation reaction of n-dodecane pyrolysis. ReaxFF MD simulations lead to reasonable Arrhenius parameters compared with experimental results based on first-order kinetic analysis of n-dodecane pyrolysis. The density/pressure effects on the pyrolysis of n-dodecane are also analyzed. By appropriate mapping of the length and time from macroscopic kinetic modeling to ReaxFF MD, a simple comparison of the conversion of n-dodecane from ReaxFF MD simulations and that from kinetic modeling is performed. In addition, the oxidation of n-dodecane is studied by ReaxFF MD simulations. We find that formaldehyde molecule is an important intermediate in the oxidation of n-dodecane, which has been confirmed by kinetic modeling, and ReaxFF leads to reasonable reaction pathways for the oxidation of n-dodecane. These results indicate that ReaxFF MD simulations can give an atomistic description of the initiation mechanism and product distributions of pyrolysis and combustion for hydrocarbon fuels, and can be further used to provide molecular based robust kinetic reaction mechanism for chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon fuels. (author)

  16. A comparison of finite element and atomistic modelling of fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Are the cohesive laws of interfaces sufficient for modelling fracture in polycrystals using the cohesive zone model? We examine this question by comparing a fully atomistic simulation of a silicon polycrystal with a finite element simulation with a similar overall geometry. The cohesive laws used in the finite element simulation are measured atomistically. We describe in detail how to convert the output of atomistic grain boundary fracture simulations into the piecewise linear form needed by a cohesive zone model. We discuss the effects of grain boundary microparameters (the choice of section of the interface, the translations of the grains relative to one another and the cutting plane of each lattice orientation) on the cohesive laws and polycrystal fracture. We find that the atomistic simulations fracture at lower levels of external stress, indicating that the initiation of fracture in the atomistic simulations is likely dominated by irregular atomic structures at external faces, internal edges, corners and junctions of grains. Thus, the cohesive properties of interfaces alone are not likely to be sufficient for modelling the fracture of polycrystals using continuum methods

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  18. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  19. Microscopic Rate Constants of Crystal Growth from Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with Metadynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Kozma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation of crystal growth can be decomposed into two steps: the determination of the microscopic rate constants and a mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. We proposed a method to determine kinetic rate constants of crystal growth. We performed classical molecular dynamics on the equilibrium liquid/crystal interface of argon. Metadynamics was used to explore the free energy surface of crystal growth. A crystalline atom was selected at the interface, and it was displaced to the liquid phase by adding repulsive Gaussian potentials. The activation free energy of this process was calculated as the maximal potential energy density of the Gaussian potentials. We calculated the rate constants at different interfacial structures using the transition state theory. In order to mimic real crystallization, we applied a temperature difference in the calculations of the two opposite rate constants, and they were applied in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The novelty of our technique is that it can be used for slow crystallization processes, while the simple following of trajectories can be applied only for fast reactions. Our method is a possibility for determination of elementary rate constants of crystal growth that seems to be necessary for the long-time goal of computer-aided crystal design.

  20. The dynamical complexity of work-hardening: a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Markus J. Buehler; Alexander Hartmaier; Mark A. Duchaineau; Farid F. Abraham; Huajian Gao

    2005-01-01

    We analyze a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of work hardening in a model system of a ductile solid.With tensile loading, we observe emission of thousands of dislocations from two sharp cracks. The dislocations interact in a complex way, revealing three fundamental mechanisms of work-hardening in this ductile material. These are (1) dislocation cutting processes, jog formation and generation of trails of point defects; (2) activation of secondary slip systems by Frank-Read and cross-slip mechanisms; and (3) formation of sessile dislocations such as Lomer-Cottrell locks.We report the discovery of a new class of point defects referred to as trail of partial point defects, which could play an important role in situations when partial dislocations dominate plasticity. Another important result of the present work is the rediscovery of the Fleischer-mechanism of cross-slip of partial dislocations that was theoretically proposed more than 50 years ago, and is now, for the first time, confirmed by atomistic simulation. On the typical time scale of molecular dynamics simulations, the dislocations self-organize into a complex sessile defect topology. Our analysis illustrates numerous mechanisms formerly only conjectured in textbooks and observed indirectly in experiments. It is the first time that such a rich set of fundamental phenomena have been revealed in a single computer simulation, and its dynamical evolution has been studied. The present study exemplifies the simulation and analysis of the complex nonlinear dynamics of a many-particle system during failure using ultra-large scale computing.

  1. Multiscale simulation of blood flow in brain arteries with an aneurysm

    CERN Document Server

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Insley, Joseph A; Papka, Michael E; Kumaran, Kalyan; Karniadakis, George Em

    2011-01-01

    Interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based simulation codes is now required in many multiscale physical and biological systems. We present the first results from coupled atomistic-continuum simulations on 190,000 processors. Platelet aggregation in the patient-specific model of an aneurysm has been modeled using a high-order spectral/hp element Navier-Stokes solver with a stochastic (coarse-grained) Molecular Dynamics solver based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD).

  2. Molecular simulation of nonfacilitated membrane permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoonor-Williams, Ernest; Rowley, Christopher N

    2016-07-01

    This is a review. Non-electrolytic compounds typically cross cell membranes by passive diffusion. The rate of permeation is dependent on the chemical properties of the solute and the composition of the lipid bilayer membrane. Predicting the permeability coefficient of a solute is important in pharmaceutical chemistry and toxicology. Molecular simulation has proven to be a valuable tool for modeling permeation of solutes through a lipid bilayer. In particular, the solubility-diffusion model has allowed for the quantitative calculation of permeability coefficients. The underlying theory and computational methods used to calculate membrane permeability are reviewed. We also discuss applications of these methods to examine the permeability of solutes and the effect of membrane composition on permeability. The application of coarse grain and polarizable models is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26706099

  3. Scalable Quantum Simulation of Molecular Energies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Malley, P J J; Kivlichan, I D; Romero, J; McClean, J R; Barends, R; Kelly, J; Roushan, P; Tranter, A; Ding, N; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Fowler, A G; Jeffrey, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neill, C; Quintana, C; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Coveney, P V; Love, P J; Neven, H; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Martinis, J M

    2015-01-01

    We report the first electronic structure calculation performed on a quantum computer without exponentially costly precompilation. We use a programmable array of superconducting qubits to compute the energy surface of molecular hydrogen using two distinct quantum algorithms. First, we experimentally execute the unitary coupled cluster method using the variational quantum eigensolver. Our efficient implementation predicts the correct dissociation energy to within chemical accuracy of the numerically exact result. Next, we experimentally demonstrate the canonical quantum algorithm for chemistry, which consists of Trotterization and quantum phase estimation. We compare the experimental performance of these approaches to show clear evidence that the variational quantum eigensolver is robust to certain errors, inspiring hope that quantum simulation of classically intractable molecules may be viable in the near future.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present molecular dynamic simulations of the shock compression of graphite with the LCBOPII potential. The range of shock intensities covers the full range of available experimental data, including near-tera-pascal pressures. The results are in excellent agreement with the available DFT data and point to a graphite-diamond transition for shock pressures above 65 GPa, a value larger than the experimental data (20 to 50 GPa). The transition mechanism leads preferentially to hexagonal diamond through a diffusion-less process but is submitted to irreversible re-graphitization upon release: this result is in good agreement with the lack of highly ordered diamond observed in post-mortem experimental samples. Melting is found for shock pressures ranging from 200 to 300 GPa, close to the approximate LCBOPII diamond melting line. A good overall agreement is found between the calculated and experimental Hugoniot data up to 46% compression rate. (authors)

  5. Scalable Quantum Simulation of Molecular Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, P. J. J.; Babbush, R.; Kivlichan, I. D.; Romero, J.; McClean, J. R.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Roushan, P.; Tranter, A.; Ding, N.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Coveney, P. V.; Love, P. J.; Neven, H.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Martinis, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first electronic structure calculation performed on a quantum computer without exponentially costly precompilation. We use a programmable array of superconducting qubits to compute the energy surface of molecular hydrogen using two distinct quantum algorithms. First, we experimentally execute the unitary coupled cluster method using the variational quantum eigensolver. Our efficient implementation predicts the correct dissociation energy to within chemical accuracy of the numerically exact result. Second, we experimentally demonstrate the canonical quantum algorithm for chemistry, which consists of Trotterization and quantum phase estimation. We compare the experimental performance of these approaches to show clear evidence that the variational quantum eigensolver is robust to certain errors. This error tolerance inspires hope that variational quantum simulations of classically intractable molecules may be viable in the near future.

  6. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of membrane remodeling by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan; Haohua, Wen; Lanyuan, Lu; Jun, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane curvature is no longer thought of as a passive property of the membrane; rather, it is considered as an active, regulated state that serves various purposes in the cell such as between cells and organelle definition. While transport is usually mediated by tiny membrane bubbles known as vesicles or membrane tubules, such communication requires complex interplay between the lipid bilayers and cytosolic proteins such as members of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) superfamily of proteins. With rapid developments in novel experimental techniques, membrane remodeling has become a rapidly emerging new field in recent years. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are important tools for obtaining atomistic information regarding the structural and dynamic aspects of biological systems and for understanding the physics-related aspects. The availability of more sophisticated experimental data poses challenges to the theoretical community for developing novel theoretical and computational techniques that can be used to better interpret the experimental results to obtain further functional insights. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms underlying membrane remodeling controlled or mediated by proteins. While studies combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations recall existing mechanistic models, concurrently, they extend the role of different BAR domain proteins during membrane remodeling processes. We review these recent findings, focusing on how multiscale molecular dynamics simulations aid in understanding the physical basis of BAR domain proteins, as a representative of membrane-remodeling proteins. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21403182) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU 21300014).

  7. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields. PMID:27513316

  8. Detecting Allosteric Networks Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, S; Wereszczynski, J

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric networks allow enzymes to transmit information and regulate their catalytic activities over vast distances. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to reveal the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon; in practice, it can be difficult to discern allosteric signals from MD trajectories. Here, we describe how MD simulations can be analyzed to reveal correlated motions and allosteric networks, and provide an example of their use on the coagulation enzyme thrombin. Methods are discussed for calculating residue-pair correlations from atomic fluctuations and mutual information, which can be combined with contact information to identify allosteric networks and to dynamically cluster a system into highly correlated communities. In the case of thrombin, these methods show that binding of the antagonist hirugen significantly alters the enzyme's correlation landscape through a series of pathways between Exosite I and the catalytic core. Results suggest that hirugen binding curtails dynamic diversity and enforces stricter venues of influence, thus reducing the accessibility of thrombin to other molecules. PMID:27497176

  9. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  10. Continuous Finite Element Methods of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are necessary to perform very long integration times. In this paper, we discuss continuous finite element methods for molecular dynamics simulation problems. Our numerical results about AB diatomic molecular system and A2B triatomic molecules show that linear finite element and quadratic finite element methods can better preserve the motion characteristics of molecular dynamics, that is, properties of energy conservation and long-term stability. So finite element method is also a reliable method to simulate long-time classical trajectory of molecular systems.

  11. Atomistic Properties of Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirdeshmukh, Dinker B; Subhadra, K G

    2011-01-01

    The book deals with atomistic properties of solids which are determined by the crystal structure, interatomic forces and atomic displacements influenced by the effects of temperature, stress and electric fields. The book gives equal importance to experimental details and theory. There are full chapters dedicated to the tensor nature of physical properties, mechanical properties, lattice vibrations, crystal structure determination and ferroelectricity. The other crystalline states like nano-, poly-, liquid- and quasi crystals are discussed. Several new topics like nonlinear optics and the Rietveld method are presented in the book. The book lays emphasis on the role of symmetry in crystal properties. Comprehensiveness is the strength of the book; this allows users at different levels a choice of chapters according to their requirements.

  12. Controllable atomistic graphene oxide model and its application in hydrogen sulfide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of an atomistic graphene oxide (GO) model has been challenging due to the structural dependence on different synthesis methods. In this work we combine temperature-programmed molecular dynamics simulation techniques and the ReaxFF reactive force field to generate realistic atomistic GO structures. By grafting a mixture of epoxy and hydroxyl groups to the basal graphene surface and fine-tuning their initial concentrations, we produce in a controllable manner the GO structures with different functional groups and defects. The models agree with structural experimental data and with other ab initio quantum calculations. Using the generated atomistic models, we perform reactive adsorption calculations for H2S and H2O/H2S mixtures on GO materials and compare the results with experiment. We find that H2S molecules dissociate on the carbonyl functional groups, and H2O, CO2, and CO molecules are released as reaction products from the GO surface. The calculation reveals that for the H2O/H2S mixtures, H2O molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the carbonyl sites and block the potential active sites for H2S decomposition. The calculation agrees well with the experiments. The methodology and the procedure applied in this work open a new door to the theoretical studies of GO and can be extended to the research on other amorphous materials

  13. Investigation of the structure of levan polysaccharide chains in water via molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Deniz; Coskunkan, Binnaz; Cem, Gulcin; Rende, Deniz; Arga, K. Yalcin; Bucak, Seyda; Baysal, Nihat; Toksoy-Oner, Ebru; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2014-03-01

    Levan is a biopolymer consisting of β-D-fructofuranose units with β (2-6) linkages between fructose rings. Investigation of the structure and behavior of levan in aqeous environments is necessary to understand its biological activity and its potential use in various applications such as carbohydrate-derived drug release. The use of different in vivo and in vitro bioactivity assays fail to relate the chemical structure and conformation to the observed biological activity. Therefore, considerable research has been directed on elucidating the biological activity mechanisms of polysaccharides by structure-function analysis. To overcome the inherent difficulties of experiments, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to retrieve comprehensive information regarding the conformations of polysaccharides and their dynamic properties. In the current study, the structure of levan is investigated in aqueous medium and in saline solutions via fully atomistic MD simulations at 298 and 310 K, representing room temperature and physiological temperatures, respectively. The material is partially based upon work supported by NSF under Grant Nos. 1200270 and 1003574, and TUBITAK 111M232 and 113M265.

  14. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  15. Effect of strain field on displacement cascade in tungsten studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Gao, N.; Wang, Z. G.; Gao, X.; He, W. H.; Cui, M. H.; Pang, L. L.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-10-01

    Using atomistic methods, the coupling effect of strain field and displacement cascade in body-centered cubic (BCC) tungsten is directly simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures. The values of the hydrostatic and uniaxial (parallel or perpendicular to primary knock-on atom (PKA) direction) strains are from -2% to 2% and the temperature is from 100 to 1000 K. Because of the annealing effect, the influence of strain on radiation damage at low temperature has been proved to be more significant than that at high temperature. When the cascade proceeds under the hydrostatic strain, the Frenkel Pair (FP) production, the fraction of defect in cluster and the average size of the defect cluster, all increase at tensile state and decrease at compressive state. When the cascade is under uniaxial strain, the effect of strain parallel to PKA direction is less than the effect of hydrostatic strain, while the effect of strain perpendicular to PKA direction can be negligible. Under the uniaxial strain along direction, the SIA and SIA cluster is observed to orientate along the strain direction at tensile state and the uniaxial compressive strain with direction perpendicular to has led to the similar preferred nucleation. All these results indicate that under irradiation, the tensile state should be avoided for materials used in nuclear power plants.

  16. A systematic framework for molecular dynamics simulations of protein post-translational modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen Petrov

    Full Text Available By directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of their targets, post-translational modifications (PTMs of proteins play a key role in different cellular processes ranging from enzymatic activation to regulation of signal transduction to cell-cycle control. Despite the great importance of understanding how PTMs affect proteins at the atomistic level, a systematic framework for treating post-translationally modified amino acids by molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a premier high-resolution computational biology tool, has never been developed. Here, we report and validate force field parameters (GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 required to run and analyze MD simulations of more than 250 different types of enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs. The newly developed GROMOS 54a7 parameters in particular exhibit near chemical accuracy in matching experimentally measured hydration free energies (RMSE=4.2 kJ/mol over the validation set. Using this tool, we quantitatively show that the majority of PTMs greatly alter the hydrophobicity and other physico-chemical properties of target amino acids, with the extent of change in many cases being comparable to the complete range spanned by native amino acids.

  17. MOLOCH computer code for molecular-dynamics simulation of processes in condensed matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbenev I.V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and experimental investigation into properties of condensed matter is one of the mainstreams in RFNC-VNIITF scientific activity. The method of molecular dynamics (MD is an innovative method of theoretical materials science. Modern supercomputers allow the direct simulation of collective effects in multibillion atom sample, making it possible to model physical processes on the atomistic level, including material response to dynamic load, radiation damage, influence of defects and alloying additions upon material mechanical properties, or aging of actinides. During past ten years, the computer code MOLOCH has been developed at RFNC-VNIITF. It is a parallel code suitable for massive parallel computing. Modern programming techniques were used to make the code almost 100% efficient. Practically all instruments required for modelling were implemented in the code: a potential builder for different materials, simulation of physical processes in arbitrary 3D geometry, and calculated data processing. A set of tests was developed to analyse algorithms efficiency. It can be used to compare codes with different MD implementation between each other.

  18. Molecular insight into amyloid oligomer destabilizing mechanism of flavonoid derivative 2-(4' benzyloxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-chromen-4-one through docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhil; Srivastava, Swati; Tripathi, Shubhandra; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of amyloid peptide (Aβ) has been shown to be directly related to progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is neurotoxic and its deposition and aggregation ultimately lead to cell death. In our previous work, we reported flavonoid derivative (compound 1) showing promising result in transgenic AD model of Drosophila. Compound 1 showed prevention of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and neuroprotective efficacy in Drosophila system. However, mechanism of action of compound 1 and its effect on the amyloid is not known. We therefore performed molecular docking and atomistic, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the process of Aβ interaction, inhibition, and destabilizing mechanism. Results showed different preferred binding sites of compound 1 and good affinity toward the target. Through the course of 35 ns molecular dynamics simulation, conformations_5 of compound 1 intercalates into the hydrophobic core near the salt bridge and showed major structural changes as compared to other conformations. Compound 1 showed interference with the salt bridge and thus reducing the inter strand hydrogen bound network. This minimizes the side chain interaction between the chains A-B leading to disorder in oligomer. Contact map analysis of amino acid residues between chains A and B also showed lesser interaction with adjacent amino acids in the presence of compound 1 (conformations_5). The study provides an insight into how compound 1 interferes and disorders the Aβ peptide. These findings will further help to design better inhibitors for aggregation of the amyloid oligomer.

  19. Molecular simulation of polymer assisted protein refolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2005-10-01

    Protein refolding in vitro, the formation of the tertiary structure that enables the protein to display its biological function, can be significantly enhanced by adding a polymer of an appropriate hydrophobicity and concentration into the refolding buffer. A molecular simulation of the refolding of a two-dimensional simple lattice protein was presented. A protein folding map recording the occurrence frequency of specified conformations was derived, from which the refolding thermodynamics and kinetics were interpreted. It is shown that, in the absence of polymer, the protein falls into the "energy trapped" conformations characterized by a high intramolecular hydrophobic interaction, denoted as HH contact, and a high magnitude of the structure overlap function, χ. This makes it difficult for the protein to fold to the native state. The polymer with a suitable chain length, concentration, and hydrophobicity has formed complex with partially folded protein and created diversified intermediates with low χ. This gives more pathways for the protein to fold to the native state. At a given hydrophobicity, the short chain polymer has a broader concentration range where it assists protein folding than those of long chains. The above simulation agrees well with the experimental results reported elsewhere [Cleland et al., J. Biol. Chem. 267, 13327 (1992); ibid., Bio/Technology 10, 1013 (1992); Chen et al., Enzyme Microb. Technol. 32, 120 (2003); Lu et al., Biochem. Eng. J. 24, 55 (2005); ibid., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 134902 (2005); ibid., Biochem. Eng. J. (to be published)] and is of fundamental importance for the design and application of polymers for protein refolding.

  20. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2013-10-28

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  1. Multilevel summation methods for efficient evaluation of long-range pairwise interactions in atomistic and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of efficient algorithms for long-range pairwise interactions is central to the success of numerous applications, ranging in scale from atomic-level modeling of materials to astrophysics. This report focuses on the implementation and analysis of the multilevel summation method for approximating long-range pairwise interactions. The computational cost of the multilevel summation method is proportional to the number of particles, N, which is an improvement over FFTbased methods whos cost is asymptotically proportional to N logN. In addition to approximating electrostatic forces, the multilevel summation method can be use to efficiently approximate convolutions with long-range kernels. As an application, we apply the multilevel summation method to a discretized integral equation formulation of the regularized generalized Poisson equation. Numerical results are presented using an implementation of the multilevel summation method in the LAMMPS software package. Preliminary results show that the computational cost of the method scales as expected, but there is still a need for further optimization.

  2. Properties of the Membrane Binding Component of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Revealed by Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, A.; St-Pierre, J. F.; Magarkar, A.;

    2011-01-01

    brought about an interesting view that the flexible loop observed in our work can be a common structural element in these types of proteins. In the same spirit we close the article by discussing the role of salt bridges in the formation of three-dimensional structures of membrane proteins that exhibit...

  3. Towards Automated Benchmarking of Atomistic Forcefields: Neat Liquid Densities and Static Dielectric Constants from the ThermoML Data Archive

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchamp, Kyle A; Rustenburg, Ariën S; Bayly, Christopher I; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Chodera, John D

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic molecular simulations are a powerful way to make quantitative predictions, but the accuracy of these predictions depends entirely on the quality of the forcefield employed. While experimental measurements of fundamental physical properties offer a straightforward approach for evaluating forcefield quality, the bulk of this information has been tied up in formats that are not machine-readable. Compiling benchmark datasets of physical properties from non-machine-readable sources require substantial human effort and is prone to accumulation of human errors, hindering the development of reproducible benchmarks of forcefield accuracy. Here, we examine the feasibility of benchmarking atomistic forcefields against the NIST ThermoML data archive of physicochemical measurements, which aggregates thousands of experimental measurements in a portable, machine-readable, self-annotating format. As a proof of concept, we present a detailed benchmark of the generalized Amber small molecule forcefield (GAFF) using t...

  4. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms. PMID:27139634

  5. Surface Structure of Hydroxyapatite from Simulated Annealing Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Xu, Dingguo; Yang, Mingli; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-05-10

    The surface structure of hydroxyapatite (HAP) is crucial for its bioactivity. Using a molecular dynamics simulated annealing method, we studied the structure and its variation with annealing temperature of the HAP (100) surface. In contrast to the commonly used HAP surface model, which is sliced from HAP crystal and then relaxed at 0 K with first-principles or force-field calculations, a new surface structure with gradual changes from ordered inside to disordered on the surface was revealed. The disordering is dependent on the annealing temperature, Tmax. When Tmax increases up to the melting point, which was usually adopted in experiments, the disordering increases, as reflected by its radial distribution functions, structural factors, and atomic coordination numbers. The disordering of annealed structures does not show significant changes when Tmax is above the melting point. The thickness of disordered layers is about 10 Å. The surface energy of the annealed structures at high temperature is significantly less than that of the crystal structure relaxed at room temperature. A three-layer model of interior, middle, and surface was then proposed to describe the surface structure of HAP. The interior layer retains the atomic configurations in crystal. The middle layer has its atoms moved and its groups rotated about their original locations. In the surface layer, the atomic arrangements are totally different from those in crystal. In particular for the hydroxyl groups, they move outward and cover the Ca(2+) ions, leaving holes occupied by the phosphate groups. Our study suggested a new model with disordered surface structures for studying the interaction of HAP-based biomaterials with other molecules. PMID:27096760

  6. Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA-Polycation Complexes: Two Distinct Binding Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondinskaia, Diana A; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Nesterenko, Alexey M; Antipina, Alexandra Yu; Gurtovenko, Andrey A

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic cationic polymers represent a promising class of delivery vectors for gene therapy. Here, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the structure and properties of complexes of DNA with four linear polycations: polyethylenimine (PEI), poly-l-lysine (PLL), polyvinylamine (PVA), and polyallylamine (PAA). These polycations differ in their polymer geometries, protonation states, and hydrophobicities of their backbone chains. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time the existence of two distinct patterns of binding of DNA with polycations. For PEI, PLL, and PAA, the complex is stabilized by the electrostatic attraction between protonated amine groups of the polycation and phosphate groups of DNA. In contrast, PVA demonstrates an alternative binding pattern as it gets embedded into the DNA major groove. It is likely that both the polymer topology and affinity of the backbone chain of PVA to the DNA groove are responsible for such behavior. The differences in binding patterns can have important biomedical implications: embedding PVA into a DNA groove makes it less sensitive to changes in the aqueous environment (pH level, ionic strength, etc.) and could therefore hinder the intracellular release of genetic material from a delivery vector, leading to lower transfection activity. PMID:27280954

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shock Waves Interacting with Nano-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqananwah, Ahmad; Koplik, Joel; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Lennard-Jones interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either atoms tethered to lattice sites by stiff springs, or on embedded atom potentials. Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this talk we present preliminary results, and the longer-term goal of this work is to understand energy transport and absorption in porous materials.

  8. Adsorption of poly(ethylene succinate) chain onto graphene nanosheets: A molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelich, Payam; Asadinezhad, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the interaction between single polymer chain and graphene nanosheets at local and global length scales is essential for it underlies the mesoscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites. A computational attempt was then performed using atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to gain physical insights into behavior of a model aliphatic polyester, poly(ethylene succinate), single chain near graphene nanosheets, where the effects of the polymer chain length, graphene functionalization, and temperature on conformational properties of the polymer were studied comparatively. Graphene functionalization was carried out through extending the parameters set of an all-atom force field. The results showed a significant conformational transition of the polymer chain from three-dimensional statistical coil, in initial state, to two-dimensional fold, in final state, during adsorption on graphene. The conformational order, overall shape, end-to-end separation statistics, and mobility of the polymer chain were found to be influenced by the graphene functionalization, temperature, and polymer chain length. Furthermore, the polymer chain dynamics mode during adsorption on graphene was observed to transit from normal diffusive to slow subdiffusive mode. The findings from this computational study could shed light on the physics of the early stages of aliphatic polyester chain organization induced by graphene. PMID:27560653

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Chemical Reactions for Use in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian Xie; Tinker, Robert

    2006-01-01

    One of the simulation engines of an open-source program called the Molecular Workbench, which can simulate thermodynamics of chemical reactions, is described. This type of real-time, interactive simulation and visualization of chemical reactions at the atomic scale could help students understand the connections between chemical reaction equations…

  10. An efficient fully atomistic potential model for dense fluid methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuntao; Ouyang, Jie; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wuming

    2016-08-01

    A fully atomistic model aimed to obtain a general purpose model for the dense fluid methane is presented. The new optimized potential for liquid simulation (OPLS) model is a rigid five site model which consists of five fixed point charges and five Lennard-Jones centers. The parameters in the potential model are determined by a fit of the experimental data of dense fluid methane using molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficient are successfully calculated for dense fluid methane at various state points. The simulated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data shown in literature. Moreover, the distribution of mean number hydrogen bonds and the distribution of pair-energy are analyzed, which are obtained from the new model and other five reference potential models. Furthermore, the space-time correlation functions for dense fluid methane are also discussed. All the numerical results demonstrate that the new OPLS model could be well utilized to investigate the dense fluid methane.

  11. Modeling Structural Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shoji; Kanada, Ryo; Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Li, Wenfei; Kenzaki, Hiroo

    2015-12-15

    Due to hierarchic nature of biomolecular systems, their computational modeling calls for multiscale approaches, in which coarse-grained (CG) simulations are used to address long-time dynamics of large systems. Here, we review recent developments and applications of CG modeling methods, focusing on our methods primarily for proteins, DNA, and their complexes. These methods have been implemented in the CG biomolecular simulator, CafeMol. Our CG model has resolution such that ∼10 non-hydrogen atoms are grouped into one CG particle on average. For proteins, each amino acid is represented by one CG particle. For DNA, one nucleotide is simplified by three CG particles, representing sugar, phosphate, and base. The protein modeling is based on the idea that proteins have a globally funnel-like energy landscape, which is encoded in the structure-based potential energy function. We first describe two representative minimal models of proteins, called the elastic network model and the classic Go̅ model. We then present a more elaborate protein model, which extends the minimal model to incorporate sequence and context dependent local flexibility and nonlocal contacts. For DNA, we describe a model developed by de Pablo's group that was tuned to well reproduce sequence-dependent structural and thermodynamic experimental data for single- and double-stranded DNAs. Protein-DNA interactions are modeled either by the structure-based term for specific cases or by electrostatic and excluded volume terms for nonspecific cases. We also discuss the time scale mapping in CG molecular dynamics simulations. While the apparent single time step of our CGMD is about 10 times larger than that in the fully atomistic molecular dynamics for small-scale dynamics, large-scale motions can be further accelerated by two-orders of magnitude with the use of CG model and a low friction constant in Langevin dynamics. Next, we present four examples of applications. First, the classic Go̅ model was used to

  12. Molecular simulation of alkyl monolayers on the Si(111)surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Shiling; (苑世领); CAI; Zhengting; (蔡政亭); XIAO; Li; (肖莉); XU; Guiying; (徐桂英); LIU; Yongjun; (刘永军)

    2003-01-01

    The structure of twelve-carbon monolayers on the H-terminated Si(111) surface is investigated by molecular simulation method. The best substitution percent on Si(111) surface obtained via molecular mechanics calculation is equal to 50%, and the (8×8) simulated cell can be used to depict the structure of alkyl monolayer on Si surface. After two-dimensional cell containing alkyl chains and four-layer Si(111) crystal at the substitution 50% is constructed, the densely packed and well-ordered monolayer on Si(111) surface can be shown through energy minimization in the suitable-size simulation cell. These simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments. These conclusions show that molecular simulation can provide otherwise inaccessible mesoscopic information at the molecular level, and can be considered as an adjunct to experiments.

  13. Thermodynamic integration based on classical atomistic simulations to determine the Gibbs energy of condensed phases: Calculation of the aluminum-zirconium system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J.-P.; Gheribi, A. E.; Chartrand, P.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, an in silico procedure to generate a fully coherent set of thermodynamic properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is proposed. The procedure is applied to the Al-Zr system because of its importance in the development of high strength Al-Li alloys and of bulk metallic glasses. Cohesive energies of the studied condensed phases of the Al-Zr system (the liquid phase, the fcc solid solution, and various orthorhombic stoichiometric compounds) are calculated using the modified embedded atom model (MEAM) in the second-nearest-neighbor formalism (2NN). The Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is parameterized in this work using ab initio and experimental data found in the literature for the AlZr3-L12 structure, while its predictive ability is confirmed for several other solid structures and for the liquid phase. The thermodynamic integration (TI) method is implemented in a general MC algorithm in order to evaluate the absolute Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solutions. The entropy of mixing calculated from the TI method, combined to the enthalpy of mixing and the heat capacity data generated from MD/MC simulations performed in the isobaric-isothermal/canonical (NPT/NVT) ensembles are used to parameterize the Gibbs energy function of all the condensed phases in the Al-rich side of the Al-Zr system in a CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. The modified quasichemical model in the pair approximation (MQMPA) and the cluster variation method (CVM) in the tetrahedron approximation are used to define the Gibbs energy of the liquid and the fcc solid solution respectively for their entire range of composition. Thermodynamic and structural data generated from our MD/MC simulations are used as input data to parameterize these thermodynamic models. A detailed analysis of the validity and transferability of the Al-Zr MEAM-2NN potential is presented throughout our work by comparing the predicted properties obtained

  14. A molecular dynamics simulation study of the pressure-volume-temperature behavior of polymers under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Justin B; Bedrov, Dmitry; Smith, Grant D; Hanson, Ben; Borodin, Oleg; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Kober, Edward M

    2009-04-14

    Isothermal compression of poly (dimethylsiloxane), 1,4-poly(butadiene), and a model Estane (in both pure form and a nitroplasticized composition similar to PBX-9501 binder) at pressures up to 100 kbars has been studied using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Comparison of predicted compression, bulk modulus, and U(s)-u(p) behavior with experimental static and dynamic compression data available in the literature reveals good agreement between experiment and simulation, indicating that MD simulations utilizing simple quantum-chemistry-based potentials can be used to accurately predict the behavior of polymers at relatively high pressure. Despite their very different zero-pressure bulk moduli, the compression, modulus, and U(s)-u(p) behavior (including low-pressure curvature) for the three polymers could be reasonably described by the Tait equation of state (EOS) utilizing the universal C parameter. The Tait EOS was found to provide an excellent description of simulation PVT data when the C parameter was optimized for each polymer. The Tait EOS parameters, namely, the zero-pressure bulk modulus and the C parameter, were found to correlate well with free volume for these polymers as measured in simulations by a simple probe insertion algorithm. Of the polymers studied, PDMS was found to have the most free volume at low pressure, consistent with its lower ambient pressure bulk modulus and greater increase in modulus with increasing pressure (i.e., crush-up behavior). PMID:19368468

  15. Atomistic Modeling of the U-Zr System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic modeling using the BFS method for alloys and ab initio based parameters is proposed for the study of fundamental properties of U-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Due to its basic atomistic nature and the universal character of the parametrization, the approach can be used for diverse problems such as the interaction between fuel and cladding and temperature gradient fuel constituent redistribution. In the first case, preliminary results for the formation of an interaction layer using large scale simulations are presented. For the second case, a mean field formalism is introduced in order to determine concentration profiles for arbitrary changes in temperature in the radial direction. (author)

  16. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom

  17. Atomistic Determination of Cross-Slip Pathway and Energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Leffers, Torben;

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism for cross slip of a screw dislocation in Cu is determined by atomistic simulations that only presume the initial and final states of the process. The dissociated dislocation constricts in the primary plane and redissociates into the cross-slip plane while still partly in the primary...

  18. Petascale Simulations of the Morphology and the Molecular Interface of Bulk Heterojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Seibers, Zach; Kumar, Rajeev; Matheson, Michael A; Ankner, John F; Goswami, Monojoy; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Shelton, William A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kilbey, S Michael

    2016-07-26

    Understanding how additives interact and segregate within bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin films is critical for exercising control over structure at multiple length scales and delivering improvements in photovoltaic performance. The morphological evolution of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends that are commensurate with the size of a BHJ thin film is examined using petascale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Comparisons between two-component and three-component systems containing short P3HT chains as additives undergoing thermal annealing demonstrate that the short chains alter the morphology in apparently useful ways: they efficiently migrate to the P3HT/PCBM interface, increasing the P3HT domain size and interfacial area. Simulation results agree with depth profiles determined from neutron reflectometry measurements that reveal PCBM enrichment near substrate and air interfaces but a decrease in that PCBM enrichment when a small amount of short P3HT chains are integrated into the BHJ blend. Atomistic simulations of the P3HT/PCBM blend interfaces show a nonmonotonic dependence of the interfacial thickness as a function of number of repeat units in the oligomeric P3HT additive, and the thiophene rings orient parallel to the interfacial plane as they approach the PCBM domain. Using the nanoscale geometries of the P3HT oligomers, LUMO and HOMO energy levels calculated by density functional theory are found to be invariant across the donor/acceptor interface. These connections between additives, processing, and morphology at all length scales are generally useful for efforts to improve device performance. PMID:27299676

  19. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludig–Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  20. Computer Simulation and X-ray Diffraction of Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction of structure in nanocrystalline α-Fe and Cu was studied by atomistic simulation. Atomic position equilibrium was reached by using molecular dynamics method to simulate nanocrystalline structure with Finnis potentials to model interatomic interactions. lt was found that the boundary component exhibits short-range order, and the distortion in crystalline component increases with the decrease of grain size.

  1. Multiscale Simulations: From Enzyme Kinetics to Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Barry Zhongqi

    2013-01-01

    The development of multiscale methods for computational simulation of biophysical systems represents a significant challenge. Effective computational models that bridge physical insights obtained from atomistic simulations and experimental findings are lacking. An accurate passing of information between these scales would enable: (1) an improved physical understanding of structure-function relationships, and (2) enhanced rational strategies for molecular engineering and materials design. Two ...

  2. Salient Frame Detection for Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Youngmin; Patro, Robert; Yiu Ip, Cheuk; O’Leary, Dianne P.; Anishkin, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in sophisticated computational techniques have facilitated simulation of incrediblydetailed time-varying trajectories and in the process have generated vast quantities of simulation data. The current tools to analyze and comprehend large-scale time-varying data, however, lag far behind our ability to produce such simulation data. Saliency-based analysis can be applied to time-varying 3D datasets for the purpose of summarization, abstraction, and motion analysis. As the sizes o...

  3. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, B. S.; Singh, P. L.; Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  4. Comparison of atomistic and elasticity approaches for carbon diffusion near line defects in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, R.G.A., E-mail: rgaveiga@gmail.com [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Perez, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, UMR CNRS 8207, Bat. C6, F59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Clouet, E. [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Domain, C. [EDF, Recherche et Developpement, Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, F77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France)

    2011-10-15

    Energy barriers for carbon migration in the neighborhood of line defects in body-centered cubic iron have been obtained by atomistic simulations. For this purpose, molecular statics with an Fe-C interatomic potential, based on the embedded atom method, has been employed. Results of these simulations have been compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. The agreement is better for a carbon atom sitting on an octahedral site (energy minimum) than one on a tetrahedral site (saddle point). Absolute differences in the energy barriers obtained by the two methods are usually below 5 meV at distances larger than 1.5 nm from a screw dislocation and 2 nm (up to 4 nm in the glide plane) from the edge dislocation. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations performed at T = 300 K and additional analysis based on the activation energies obtained by both methods show that they are in good qualitative agreement, despite some important quantitative discrepancies due to the large absolute errors found near the dislocation cores.

  5. Comparison of atomistic and elasticity approaches for carbon diffusion near line defects in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy barriers for carbon migration in the neighborhood of line defects in body-centered cubic iron have been obtained by atomistic simulations. For this purpose, molecular statics with an Fe-C interatomic potential, based on the embedded atom method, has been employed. Results of these simulations have been compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. The agreement is better for a carbon atom sitting on an octahedral site (energy minimum) than one on a tetrahedral site (saddle point). Absolute differences in the energy barriers obtained by the two methods are usually below 5 meV at distances larger than 1.5 nm from a screw dislocation and 2 nm (up to 4 nm in the glide plane) from the edge dislocation. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations performed at T = 300 K and additional analysis based on the activation energies obtained by both methods show that they are in good qualitative agreement, despite some important quantitative discrepancies due to the large absolute errors found near the dislocation cores.

  6. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  7. OpenMM: A Hardware Independent Framework for Molecular Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Eastman, Peter; Pande, Vijay S.

    2010-01-01

    The wide diversity of computer architectures today requires a new approach to software development. OpenMM is a framework for molecular mechanics simulations, allowing a single program to run efficiently on a variety of hardware platforms.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  9. Liquid crystal director fluctuations and surface anchoring by molecular simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrienko, D.; Germano, G; Allen, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a simple and reliable method to measure the liquid crystal surface anchoring strength by molecular simulation. The method is based on the measurement of the long-range fluctuation modes of the director in confined geometry. As an example, molecular simulations of a liquid crystal in slab geometry between parallel walls with homeotropic anchoring have been carried out using the Monte Carlo technique. By studying different slab thicknesses, we are able to calculate separately the pos...

  10. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins involved in the oxidative stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1, are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5-1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response.

  11. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-06-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm as well as parallel execution of the hybrid simulation. We describe the implementational concept of the tool and its parallel extensions. We particularly focus on the parallel execution of particle insertions into dense molecular systems and propose a respective parallel algorithm. Our implementations are validated for serial and parallel setups in two and three dimensions. © 2012 IEEE.

  12. Atomic level insights into realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes through MD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Maiti, Prabal K.; Bharatam, Prasad V.

    2016-09-01

    Computational studies performed on dendrimer-drug complexes usually consider 1:1 stoichiometry, which is far from reality, since in experiments more number of drug molecules get encapsulated inside a dendrimer. In the present study, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were implemented to characterize the more realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes (1:n stoichiometry) in order to understand the effect of high drug loading on the structural properties and also to unveil the atomistic level details. For this purpose, possible inclusion complexes of model drug Nateglinide (Ntg) (antidiabetic, belongs to Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II) with amine- and acetyl-terminated G4 poly(amidoamine) (G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac)) dendrimers at neutral and low pH conditions are explored in this work. MD simulation analysis on dendrimer-drug complexes revealed that the drug encapsulation efficiency of G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac) dendrimers at neutral pH was 6 and 5, respectively, while at low pH it was 12 and 13, respectively. Center-of-mass distance analysis showed that most of the drug molecules are located in the interior hydrophobic pockets of G4 PAMAM(NH2) at both the pH; while in the case of G4 PAMAM(Ac), most of them are distributed near to the surface at neutral pH and in the interior hydrophobic pockets at low pH. Structural properties such as radius of gyration, shape, radial density distribution, and solvent accessible surface area of dendrimer-drug complexes were also assessed and compared with that of the drug unloaded dendrimers. Further, binding energy calculations using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach revealed that the location of drug molecules in the dendrimer is not the decisive factor for the higher and lower binding affinity of the complex, but the charged state of dendrimer and drug, intermolecular interactions, pH-induced conformational changes, and surface groups of dendrimer do play an

  13. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    2004-01-01

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the po

  14. Molecular Simulations of Nanoscale Transformations in Ionic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is to obtain a profound understanding of transformations in NCs at the atomic level, by performing molecular simulations for such transformations, and by comparing the simulation results with available experimental high resolution transmission electron m

  15. Impact of ionic liquids in aqueous solution on bacterial plasma membranes studied with molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geraldine S; Zidar, Jernej; Cheong, Daniel W; Jaenicke, Stephan; Klähn, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The impact of five different imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) diluted in water on the properties of a bacterial plasma membrane is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Cations considered are 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (OMIM), 1-octyloxymethyl-3-methylimidazolium (OXMIM), and 1-tetradecyl-3-methylimidazolium (TDMIM), as well as the anions chloride and lactate. The atomistic model of the membrane bilayer is designed to reproduce the lipid composition of the plasma membrane of Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Spontaneous insertion of cations into the membrane is observed in all ILs. Substantially more insertions of OMIM than of OXMIM occur and the presence of chloride reduces cation insertions compared to lactate. In contrast, anions do not adsorb onto the membrane surface nor diffuse into the bilayer. Once inserted, cations are oriented in parallel to membrane lipids with cation alkyl tails embedded into the hydrophobic membrane core, while the imidazolium-ring remains mostly exposed to the solvent. Such inserted cations are strongly associated with one to two phospholipids in the membrane. The overall order of lipids decreased after OMIM and OXMIM insertions, while on the contrary the order of lipids in the vicinity of TDMIM increased. The short alkyl tails of OMIM and OXMIM generate voids in the bilayer that are filled by curling lipids. This cation induced lipid disorder also reduces the average membrane thickness. This effect is not observed after TDMIM insertions due to the similar length of cation alkyl chain and the fatty acids of the lipids. This lipid-mimicking behavior of inserted TDMIM indicates a high membrane affinity of this cation that could lead to an enhanced accumulation of cations in the membrane over time. Overall, the simulations reveal how cations are inserted into the bacterial membrane and how such insertions change its properties. Moreover, the different roles of cations and anions are highlighted and the fundamental

  16. Effects of oxidation on tensile deformation of iron nanowires: Insights from reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Gurcan; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of oxidation on the mechanical properties of nanostructured metals is rarely explored and remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, in this work, we systematically investigate the mechanical properties and changes in the metallic iron (Fe) nanowires (NWs) under various atmospheric conditions of ambient dry O2 and in a vacuum. More specifically, we focus on the effect of oxide shell layer thickness over Fe NW surfaces at room temperature. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the variable charge ReaxFF force field potential model that dynamically handles charge variation among atoms as well as breaking and forming of the chemical bonds associated with the oxidation reaction. The ReaxFF potential model allows us to study large length scale mechanical atomistic deformation processes under the tensile strain deformation process, coupled with quantum mechanically accurate descriptions of chemical reactions. To study the influence of an oxide layer, three oxide shell layer thicknesses of ˜4.81 Å, ˜5.33 Å, and ˜6.57 Å are formed on the pure Fe NW free surfaces. It is observed that the increase in the oxide layer thickness on the Fe NW surface reduces both the yield stress and the critical strain. We further note that the tensile mechanical deformation behaviors of Fe NWs are dependent on the presence of surface oxidation, which lowers the onset of plastic deformation. Our MD simulations show that twinning is of significant importance in the mechanical behavior of the pure and oxide-coated Fe NWs; however, twin nucleation occurs at a lower strain level when Fe NWs are coated with thicker oxide layers. The increase in the oxide shell layer thickness also reduces the external stress required to initiate plastic deformation.

  17. Molecular Simulation Study of the Early Stages of Formation of Bioinspired Mesoporous Silica Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centi, Alessia; Jorge, Miguel

    2016-07-19

    The use of bioinspired templates, such as polyamines and polypeptides, could lead to significant improvements in the synthesis conditions under which mesoporous materials are traditionally produced, removing the need for strong pH as well as high temperature or pressure. In this work, we perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of 1,12-diaminododecane surfactants, in water and in the presence of silica monomers, to investigate the early stages of synthesis of one of the first examples of bioinspired silica materials. Different surfactant concentrations and pH were considered, clarifying the influence of the charge state of the molecules on the self-assembly process. We show that the amphiphilic amines form stable lamellar structures at equilibrium in the range from intermediate to high pH values. In a later stage, when silica species are added to the system, our results reveal that, in the same range of pH, silicates strongly adsorb around these aggregates at the interface with water. This causes a considerable modification of the curvature of the layer, which suggests a tendency for the system to evolve from a lamellar phase to the formation of vesicle structures. Furthermore, we show that silica monomers are able to penetrate the layer spontaneously when defects are created as a result of surfactants' head-to-head repulsion. These findings are in agreement with experimental observations and support the pillaring mechanism postulated for this class of materials. However, our simulations indicate that the aggregation process is driven by charge matching between surfactant heads and silica monomers rather than by hydrogen bond interactions between neutral species, as had been previously hypothesized. PMID:27340948

  18. Molecular simulation for novel carbon buckyball materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan R. Obayes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of buckyballs was unexpected because the researchers were delivering carbon plasmas to reproduce and describe unidentified interstellar matter. Density functional theory was done to study and design the structure of [8]circulene and three new buckyballs with molecular dimensions of less than a nanometer. Cyclic polymerization reactions can be utilized to prepare new buckyballs, and this process also produces molecules of hydrogen. All reactions are spontaneous and exothermic as per the estimations to the values of entropy, Gibbs energy, and enthalpy changes. The results demonstrate that the most symmetric buckyball is the most stable, and the molecular dimensions are less than a nanometer. The new buckyballs are characterized by the high efficiency of their energy gaps, making it potentially useful for solar cell applications.

  19. Neutron Star Crust and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A; Berry, D K

    2011-01-01

    In this book chapter we review plasma crystals in the laboratory, in the interior of white dwarf stars, and in the crust of neutron stars. We describe a molecular dynamics formalism and show results for many neutron star crust properties including phase separation upon freezing, diffusion, breaking strain, shear viscosity and dynamics response of nuclear pasta. We end with a summary and discuss open questions and challenges for the future.

  20. Bottom-up derivation of conservative and dissipative interactions for coarse-grained molecular liquids with the conditional reversible work method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichmann, Gregor; Marcon, Valentina; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der, E-mail: vandervegt@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-14

    Molecular simulations of soft matter systems have been performed in recent years using a variety of systematically coarse-grained models. With these models, structural or thermodynamic properties can be quite accurately represented while the prediction of dynamic properties remains difficult, especially for multi-component systems. In this work, we use constraint molecular dynamics simulations for calculating dissipative pair forces which are used together with conditional reversible work (CRW) conservative forces in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The combined CRW-DPD approach aims to extend the representability of CRW models to dynamic properties and uses a bottom-up approach. Dissipative pair forces are derived from fluctuations of the direct atomistic forces between mapped groups. The conservative CRW potential is obtained from a similar series of constraint dynamics simulations and represents the reversible work performed to couple the direct atomistic interactions between the mapped atom groups. Neopentane, tetrachloromethane, cyclohexane, and n-hexane have been considered as model systems. These molecular liquids are simulated with atomistic molecular dynamics, coarse-grained molecular dynamics, and DPD. We find that the CRW-DPD models reproduce the liquid structure and diffusive dynamics of the liquid systems in reasonable agreement with the atomistic models when using single-site mapping schemes with beads containing five or six heavy atoms. For a two-site representation of n-hexane (3 carbons per bead), time scale separation can no longer be assumed and the DPD approach consequently fails to reproduce the atomistic dynamics.

  1. Applications of Cerius2, software of molecular simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the investigations have a theoretical sustenance based on molecular simulation. The area of application of molecular simulation is very wide, in the Materials Technology Department assigned to the Applied Sciences Management have been treated problems about metallic nano structures, glasses, interfaces, and molecules, to sustain and to explain some of the experimental results. Energy calculations are carried out to determine minimum energy structures, for later on to carry out calculations of some of their properties; as well as the images simulation of Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. (Author)

  2. Multiscale coupling of molecular dynamics and peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2016-10-01

    We propose a multiscale computational model to couple molecular dynamics and peridynamics. The multiscale coupling model is based on a previously developed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) theory, which has three dynamics equations at three different scales, namely, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. In the proposed multiscale coupling approach, we divide the simulation domain into atomistic region and macroscale region. Molecular dynamics is used to simulate atom motions in atomistic region, and peridynamics is used to simulate macroscale material point motions in macroscale region, and both methods are nonlocal particle methods. A transition zone is introduced as a messenger to pass the information between the two regions or scales. We employ the "supercell" developed in the MMMD theory as the transition element, which is named as the adaptive multiscale element due to its ability of passing information from different scales, because the adaptive multiscale element can realize both top-down and bottom-up communications. We introduce the Cauchy-Born rule based stress evaluation into state-based peridynamics formulation to formulate atomistic-enriched constitutive relations. To mitigate the issue of wave reflection on the interface, a filter is constructed by switching on and off the MMMD dynamic equations at different scales. Benchmark tests of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) wave propagations from atomistic region to macro region are presented. The mechanical wave can transit through the interface smoothly without spurious wave deflections, and the filtering process is proven to be efficient.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation study of polyelectrolyte adsorption on cellulose surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Biermann, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of two polyelectrolyte ((carboxy methyl) cellulose and poly(acrylate) in water on crystalline cellulose is studied in this work. The multi-component problem has been splitted up into simulations of solutions of the polyelectrolyte (polyanions including sodium counterions) in water, into simulations of the interface of crystalline cellulose towards water. Finally polyelectrolyte-cellulose systems were studied. Molecular dynamics simulations of diluted (_ 2:5 weight percent) aque...

  4. Calculation and visualization of atomistic mechanical stresses in nanomaterials and biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Fenley

    Full Text Available Many biomolecules have machine-like functions, and accordingly are discussed in terms of mechanical properties like force and motion. However, the concept of stress, a mechanical property that is of fundamental importance in the study of macroscopic mechanics, is not commonly applied in the biomolecular context. We anticipate that microscopical stress analyses of biomolecules and nanomaterials will provide useful mechanistic insights and help guide molecular design. To enable such applications, we have developed Calculator of Atomistic Mechanical Stress (CAMS, an open-source software package for computing atomic resolution stresses from molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The software also enables decomposition of stress into contributions from bonded, nonbonded and Generalized Born potential terms. CAMS reads GROMACS topology and trajectory files, which are easily generated from AMBER files as well; and time-varying stresses may be animated and visualized in the VMD viewer. Here, we review relevant theory and present illustrative applications.

  5. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, E.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 A cutoff, correct

  6. Multi-scale modelling of ions in solution: from atomistic descriptions to chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ions in solution play a fundamental role in many physical, chemical, and biological processes. The PUREX process used in the nuclear industry to the treatment of spent nuclear fuels is considered as an example. For industrial applications these systems are usually described using simple analytical models which are fitted to reproduce the available experimental data. In this work, we propose a multi-scale coarse graining procedure to derive such models from atomistic descriptions. First, parameters for classical force-fields of ions in solution are extracted from ab-initio calculations. Effective (McMillan-Mayer) ion-ion potentials are then derived from radial distribution functions measured in classical molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to define an implicit solvent model of electrolytes. Finally, perturbation calculations are performed to define the best possible representation for these systems, in terms of charged hard-sphere models. Our final model is analytical and contains no free 'fitting' parameters. It shows good agreement with the exact results obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations for the thermodynamic and structural properties. Development of a similar model for the electrolyte viscosity, from information derived from atomistic descriptions, is also introduced. (author)

  7. Atomistic Modeling of Gas Adsorption in Nanocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zollo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures are currently under investigation as possible ideal media for gas storage and mesoporous materials for gas sensors. The recent scientific literature concerning gas adsorption in nanocarbons, however, is affected by a significant variation in the experimental data, mainly due to the different characteristics of the investigated samples arising from the variety of the synthesis techniques used and their reproducibility. Atomistic simulations have turned out to be sometimes crucial to study the properties of these systems in order to support the experiments, to indicate the physical limits inherent in the investigated structures, and to suggest possible new routes for application purposes. In consideration of the extent of the theme, we have chosen to treat in this paper the results obtained within some of the most popular atomistic theoretical frameworks without any purpose of completeness. A significant part of this paper is dedicated to the hydrogen adsorption on C-based nanostructures for its obvious importance and the exceptional efforts devoted to it by the scientific community.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of crystal orientation on the tensile and shear deformation of nickel–silicon interfaces: A molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The deformation and fracture mechanisms of Si–Ni interfaces under tensile and shear loads were studied by MD simulations. ► A higher tensile strength is obtained for interface planes with higher density. ► Sliding of atomic planes occurs at planes with a high density that leads to a fluctuation in the stress–strain curve. ► Amorphization of the interface region was observed when sliding of low density planes was not easy to occur. ► The relationship between the interface strength and the planar density and the width of the disorder zone was demonstrated. - Abstract: Atomistic simulation was used to study the deformation and fracture mechanisms of Ni–Si interfaces under tensile and shear loads dependent on the crystal structure of interface zone. Modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential was utilized for molecular dynamics (MD) modeling. The simulation includes analysis of common neighbors, coordination number, least-square atomic local strain, and radial distribution function. The profound effect of interface crystallography on the tensile and shear deformation is shown. The highest tensile strength is obtained for interfaces with high plane density due to lowest atomic disorder while under shear loading planes with low density exhibit a high local deformation as a result of regional atomic amorphization. The deformation mechanism in shear mode is shown to be controlled by planner sliding and local amorphization at the interface zone. A general agreement between the strength and atomic planar density at the interface is demonstrated.

  10. ADATOM, VACANCY AND SPUTTERING YIELDS OF ENERGETIC Pt ATOMS IMPACTING ON Pt(100) BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE ZI-YAN; ZHANG QING-YU

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the influence of incident atoms with low energy on the Pt(100) surface by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potential obtained by the embedded atom method (EAM) was used in the simulation. The incident energy changes from 0.leV to 200eV, and the target temperature ranges from 100 to 500 K. The target scales are 6×6×4 and 8×8×4 fcc cells for lower and higher incident energies, respectively. The adatom, sputtering, vacancy and backscattering yields are calculated. It was found that there is a sputtering threshold for the incident energy. When the incident energy is higher than the sputtering threshold, the sputtering yield increases with the increase of incident energy, and the sputtering shows a symmetrical pattern. We found that the adatom and vacancy yields increase as the incident energy increases. The vacancy yields are much higher than those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The dependence of the adatom and sputtering yields on the incident energy and the relative atomistic mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Molecular Origin of Gerstmann-Str ussler-Scheinker Syndrome: Insight from Computer Simulation of an Amyloidogenic Prion Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diadone, Isabella [University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins become pathogenic through misfolding. Here, we characterize the folding of a peptide consisting of residues 109 122 of the Syrian hamster prion protein (the H1 peptide) and of a more amyloidogenic A117V point mutant that leads in humans to an inheritable form of the Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are performed for 2.5 s. Both peptides lose their -helical starting conformations and assume a -hairpin that is structurally similar in both systems. In each simulation several unfolding/refolding events occur, leading to convergence of the thermodynamics of the conformational states to within 1 kJ/mol. The similar stability of the -hairpin relative to the unfolded state is observed in the two peptides. However, substantial differences are found between the two unfolded states. A local minimum is found within the free energy unfolded basin of the A117V mutant populated by misfolded collapsed conformations of comparable stability to the -hairpin state, consistent with increased amyloidogenicity. This population, in which V117 stabilizes a hydrophobic core, is absent in the wild-type peptide. These results are supported by simulations of oligomers showing a slightly higher stability of the associated structures and a lower barrier to association for the mutated peptide. Hence, a single point mutation carrying only two additional methyl groups is here shown to be responsible for rather dramatic differences of structuring within the unfolded (misfolded) state.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  13. Microscopic molecular superfluid response: theory and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in 1938, superfluidity has been the subject of much investigation because it provides a unique example of a macroscopic manifestation of quantum mechanics. About 60 years later, scientists successfully observed this phenomenon in the microscopic world though the spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in helium nano-droplets. This reduction of scale suggests that not only helium but also para-H2 (pH2) can be a candidate for superfluidity. This expectation is based on the fact that the smaller number of neighbours and surface effects of a finite-size cluster may hinder solidification and promote a liquid-like phase. The first prediction of superfluidity in pH2 clusters was reported in 1991 based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The possible superfluidity of pH2 was later indirectly observed in a spectroscopic Andronikashvili experiment in 2000. Since then, a growing number of studies have appeared, and theoretical simulations have been playing a special role because they help guide and interpret experiments. In this review, we go over the theoretical studies of pH2 superfluid clusters since the experiment of 2000. We provide a historical perspective and introduce the basic theoretical formalism along with key experimental advances. We then present illustrative results of the theoretical studies and comment on the possible future developments in the field. We include sufficient theoretical details such that the review can serve as a guide for newcomers to the field.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of Ni3Al melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongshan Wang; Huaiyu Hou; Xiaodong Ni; Guoliang Chen

    2008-01-01

    With the Voter-Chert version of embedded-atom model (EAM) potential and molecular dynamics, the melting of Ni3A1 alloy was simulated by one-phase (conventional) and two-phase approaches. It is shown that the simulated melting point is dependent on the potential and the simulation method. The structures of the melts obtained by different simulation methods were analyzed by the pair correlation function, the coordination number, and the distribution of atom pair type (indexed by the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis technique). The results show that the structures are very similar.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Glass Transition Behavior of Polyimide Ensemble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of chromophores to the glass transition temperature of polyimide ensemble has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with barrier analysis. Simulated Tg results indicated a good agreement with experimental value. This study showed the MD simulation could estimate the effect of chromophores to the Tg of polyimide ensemble conveniently and an estimation approach method had a surprising deviation of Tg from experiment. At the same time, a polyimide structure with higher barrier energy was designed and validated by MD simulation.

  16. Molecular simulation of the surface tension of real fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Werth, Stephan; Hasse, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Molecular models of real fluids are validated by comparing the vapor-liquid surface tension from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to correlations of experimental data. The considered molecular models consist of up to 28 interaction sites, including Lennard-Jones sites, point charges, dipoles and quadrupoles. They represent 38 real fluids, such as ethylene oxide, sulfur dioxide, phosgene, benzene, ammonia, formaldehyde, methanol and water, and were adjusted to reproduce the saturated liquid density, vapor pressure and enthalpy of vaporization. The models were not adjusted to interfacial properties, however, so that the present MD simulations are a test of model predictions. It is found that all of the considered models overestimate the surface tension. In most cases, however, the relative deviation between the simulation results and correlations to experimental data is smaller than 20 %. This observation corroborates the outcome of our previous studies on the surface tension of 2CLJQ and 2CLJD fluids where a...

  17. Simulation of molecular transitions using classical trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, A.; Martens, C. C. [University of California, California (United States)

    2001-03-01

    In the present work, we describe the implementation of a semiclassical method to study physical-chemical processes in molecular systems where electronic state transitions and quantum coherence play a dominant role. The method is based on classical trajectory propagation on the underlying coupled electronic surfaces and is derived from the semiclassical limit of the quantum Liouville equation. Unlike previous classical trajectory-based methods, quantum electronic coherence are treated naturally within this approach as complex weighted trajectory ensembles propagating on the average electronic surfaces. The method is tested on a model problem consisting of one-dimensional motion on two crossing electronic surfaces. Excellent agreement is obtained when compared to the exact results obtained by wave packet propagation. The method is applied to model quantum wave packet interferometry, where two wave packets, differing only in a relative phase, collide in the region where the two electronic surfaces cross. The dependence of the resulting population transfer on the initial relative phase of the wave packets is perfectly captured by our classical trajectory method. Comparison with an alternative method, surface hopping, shows that our approach is appropriate for modelling quantum interference phenomena. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe la implementacion de un metodo semiclasico para estudiar procesos fisicos-quimicos en sistemas moleculares donde las transiciones entre estados electronicos y las coherencias cuanticas juegan un papel predominante. El metodo se basa en la propagacion de trayectorias clasicas sobre las correspondientes superficies electronicas acopladas y se deriva a partir del limite semiclasico de la ecuacion cuantica de Liouville. A diferencia de metodos previos basados en trayectoria clasica, dentro de este esquema, las coherencias electronicas cuanticas son tratadas de manera natural como ensamble de trayectorias con pesos complejos, moviendose en

  18. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of diffusion mechanisms in NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soule De Bas, B.; Farkas, D

    2003-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion process in ordered B2 NiAl at high temperature were performed using an embedded atom interatomic potential. Diffusion occurs through a variety of cyclic mechanisms that accomplish the motion of the vacancy through nearest neighbor jumps restoring order to the alloy at the end of the cycle. The traditionally postulated six-jump cycle is only one of the various cycles observed and some of these are quite complex. A detailed sequential analysis of the observed six-jump cycles was performed and the results are analyzed in terms of the activation energies for individual jumps calculated using molecular statics simulations.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid-vapor surface tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德; ZENG; Danling; 等

    2002-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation model is established based on the well-known Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential function to determine the surface tension of a Lennard-Jones liquid-vapor interface.The simulation is carried out with argon as the working fluid of a given molecular number at different temperature and different truncated radius.It is found that the surface tension of a Lennard-Jones fluid is likely to be bigger for a bigger truncated radius,and tends to be constant after the truncated radius increased to a certain value.It is also found that the surface tension becomes smaller as the temperature increases.

  1. SPILADY: A parallel CPU and GPU code for spin-lattice magnetic molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, S. L.; Woo, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-lattice dynamics generalizes molecular dynamics to magnetic materials, where dynamic variables describing an evolving atomic system include not only coordinates and velocities of atoms but also directions and magnitudes of atomic magnetic moments (spins). Spin-lattice dynamics simulates the collective time evolution of spins and atoms, taking into account the effect of non-collinear magnetism on interatomic forces. Applications of the method include atomistic models for defects, dislocations and surfaces in magnetic materials, thermally activated diffusion of defects, magnetic phase transitions, and various magnetic and lattice relaxation phenomena. Spin-lattice dynamics retains all the capabilities of molecular dynamics, adding to them the treatment of non-collinear magnetic degrees of freedom. The spin-lattice dynamics time integration algorithm uses symplectic Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of atomic coordinate, velocity and spin evolution operators, and delivers highly accurate numerical solutions of dynamic evolution equations over extended intervals of time. The code is parallelized in coordinate and spin spaces, and is written in OpenMP C/C++ for CPU and in CUDA C/C++ for Nvidia GPU implementations. Temperatures of atoms and spins are controlled by Langevin thermostats. Conduction electrons are treated by coupling the discrete spin-lattice dynamics equations for atoms and spins to the heat transfer equation for the electrons. Worked examples include simulations of thermalization of ferromagnetic bcc iron, the dynamics of laser pulse demagnetization, and collision cascades. Catalogue identifier: AFAN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFAN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Apache License, Version 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1611165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 367246683

  2. Computer simulation in materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, R.J.; Beeler, J.R.; Esterling, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers on the subject of modeling in materials science. Topics include thermodynamics of metallic solids and fluids, grain-boundary modeling, fracture from an atomistic point of view, and computer simulation of dislocations on an atomistic level.

  3. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping eSun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY.Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities.

  4. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Bertelshofer, Franziska; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY) is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY. Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities. PMID:26913282

  5. Applications of Cerius2, software of molecular simulation; Aplicaciones de Cerius2, software de simulacion molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez G, M.E.; Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Most of the investigations have a theoretical sustenance based on molecular simulation. The area of application of molecular simulation is very wide, in the Materials Technology Department assigned to the Applied Sciences Management have been treated problems about metallic nano structures, glasses, interfaces, and molecules, to sustain and to explain some of the experimental results. Energy calculations are carried out to determine minimum energy structures, for later on to carry out calculations of some of their properties; as well as the images simulation of Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. (Author)

  6. Radiation track structure simulation in a molecular medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A problem in the simulation of track structures is identified; because the underlying medium is assumed to be a continuum in the simulation, events (and therefore chemical species) can be generated unphysically close together. The problem is particularly severe for low-energy electrons, which are responsible for inducing most of the observed chemistry. Two modified simulation methods are proposed to investigate this effect. The first method modifies the density of the medium using the radial distribution function, to ensure that events can not be generated closer to one another than nearest neighbour molecules. The second method simulates the track in a molecular medium, using configurations generated by molecular dynamics. When gas phase cross-sections are used these two methods have large effects on the mean electron range and the mean inter-event distance, but surprisingly, they act in opposite directions. When condensed phase cross-sections are used the effects are much smaller. (author)

  7. A Simple Method for Automated Equilibration Detection in Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodera, John D

    2016-04-12

    Molecular simulations intended to compute equilibrium properties are often initiated from configurations that are highly atypical of equilibrium samples, a practice which can generate a distinct initial transient in mechanical observables computed from the simulation trajectory. Traditional practice in simulation data analysis recommends this initial portion be discarded to equilibration, but no simple, general, and automated procedure for this process exists. Here, we suggest a conceptually simple automated procedure that does not make strict assumptions about the distribution of the observable of interest in which the equilibration time is chosen to maximize the number of effectively uncorrelated samples in the production timespan used to compute equilibrium averages. We present a simple Python reference implementation of this procedure and demonstrate its utility on typical molecular simulation data. PMID:26771390

  8. Prototyping Bio-Nanorobots using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdi, Mustapha; Ferreira, A; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a molecular mechanics study using a molecular dynamics software (NAMD) coupled to virtual reality (VR) techniques for intuitive Bio-NanoRobotic prototyping. Using simulated Bio-Nano environments in VR, the operator can design and characterize through physical simulation and 3-D visualization the behavior of Bio-NanoRobotic components and structures. The main novelty of the proposed simulations is based on the characterization of stiffness performances of passive joints-based deca-alanine protein molecule and active joints-based viral protein motor (VPL) in their native environment. Their use as elementary Bio-NanoRobotic components (1 dof platform) are also simulated and the results discussed.

  9. Filaments in Simulations of Molecular Cloud Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Gilberto C

    2013-01-01

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse is hierarchical in nature, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in cloud, and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features, through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump, but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalli...

  10. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. II. From time Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    From a nanoscale heat transfer point of view, currently one of the most interesting and challenging tasks is to quantitatively analyze phonon mode specific transport properties in solid materials, which plays a vital role in many emerging and diverse technological applications. It has not been long that such information can be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. However, few methods have been developed for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations [Phys. Rev. B 91, 115426 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.115426], the other widely used computational method for calculating thermal transport of materials in addition to EMD. In this work, a computational scheme based on time Fourier transform of atomistic heat current, called the frequency domain direct decomposed method (FDDDM), is proposed to analyze the contributions of frequency dependent thermal conductivity in NEMD simulations. The FDDDM results of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber Si are compared with the TDNMA method from EMD simulation. Similar trends are found for both cases, which confirm the validity of our FDDDM approach. Benefiting from the inherent nature of NEMD and the theoretical formula that does not require any temperature assumption, the FDDDM can be directly used to investigate the size and temperature effect. Moreover, the unique advantage of FDDDM prior to previous methods (such as SED and TDNMA) is that it can be straightforwardly used to characterize the phonon frequency dependent thermal conductivity of disordered systems, such as amorphous materials. The FDDDM approach can also be a good candidate to be used to understand the phonon behaviors and thus provides useful guidance for designing efficient structures for advanced thermal management.

  11. Hydration of polyelectrolytes studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Biermann, Oliver; Haedicke, Erich; Koltzenburg, Sebastian; Seufert, Michael; Mueller-Plathe, Florian

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of diluted (~2.5 weight percent) aqueous solutions of two polyelectrolytes, namely sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium poly(acrylate) (PAA) have been performed. Water and counterions were taken into account explicitly. For CMC the substitution pattern and starting conformation is all-important. Two simulations of CMC oligomers resulted in different structures: One molecule takes a stretched conformation, while the second one keeps a globule-like, to...

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Pabis, Anna; Geronimo, Inacrist; York, Darrin M.; Paneth, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron–sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specif...

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shear Moduli for Coulomb Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2008-01-01

    Torsional (shear) oscillations of neutron stars may have been observed in quasiperiodic oscillations of Magnetar Giant Flares. The frequencies of these modes depend on the shear modulus of neutron star crust. We calculate the shear modulus of Coulomb crystals from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that electron screening reduces the shear modulus by about 10% compared to previous Ogata et al. results. Our MD simulations can be extended to calculate the effects of impurities and or polycrystalline structures on the shear modulus.

  14. Molecular Simulation towards Efficient and Representative Subsurface Reservoirs Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    This dissertation focuses on the application of Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation and Molecular Dynamics (MD) in modeling thermodynamics and flow of subsurface reservoir fluids. At first, MC molecular simulation is proposed as a promising method to replace correlations and equations of state in subsurface flow simulators. In order to accelerate MC simulations, a set of early rejection schemes (conservative, hybrid, and non-conservative) in addition to extrapolation methods through reweighting and reconstruction of pre-generated MC Markov chains were developed. Furthermore, an extensive study was conducted to investigate sorption and transport processes of methane, carbon dioxide, water, and their mixtures in the inorganic part of shale using both MC and MD simulations. These simulations covered a wide range of thermodynamic conditions, pore sizes, and fluid compositions shedding light on several interesting findings. For example, the possibility to have more carbon dioxide adsorbed with more preadsorbed water concentrations at relatively large basal spaces. The dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter corresponds to the introductory part where a brief background about molecular simulation and motivations are given. The second chapter is devoted to discuss the theoretical aspects and methodology of the proposed MC speeding up techniques in addition to the corresponding results leading to the successful multi-scale simulation of the compressible single-phase flow scenario. In chapter 3, the results regarding our extensive study on shale gas at laboratory conditions are reported. At the fourth and last chapter, we end the dissertation with few concluding remarks highlighting the key findings and summarizing the future directions.

  15. Vision-Augmented Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajab Al-Sayegh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a user-friendly vision-augmented technique to carry out atomic simulation using hand gestures. The system is novel in its concept as it enables the user to directly manipulate the atomic structures on the screen, in 3D space using hand gestures, allowing the exploration and visualisation of molecular interactions at different relative conformations. The hand gestures are used to pick and place atoms on the screen allowing thereby the ease of carrying out molecular dynamics simulation in a more efficient way. The end result is that users with limited expertise in developing molecular structures can now do so easily and intuitively by the use of body gestures to interact with the simulator to study the system in question. The proposed system was tested by simulating the crystal anisotropy of crystalline silicon during nanoindentation. A long-range (Screened bond order Tersoff potential energy function was used during the simulation which revealed the value of hardness and elastic modulus being similar to what has been found previously from the experiments. We anticipate that our proposed system will open up new horizons to the current methods on how an MD simulation is designed and executed.

  16. Molecular simulation of C60 adsorption onto a TiO2 rutile (1 1 0) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo molecular simulation study is presented on the adsorption and growth of C60 films on the surface of the (1 1 0) face of rutile. Simulations are performed for a temperature of 600 K using atomistic models both for the fullerene molecules and the TiO2 surface. It is found in this work that C60 is adsorbed preferably in an ordered arrangement along the surface depressions over the exposed undercoordinated Ti cations. At low densities adsorption occurs preferably at alternate rows, with locations in consecutive rows being occupied appreciably only at higher C60 densities. At low densities, the fullerene molecules tend to aggregate into islands in the surface plane. Additional layers of C60 form only as the density increases, and do so before a monolayer is completed in all consecutive rows. Full monolayer capacity obtained at the highest densities is about 0.9 C60 molecules per nm2, but this is only achieved by completing the packing of molecules in interstices at a slightly upper level. The fraction of the molecules that lie closest to the surface only amounts to 0.6 molecules per nm2.

  17. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube—polyamide-6,6 nanocomposites: Reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2011-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of composites of carbon nanotubes and polyamide-6,6 has been investigated using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution. It is found, in line with experiments, that the composites have thermal conductivities, which are only moderately larger than that of pure polyamide. The composite conductivities are orders of magnitude less than what would be expected from naïve additivity arguments. This means that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of isolated nanotubes, which exceed the best-conducting metals, cannot be harnessed for heat transport, when the nanotubes are embedded in a polymer matrix. The main reason is the high interfacial thermal resistance between the nanotubes and the polymer, which was calculated in addition to the total composite thermal conductivity as well as that of the subsystem. It hinders heat to be transferred from the slow-conducting polymer into the fast-conducting nanotubes and back into the polymer. This interpretation is in line with the majority of recent simulation works. An alternative explanation, namely, the damping of the long-wavelength phonons in nanotubes by the polymer matrix is not supported by the present calculations. These modes provide most of the polymers heat conduction. An additional minor effect is caused by the anisotropic structure of the polymer phase induced by the nearby nanotube surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the polymer matrix increases slightly in the direction parallel to the nanotubes, whereas it decreases perpendicular to it.

  18. Atomistic Conversion Reaction Mechanism of WO3 in Secondary Ion Batteries of Li, Na, and Ca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Hai Yan; Luo, Langli; Shao, Yuyan; Gao, Fei; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong M.

    2016-05-13

    Reversible insertion and extraction of ionic species into a host lattice governs the basic operating principle for both rechargeable battery (such as lithium batteries) and electrochromic devices (such as ANA Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner electrochromic window). Intercalation and/or conversion are two fundamental chemical processes for some materials in response to the ion insertion. The interplay between these two chemical processes has never been established. It is speculated that the conversion reaction is initiated by ion intercalation. However, experimental evidence of intercalation and subsequent conversion remains unexplored. Here, using in situ HRTEM and spectroscopy, we captured the atomistic conversion reaction processes during lithium, sodium and calcium ion insertion into tungsten trioxide (WO3) single crystal model electrodes. An intercalation step right prior to conversion is explicitly revealed at atomic scale for the first time for these three ion species. Combining nanoscale diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, it is found that, beyond intercalation, the inserted ion-oxygen bonding formation destabilized the transition-metal framework which gradually shrunk, distorted and finally collapsed to a pseudo-amorphous structure. This study provides a full atomistic picture on the transition from intercalation to conversion, which is of essential for material applications in both secondary ion batteries and electrochromic devices.

  19. Atomistic study of the buckling of gold nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Paer A.T., E-mail: par.olsson@mek.lth.se [Division of Mechanics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Park, Harold S., E-mail: parkhs@bu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    In this work, we present results from atomistic simulations of gold nanowires under axial compression, with a focus on examining the effects of both axial and surface orientation effects on the buckling behavior. This was accomplished by using molecular statics simulations while considering three different crystallographic systems: <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace}, <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} and <1 1 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace}, with aspect ratios spanning from 20 to 50 and cross-sectional dimensions ranging from 2.45 to 5.91 nm. The simulations indicate that there is a deviation from the inverse square length dependence of critical forces predicted from traditional linear elastic Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko beam theories, where the nature of the deviation from the perfect inverse square length behavior differs for different crystallographic systems. This variation is found to be strongly correlated to either stiffening or increased compliance of the tangential stiffness due to the influence of nonlinear elasticity, which leads to normalized critical forces that decrease with decreasing aspect ratio for the <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} and <1 0 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} systems, but increase with decreasing aspect ratio for the <1 1 0>/{l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} system. In contrast, it was found that the critical strains are all lower than their bulk counterparts, and that the critical strains decrease with decreasing cross-sectional dimensions; the lower strains may be an effect emanating from the presence of the surfaces, which are all more elastically compliant than the bulk and thus give rise to a more compliant flexural rigidity.

  20. THE REFINEMENT OF NMR STRUCTURES BY MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TORDA, AE; VANGUNSTEREN, WF

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the use of molecular dynamics simulations as a tool for the refinement of structures based on NMR data. The procedure always involves the construction of a pseudo-energy term to model the experimental data and we consider the various approaches to this problem. We detail recent work where