WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic-scale intracellular water

  1. Atomic scale structures of interfaces between kaolinite edges and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Wang, R.; Meijer, E.J.; Zhou, H.; He, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the atomic scale structures of kaolinite edge surfaces in contact with water. The commonly occurring edge surfaces are investigated (i.e. (0 1 0) and (1 1 0)) by using first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) technique. For (1 1 0)-type edge surface, there are two different

  2. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4 in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate. The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (Ubias influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G0 (G0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant or 2G0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  3. Atomic-Scale Analysis of the RuO2/Water Interface under Electrochemical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Rossmeisl, Jan; Björketun, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the interface between ruthenium oxide and water was examined using density functional theory calculations for a range of pH and electrode potential values, and the results were summarized in a surface Pourbaix diagram. The results indicate that pH affects the interfacial structure...... as a consequence of the formation of a stable hydrogen network and the impact of the electric field on the interfacial Gibbs energy. Focusing on the potential region of the oxygen evolution reaction (1.23 V vs a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) + overpotential), variations in pH were found to change both...... the formal Ru valency and the structure of the primary water layer by altering the work function of the interfacial structure. We hypothesize that the effects of pH on the hydrogen bond network and formal valency observed in this work also apply to other transition-metal oxides....

  4. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  5. Probing Volume Changes and the Intracellular Water in Single Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghoon; Arora, Silki; Mauser, Jennifer; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Schulte, Alfons

    2012-02-01

    In the living cell, water is one of the most abundant substances, and cells have developed very efficient machinery for transporting water in and out. Erythrocytes can undergo large, but reversible, volume changes under hydrostatic pressure and a possible mechanism may involve transport of water. We employ confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy over the frequency range from 150 to 4000 cm-1 to probe both the intracellular hemoglobin and water in individual red blood cells under physiological conditions. We investigate changes in the OH stretch bands near 3400 cm-1 due to the cellular water. Results of experiments that employ variations in external parameters such as pressure will be presented.

  6. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied....... Kinetic friction is observed to be caused by atomic-scale Stick and slip which occurs by nucleation and subsequent motion of dislocations preferably between close-packed {111} planes. Stick and slip seems ro occur in different situations. For single crystalline contacts without grain boundaries...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  7. Ohm's law survives to the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Mahapatra, S; Ryu, H; Lee, S; Fuhrer, A; Reusch, T C G; Thompson, D L; Lee, W C T; Klimeck, G; Hollenberg, L C L; Simmons, M Y

    2012-01-06

    As silicon electronics approaches the atomic scale, interconnects and circuitry become comparable in size to the active device components. Maintaining low electrical resistivity at this scale is challenging because of the presence of confining surfaces and interfaces. We report on the fabrication of wires in silicon--only one atom tall and four atoms wide--with exceptionally low resistivity (~0.3 milliohm-centimeters) and the current-carrying capabilities of copper. By embedding phosphorus atoms within a silicon crystal with an average spacing of less than 1 nanometer, we achieved a diameter-independent resistivity, which demonstrates ohmic scaling to the atomic limit. Atomistic tight-binding calculations confirm the metallicity of these atomic-scale wires, which pave the way for single-atom device architectures for both classical and quantum information processing.

  8. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  9. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  10. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative

  11. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M.; Jamali, T.; Sadeghi, A.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Fesler, G.; Meyer, E.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H =0.61 ±0.02 at a 1 σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h (q ) , on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  12. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M; Jamali, T; Sadeghi, A; Movahed, S M S; Fesler, G; Meyer, E; Khoshnevisan, B; Jafari, G R

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H=0.61±0.02 at a 1σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h(q), on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  13. Seebeck effect at the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-04

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging.

  14. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  15. Atomic scale front propagation at the onset of frictional sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Taloni, Alessandro; Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro; Manini, Nicola; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Macroscopic frictional sliding emerges from atomic-scale interactions and processes at the contact interface, but bridging the gap between micro and macro scales still remains an unsolved challenge. Direct imaging of the contact surface and simultaneous measurement of stress fields during macroscopic frictional slip revealed the formation of crack precursors, questioning the traditional picture of frictional contacts described in terms of a single degree of freedom. Here we study the onset of frictional slip at atomic scale by simulating the motion of an aluminum block pushed by a slider on a copper substrate. We show the formation of dynamic slip front propagation and precursory activity that resemble macroscopic observations. The analysis of stress patterns during slip, however, reveals subtle effects due to the lattice structures which hinder a direct application of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Our results illustrate that dynamic front propagation arises already at the atomic scales and shed light on the connections between atomic-scale and macroscopic friction.

  16. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute...... conditions, ii) water dipolar relaxation oscillates with glycolysis and in phase with ATP concentration, iii) this phenomenon is scale-invariant from the subcellular to the ensemble of synchronized cells and, iv) the periodicity of both glycolytic oscillations and dipolar relaxation are equally affected by D...

  17. Contact and Alignment Marker Technology for Atomic Scale Device Fabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiddam, M.R.; Rogge, S.; Drift, E. van der; Ilge, B.; Palasantzas, G.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on the technology to link atomic scale structures to macroscopic contact pads. Dedicated processes for electrode pattern formation in several materials have been developed and characterised. For pattern formation in CoSi2 a thermal compromise between proper silicide formation

  18. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  19. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue. PMID:22848359

  20. Understanding the Atomic-Scale World with the Molecular Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert F.

    2006-12-01

    The Molecular Workbench (MW) is a sophisticated system for developing and delivering interactive learning activities to teach basic concepts that govern atomic and nanoscale phenomena. The system is based on a molecular dynamics model that calculates the motion of atoms, molecules, and other objects in real time as a result of the applicable forces, including Lennard-Jones potentials, electrostatic potentials, elastic bonds, and external fields. Light-atom interactions are modeled with photons of selectable energy that interact with the excited states of atoms. The built-in authoring functions can be used to create or modify learning activities. The ease of creating MW materials has led to over 200 activities contributed by staff and collaborators. Many are housed in a database with fields that include an overview, learning objectives, a description of the central concepts addressed, textbook references, and extensions. MW has been used extensively in classrooms in grades 7-14. In several settings student learning gains have been measured using a pre-posttest design. Research results will be reported that show Overall increases in understanding of atomic scale phenomena at high school and community college levels. The ability to transfer understanding of atomic-scale phenomena to new situations and to reason about macroscopic phenomena on the basis of atomic-scale interactions. Better understanding of difficult questions that required immersive visualization and prediction MW is written in Java, so it runs under all common operating systems, including Mac OSX, Windows, and Linux. It is open source, so it can be shared and copied by any user.

  1. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  2. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular....... As a particularly intriguing example of this, the lateral pressure profiles of raft-like and non-raft systems indicate that the lipid composition of membrane domains may have a major impact on membrane protein activation....

  3. Spin mapping at the nanoscale and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-10-01

    The direct observation of spin structures with atomic-scale resolution, a long-time dream in condensed matter research, recently became a reality based on the development of spin-sensitive scanning probe methods, such as spin-polarized scanning-tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) and magnetic exchange force microscopy (MExFM). This article reviews the basic principles and methods of SP-STM and MExFM and describes recently achieved milestones in the application of these techniques to metallic and electrically insulating magnetic nanostructures. Discoveries of novel types of magnetic order at the nanoscale are presented as well as challenges for the future, including studies of local spin excitations based on spin-resolved inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and measurements of damping forces in MExFM experiments.

  4. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Feijó Delgado

    Full Text Available We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein, we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  5. Tuning magnetotransport in a compensated semimetal at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Barreteau, Céline; Ubrig, Nicolas; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2015-11-01

    Either in bulk form, or in atomically thin crystals, layered transition metal dichalcogenides continuously reveal new phenomena. The latest example is 1T'-WTe2, a semimetal found to exhibit the largest known magnetoresistance in the bulk, and predicted to become a topological insulator in strained monolayers. Here we show that reducing the thickness through exfoliation enables the electronic properties of WTe2 to be tuned, which allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed magnetotransport down to the atomic scale. The longitudinal resistance and the unconventional magnetic field dependence of the Hall resistance are reproduced quantitatively by a classical two-band model for crystals as thin as six monolayers, whereas a crossover to an Anderson insulator occurs for thinner crystals. Besides establishing the origin of the magnetoresistance of WTe2, our results represent a complete validation of the classical theory for two-band electron-hole transport, and indicate that atomically thin WTe2 layers remain gapless semimetals.

  6. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  7. Atomic-scale investigations of the struct. and dynamics of complex catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl Sohlberg, Drexel University

    2007-05-16

    By some accounts, catalysis impacts ≥ 30% of GDP in developed countries [Maxwell, I. E. Nature 394, 325-326 (1998)]. Catalysis is the enabling technology for petroleum production, for control of gaseous emissions from petroleum combustion, and for the production of industrial and consumer chemicals. Future applications of catalysis are potentially even more far reaching. There is an ever-growing need to move the economy from a fossil-fuel energy base to cleaner alternatives. Hydrogen-based combustion systems and fuel cells could play a dominant role, given a plentiful and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Photocatalysis is the most promising clean technology for hydrogen production, relying solely on water and sunlight, but performance enhancements in photocatalysis are needed to make this technology economically competitive. Given the enormously wide spread utilization of catalysts, even incremental performance enhancements would have far-reaching benefits for multiple end-use sectors. In the area of fuel and chemical production, such improvements would translate into vast reductions in energy consumption. At the consumption end, improvements in the catalysts involved would yield tremendous reductions in pollution. In the area of photocatalysis, such efficiency improvements could finally render hydrogen an economically viable fuel. Prerequisite to the non-empirical design and refinement of improved catalysts is the identification of the atomic-scale structure and properties of the catalytically active sites. This has become a major industrial research priority. The focus of this research program was to combine atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy with first-principles density functional theory calculations to deliver an atomic-scale description of heterogeneous catalytic systems that could form the basis for non-empirical design of improved catalysts with greater energy efficiency.

  8. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-01

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (cryopreservation for practical applications.

  9. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Akrami, S.M.R.; Nakayachi, H.; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O3 cleaning. ...

  10. Understanding the Atomic-Scale Contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local...

  11. Deciphering Adsorption Structure on Insulators at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Feibelman, Peter J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Nanotechnologies

    2014-09-01

    We applied Scanning Probe Microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) to discover the basics of how adsorbates wet insulating substrates, addressing a key question in geochemistry. To allow experiments on insulating samples we added Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) capability to our existing UHV Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). This was accomplished by integrating and debugging a commercial qPlus AFM upgrade. Examining up-to-40-nm-thick water films grown in vacuum we found that the exact nature of the growth spirals forming around dislocations determines what structure of ice, cubic or hexagonal, is formed at low temperature. DFT revealed that wetting of mica is controlled by how exactly a water layer wraps around (hydrates) the K+ ions that protrude from the mica surface. DFT also sheds light on the experimentally observed extreme sensitivity of the mica surface to preparation conditions: K atoms can easily be rinsed off by water flowing past the mica surface.

  12. Controlling Mobility in Perovskite Oxides by Ferroelectric Modulation of Atomic-Scale Interface Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashevich, Andrei; Marshall, Matthew S J; Visani, Cristina; Disa, Ankit S; Xu, Haichao; Walker, Frederick J; Ahn, Charles H; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2017-12-26

    Coherent and epitaxial interfaces permit the realization of electric field driven devices controlled by atomic-scale structural and electronic effects at interfaces. Compared to conventional field effect devices where channel conductivity is modulated by carrier density modification, the propagation of atomic-scale distortions across an interface can control the atomic scale bonding, interatomic electron tunneling rates and thus the mobility of the channel material. We use first-principles theory to design an atomically abrupt epitaxial perovskite heterostructure involving an oxide ferroelectric (PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3) and conducting oxide channel (LaNiO3) where coupling of polar atomic motions to structural distortions can induce large, reversible changes in the channel mobility. We fabricate and characterize the heterostructure and measure record values, larger than 1000%, for the conductivity modulation. Our results describe how purely interfacial effects can be engineered to deliver unique electronic device properties and large responses to external fields.

  13. Atomic-scale Modelling of Electro-catalytic Surfaces and Dynamic Electrochemical Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard

    This dissertation addresses numerical calculations on the atomic scale to study catalytic surfaces for electrochemistry. The first half of the thesis deals with calculations on the properties of catalytic surfaces, using well known methodology, whereas the second half of the thesis deals with the......This dissertation addresses numerical calculations on the atomic scale to study catalytic surfaces for electrochemistry. The first half of the thesis deals with calculations on the properties of catalytic surfaces, using well known methodology, whereas the second half of the thesis deals...... with the development of new methodology to explicitly include the electrolyte in the atomic scale calculations. Chapter 3 presents calculations on contracted and reconstructed platinum surfaces, which are relevant for development of catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Correlation of the results...

  14. [Acanthamoeba, naturally intracellularly infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after their isolation from a microbiologically contaminated drinking water system in a hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R; Burghardt, H; Bergmann, H

    1995-03-01

    The drinking water system of a new hospital building that was highly contaminated with bacteria before opening was investigated too for the prevalence of small free living amoebae. Germ counts resulted in > 100 CFU/ml in 100% of the cold water samples, that showed also growth of P. aeruginosa, whereas E. coli and coliforme bacteria could not be identified. The investigation of 37 water samples for protozoa revealed growth of small freeliving amoebae in 20 samples (54%) belonging to 10 species of the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmannella, Echinamoeba among others. In addition 2 Ciliate- and 2 Microflagellate-species could be observed. While all Naegleria strains isolated belonged to the N. gruberi-complex two of 16 Acanthamoeba-isolates proved to be pathogenic for laboratory mice. From 7 watersamples positive with P. aeruginosa 5 Acanthamoeba- and 2 Echinamoeba strains could be isolated which revealed intracellular multiplication of P. aeruginosa. Because of their well known resistances against chlorine, the amoebae and their cysts are considered to be vectors for these intracellular bacteria. A complete sanitation of the incriminated drinking water system was accomplished by combined chemical and thermic disinfection measures.

  15. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana

    2009-01-01

    , the exceptional nature of cardiolipins is characterized by their small charged head group connected to typically four hydrocarbon chains. In this work, we present atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the inner mitochondrial membrane modeled as a mixture of cardiolipins (CLs), phosphatidylcholines (PCs...

  16. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  17. Electric field as a switching tool for magnetic states in atomic-scale nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negulyaev, N N; Stepanyuk, V S; Hergert, W; Kirschner, J

    2011-01-21

    One of the most promising candidates for the construction of ultrahigh-density storage media is low-dimensional atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures exhibiting magnetic bi- or multistability. Here we propose a novel route of locally controlling and switching magnetism in such nanostructures. Our ab initio studies reveal that externally applied electric field can be used for this purpose.

  18. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...

  19. Continuum mechanics at the atomic scale : Insights into non-adhesive contacts using molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2016-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study non-adhesive contact at the atomic scale. Starting from the case of Hertzian contact, it was found that the reduced Young’s modulus E* for shallow indentations scales as a function of, both, the indentation depth and the contact

  20. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junggoo; Lee, Joonho; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Mori, Hirotaro

    2009-11-01

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  1. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junggoo [Functional Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 66 Sangnam-dong, Changwon, Kyungsangnam-Do 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Tanaka, Toshihiro [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mori, Hirotaro, E-mail: jglee36@kims.re.k [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2009-11-25

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  2. Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam S; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-07-17

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local contact potential difference does reflect the periodicity of the ionic crystal, but not the magnitude of its Madelung surface potential. The imaging mechanism relies on the induced polarization of the ions at the tip-surface interface owing to the modulation of the applied bias voltage. Our findings are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical expectations and experimental observations.

  3. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... a quasipoint source with a spatial extension similar to the size of a dangling bond. [S0031-9007(98)08376-8]....

  4. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yen-Ting; Lo, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Chu-Chun; Chen, Peng-Yu; Wu, Jenq-Shinn; Liang, Chi-Te; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  5. Atomic-scale sensing of the magnetic dipolar field from single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Paul, William; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Willke, Philip; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2017-05-01

    Spin resonance provides the high-energy resolution needed to determine biological and material structures by sensing weak magnetic interactions. In recent years, there have been notable achievements in detecting and coherently controlling individual atomic-scale spin centres for sensitive local magnetometry. However, positioning the spin sensor and characterizing spin-spin interactions with sub-nanometre precision have remained outstanding challenges. Here, we use individual Fe atoms as an electron spin resonance (ESR) sensor in a scanning tunnelling microscope to measure the magnetic field emanating from nearby spins with atomic-scale precision. On artificially built assemblies of magnetic atoms (Fe and Co) on a magnesium oxide surface, we measure that the interaction energy between the ESR sensor and an adatom shows an inverse-cube distance dependence (r-3.01±0.04). This demonstrates that the atoms are predominantly coupled by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, which, according to our observations, dominates for atom separations greater than 1 nm. This dipolar sensor can determine the magnetic moments of individual adatoms with high accuracy. The achieved atomic-scale spatial resolution in remote sensing of spins may ultimately allow the structural imaging of individual magnetic molecules, nanostructures and spin-labelled biomolecules.

  6. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  7. Sensing for intracellular thiols by water-insoluble two-photon fluorescent probe incorporating nanogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xudong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, Rui, E-mail: hurui@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: yili@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Optoelectronic Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Guoqiang, E-mail: gqyang@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A novel “turn-on” two-photon fluorescent probe based on a π-conjugated triarylboron luminogen was designed and synthesized. • Fast, selective and sensitive detection of biothiols in 100% aqueous solution by simply loaded on a nanogel. • Single-photon and two-photon fluorescent bioimaging of biothiols in NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. - Abstract: A novel “turn-on” two-photon fluorescent probe containing a π-conjugated triarylboron luminogen and a maleimide moiety DMDP-M based on the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism for biothiol detection was designed and synthesized. By simply loading the hydrophobic DMDP-M on a cross-linked Pluronic{sup ®} F127 nanogel (CL-F127), a probing system DMDP-M/CL-F127 was established, which shows quick response, high selectivity and sensitivity to cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) in aqueous phase. The DMDP-M/CL-F127 system presented the fastest response to Cys with a rate constant of 0.56 min{sup −1}, and the detection limit to Cys was calculated to be as low as 0.18 μM. The DMDP-M/CL-F127 system has been successfully applied to the fluorescence imaging of biothiols in NIH/3T3 fibroblasts either with single-photon or two-photon excitation because of its high biocompatibility and cell-membrane permeability. The present work provides a general, simple and efficient strategy for the application of hydrophobic molecules to sensing biothiols in aqueous phase, and a novel sensing system for intracellular biothiols fitted for both single-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging.

  8. Intracellular water in Artemia cysts (brine shrimp): Investigations by deuterium and oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Kasturi, S R; Seitz, P.K.; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    The dormant cysts of Artemia undergo cycles of hydration-dehydration without losing viability. Therefore, Artemia cysts serve as an excellent intact cellular system for studying the dynamics of water-protein interactions as a function of hydration. Deuterium spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times of water in cysts hydrated with D2O have been measured for hydrations between 1.5 and 0.1 g of D2O per gram of dry solids. When the relaxation rates (I/T1, I/T2) of 2H and 17O are plot...

  9. Dual Impact of Tolvaptan on Intracellular and Extracellular Water in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients with Fluid Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Murakami, Takuya; Igarashi, Yusuke; Okabe, Kyochika; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Saito, Takako; Sekiguchi, Chuji; Miyazawa, Yasuharu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    Objective Tolvaptan, an oral selective V2-receptor antagonist, is a water diuretic that ameliorates fluid retention with a lower risk of a worsening renal function than conventional loop diuretics. Although loop diuretics predominantly decrease extracellular water (ECW) compared with intracellular water (ICW), the effect of tolvaptan on fluid distribution remains unclear. We therefore examined how tolvaptan changes ICW and ECW in accordance with the renal function. Methods Six advanced chronic kidney disease patients (stage 4 or 5) with fluid retention were enrolled in this study. Tolvaptan (7.5 mg/day) added to conventional diuretic treatment was administered to remove fluid retention. The fluid volume was measured using a bioimpedance analysis device before (day 0) and after (day 5 or 6) tolvaptan treatment. Results Body weight decreased by 2.6%±1.3% (64.4±6.5 vs. 62.8±6.3 kg, p=0.06), and urine volume increased by 54.8%±23.9% (1,215±169 vs. 1,709±137 mL/day, p=0.03) between before and after tolvaptan treatment. Tolvaptan significantly decreased ICW (6.5%±1.5%, p=0.01) and ECW (7.5%±1.4%, p=0.02), which had similar reduction rates (p=0.32). The estimated glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged during the treatment (14.6±2.8 vs. 14.9±2.7 mL/min/1.732 m, p=0.35). Conclusion Tolvaptan ameliorates body fluid retention, and induces an equivalent reduction rate of ICW and ECW without a worsening renal function. Tolvaptan is a novel water diuretic that has a different effect on fluid distribution compared with conventional loop diuretics.

  10. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, S M R; Nakayachi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2014-11-14

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O₃ cleaning. We found that all the methods provide significant improvements in both the imaging and force measurements in spite of the tip transfer through the air. Among the methods, we found that the Si coating provides the best stability and reproducibility in the measurements. To understand the origin of the fouling resistance of the cleaned tip surface and the difference between the cleaning methods, we have investigated the tip surface properties by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that the contaminations adsorbed on the tip during the tip transfer through the air should desorb from the surface when it is immersed in aqueous solution due to the enhanced hydrophilicity by the tip treatments. The tip surface prepared by the Si coating is oxidized when it is immersed in aqueous solution. This creates local spots where stable hydration structures are formed. For the other methods, there is no active mechanism to create such local hydration sites. Thus, the hydration structure formed under the tip apex is not necessarily stable. These results reveal the desirable tip properties for atomic-scale AFM measurements in liquid, which should serve as a guideline for further improvements of the tip treatment methods.

  11. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  12. Nanometer-scale metallic grains connected with atomic-scale conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, A.; Korotkov, A. L.; Bowman, M.; Waddell, J.; Davidovic, D.

    2003-03-01

    We describe a technique for connecting a nanometer-scale gold grain to leads by atomic-scale gold point contacts. These devices differ from previous metallic quantum dots in that the conducting channels are relatively well transmitting. We investigate the dependence of the Coulomb blockade on contact resistance. The high-resistance devices display Coulomb blockade and the low-resistance devices display a zero-bias conductance dip, both in quantitative agreement with theory. We find that in the intermediate regime, where the sample resistance is close to h/e2, the I-V curve displays a Coulomb staircase with symmetric contact capacitances.

  13. Probing electronic state at atomic scale on the surface of SrVO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Ryota; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2014-03-01

    Probing electronic structure of atomically well controlled surface of Perovskite-type 3d transition-metal oxides have been attracting much interest because of their intriguing emergent physical properties by heterostructure engineering. In this study, we have especially focused on SrVO3, where importance of correlation effects has been considered. We successfully obtained atomically flat surfaces of SrVO3, which gave us the great opportunity to visualize correlated electronic state at atomic scale by means of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Based on the experimental data, we discuss spectroscopic signature of many body effects on the surface of SrVO3 system.

  14. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends...... in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  15. In situ atom scale visualization of domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-10-08

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application.

  16. Effect of atomizer scale and fluid properties on atomization mechanisms and spray characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waind, Travis

    Atomization is chaos. The breakup of liquid structures by a gas encompasses such a wide range of possible configurations that a definitive mechanism describing breakup in any and all situations is an impossibility. However, when focus is applied, trends can be teased out of experimental data that seem to appropriately describe the action undertaken. These studies sought to better understand atomization, specifically coaxial, two-stream, airblast (or air-assist) atomization in which a central liquid jet is broken up by an annular, high-velocity gas stream. The studies enclosed focused on identifying the effect of changing the atomizer's scale on atomization. While most (but not all) atomization studies only focus on the resulting far-field drop diameters, these studies placed the focus largely on the intermediate structures, in the form of the intact liquid jet (ILJ), while also quantifying the resulting drop diameters. The location and shape of the ILJ constantly change, and on its surface, wavelengths were seen to form and grow, which have been correlated to the resulting drop diameters in previous studies. The studies enclosed herein are unique in that they attempt to apply and explain exiting mechanism-based breakup mechanisms to regimes, fluids, and geometry changes not yet evaluated in the literature. Existing correlations were compared to the experimental data for a range of atomizer geometries, and when they were found lacking, Buckingham-(Pi) theorem was used to develop new correlations for predicting behavior. Additionally, the method developed for the calculation of these parameters for other image sets is included, allowing for easy comparison and value verification. A small-scale, coaxial atomization system was used to atomize water and two silicone oils with air. The atomizers used in these studies had the same general geometry type, but had varying sizes, allowing for the effect of both scale and geometry to be evaluated. These studies quantified

  17. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoy, A.; Bissbort, U.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cappellaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  18. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  19. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  20. Direct evidence of atomic-scale structural fluctuations in catalyst nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pin Ann; Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Burgos, Juan C; Balbuena, Perla B; Natarajan, Bharath; Sharma, Renu

    2017-05-01

    Rational catalyst design requires an atomic scale mechanistic understanding of the chemical pathways involved in the catalytic process. A heterogeneous catalyst typically works by adsorbing reactants onto its surface, where the energies for specific bonds to dissociate and/or combine with other species (to form desired intermediate or final products) are lower. Here, using the catalytic growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a prototype reaction, we show that the chemical pathway may in-fact involve the entire catalyst particle, and can proceed via the fluctuations in the formation and decomposition of metastable phases in the particle interior. We record in situ and at atomic resolution, the dynamic phase transformations occurring in a Cobalt catalyst nanoparticle during SWCNT growth, using a state-of-the-art environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). The fluctuations in catalyst carbon content are quantified by the automated, atomic-scale structural analysis of the time-resolved ETEM images and correlated with the SWCNT growth rate. We find the fluctuations in the carbon concentration in the catalyst nanoparticle and the fluctuations in nanotube growth rates to be of complementary character. These findings are successfully explained by reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations that track the spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of carbon atoms within and on the surface of the catalyst particle. We anticipate that our approach combining real-time, atomic-resolution image analysis and molecular dynamics simulations will facilitate catalyst design, improving reaction efficiencies and selectivity towards the growth of desired structure.

  1. Sensing Noncollinear Magnetism at the Atomic Scale Combining Magnetic Exchange and Spin-Polarized Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Gerritsen, Jan W; Wegner, Daniel; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-09-13

    Storing and accessing information in atomic-scale magnets requires magnetic imaging techniques with single-atom resolution. Here, we show simultaneous detection of the spin-polarization and exchange force with or without the flow of current with a new method, which combines scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy. To demonstrate the application of this new method, we characterize the prototypical nanoskyrmion lattice formed on a monolayer of Fe/Ir(111). We resolve the square magnetic lattice by employing magnetic exchange force microscopy, demonstrating its applicability to noncollinear magnetic structures for the first time. Utilizing distance-dependent force and current spectroscopy, we quantify the exchange forces in comparison to the spin-polarization. For strongly spin-polarized tips, we distinguish different signs of the exchange force that we suggest arises from a change in exchange mechanisms between the probe and a skyrmion. This new approach may enable both nonperturbative readout combined with writing by current-driven reversal of atomic-scale magnets.

  2. New Strategies for Atomic Scale Measurements at Interfaces using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A.

    1997-03-01

    The local electronic structure of a material can be measured directly from the energy loss spectrum of a swift electron scattered through it. When the electron beam is focussed down to the width of an atomic column, the electronic density of states at an interface, grain boundary or impurity site can be decomposed by site, chemical species and angular momentum. Here, we discuss the use of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) fine structure to provide insight into the origin of grain boundary and interfacial properties. EELS can reveal the physics underlying why a particular local bonding arrangement develops. Even a qualitative understanding of local bonding can help indentify possible sites for chemical reactions and potentially weak points at a grain boundary. More can be done however: an EELS sum rule allows quantitative estimates of grain boundary energies. This is particularly useful at general, large angle grain boundaries where no other atomic scale information can be obtained. As an example, we show how atomic-scale EELS measurements of grain boundaries in Ni_3Al (D.A. Muller, S. Subramanian, P.E. Batson, S.L. Sass, J. Silcox, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75 4744 (1995). lead not only to rules-of-thumb for segregation and bond strength, but also to quantitative estimates of the boundary cohesion. Application to magnetic multilayers and Al:Cu interconnects will also be touched on. (Work at Cornell supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER45322 and NSF grant DMR-9121654.)

  3. Correlation of experimentally measured atomic scale properties of EUV photoresist to modeling performance: an exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Chandonait, Jonathan; Melvin, Lawrence S.; Marokkey, Sajan; Yan, Qiliang; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Painter, Benjamin; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm stands at the crossroads of next generation patterning technology for high volume manufacturing of integrated circuits. Photo resist models that form the part of overall pattern transform model for lithography play a vital role in supporting this effort. The physics and chemistry of these resists must be understood to enable the construction of accurate models for EUV Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). In this study, we explore the possibility of improving EUV photo-resist models by directly correlating the parameters obtained from experimentally measured atomic scale physical properties; namely, the effect of interaction of EUV photons with photo acid generators in standard chemically amplified EUV photoresist, and associated electron energy loss events. Atomic scale physical properties will be inferred from the measurements carried out in Electron Resist Interaction Chamber (ERIC). This study will use measured physical parameters to establish a relationship with lithographically important properties, such as line edge roughness and CD variation. The data gathered from these measurements is used to construct OPC models of the resist.

  4. Atomic-scale modelling of primary damage and properties of radiation defects in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Osetsky, Y N

    2003-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in recent years in the understanding of radiation damage production in high-energy displacement cascades, the properties of the defects and evolution of radiation damage in metals. Two main reasons form the basis of this success. First, the significant increase in computing power has allowed simulation of realistic cascade energies with good statistics and relatively long-time evolution of defects to be carried out. Second, new experimental findings and corresponding theoretical calculations have allowed interpretation of a number of mechanisms and phenomena crucial for understanding and prediction of practically important radiation effects, such as void swelling, radiation growth, matrix hardening and plastic flow localisation. In this paper we review the most significant results in atomic-scale computer modelling related to these issues, mainly focusing on new achievements such as the formation of extended defect clusters, the dynamic properties of defect clusters, int...

  5. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  6. Atomic-scale investigation of graphene grown on Cu foil and the effects of thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Gao, Li; Tian, Jifa; Cao, Helin; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Yitamben, Esmeralda N; Fisher, Brandon; Guest, Jeffrey R; Chen, Yong P; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2011-05-24

    We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing on ex-situ chemically vapor deposited submonolayer graphene islands on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. Low-temperature annealed graphene islands on Cu foil (at ∼430 °C) exhibit predominantly striped Moiré patterns, indicating a relatively weak interaction between graphene and the underlying polycrystalline Cu foil. Rapid high-temperature annealing of the sample (at 700-800 °C) gives rise to the removal of Cu oxide and the recovery of crystallographic features of the copper that surrounds the intact graphene. These experimental observations of continuous crystalline features between the underlying copper (beneath the graphene islands) and the surrounding exposed copper areas revealed by high-temperature annealing demonstrates the impenetrable nature of graphene and its potential application as a protective layer against corrosion.

  7. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  8. Finite Bias Calculations to Model Interface Dipoles in Electrochemical Cells at the Atomic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure t...... to satisfy the thermodynamic constraints imposed by the environment. This is captured by the generalized computational hydrogen electrode model, which enables us to make efficient first-principles calculations of atomic scale properties of the electrochemical interface.......The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure...

  9. Atomic Scale Picture of the Ion Conduction Mechanism in Tetrahedral Network of Lanthanum Barium Gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalarvo, Niina H [ORNL; Gourdon, Olivier [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Gout, Delphine J [ORNL; Ohl, Michael E [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Combined experimental study of impedance spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering was performed to shed light into the atomic scale ion migration processes in proton and oxide ion conductor; La0.8Ba1.2GaO3.9 . This material consist of tetrahedral GaO4 units, which are rather flexible and rocking motion of these units promotes the ionic migration process. The oxide ion (vacancy) conduction takes place on channels along c axis, involving a single elementary step, which occurs between adjacent tetrahedron (inter-tetrahedron jump). The proton conduction mechanism consists of intra-tetrahedron and inter-tetrahedron elementary processes. The intra-tetrahedron proton transport is the rate-limiting process, with activation energy of 0.44 eV. The rocking motion of the GaO4 tetrahedron aids the inter-tetrahedral proton transport, which has the activation energy of 0.068 eV.

  10. Atomic-scale simulation of dust grain collisions: Surface chemistry and dissipation beyond existing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Doan, Baochi D.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2017-10-01

    The early stages of planet formation involve steps where submicron-sized dust particles collide to form aggregates. However, the mechanism through which millimeter-sized particles aggregate to kilometer-sized planetesimals is still not understood. Dust grain collision experiments carried out in the environment of the Earth lead to the prediction of a 'bouncing barrier' at millimeter-sizes. Theoretical models, e.g., Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov theories, lack two key features, namely the chemistry of dust grain surfaces, and a mechanism for atomic-scale dissipation of energy. Moreover, interaction strengths in these models are parameterized based on experiments done in the Earth's environment. To address these issues, we performed atomic-scale simulations of collisions between nonhydroxylated and hydroxylated amorphous silica nanoparticles. We used the ReaxFF approach which enables modeling chemical reactions using an empirical potential. We found that nonhydroxylated nanograins tend to adhere with much higher probability than suggested by existing theories. By contrast, hydroxylated nanograins exhibit a strong tendency to bounce. Also, the interaction between dust grains has the characteristics of a strong chemical force instead of weak van der Waals forces. This suggests that the formation of strong chemical bonds and dissipation via internal atomic vibration may result in aggregation beyond what is expected based on our current understanding. Our results also indicate that experiments should more carefully consider surface conditions to mimic the space environment. We also report results of simulations with molten silica nanoparticles. It is found that molten particles are more likely to adhere due to viscous dissipation, which supports theories that suggest aggregation to kilometer scales might require grains to be in a molten state.

  11. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  12. Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyo-Ki; Jo, Junhyeon; Hwang, Daeyeon; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Son, Seungwoo; Kim, Jung Hwa; Jin, Mi-Jin; Jun, Young Chul; Erni, Rolf; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Zonghoon

    2017-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconducting oxide on graphene carries a unique combination of wide band gap, high charge carrier mobility, and optical transparency, which can be widely applied for optoelectronics. However, study on the epitaxial formation and properties of oxide monolayer on graphene remains unexplored due to hydrophobic graphene surface and limits of conventional bulk deposition technique. Here, we report atomic scale study of heteroepitaxial growth and relationship of a single-atom-thick ZnO layer on graphene using atomic layer deposition. We demonstrate atom-by-atom growth of zinc and oxygen at the preferential zigzag edge of a ZnO monolayer on graphene through in situ observation. We experimentally determine that the thinnest ZnO monolayer has a wide band gap (up to 4.0 eV), due to quantum confinement and graphene-like structure, and high optical transparency. This study can lead to a new class of atomically thin two-dimensional heterostructures of semiconducting oxides formed by highly controlled epitaxial growth.

  13. DFT +U studies of atomic scale magnetism: A curious case study for future spintronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Hashemi, Hossein; Jones, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    Atomic scale magnetism attracts interest due to both its possible application to nanoscale spintroic devices, and due to its inherent interest as a source of basic quantum mechanical interactions. We work together with the local Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) team to match our calculations to experiment, and in the process learn much which can't be measured with the STM. In particular we use DFT +U to calculate the properties of magnetic atoms on nanolayers of insulator on top of a metal such as silver. In this talk we report the results of detailed calculations of singles and dimers of Mn on MgO/Ag. As time permits we may include our calculations of other magnetic adatoms for comparison. We find that the local interactions are very different for the three stable binding sites on this surface, both for charge and spin densities. Using on onsite Hubbard U parameter which we determine from first principles, we are able to study the variability of the magnetic moment between the binding sites, as well as determine the lowest energy binding site. The magnetic adatoms affect the surrounding interface layer in unexpected ways. We are able to obtain interesting insights which help us understand how magnetism propagates along surfaces as well as between interfaces. Research for this project is partially funded by KAUST.

  14. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  15. A theoretical study of the atomic and electronic structures of three prospective atomic scale wire systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevlin, S A

    2001-01-01

    transport properties of the line are also calculated. Finally we find which of the two models of the (4x1)-Si(111)-ln reconstruction is thermodynamically favoured in a supercell geometry. We use ab initio plane wave techniques in the Local-Density-Approximation, and calculate and compare the electronic structure of the two models with respect to the characteristic energies for electron dispersion along and across the chain structures. We also consider the effects of electronic structure on the in-plane transport properties of the indium lines. The structural and electronic properties of several candidate atomic scale wires are analysed. Three candidates are studied: the trans-polyacetylene molecule, the silicon line on the (001) face of cubic silicon carbide (the (nx2) series of reconstructions) and the indium chain on the (111) face of silicon carbide (the (4x1) reconstruction). We use the polyacetylene molecule as a test-bed for the techniques that we use to calculate transport properties in an empirically ...

  16. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  17. Atomic-Scale Mechanism of Efficient Hydrogen Evolution at SiC Nanocrystal Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2013-01-03

    Efficient electrochemical hydrogen evolution at ultrathin 3C-SiC nanocrystal electrodes in acid solutions was recently reported, but the atomic-scale mechanism of the reaction was not identified. Here we report quantum mechanical calculations of pertinent reactions and show that the reaction happens at pre-existing hydrogenated surface Si-H sites through a mechanism that is related to the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism that occurs in metals. Here the Heyrovsky reaction occurs as the first step, where an electron from the substrate reacts with a hydronium adsorbed at a Si-H site, creating an H2 molecule and a Si dangling bond. The Volmer reaction follows and regenerates the Si-H. This ordering of reactions is supported by the fact that the hydrogen coverage on SiC electrodes does not depend on the applied voltage, in contrast to the cases of metal electrodes. Moreover, the Volmer reaction, which is a one-step process on metal surface, is a two-step process here. We then show that the rise of the conduction band due to quantum confinement accounts for the fact that only ultrasmall SiC nanocrystals are electrochemically active. We also show that the ability of a Si-H bond to bind a hydronium is essential for the hydrogen evolution to occur at high rate.

  18. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials' frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-01

    Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  19. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  20. Atomic-scale insight into the origin of pyridine inhibition of MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temel, Burcin; Tuxen, Anders K.; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Basic nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyridine are well known to be inhibitors of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction for the MoS2-based catalysts. From an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, atomic-scale insight...... also at the edges. The calculated DFT energies and simulated STM images allowed us to conclude that these species are pyridinium ions located at the catalytically active brim sites. Furthermore, the DFT results for the vibrational modes of the adsorbed pyridinium species agree well with those observed...... in earlier IR experiments on high surface alumina-supported MoS2 catalyst. The adsorption sites appear to be very similar to the brim sites involved in hydrogenation reactions in HDS. Thus, the combined STM and DFT results provide new atomic-scale insight into the inhibition effect of basic N...

  1. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb < DOgb < DFegb < DMggb) and are only one order of magnitude smaller than those evaluated in the supercooled melt. In using a newly derived expression for the bulk self-diffusion coefficient it is concluded that the latter one is driven by the grain boundary contribution as long as the grain size is smaller than a centimeter. In assuming that the electrical conduction at grain boundaries is purely ionic, the macroscopic grain boundary conductivity is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than in molten olivine, and one order of magnitude higher than the lattice conductivity. A consequence is that the conductivity of the olivine polycrystal is dominated by the grain interior contribution as soon as the grain size is larger than a micrometer or so. The grain boundary viscosity has been evaluated from the Green-Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with

  2. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    2015. 15. Invited. New Insights into Friction and Wear through In-Situ Nanotribology. Joint Symposium of the Surface Science Society of Japan and...and Carpick, R.W. Influence of Surface Passivation on the Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond and Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0053 Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanism that controls the attainment of ultralow friction and wear in carbon based

  3. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  4. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Droplet Coalescence Driven Nucleation and Growth at Liquid/Solid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2017-06-27

    Unraveling dynamical processes of liquid droplets at liquid/solid interfaces and the interfacial ordering is critical to understanding solidification, liquid-phase epitaxial growth, wetting, liquid-phase joining, crystal growth, and lubrication processes, all of which are linked to different important applications in material science. In this work, we observe direct in situ atomic-scale behavior of Bi droplets segregated on SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and demonstrate ordered interface and surface structures for the droplets on the oxide at the atomic scale and unravel a nucleation mechanism involving droplet coalescence at the liquid/solid interface. We identify a critical diameter of the formed nanocrystal in stabilizing the crystalline phase and reveal lattice-induced fast crystallization of the droplet at the initial stage of the coalescence of the nanocrystal with the droplet. Further sequential observations show the stepped coalescence and growth mechanism of the nanocrystals at the atomic scale. These results offer insights into the dynamic process at liquid/solid interfaces, which may have implications for many functionalities of materials and their applications.

  5. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity.

  6. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  7. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  8. Atomic-scale structure evolution in a quasi-equilibrated electrochemical process of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have proven to be extremely attractive candidates for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and smart grid in terms of energy density, power density, and service life. Further performance optimization to satisfy ever-increasing demands on energy storage of such applications is highly desired. In most of cases, the kinetics and stability of electrode materials are strongly correlated to the transport and storage behaviors of lithium ions in the lattice of the host. Therefore, information about structural evolution of electrode materials at an atomic scale is always helpful to explain the electrochemical performances of batteries at a macroscale. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows simultaneous imaging of light and heavy elements, providing an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nearly equilibrated local structure of electrode materials after electrochemical cycling at atomic resolution. Recent progress toward unraveling the atomic-scale structure of selected electrode materials with different charge and/or discharge state to extend the current understanding of electrochemical reaction mechanism with the ABF and high angle annular dark field STEM imaging is presented here. Future research on the relationship between atomic-level structure evolution and microscopic reaction mechanisms of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries is envisaged. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Spilanthol from Acmella Oleracea Lowers the Intracellular Levels of cAMP Impairing NKCC2 Phosphorylation and Water Channel AQP2 Membrane Expression in Mouse Kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gerbino

    Full Text Available Acmella oleracea is well recognized in Brazilian traditional medicine as diuretic, although few scientific data have been published to support this effect. Aim of this study was to determine the molecular effect of Acmella oleracea extract and its main alkylamide spilanthol on two major processes involved in the urine concentrating mechanism: Na-K-2Cl symporter (NKCC2 activity in the thick ascending limb and water channel aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct cells. Phosphorylation of NKCC2 was evaluated as index of its activation by Western blotting. Rate of aquaporin 2 apical expression was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy. Spilanthol-induced intracellular signalling events were dissected by video-imaging experiments. Exposure to spilanthol reduced the basal phosphorylation level of NKCC2 both in freshly isolated mouse kidney slices and in NKCC2-expresing HEK293 cells. In addition, exposure to spilanthol strongly reduced both desmopressin and low Cl--dependent increase in NKCC2 phosphorylation in mouse kidney slices and NKCC2-expressing HEK293 cells, respectively. Similarly, spilanthol reduced both desmopressin- and forskolin-stimulated aquaporin 2 accumulation at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct in mouse kidney slice and MCD4 cells, respectively. Of note, when orally administered, spilanthol induced a significant increase in both urine output and salt urinary excretion associated with a markedly reduced urine osmolality compared with control mice. Finally, at cellular level, spilanthol rapidly reduced or reversed basal and agonist-increased cAMP levels through a mechanism involving increases in intracellular [Ca2+]. In conclusion, spilanthol-induced inhibition of cAMP production negatively modulates urine-concentrating mechanisms thus holding great promise for its use as diuretic.

  10. The corrected traditional equations for calculation of hepatic clearance that account for the difference in drug ionization in extracellular and intracellular tissue water and the corresponding corrected PBPK equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2011-03-01

    The estimation of hepatic clearance, Clh, using in vitro data on metabolic stability of compound, its protein binding and blood–plasma equilibrium concentration ratio is commonly performed using well-stirred, parallel tube or dispersion models. It appears that for ionizable drugs there is a difference of the steady-state concentrations in extracelluar and intracellular water (at hepatocytes), where metabolism takes place. This occurs due to the different pH of extra- and intracellular water (7.4 and 7.0, respectively). The account of this fact leads to the novel equations for Clh . These equations include the additional parameter named ionization factor, FI, which is the ratio of the unionized drug fractions in plasma and intracellular tissue water (or the ratio of the unbound drug concentrations in intracellular tissue water and plasma at equilibrium). For neutral drugs FI = 1 and the novel equations coincide with the traditional ones. It is shown that the account of this factor may yield the calculated Clh up to 6.3-fold greater than that obtained by the traditional equations for the strong diprotic basic compounds, and up to 6.3-fold smaller for the strong diprotic acidic compounds. For triprotic acids and bases the difference could be as much as 15-fold. The account of pH difference between extra- and intracellular water also results in the change of the term commonly used to describe drug metabolic elimination rate in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) equation. This consequently may lead to a noticeable change of drug concentration-time profiles in plasma and tissues. The effect of ionization factor is especially pronounced for the low-extraction ratio drugs. The examples of significant improvement in the prediction of hepatic clearance due to the account of ionization factor are provided. A more general equation for hepatic clearance, which accounts for ionization factor and possible drug uptake and efflux, is obtained.

  11. Strain-induced preferential dissolution at the dislocation emergences in MnS: an atomic scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Wang, Y. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2015-08-01

    The long-standing problem of dislocation-preferential dissolution in a crystal has been generally ascribed to the distortion energy stored in the vicinity of the dislocation core. However, due to lack of experimental means, the relationship between the local distortion state and the electrochemical behaviour of a single dislocation has not been established so far. via in situ ex-environment transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we demonstrate that the emergences of both edge and screw dislocations on MnS surfaces are the preferential sites for dissolution of the MnS inclusions within a stainless steel. In addition, we map the strain-induced variation of the standard electrode potential around the edge dislocation by a combination of the aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM and strain-analysis-based mechanochemistry theory. Significantly, our report provides a new approach to investigate the strain-corrosion correlation at an atomic scale.

  12. Atomic-scale observation of migration and coalescence of Au nanoclusters on YSZ surface by aberration-corrected STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Chen, Chunlin; Huang, Sumei

    2014-07-01

    Unraveling structural dynamics of noble metal nanoclusters on oxide supports is critical to understanding reaction process and origin of catalytic activity in heterogeneous catalysts. Here, we show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy can provide direct atomic-resolution imaging of surface migration, coalescence, and atomic rearrangement of Au clusters on an Y:ZrO₂ (YSZ) support. The high resolution enables us to reveal migration and coalescence process of Au clusters at the atomic scale, and to demonstrate that the coalesced clusters undergo a cooperative atomic rearrangement, which transforms the coherent into incoherent Au/YSZ interface. This approach can help to elucidate atomistic mechanism of catalytic activities and to develop novel catalysts with enhanced functionality.

  13. Atomic scale study of surface orientations and energies of Ti 2 O 3 crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Meng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Blvd, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China; Wang, Zhiguo [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, People' s Republic of China; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2017-10-30

    For nanostructured particles, the faceting planes and their terminating chemical species are two critical factors that govern the chemical behavior of the particle. The surface atomistic structure and termination of the Ti2O3 crystals were analyzed using atomic-scale aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combining with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. STEM imaging reveals that the Ti2O3 crystal are most often faceted along (001), (012), (-114) and (1-20) planes. DFT calculation indicates that the (012) surface with TiO-termination have the lowest cleavage energy and correspondingly the lowest surface energy, indicating that (012) will be the most stable and prevalent surfaces in Ti2O3 nanocrystals. These observations provide insights for exploring the interfacial process involving Ti2O3 nanoparticles.

  14. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R; Blais, Jules M; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g(-1) dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL(-1) in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K(d)), MC-RR had the highest affinity for sediment particles (log K(d)=1.3) while MC-LA had the lowest affinity (log K(d)=-0.4), partitioning mainly into pore waters. Our findings confirm that sediments serve as a reservoir for microcystins but suggest that some variants may diffuse into overlying water thereby constituting a new route of exposure following the dissipation of toxic blooms. The method is well suited to determine the fate and persistence of different

  15. Origin of the catalytic activity of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles determined from an atomic-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, L S R; Sakata, Osami; Kohara, Shinji; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-09

    The 3-dimensional (3D) atomic-scale structure of newly discovered face-centered cubic (fcc) and conventional hexagonal close packed (hcp) type ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles (NPs) of 2.2 to 5.4 nm diameter were studied using X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling. Atomic PDF based high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements show highly diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns for fcc- and hcp-type Ru NPs. We here report the atomic-scale structure of Ru NPs in terms of the total structure factor and Fourier-transformed PDF. It is found that the respective NPs have substantial structural disorder over short- to medium-range order atomic distances from the PDF analysis. The first-nearest-neighbor peak analyses show a significant size dependence for the fcc-type Ru NPs demonstrating the increase in the peak height due to an increase in the number density as a function of particle size. The bond angle and coordination number (CN) distribution for the RMC-simulated fcc- and hcp-type Ru NP models indicated inherited structural features from their bulk counterparts. The CN analysis of the whole NP and surface of each RMC model of Ru NPs show the low activation energy packing sites on the fcc-type Ru NP surface atoms. Finally, our newly defined order parameters for RMC simulated Ru NP models suggested that the enhancement of the CO oxidation activity of fcc-type NPs was due to a decrease in the close packing ordering that resulted from the increased NP size. These structural findings could be positively supported for synthesized low-cost and high performance nano-sized catalysts and have potential application in fuel-cell systems and organic synthesis.

  16. Experimental verification of orbital engineering at the atomic scale: Charge transfer and symmetry breaking in nickelate heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Rui, Xue; Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Disa, Ankit S.; Longo, Paolo; Okunishi, Eiji; Walker, Fred; Ahn, Charles H.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Epitaxial strain, layer confinement, and inversion symmetry breaking have emerged as powerful new approaches to control the electronic and atomic-scale structural properties of complex metal oxides. Trivalent rare-earth (RE) nickelate R E NiO3 heterostructures have been shown to be exemplars since the orbital occupancy, degeneracy, and, consequently, electronic/magnetic properties can be altered as a function of epitaxial strain, layer thickness, and superlattice structure. One recent example is the tricomponent LaTiO3-LaNiO3-LaAlO3 superlattice which exhibits charge transfer and orbital polarization as the result of its interfacial dipole electric field. A crucial step towards control of these parameters for future electronic and magnetic device applications is to develop an understanding of both the magnitude and range of the octahedral network's response towards interfacial strain and electric fields. An approach that provides atomic-scale resolution and sensitivity towards the local octahedral distortions and orbital occupancy is therefore required. Here, we employ atomic-resolution imaging coupled with electron spectroscopies and first-principles theory to examine the role of interfacial charge transfer and symmetry breaking in a tricomponent nickelate superlattice system. We find that nearly complete charge transfer occurs between the LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 layers, resulting in a mixed Ni2 +/Ni3 + valence state. We further demonstrate that this charge transfer is highly localized with a range of about 1 unit cell within the LaNiO3 layers. We also show how Wannier-function-based electron counting provides a simple physical picture of the electron distribution that connects directly with formal valence charges. The results presented here provide important feedback to synthesis efforts aimed at stabilizing new electronic phases that are not accessible by conventional bulk or epitaxial film approaches.

  17. Atomic-scale scanning tunneling microscopy study of plasma-oxidized ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J I; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2003-02-15

    In the present work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was employed to study the surface modification of ultrahigh modulus carbon fibers at the atomic level by oxygen plasma. As detected by STM, the distinctive feature of the fresh, untreated surface was the general presence of atomic-scale arrangements in different degrees of order (from atomic-sized spots without a clearly ordered disposition to triangular patterns identical to those typical of perfect graphite). Following fiber exposure to the plasma, the STM images showed evidence of the abstraction of carbon atoms from random locations on the fiber surface, giving rise to the development of defects (i.e., structural disorder), which in turn were the places where oxygen could be introduced during and after the plasma etching. It was observed that the most effective treatments in terms of extent of surface structural modification (disordering) and uniform introduction of oxygen were those carried out for just a few ( approximately 3) minutes. Considerably shorter exposures failed to provide a homogeneous modification and many locations on the fiber surface remained unaltered, retaining their original atomic-scale order, whereas longer treatments did not bring about further structural changes to the surface and only led to fiber consumption. These results are consistent with previous X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on these fibers and provide an atomic-level understanding of the saturation effect observed in the surface oxygen concentration of this and other types of carbon fibers with plasma oxidation. Such understanding may also prove helpful for the accurate control and optimization of fiber-matrix interaction in composite materials.

  18. Inclusion of pH and potential in atomic-scale simulations of the electrochemical interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in computational power and theory have allowed for density functional theory calculations on electrochemical systems. Currently, there are two main types of ab initio studies on electrochemical systems. Catalyst screening/optimization studies focus on adsorption free energies...... on the interface structure and its corresponding free energy. Using simple thermodynamic arguments, the method determines ground state interface structures as a function of pH and potential. As an example, we apply the method to a set of Pt(111)| water structures and determine the corresponding Pourbaix diagram...... interest in the development of efficient electrocatalysts for alkaline environments [2]. Consideration of pH is thus a crucial challenge in ab initio simulations. Here we present a generalization of the computational hydrogen electrode to explicitly capture the respective pH and potential effects...

  19. Comparative atomic-scale hydration of the ceramide and phosphocholine headgroup in solution and bilayer environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J.; Lorenz, Christian D.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have used neutron diffraction to elucidate the hydration of the ceramide and the phosphatidylcholine headgroup in solution. These solution studies provide bond-length resolution information on the system, but are limited to liquid samples. The work presented here investigates how the hydration of ceramide and phosphatidylcholine headgroups in a solution compares with that found in a lipid bilayer. This work shows that the hydration patterns seen in the solution samples provide valuable insight into the preferential location of hydrating water molecules in the bilayer. There are certain subtle differences in the distribution, which result from a combination of the lipid conformation and the lipid-lipid interactions within the bilayer environment. The lipid-lipid interactions in the bilayer will be dependent on the composition of the bilayer, whereas the restricted exploration of conformational space is likely to be applicable in all membrane environments. The generalized description of hydration gathered from the neutron diffraction studies thus provides good initial estimation for the hydration pattern, but this can be further refined for specific systems.

  20. In situ atomic scale mechanical microscopy discovering the atomistic mechanisms of plasticity in nano-single crystals and grain rotation in polycrystalline metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaodong; Wang, Lihua; Yue, Yonghai; Zhang, Ze

    2015-04-01

    In this review, we briefly introduce our in situ atomic-scale mechanical experimental technique (ASMET) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can observe the atomic-scale deformation dynamics of materials. This in situ mechanical testing technique allows the deformation of TEM samples through a simultaneous double-tilt function, making atomic-scale mechanical microscopy feasible. This methodology is generally applicable to thin films, nanowires (NWs), tubes and regular TEM samples to allow investigation of the dynamics of mechanically stressed samples at the atomic scale. We show several examples of this technique applied to Pt and Cu single/polycrystalline specimens. The in situ atomic-scale observation revealed that when the feature size of these materials approaches the nano-scale, they often exhibit "unusual" deformation behaviours compared to their bulk counterparts. For example, in Cu single-crystalline NWs, the elastic-plastic transition is size-dependent. An ultra-large elastic strain of 7.2%, which approaches the theoretical elasticity limit, can be achieved as the diameter of the NWs decreases to ∼6 nm. The crossover plasticity transition from full dislocations to partial dislocations and twins was also discovered as the diameter of the single-crystalline Cu NWs decreased. For Pt nanocrystals (NC), the long-standing uncertainties of atomic-scale plastic deformation mechanisms in NC materials (grain size G less than 15 nm) were clarified. For larger grains with G<∼10 nm, we frequently observed movements and interactions of cross-grain full dislocations. For G between 6 and 10 nm, stacking faults resulting from partial dislocations become more frequent. For G<∼6 nm, the plasticity mechanism transforms from a mode of cross-grain dislocation to a collective grain rotation mechanism. This grain rotation process is mediated by grain boundary (GB) dislocations with the assistance of GB diffusion and shuffling. These in situ atomic-scale images

  1. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  2. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  3. Role of support-nanoalloy interactions in the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering for tuning catalytic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Wanjala, Bridgid N; Engelhard, Mark H; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-09-12

    The understanding of the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in supported nanosized alloy particles is fundamental for achieving active catalysts by design. This report shows how such knowledge can be obtained by a combination of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fine structure absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis, and how the support-nanoalloy interaction influences the catalytic activity of ternary nanoalloy (platinum-nickel-cobalt) particles on three different supports: carbon, silica, and titania. The reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen is employed as a probe to the catalytic activity. The thermochemical processing of this ternary composition, in combination with the different support materials, is demonstrated to be capable of fine-tuning the catalytic activity and stability. The support-nanoalloy interaction is shown to influence structural and chemical ordering in the nanoparticles, leading to support-tunable active sites on the nanoalloys for oxygen activation in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. A nickel/cobalt-tuned catalytic site on the surface of nanoalloy is revealed for oxygen activation, which differs from the traditional oxygen-activation sites known for oxide-supported noble metal catalysts. The discovery of such support-nanoalloy interaction-enabled oxygen-activation sites introduces a very promising strategy for designing active catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

  4. Reversible 2D Phase Transition Driven By an Electric Field: Visualization and Control on the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, B; van Vörden, D; Graf, P; Robles, R; Abufager, P; Lorente, N; Bobisch, C A; Möller, R

    2016-01-13

    We report on a reversible structural phase transition of a two-dimensional system that can be locally induced by an external electric field. Two different structural configurations may coexist within a CO monolayer on Cu(111). The balance between the two phases can be shifted by an external electric field, causing the domain boundaries to move, increasing the area of the favored phase controllable both in location and size. If the field is further enhanced new domains nucleate. The arrangement of the CO molecules on the Cu surface is observed in real time and real space with atomic resolution while the electric field driving the phase transition is easily varied over a broad range. Together with the well-known molecular manipulation of CO adlayers, our findings open exciting prospects for combining spontaneous long-range order with man-made CO structures such as "molecule cascades" or "molecular graphene". Our new manipulation mode permits us to bridge the gap between fundamental concepts and the fabrication of arbitrary atomic patterns in large scale, by providing unprecedented insight into the physics of structural phase transitions on the atomic scale.

  5. Towards the atomic-scale characterization of isolated iron sites confined in a nitrogen-doped graphene matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingfei; Liu, Yun; Li, Haobo [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Li, Lulu [College of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116023 (China); Deng, Dehui [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Yang, Fan, E-mail: fyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Bao, Xinhe, E-mail: xhbao@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Local atomic and electronic structure of the Fe-N-C catalyst characterized by STM and STS. • The combination of air-AFM, UHV-STM and DFT calculations for the characterization of powder catalysts. • The selection of solvent is vital to the homogeneous dispersion of powder catalyst on a planar support. - Abstract: Atomic scale characterization of the surface structure of powder catalysts is essential to the identification of active sites, but remains a major challenge in catalysis research. We described here a procedure that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM), operated in air, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), operated in UHV, to obtain the atomic structure and local electronic properties of powder catalysts. The atomically dispersed Fe-N-C catalyst was used as an example, which was synthesized by low temperature ball milling methods. We discussed the effect of solvents in the dispersion of powder catalysts on a planar support, which is key to the subsequent atomic characterization. From the morphology, atomic structure and local electronic properties of the Fe-N-C catalyst, our combined measurements also provide an insight for the effect of ball milling in the preparation of atomically dispersed metal catalysts.

  6. Atomic-scale study of the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition mechanism in GeTe thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R; Fallica, R; Mokhles Gerami, A; Mølholt, T E; Wiemer, C; Longo, M; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Johnston, K; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Ncube, M; Bharuth-Ram, K; Fanciulli, M; Gislason, H P; Langouche, G; Ólafsson, S; Weyer, G

    2017-08-15

    The underlying mechanism driving the structural amorphous-to-crystalline transition in Group VI chalcogenides is still a matter of debate even in the simplest GeTe system. We exploit the extreme sensitivity of 57Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy, following dilute implantation of 57Mn (T½ = 1.5 min) at ISOLDE/CERN, to study the electronic charge distribution in the immediate vicinity of the 57Fe probe substituting Ge (FeGe), and to interrogate the local environment of FeGe over the amorphous-crystalline phase transition in GeTe thin films. Our results show that the local structure of as-sputtered amorphous GeTe is a combination of tetrahedral and defect-octahedral sites. The main effect of the crystallization is the conversion from tetrahedral to defect-free octahedral sites. We discover that only the tetrahedral fraction in amorphous GeTe participates to the change of the FeGe-Te chemical bonds, with a net electronic charge density transfer of  ~ 1.6 e/a0 between FeGe and neighboring Te atoms. This charge transfer accounts for a lowering of the covalent character during crystallization. The results are corroborated by theoretical calculations within the framework of density functional theory. The observed atomic-scale chemical-structural changes are directly connected to the macroscopic phase transition and resistivity switch of GeTe thin films.

  7. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  8. Does the intracellular ionic concentration or the cell water content (cell volume) determine the activity of TonEBP in NIH3T3 cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Tina; Schou, Kenneth; Friis, Martin Barfred

    2008-01-01

    of the present investigation was to investigate whether cell shrinkage or high intracellular ionic concentration induced the activation of TonEBP. We designed a model system for isotonically shrinking cells over a prolonged period of time. Cells swelled in hypotonic medium and performed a regulatory volume...

  9. Atomic scale characterization of the origin of mobility loss at the silicon carbide/silicon dioxide interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Trinity Leigh

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band gap semiconductor with material properties which make it ideally suited for high temperature, high frequency, and high power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) applications. The wide scale commercial development of these devices has been hindered due to disappointing electron mobility when compared to properties of the bulk material. This mobility loss has been associated with the interface between SiC and the native oxide formed (SiO2). Many improvements in mobility have been realized, but it is currently still significantly less than that of the bulk material. The work in this dissertation is aimed at understanding the origin of this mobility loss from an atomic perspective. Analytical electron microscopy techniques including scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) are used in this study to characterize the 4HSiC/SiO2 interface. The effect of aluminum implantation, nitric oxide annealing, oxidation rate, and activation annealing temperature on the interface was examined. We found a carbon rich transition layer present on the SiC side of the interface which varies in thickness depending on processing conditions. The thickness of this transition region is linearly related to the electron mobility. We were also able to determine that this transition region occurs as a result of the oxidation process. During oxidation, carbon interstitials are emitted on both sides of the interface, causing a carbon pileup on the SiC side of the interface, which we detect as a transition region. The rate of oxidation is also very important as oxidizing at a fast rate leads to greater carbon pileup. The extra carbon in this transition region acts as electron scattering centers, which ultimately lead to a reduced electron mobility. This study is able to directly correlate the microstructure on an atomic

  10. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Electrochemical Delithiation Induced Structure Evolution of LiCoO2 Cathode in a Working All-Solid-State Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yue; Zhang, Jienan; Jiang, Liwei; Shi, Jin-An; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Zou, Dongli; Wang, Jiangyong; Yu, Xiqian; Xiao, Ruijuan; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan

    2017-03-29

    We report a method for in situ atomic-scale observation of electrochemical delithiation in a working all-solid-state battery using a state-of-the-art chip based in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) holder and focused ion beam milling to prepare an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery sample. A battery consisting of LiCoO2 cathode, LLZO solid state electrolyte and gold anode was constructed, delithiated and observed in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope at atomic scale. We found that the pristine single crystal LiCoO2 became nanosized polycrystal connected by coherent twin boundaries and antiphase domain boundaries after high voltage delithiation. This is different from liquid electrolyte batteries, where a series of phase transitions take place at LiCoO2 cathode during delithiation. Both grain boundaries become more energy favorable along with extraction of lithium ions through theoretical calculation. We also proposed a lithium migration pathway before and after polycrystallization. This new methodology could stimulate atomic scale in situ scanning/TEM studies of battery materials and provide important mechanistic insight for designing better all-solid-state battery.

  11. Atomic-scale characterization of the equilibrium β phase in Mg-Nd-Y alloy by means of HAADF-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingxu; Chen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    The β phase in Mg-Nd-Y alloy, which forms during isothermal ageing, is proved to be Mg41 Nd5 by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results as compositional evidence and by atomic-scaled high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) direct images from [001]β , [111¯]β, and [3¯11]β as structural evidence. SCANNING 38:743-746, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Atomic-scale structure of biogenic materials by total X-ray diffraction: a study of bacterial and fungal MnOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, V; Ren, Y; Saratovsky, I; Pastén, P; Gurr, S J; Hayward, M A; Poeppelmeier, K R; Gaillard, J-F

    2009-02-24

    Biogenic materials are produced by microorganisms and are typically found in a nanophase state. As such, they are difficult to characterize structurally. In this report, we demonstrate how high-energy X-ray diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis can be used to determine the atomic-scale structures of MnO(x) produced by bacteria and fungi. These structures are well-defined, periodic, and species-specific, built of Mn-O(6) octahedra forming birnessite-type layers and todorokite-type tunnels, respectively. The inherent structural diversity of biogenic material may offer opportunities for practical applications.

  13. A perfect wetting of Mg monolayer on Ag(111) under atomic scale investigation: First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaou, Amani; Sarpi, Brice; Guiltat, Mathilde; Payen, Kevin; Daineche, Rachid; Landa, Georges; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2016-05-01

    First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy experiments of the adsorption of Mg on Ag(111) substrate are conducted. This detailed study reveals that an atomic scale controlled deposition of a metallic Mg monolayer perfectly wets the silver substrate without any alloy formation at the interface at room temperature. A liquid-like behavior of the Mg species on the Ag substrate is highlighted as no dot formation is observed when coverage increases. Finally a layer-by-layer growth mode of Mg on Ag(111) can be predicted, thanks to density functional theory calculations as observed experimentally.

  14. The atomic-scale mechanism for the enhanced glass-forming-ability of a Cu-Zr based bulk metallic glass with minor element additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Liu, C T; Yang, Y; Liu, J B; Dong, Y D; Lu, J

    2014-04-11

    It is known that the glass forming-ability (GFA) of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be greatly enhanced via minor element additions. However, direct evidence has been lacking to reveal its structural origin despite different theories hitherto proposed. Through the high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, here we show that the content of local crystal-like orders increases significantly in a Cu-Zr-Al BMG after a 2-at% Y addition. Contrasting the previous studies, our current results indicate that the formation of crystal-like order at the atomic scale plays an important role in enhancing the GFA of the Cu-Zr-Al base BMG.

  15. In vivo metabolite compartmentalization probed using intracellular GdDTPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Rowland, Ian

    Fast trans-membrane water exchange enables in- tracellular relaxation enhancement of water by contrast agents in the extracellular space. For me- tabolites not in fast exchange across membranes, intracellular metabolite relaxation enhancement will only occur if the contrast agent and metabolite...... are in the same compartment. Extracellular contrast has utilized electroporation methods to deliver GdDTPA into the cytosol of rat muscle in vivo in order to probe the intracellular compart- mentalization of MR-visible metabolites....

  16. High Resolution Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Atomic Scale: CO on Au(110) and Cu(100), and C2H2 on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Jiang, Chilun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, Wilson

    2012-11-01

    STM-IETS has been regarded as the ultimate tool to identify and characterize single molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with atomic spatial resolution. With the improvement of the energy resolution obtained at ˜600 mK, STM-IETS is able to reveal subtle interactions between the molecule and its environment which was previously not possible at higher temperatures. Here we demonstrate the capability of sub-Kelvin STM on detecting the influence of the tip as well as the anisotropy of the reconstructed Au(110) surface on the low energy hindered vibrational motions of single adsorbed CO molecule. In the case of acetylene, more vibrational modes are resolved due to the enhanced spectral resolution. Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with atomic scale spatial resolution opens new possibilities to probe molecular interactions with high spectral resolution.

  17. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  18. Molecular cloning, characterization and analysis of the intracellular localization of a water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) from Virginia pepperweed (Lepidium virginicum), a unique WSCP that preferentially binds chlorophyll b in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Yanai, Haruna; Oka-Takayama, Yuko; Zanma-Sohtome, Aya; Fujiyama, Kosaku; Uchida, Akira; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Various plants possess non-photosynthetic, hydrophilic chlorophyll (Chl) proteins called water-soluble Chl-binding proteins (WSCPs). WSCPs are categorized into two classes; Class I (photoconvertible type) and Class II (non-photoconvertible type). Among Class II WSCPs, only Lepidium virginicum WSCP (LvWSCP) exhibits a low Chl a/b ratio compared with that found in the leaf. Although the physicochemical properties of LvWSCP have been characterized, its molecular properties have not yet been documented. Here, we report the characteristics of the LvWSCP gene, the biochemical properties of a recombinant LvWSCP, and the intracellular localization of LvWSCP. The cloned LvWSCP gene possesses a 669-bp open reading frame. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the precursor of LvWSCP contains both N- and C-terminal extension peptides. RT-PCR analysis revealed that LvWSCP was transcribed in various tissues, with the levels being higher in developing tissues. A recombinant LvWSCP and hexa-histidine fusion protein (LvWSCP-His) could remove Chls from the thylakoid in aqueous solution and showed an absorption spectrum identical to that of native LvWSCP. Although LvWSCP-His could bind both Chl a and Chl b, it bound almost exclusively to Chl b when reconstituted in 40 % methanol. To clarify the intracellular targeting functions of the N- and C-terminal extension peptides, we constructed transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing the Venus protein fused with the LvWSCP N- and/or C-terminal peptides, as well as Venus fused at the C-terminus of LvWSCP. The results showed that the N-terminal peptide functioned in ER body targeting, while the C-terminal sequence did not act as a trailer peptide.

  19. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-16

    The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material.

  20. Dual photo- and pH-responsive supramolecular nanocarriers based on water-soluble pillar[6]arene and different azobenzene derivatives for intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Yu; Jia, Keke; Cao, Yu; Li, Yan; Qin, Shan; Zhou, Fan; Lin, Chen; Zhang, Dongmei; Wang, Leyong

    2015-01-12

    Two novel types of supramolecular nanocarriers fabricated by the amphiphilic host-guest inclusion complex formed from water-soluble pillar[6]arene (WP6) and azobenzene derivatives G1 or G2 have been developed, in which G1 is structurally similar to G2 but has an extra phenoxy group in its hydrophobic region. Supramolecular micelles can be initially formed by WP6 with G1, which gradually transform into layered structures with liquid-crystalline properties, whereas stable supramolecular vesicles are obtained from WP6 and G2, which exhibit dual photo- and pH-responsiveness. Notably, the resulting WP6⊃G2 vesicles can efficiently encapsulate anticancer drug mitoxantrone (MTZ) to achieve MTZ-loaded vesicles, which maintain good stability in a simulated normal physiological environment, whereas in an acid environment similar to that of tumor cells or with external UV irradiation, the encapsulated drug is promptly released. More importantly, cytotoxicity assay indicates that such vesicles have good biocompatibility and the MTZ-loaded vesicles exhibit comparable anticancer activity to free MTZ, especially with additional UV stimulus, whereas its cytotoxicity for normal cells was remarkably reduced. Flow cytometric analysis further confirms that the cancer cell death caused by MTZ-loaded vesicles is associated with apoptosis. Therefore, the dual pH- and UV-responsive supramolecular vesicles are a potential platform for controlled release and targeted anticancer drug delivery. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

    2006-09-29

    Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding

  2. High attenuation in MgSiO3 post-perovskite due to [100] dislocation glide under D'' conditions: an atomic scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Carrez, P.

    2016-12-01

    Dislocation motion in crystalline materials represents one of the most efficient mechanisms to produce plastic shear, the key mechanism for CPO development. Previous atomistic simulations show that MgSiO3 ppv is characterized by remarkably low lattice friction opposed to the glide of straight [100] screw dislocations in (010), while glide in (001) requires one order of magnitude larger stress values [1]. At finite temperature, dislocation glide occurs through nucleation and propagation of kink-pairs, i.e. dislocation does not move as a straight line, but partly bows out over the Peierls potential. We propose a theoretical study of a kink-pair formation mechanism for [100] screw dislocations in MgSiO3 ppv employing the line tension (LT) model [2] in conjunction with ab-initio atomic-scale modeling. The dislocation line tension, which plays a key role in dislocation dynamics, is computed at atomic scale as the energy increase resulting from individual atomic displacements due to the nucleation of a bow out. The estimated kink-pair formation enthalpy gives an access to evolution of critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) with temperature. Our results clearly demonstrate that at the lower mantle conditions, lattice friction in ppv vanishes for temperatures above ca. 600 K, i.e. ppv deforms in the athermal regime in contrast to the high-lattice friction bridgmanite [3]. Moreover, in the Earth's mantle, high-pressure Mg-ppv can be expected to be as ductile as MgO. Our simulations demonstrate that ppv contributes to a weak layer at the base of the mantle which is likely to promote alignment of (010) planes. In addition to that, we show that the high mobility of [100] dislocations results in a decrease of the apparent shear modulus (up to 15%) which contributes to a decrease of the shear wave velocity of about 7% and suggest that ppv induces energy dissipation and strong seismic attenuation in the D" layer. References[1] Goryaeva A, Carrez Ph & Cordier P (2015) Modeling

  3. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  4. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  5. Atomic scale structure of the 5-fold surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal: A quantitative X-Ray photoelectron diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Huan, C.H.A.; Wee, A.T.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.; Shi, F.J.; Rotenberg, E.; Barman, S.R.; Paggel, J.J.; Horn, K.; Ebert, Ph.; Urban, K.

    2004-02-11

    The atomic scale structure of the 5-fold symmetric surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal is investigated quantitatively by comparing x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) simulations to experiment. The observed 5-fold symmetry of the diffraction patterns indicates that the surface is quasicrystalline with no hint of a reconstruction from the bulk structure. In analyzing the experimental data, many possible bulk terminations have been tested. Those few that fit best to the data have in common that they contain an Al-rich surface layer followed by a dense mixed Al/Pd/Mn layer. These best terminations, while not identical to each other, are suggested to form terraces coexisting on a real surface. Structural relaxations of the quasicrystal surface are also analyzed: mixing several best-fit terminations gives average best-fit interlayer spacing changes of Dd12 = -0.057 Angstrom, Dd24 = +0.159 Angstrom. These results are in good agreement with a prior structure determination by LEED on a sample that was prepared in a different manner.

  6. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  7. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  8. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  9. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  10. Atomic scale studies of La/Sr ordering in La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Roldan, Manuel

    2016-12-21

    Many fascinating properties of materials depend strongly on the local chemical environment. This is the case for many complex oxides, such as materials with colossal magnetoresistance, where small variations of composition at the atomic scale can affect drastically the macroscopic properties. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the local chemical composition with atomic resolution and to find out if any underlying chemical order is in any way connected to the magnetic properties of double perovskite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (LSMO) manganite oxides. For these compounds, charge and orbital ordering are observed for some doping values near x = 0.50 [1, 2]. For this purpose, we have use aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements and also theoretical simulations. We have compared different compositions within three distinct magnetic regions of the phase diagram: a ferromagnetic metallic sample with x=0.36, an insulating, antiferromagnetic (AF) x=0.56 and an additional AF x=0.50 sample which also exhibits charge ordering. High angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images, also known as Z-contrast, confirm that our single crystals exhibit high crystal quality. No secondary phases or defects are observed. Figure 1 displays an atomic resolution image obtained with the c-axis perpendicular to the electron beam of a x=0.50 sample. The perovskite (P)-like planes and the rock salt (R)-like planes are clearly observed, highlighted in green and red, respectively, on the image. The P-like planes exhibit a slightly high contrast, suggesting a possible La enrichment. EELS atomic resolution maps (inset) support a high degree of La segregation on those planes, while R-like planes are Sr rich. However, due to dechanneling of the beam, detailed image simulations are essential to accurately quantify the local chemical composition in an atomic column-by-atomic column fashion. For all our

  11. A biexponential DWI study in rat brain intracellular oedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, Roy, E-mail: roy.steier@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Pecs Diagnostic Center, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Aradi, Mihaly [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Pecs Diagnostic Center, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Pal, Jozsef [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Perlaki, Gabor; Orsi, Gergely; Bogner, Peter [Pecs Diagnostic Center, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); Galyas, Ferenc [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine University of Pecs, H-7623 Pecs, Ret street 2 (Hungary); and others

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To examine the changes in MR parameters derived from diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) biexponential analysis in an in vivo intracellular brain oedema model, and to apply electron microscopy (EM) to shed more light on the morphological background of MR-related observations. Materials and methods: Intracellular oedema was induced in ten male Wistar rats (380-450 g) by way of water load, using a 20% body weight intraperitoneal injection of 140 mmol/L dextrose solution. A 3T MRI instrument was used to perform serial DWI, and MR specroscopy (water signal) measurements. Following the MR examination the brains of the animals were analyzed for EM. Results: Following the water load induction, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values started declining from 724 {+-} 43 {mu}m{sup 2}/s to 682 {+-} 26 {mu}m{sup 2}/s (p < 0.0001). ADC-fast values dropped from 948 {+-} 122 to 840 {+-} 66 {mu}m{sup 2}/s (p < 0.001). ADC-slow showed a decrease from 226 {+-} 66 to 191 {+-} 74 {mu}m{sup 2}/s (p < 0.05). There was a shift from the slow to the fast component at 110 min time point. The percentage of the fast component demonstrated moderate, yet significant increase from 76.56 {+-} 7.79% to 81.2 {+-} 7.47% (p < 0.05). The water signal was increasing by 4.98 {+-} 3.52% compared to the base line (p < 0.01). The results of the E.M. revealed that water was detected intracellularly, within astrocytic preivascular end-feet and cell bodies. Conclusion: The unexpected volume fraction changes (i.e. increase in fast component) detected in hypotonic oedema appear to be substantially different from those observed in stroke. It may suggest that ADC decrease in stroke, in contrast to general presumptions, cannot be explained only by water shift from extra to intracellular space (i.e. intracellular oedema).

  12. Intracellular ion channels and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi eLeanza; Lucia eBiasutto; Antonella eManago; Erich eGulbins; Mario eZoratti; Ildikò eSzabò

    2013-01-01

    Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channel...

  13. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  14. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  15. Characterization of Leptin Intracellular Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Walum

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is produced by adipose tissue, and its concentration in plasma is related to the amount of fat in the body. The leptin receptor (OBR is a member of the class I cytokine receptor family and several different isoforms, produced by alternative mRNA splicing are found in many tissues, including the hypothalamus. The two predominant isoforms includes a long form (OBRl with an intracellular domain of 303 amino acids and a shorter form (OBRs with an intracellular domain of 34 amino acids. Since OBRl is mainly expressed in the hypotalamus, it has been suggested to be the main signalling form. The peripheral production of leptin by adipocyte tissue and its effects as a signal of satiety in the central nervous system imply that leptin gains access to regions of the brain regulating in energy balance by crossing the blood-brain barrier. In an attempt to characterize the intracellular transport of leptin, we have followed binding internalization and degradation of leptin in HEK293 cells. We have also monitored the intracellular transport pathway of fluorescent conjugated leptin in HEK293 cells. Phenylarsine oxide, a general inhibitor of endocytosis, as well as incubation at mild hypertonic conditions, prevented the uptake of leptin, confirming a receptor-mediated internalization process. When internalized, 125I-leptin was rapidly accumulated inside the cells and reached a maximum after 10 min. After 70 minutes about 40-50% of total counts in each time point were found in the medium as TCA-soluble material. Leptin sorting, at the level of early endosomes, did not seem to involve recycling endosomes, since FITC-leptin was sorted from Cy3- transferrin containing compartments at 37°C. At 45 minutes of continuos internalization, FITC-leptin appeared mainly accumulated in late endocytic structures colocalizing with internalized rhodamine coupled epidermial growth factor (EGF and the lysosomal marker protein lamp-1. The transport of leptin was also shown

  16. Differentiating Intracellular from Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Soil by Sonication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.P.; Hu, C.S.; Oenema, O.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio

  17. Simple Recovery of Intracellular Gold Nanoparticles from Peanut Seedling Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, D; Mehta, Urmil J; Ahmad, Absar

    2015-02-01

    Fabrication of inorganic nanomaterials via a biological route witnesses the formation either extracellularly, intracellulary or both. Whereas extracellular formation of these nanomaterials is cherished owing to their easy and economical extraction and purification processes; the intracellular formation of nanomaterials, due to the lack of a proper recovery protocol has always been dreaded, as the extraction processes used so far were tedious, costly, time consuming and often resulting in very low recovery. The aim of the present study was to overcome the problems related with the extraction and recovery of intracellularly synthesized inorganic nanoparticles, and to devise a method to increasing the output, the shape, size, composition and dispersal of nanoparticles is not altered. Water proved to be much better system as it provided well dispersed, stable gold nanoparticles and higher recovery. This is the first report, where intracellular nanoparticles have been recovered using a very cost-effective and eco-friendly approach.

  18. Intracellular ion channels and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Luigi; Biasutto, Lucia; Managò, Antonella; Gulbins, Erich; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2013-09-03

    Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K(+) channels (Ca(2+)-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K(+) channel-3 (TASK-3)), Ca(2+) uniporter MCU, Mg(2+)-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC) and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, the ER-located Ca(2+) depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1), a component of the store-operated Ca(2+) channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

  19. Intracellular ion channels and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eLeanza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channels (Ca2+-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K+ channel-3 (TASK-3, Ca2+ uniporter MCU, Mg2+-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor, the ER-located Ca2+ depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1, a component of the store-operated Ca2+ channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

  20. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  1. Intracellular polyamines enhance astrocytic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y; Nichols, Colin G; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N

    2012-12-05

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine, endogenous polyamines with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant, and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These polyamines are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. The results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21-25-day-old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow through gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with intracellular solutions containing 1 mM SPM, a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM through gap junctions and further indicate a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network under both normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Anomalous dynamics in intracellular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    This talk will describe quantitative analyses of particle tracking data for systems with cytoskeletally associated molecular motors to better understand the motions contributing to intracellular transport and, more generally, means for characterizing systems far from equilibrium. In particular, we have studied the motions of insulin-containing vesicles (granules) in a pancreatic beta cell line. We find subdiffusive behavior with correlations in both space and time. These data can be modeled by subordinating an ergodic random walk process to a non-ergodic one. We relate the dynamics to the underlying microtubule structure by imaging in the presence of the drug vinblastine. Our results provide a simple physical mechanism for how diverse pools of insulin granules and, in turn, biphasic secretion could arise. Time permitting, these dynamics will be compared with those of actomyosin assemblies.

  3. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  4. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  5. BDI-modelling of complex intracellular dynamics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Snoep, J.L.; Treur, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Wijngaards, W.C.A.

    2008-01-01

    A BDI-based continuous-time modelling approach for intracellular dynamics is presented. It is shown how temporalised BDI-models make it possible to model intracellular biochemical processes as decision processes. By abstracting from some of the details of the biochemical pathways, the model achieves

  6. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  7. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-04

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  8. [A therapeutic Trojan horse: intracellular antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillaud, J L

    1999-10-01

    Intracellular immunization is a novel therapeutic approach based on intracellular expression of recombinant antibody fragments, either Fab or single chain Fv (scFv generated by the assembly of the VH with the VL region), targeted to the desired cell compartment (cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum ...) using appropriate targeting sequences. Due to their exquisite specificity, these intracellular antibodies can be used to neutralize or modulate the functional activity of the target molecule. Intracellular immunization strategies currently under investigation in the field of oncology are directed against mutated oncogenic molecules such as ErbB-2, p21ras, and p53, as well as against apoptosis-inhibiting molecules such as Bcl-2. The first Phase I clinical trials on intracellular immunization are under way in the United States.

  9. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  10. Intracellular amorphous carbonates uncover a new biomineralization process in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignier, A; Pacton, M; Filella, M; Jaquet, J-M; Barja, F; Pollok, K; Langenhorst, F; Lavigne, S; Guagliardo, P; Kilburn, M R; Thomas, C; Martini, R; Ariztegui, D

    2017-03-01

    Until now, descriptions of intracellular biomineralization of amorphous inclusions involving alkaline-earth metal (AEM) carbonates other than calcium have been confined exclusively to cyanobacteria (Couradeau et al., 2012). Here, we report the first evidence of the presence of intracellular amorphous granules of AEM carbonates (calcium, strontium, and barium) in unicellular eukaryotes. These inclusions, which we have named micropearls, show concentric and oscillatory zoning on a nanometric scale. They are widespread in certain eukaryote phytoplankters of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) and represent a previously unknown type of non-skeletal biomineralization, revealing an unexpected pathway in the geochemical cycle of AEMs. We have identified Tetraselmis cf. cordiformis (Chlorophyta, Prasinophyceae) as being responsible for the formation of one micropearl type containing strontium ([Ca,Sr]CO3 ), which we also found in a cultured strain of Tetraselmis cordiformis. A different flagellated eukaryotic cell forms barium-rich micropearls [(Ca,Ba)CO3 ]. The strontium and barium concentrations of both micropearl types are extremely high compared with the undersaturated water of Lake Geneva (the Ba/Ca ratio of the micropearls is up to 800,000 times higher than in the water). This can only be explained by a high biological pre-concentration of these elements. The particular characteristics of the micropearls, along with the presence of organic sulfur-containing compounds-associated with and surrounding the micropearls-strongly suggest the existence of a yet-unreported intracellular biomineralization pathway in eukaryotic micro-organisms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology; Simulations a l'echelle atomique des defauts de l'implantation de l'hydrogene en silicium - technologie smart Cut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-15

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut{sup TM} technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  12. Intracellular and juxtacellular staining with biocytin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles J; Sachdev, R N S

    2004-05-01

    Many physiological studies require microscopic examination of the recorded neuron for identification. This unit describes how intracellular and extracellular recording can be combined with single-neuron staining to enable sequential physiological and morphological studies.

  13. Intracellular temperature measurements with fluorescent polymeric thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Seiichi; Gota, Chie; Tsuji, Toshikazu; Inada, Noriko

    2017-10-05

    In 2003, we successfully created the first fluorescent polymeric thermometer by combining a thermo-responsive polymer and an environment-sensitive (polarity and hydrogen bonding-sensitive) fluorophore. Its high sensitivity to temperature variation and high hydrophilicity, even under conditions of high ionic strength, enabled intracellular temperature measurements. Along with the progress of our research projects, the development of new luminescent molecular thermometers and the establishment of novel methods for measuring intracellular temperature have matured in this field. In this Feature Article, we summarize the background and history of intracellular temperature measurements using fluorescent polymeric thermometers based on studies performed in our laboratory and the relationship between our methods and those of other eminent research groups. Future research directions regarding intracellular temperature measurements are also discussed.

  14. Functional Implications of Intracellular Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holehouse, Alex S; Pappu, Rohit V

    2018-01-11

    Intracellular environments are heterogeneous milieus comprising of macromolecules, osmolytes, and a range of assemblies that include membrane-bound organelles and membraneless biomolecular condensates. The latter are non-stoichiometric assemblies of protein and RNA molecules. They represent distinct phases and form via intracellular phase transitions. Here, we present insights from recent studies and provide a perspective on how phase transitions that lead to biomolecular condensates might contribute to cellular functions.

  15. The carbon fertilization effect over a century of anthropogenic CO2 emissions: higher intracellular CO2 and more drought resistance among invasive and native grass species contrasts with increased water use efficiency for woody plants in the US Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Brandon L; Hanson, David T; Lowrey, Timothy K; Sharp, Zachary D

    2017-02-01

    From 1890 to 2015, anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions have increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations from 270 to 400 mol mol(-1) . The effect of increased carbon emissions on plant growth and reproduction has been the subject of study of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments. These experiments have found (i) an increase in internal CO2 partial pressure (ci ) alongside acclimation of photosynthetic capacity, (ii) variable decreases in stomatal conductance, and (iii) that increases in yield do not increase commensurate with CO2 concentrations. Our data set, which includes a 115-year-long selection of grasses collected in New Mexico since 1892, is consistent with an increased ci as a response to historical CO2 increase in the atmosphere, with invasive species showing the largest increase. Comparison with Palmer Drought Sensitivity Index (PDSI) for New Mexico indicates a moderate correlation with Δ(13) C (r(2)  = 0.32, P CO2 in the event of reduced stomatal conductance in response to short-term water shortage. Comparison with C3 trees from arid environments (Pinus longaeva and Pinus edulis in the US Southwest) as well as from wetter environments (Bromus and Poa grasses in New Mexico) suggests differing responses based on environment; arid environments in New Mexico see increased intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) in response to historic elevated CO2 while wetter environments see increased ci . This study suggests that (i) the observed increases in ci in FACE experiments are consistent with historical CO2 increases and (ii) the CO2 increase influences plant sensitivity to water shortage, through either increased WUE or ci in arid and wet environments, respectively. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations >60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2–3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations. PMID:27847498

  17. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations.

  18. Micro- and nanotechnologies for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lee, Chun-Sing; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-11-01

    The majority of drugs and biomolecules need to be delivered into cells to be effective. However, the cell membranes, a biological barrier, strictly resist drugs or biomolecules entering cells, resulting in significantly reduced intracellular delivery efficiency. To overcome this barrier, a variety of intracellular delivery approaches including chemical and physical ways have been developed in recent years. In this review, the focus is on summarizing the nanomaterial routes involved in making use of a collection of receptors for the targeted delivery of drugs and biomolecules and the physical ways of applying micro- and nanotechnologies for high-throughput intracellular delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. BDI-modelling of complex intracellular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, C M; Snoep, J L; Treur, J; Westerhoff, H V; Wijngaards, W C A

    2008-03-07

    A BDI-based continuous-time modelling approach for intracellular dynamics is presented. It is shown how temporalized BDI-models make it possible to model intracellular biochemical processes as decision processes. By abstracting from some of the details of the biochemical pathways, the model achieves understanding in nearly intuitive terms, without losing veracity: classical intentional state properties such as beliefs, desires and intentions are founded in reality through precise biochemical relations. In an extensive example, the complex regulation of Escherichia coli vis-à-vis lactose, glucose and oxygen is simulated as a discrete-state, continuous-time temporal decision manager. Thus a bridge is introduced between two different scientific areas: the area of BDI-modelling and the area of intracellular dynamics.

  20. A possible low intracellular potassium in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, E W; Wang, J; Stallone, F; Van Itallie, T B; Pierson, R N

    1981-03-01

    In comparison with lean marathon runners whose fat content was 15%, obese subjects with a fat content of 55% showed a 36% reduction in intracellular potassium. It is hypothesized that as much as 60% of this decrease may have been due to the lower proportion of muscle (which has the highest intracellular potassium of any tissue) in the fat free mass of very obese subjects. The remainder of the decrease seems to have been a measurement artefact owing to self-absorption of gamma rays by adipose tissue, most of which is distributed over potassium rich lean tissue. The low intracellular potassium values found in obesity should not be interpreted as necessarily signifying potassium deficiency.

  1. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale - the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  2. Atomic-Scale Principles of Combustion Nanocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Molecules", W. L. Whetten , J. Khoury, I. Vezmar, S. Murthy, C. L. Cleveland, W. D. Luedtke, U. Landman, Adv. Mater. 8, 428 (1996), that served as a guide...Yoon, R. N. Barnett, R. L. Whetten , U. Landman, and R. Jin “Total Structure of the Golden Nanocrystal Au36(SR)24 “, Angew. Chem. Int Ed. 51, 13114...2012). 10. I. Chakraborty, A. Govindarajan, J.Erusappan, A. Ghosh, T. Pradeep, B.Yoon, R. L. Whetten , and U. Landman “The Superstable 25-kDa

  3. Continuum Mechanics at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    stress is singular at t=o bu* also the stored elastic energy. For that reason we are forced to consider the Polution valid only in a hollow cylinder...Diego Dept. of Applied Mechanics Prof. W.D. Pilkey La Jolla, California 92037 University of Virginia Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Prof. William A...University of California, LA School of Engineering & Applied Science Prof. J,. D. Achenbach Los Angeles, California 90024 Northwestern University Dept. of

  4. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  5. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  6. Efficient intracellular delivery of native proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Astolfo, Diego S; Pagliero, Romina J; Pras, Anita; Karthaus, Wouter R; Clevers, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07164282X; Prasad, Vikram; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Rehmann, Holger; Geijsen, Niels|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194303403

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein function is used to intervene in cellular processes but is often done indirectly by means of introducing DNA or mRNA encoding the effector protein. Thus far, direct intracellular delivery of proteins has remained challenging. We developed a method termed iTOP, for induced

  7. Hepatitis C virus intracellular host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefhebber, Johanna Maaike Pieternella

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects about 170 million people worldwide causing a major healthcare problem. The virus lifecycle is greatly dependent on the host-cell for effective replication. In this thesis, the intracellular interactions of the non-structural HCV proteins with the host-cell were

  8. Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Engelhart, Merete; Thybo, Sören

    2017-01-01

    attempts of immunosuppressive treatments were found to be caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare. While she was receiving high-dose prednisolone, as worsening of her connective tissue disease was suspected to be the cause of the inflammatory changes, she had Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...

  9. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To study the propagation of such defects with time and their effect on the intracellular protein expression patterns, a comprehensive and largest pathway map of T-cell activation network is reconstructed manually. The entire pathway reactions are then translated using logical equations and simulated using the published ...

  10. Molecular detection and characterization of sustainable intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial contamination in cell and tissue culture is a constant problem, which can compromise development and applications of cell lines. ... All rights reserved. Keywords: Intracellular contaminants, cell cultures, bacteria culture, pre-clinical studies. ..... or perpendicular to the cell layer surface on. Epon blocks with an Epon ...

  11. [The role of intracellular electrolytes in the maintenance of erythrocyte deformability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, N

    1996-09-01

    Regulation of intracellular cation concentration is critical for the maintenance of erythrocyte deformability. The cellular cation concentrations are the result of an equilibrium between passive diffusion and active transport (pump). In stomatocytosis, the pump hyperactivity is unable to counterbalance the leakage of sodium, leading to an increased cellular sodium and water content. The overhydrated stomatocytes become less deformable. In xerocytosis, the primary defect is an increased leakage of potassium from the erythrocytes. Pump activity is unable to fully compensate, and the net intracellular cation concentration and water are decreased, leading to dehydration. Increased intracellular calcium results in potassium loss, dehydration and cross-linking of skeletal proteins. These mechanisms are attractive for explaining erythrocyte senescence, though not entirely proven.

  12. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-12-24

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  13. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  14. The Microscopic Structure of Adsorbed Water on Hydrophobic Surfaces under Ambient Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peigen; Xu, Ke; Varghese, Joseph O.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of water vapor with hydrophobic surfaces is poorly understood. We utilize graphene templating to preserve and visualize the microscopic structures of adsorbed water on hydrophobic surfaces. Three well-defined surfaces [H–Si(111), graphite, and functionalized mica] were investigated, and water was found to adsorb as nanodroplets (~10–100 nm in size) on all three surfaces under ambient conditions. The adsorbed nanodroplets were closely associated with atomic-scale surface defect...

  15. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tap as described). 3. In all situations, drink or cook only with water that comes out of the tap cold. Water that comes out of the tap warm or hot can contain much higher levels of lead. Boiling ...

  16. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The ability to regulate the interaction between cells and their extracellular environment is essential for the maintenance of appropriate physiological function. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), this regulation occurs through multiple mechanisms that provide spatial and temporal control...... for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...

  17. Leishmania hijacking of the macrophage intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2016-02-01

    Leishmania spp., transmitted to humans by the bite of the sandfly vector, are responsible for the three major forms of leishmaniasis, cutaneous, diffuse mucocutaneous and visceral. Leishmania spp. interact with membrane receptors of neutrophils and macrophages. In macrophages, the parasite is internalized within a parasitophorous vacuole and engages in a particular intracellular lifestyle in which the flagellated, motile Leishmania promastigote metacyclic form differentiates into non-motile, metacyclic amastigote form. This phenomenon is induced by Leishmania-triggered events leading to the fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with vesicular members of the host cell endocytic pathway including recycling endosomes, late endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. Maturation of the parasitophorous vacuole leads to the intracellular proliferation of the Leishmania amastigote forms by acquisition of host cell nutrients while escaping host defense responses. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  19. Mitochondrial synapses: intracellular communication and signal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Communication is a central theme in biology. Consequently, specialized structures have evolved to permit rapid communication among cells, tissues, organs, and physiological systems, thus enhancing the overall function and adaptation of the organism. A prime example is the neuronal synapse. In the brain, synaptic communication establishes neuronal networks with the capacity to integrate, process, and store information, giving rise to complex output signals capable of orchestrating functions across the organism. At the intracellular level, discoveries now reveal the existence of 'mitochondrial synapses' establishing mitochondrial networks, with defined chromatin-modifying mitochondrial output signals capable of orchestrating gene expression across the genome. These discoveries raise the possibility that in addition to their role as powerhouses and neuromodulators, mitochondria behave as intracellular signal-processing networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intracellular magnesium detection by fluorescent indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Valentina; Schweigel-Röntgen, Monika; Cittadini, Achille; Wolf, Federica I

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is essential for a wide variety of biochemical reactions and physiological functions, but its regulatory mechanisms (both at the cellular and at the systemic level) are still poorly characterized. Not least among the reasons for this gap are the technical difficulties in sensing minor changes occurring over a high background concentration. Specific fluorescent indicators are highly sensitive tools for dynamic evaluation of intracellular magnesium concentration. We herein discuss the main criteria to consider when choosing a magnesium-specific fluorescent indicator and provide examples among commercial as well as developmental sensors. We focus on spectrofluorimetric approaches to quantify Mg(2+) concentration in cell or mitochondria suspensions, and on imaging techniques to detect intracellular magnesium distribution and fluxes by live microscopy, reporting a detailed description of standard protocols for each method. The general guidelines we provide should be applicable to specific issues by any researcher in the field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficient Intracellular Assembly of Papillomaviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Christopher B.; Diana V Pastrana; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2004-01-01

    Although the papillomavirus structural proteins, L1 and L2, can spontaneously coassemble to form virus-like particles, currently available methods for production of L1/L2 particles capable of transducing reporter plasmids into mammalian cells are technically demanding and relatively low-yield. In this report, we describe a simple 293 cell transfection method for efficient intracellular production of papillomaviral-based gene transfer vectors carrying reporter plasmids. Using bovine papillomav...

  2. Functions of Intracellular Retinoid Binding-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Joseph L

    Multiple binding and transport proteins facilitate many aspects of retinoid biology through effects on retinoid transport, cellular uptake, metabolism, and nuclear delivery. These include the serum retinol binding protein sRBP (aka Rbp4), the plasma membrane sRBP receptor Stra6, and the intracellular retinoid binding-proteins such as cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBP) and cellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP). sRBP transports the highly lipophilic retinol through an aqueous medium. The major intracellular retinol-binding protein, CRBP1, likely enhances efficient retinoid use by providing a sink to facilitate retinol uptake from sRBP through the plasma membrane or via Stra6, delivering retinol or retinal to select enzymes that generate retinyl esters or retinoic acid, and protecting retinol/retinal from excess catabolism or opportunistic metabolism. Intracellular retinoic acid binding-proteins (CRABP1 and 2, and FABP5) seem to have more diverse functions distinctive to each, such as directing retinoic acid to catabolism, delivering retinoic acid to specific nuclear receptors, and generating non-canonical actions. Gene ablation of intracellular retinoid binding-proteins does not cause embryonic lethality or gross morphological defects. Metabolic and functional defects manifested in knockouts of CRBP1, CRBP2 and CRBP3, however, illustrate their essentiality to health, and in the case of CRBP2, to survival during limited dietary vitamin A. Future studies should continue to address the specific molecular interactions that occur between retinoid binding-proteins and their targets and their precise physiologic contributions to retinoid homeostasis and function.

  3. Extracellular and Intracellular Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bronner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An organism with an internal skeleton must accumulate calcium while maintaining body fluids at a well-regulated, constant calcium concentration. Neither calcium absorption nor excretion plays a significant regulatory role. Instead, isoionic calcium uptake and release by bone surfaces causes plasma calcium to be well regulated. Very rapid shape changes of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in response to hormonal signals, modulate the available bone surfaces so that plasma calcium can increase when more low-affinity bone calcium binding sites are made available and can decrease when more high-affinity binding sites are exposed. The intracellular free calcium concentration of body cells is also regulated, but because cells are bathed by fluids with vastly higher calcium concentration, their major regulatory mechanism is severe entry restriction. All cells have a calcium-sensing receptor that modulates cell function via its response to extracellular calcium. In duodenal cells, the apical calcium entry structure functions as both transporter and a vitamin D–responsive channel. The channel upregulates calcium entry, with intracellular transport mediated by the mobile, vitamin D–dependent buffer, calbindin D9K, which binds and transports more than 90% of the transcellular calcium flux. Fixed intracellular calcium binding sites can, like the body's skeleton, take up and release calcium that has entered the cell, but the principal regulatory tool of the cell is restricted entry.

  4. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  5. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-03-15

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities.

  6. Error Propagation Analysis for Quantitative Intracellular Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Tillack

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Model-based analyses have become an integral part of modern metabolic engineering and systems biology in order to gain knowledge about complex and not directly observable cellular processes. For quantitative analyses, not only experimental data, but also measurement errors, play a crucial role. The total measurement error of any analytical protocol is the result of an accumulation of single errors introduced by several processing steps. Here, we present a framework for the quantification of intracellular metabolites, including error propagation during metabolome sample processing. Focusing on one specific protocol, we comprehensively investigate all currently known and accessible factors that ultimately impact the accuracy of intracellular metabolite concentration data. All intermediate steps are modeled, and their uncertainty with respect to the final concentration data is rigorously quantified. Finally, on the basis of a comprehensive metabolome dataset of Corynebacterium glutamicum, an integrated error propagation analysis for all parts of the model is conducted, and the most critical steps for intracellular metabolite quantification are detected.

  7. Intracellular Pressure Dynamics in Blebbing Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, Wanda; Guy, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions that play an important role in cell migration, particularly in three-dimensional environments. A bleb is initiated when the cytoskeleton detaches from the cell membrane, resulting in the pressure-driven flow of cytosol toward the area of detachment and local expansion of the cell membrane. Recent experiments involving blebbing cells have led to conflicting hypotheses regarding the timescale of intracellular pressure propagation. The interpretation of one set of experiments supports a poroelastic model of the cytoplasm that leads to slow pressure equilibration when compared to the timescale of bleb expansion. A different study concludes that pressure equilibrates faster than the timescale of bleb expansion. To address this discrepancy, a dynamic computational model of the cell was developed that includes mechanics of and the interactions among the cytoplasm, the actin cortex, the cell membrane, and the cytoskeleton. The model results quantify the relationship among cytoplasmic rheology, pressure, and bleb expansion dynamics, and provide a more detailed picture of intracellular pressure dynamics. This study shows the elastic response of the cytoplasm relieves pressure and limits bleb size, and that both permeability and elasticity of the cytoplasm determine bleb expansion time. Our model with a poroelastic cytoplasm shows that pressure disturbances from bleb initiation propagate faster than the timescale of bleb expansion and that pressure equilibrates slower than the timescale of bleb expansion. The multiple timescales in intracellular pressure dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in the interpretation of experimental results. PMID:26958893

  8. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical

  9. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Efficient intracellular assembly of papillomaviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2004-01-01

    Although the papillomavirus structural proteins, L1 and L2, can spontaneously coassemble to form virus-like particles, currently available methods for production of L1/L2 particles capable of transducing reporter plasmids into mammalian cells are technically demanding and relatively low-yield. In this report, we describe a simple 293 cell transfection method for efficient intracellular production of papillomaviral-based gene transfer vectors carrying reporter plasmids. Using bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) and human papillomavirus type 16 as model papillomaviruses, we have developed a system for producing papillomaviral vector stocks with titers of several billion transducing units per milliliter. Production of these vectors requires both L1 and L2, and transduction can be prevented by papillomavirus-neutralizing antibodies. The stocks can be purified by an iodixanol (OptiPrep) gradient centrifugation procedure that is substantially more effective than standard cesium chloride gradient purification. Although earlier data had suggested a potential role for the viral early protein E2, we found that E2 protein expression did not enhance the intracellular production of BPV1 vectors. It was also possible to encapsidate reporter plasmids devoid of BPV1 DNA sequences. BPV1 vector production efficiency was significantly influenced by the size of the target plasmid being packaged. Use of 6-kb target plasmids resulted in BPV1 vector yields that were higher than those with target plasmids closer to the native 7.9-kb size of papillomavirus genomes. The results suggest that the intracellular assembly of papillomavirus structural proteins around heterologous reporter plasmids is surprisingly promiscuous and may be driven primarily by a size discrimination mechanism.

  11. Evidence that downregulation of hexose transport limits intracellular glucose in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesell, R.R.; Regen, D.M.; Pelletier, D.; Abumrad, N.A. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Measurements of initial glucose entry rate and intracellular glucose concentration in cultured cells are difficult because of rapid transport relative to intracellular volume and a substantial extracellular space from which glucose cannot be completely removed by quick exchanges of medium. In 3T3-L1 cells, we obtained good estimates of initial entry of ({sup 14}C)methylglucose and D-({sup 14}C)glucose with (1) L-({sup 3}H)glucose as an extracellular marker together with the ({sup 14}C)glucose or ({sup 14}C)methylglucose in the substrate mixture, (2) sampling times as short as 2 s, (3) ice-cold phloretin-containing medium to stop uptake and rinse away the extracellular label, and (4) nonlinear regression of time courses. Methylglucose equilibrated in two phases--the first with a half-time of 1.7 s and the second with a half-time of 23 s; it eventually equilibrated in an intracellular space of 8 microliters/mg protein. Entry of glucose remained almost linear for 10 s, making its transport kinetics easier to study (Km = 5.7 mM, Vmax = 590 nmol.s-1.ml-1 cell water). Steady-state intracellular glucose concentration was 75-90% of extracellular glucose concentration. Cells grown in a high-glucose medium (24 mM) exhibited a 67% reduction of glucose-transport activity and a 50% reduction of steady-state ratio of intracellular glucose to extracellular glucose.

  12. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available , and of the remaining 2,5 percent, some 70 percent is frozen in the polar caps and around 30 percent is present as soil moisture or in underground aquifers. Less than 1 percent is thus accessible for direct use by humans, animals and plants. Consequently... be serviced with harvested water and/or grey water. Conserve and reuse cooling tower water by using efficient systems and strategies. Avoid ?once-through systems? commonly used for evaporation coolers, ice makers, hydraulic equipment, and air compressors...

  13. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Strategies for intracellular survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eAdler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterised mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defence mechanisms such as the induction of iNOS, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed.

  15. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis. PMID:8585727

  16. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  17. Intracellular delivery of nanocarriers and targeting to subcellular organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Aditi; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in drug delivery indicate a steady increase in the use of targeted therapeutics to enhance the specific delivery of biologically active payloads to diseased tissues while avoiding their off-target effects. However, in most cases, the distribution of therapeutics inside cells and their targeting to intracellular targets still presents a formidable challenge. The main barrier to intracellular delivery is the translocation of therapeutic molecules across the cell membrane, and ultimately through the membrane of their intracellular target organelles. Another prerequisite for an efficient intracellular localization of active molecules is their escape from the endocytic pathway. Pharmaceutical nanocarriers have demonstrated substantial advantages for the delivery of therapeutics and offer elegant platforms for intracellular delivery. They can be engineered with both intracellular and organelle-specific targeting moieties to deliver encapsulated or conjugated cargoes to specific sub-cellular targets. In this review, we discuss important aspects of intracellular drug targeting and delivery with a focus on nanocarriers modified with various ligands to specifically target intracellular organelles. Intracellular delivery affords selective localization of molecules to their target site, thus maximizing their efficacy and safety. The advent of novel nanocarriers and targeting ligands as well as exploration of alternate routes for the intracellular delivery and targeting has prompted extensive research, and promises an exciting future for this field.

  18. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  19. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intracellular metabolic pathways control immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Galgani, Mario; De Rosa, Veronica; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have been linked to immune dysfunction, raising the possibility that metabolic alterations can be induced by or be a consequence of alterations in immunological tolerance. Here, we describe how intracellular metabolic signalling pathways can 'sense' host energy/nutritional status, and in response, modulate regulatory T (Treg) cell function. In particular, we focus on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling, and how stimuli such as nutrients and leptin activate mTOR in an oscillatory manner to determine Treg cell proliferation status. We propose that metabolic changes such as nutritional deprivation or overload could dictate the characteristics of the Treg cell compartment and subsequent downstream immune reactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  2. [Rab Proteins, Intracellular Transport and Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černochová, R; Nekulová, M; Holčaková, J

    Rab proteins are small monomeric enzymes which belong to the large Ras protein superfamily and allow hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine (GDP). Up to now more than 60 proteins have been described that act primarily as regulators of intracellular transport. Rab GTPases are mostly located at the intracellular membranes, where they provide connections to motor proteins and to the cytoskeleton and control various steps of the traffic pathways including the formation and movement of vesicles or membrane fusion controlling secretion, endocytosis, recycling and degradation of proteins. Today, the deregulated expression of Rab protein is discussed in different types of malignancies. The number of identified diseases associated with mutations in Rab proteins or their cooperating partners increases and the evidence for the involvement of Rab to the human pathologies such as the immune failure, obesity and diabetes, Alzheimers disease or hereditary genetic diseases is growing. The malfunctions of Rab proteins caused by mutations or aberrant posttranslational modifications lead to changes in the protein and vesicle trafficking, which play a crucial role in the formation and development of cancer and the deregulation of Rab expression frequently influences the migration, invasion, proliferation and drug resistance of the tumor cells. This article summarizes the main functions of Rab proteins in the cells, describes the mechanism of their activity and focuses on the current knowledge about the roles of these GTPases in carcinogenesis.Key words: Rab GTPases - protein transport - carcinogenesisThis work was supported by the project MEYS - NPS I - LO1413.The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study.The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 13. 5. 2016Accepted: 31. 5. 2016.

  3. Intracellular mechanisms of lymphoid cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresa, K; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is associated with the appearance of an intracellular factor (ADR) that can induce DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR plays a role in the sequence of intracellular events leading to activation for IL-2-mediated proliferation. Because of the nature of the defining assay, the locus of ADR action appears to be near the terminal end of the transduction pathway. Interestingly, although lymphocytes from aged individuals respond poorly to proliferative stimuli, they appear to produce normal to above-normal levels of ADR. In contrast, their nuclei are only poorly responsive to stimulation by ADR. Preparations rich in ADR activity have proteolytic activity as well. In addition, aprotinin, as well as a variety of other protease inhibitors, suppresses ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by absorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads, and can be removed from the beads by elution at pH 5.0. This latter suggests that ADR itself is a protease. However, its endogenous substrate is not yet known. We have also detected an inhibitor of ADR activity in the cytoplasm of resting lymphocytes. This is a heat-stable protein of approximately 60,000 Da. In addition to suppressing the interaction of ADR with quiescent nuclei, the inhibitor can suppress DNA synthetic activity of replicative nuclei isolated from mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, these preparations had little or no activity on replicative nuclei derived from several neoplastic cell lines. The resistance of tumor cell nuclei to spontaneously occurring cytoplasmic inhibitory factors such as the one described here may provide one explanation for the loss of growth control in neoplastic cells.

  4. Traffic jams II: an update of diseases of intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridor, Meir; Hannan, Lisa A

    2002-11-01

    As more details emerge on the mechanisms that mediate and control intracellular transport, the molecular basis for variety of human diseases has been revealed. In turn, disease pathology and physiology shed light on the intricate controls that regulate intracellular transport to assure proper cellular and tissue function and homeostasis. We previously listed a number of diseases that are the result of defects in intracellular transport, or cause defects in intracellular transport. (Aridor M, Hannan LA. Traffic Jam: A compendium of human diseases that affect intracellular transport processes. Traffic 2000; 1: 836-851). This Toolbox updates the previous list to include additional disorders that were recently identified to be related to intracellular trafficking. In the time since we have published our first list there have been significant advances in understanding of the molecular basis of these defects. Such advances will pave the way to future effective therapeutics.

  5. The Role of Autophagy in Intracellular Pathogen Nutrient Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSteele

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following entry into host cells intracellular pathogens must simultaneously evade innate host defense mechanisms and acquire energy and anabolic substrates from the nutrient-limited intracellular environment. Most of the potential intracellular nutrient sources are stored within complex macromolecules that are not immediately accessible by intracellular pathogens. To obtain nutrients for proliferation, intracellular pathogens must compete with the host cell for newly-imported simple nutrients or degrade host nutrient storage structures into their constituent components (fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. It is becoming increasingly evident that intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide variety of strategies to accomplish this task. One recurrent microbial strategy is to exploit host degradative processes that break down host macromolecules into simple nutrients that the microbe can use. Herein we focus on how a subset of bacterial, viral and eukaryotic pathogens leverage the host process of autophagy to acquire nutrients that support their growth within infected cells

  6. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  7. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...... which diffusion-mediated signaling is possible. We show that purely diffusive transmission of intracellular information by H(2)O(2) over a distance of 1 μm (typical distance between organelles, which may function as relay stations) is possible at frequencies well above 1 Hz, which is the highest......, at this longer distance a high rate of enzymatic degradation is required to make signaling at frequencies above 0.1 Hz possible. In either case, cytoplasmic streaming does not seriously disturb signals. We conclude that although purely diffusion-mediated signaling without relaying stations is theoretically...

  8. Fully glutathione degradable waterborne polyurethane nanocarriers: Preparation, redox-sensitivity, and triggered intracellular drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ismail; Babanejad, Niloofar; Shendi, Hasan Kashef; Nabid, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Polyurethanes are important class of biomaterials that are extensively used in medical devices. In spite of their easy synthesis, polyurethanes that are fully degradable in response to the intracellular reducing environment are less explored for controlled drug delivery. Herein, a novel glutathione degradable waterborne polyurethane (WPU) nanocarrier for redox triggered intracellular delivery of a model lipophilic anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) is reported. The WPU was prepared from polyaddition reaction of isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and a novel linear polyester polyol involving disulfide linkage, disulfide labeled chain extender, dimethylolpropionic acid (DMPA) using dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. The resulting polyurethane self-assembles into nanocarrier in water. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed fast swelling and disruption of nanocarriers under an intracellular reduction-mimicking environment. The in vitro release studies showed that DOX was released in a controlled and redox-dependent manner. MTT assays showed that DOX-loaded WPU had a high in vitro antitumor activity in both HDF noncancer cells and MCF- 7 cancer cells. In addition, it is found that the blank WPU nanocarriers are nontoxic to HDF and MCF-7 cells even at a high concentration of 2mg/mL. Hence, nanocarriers based on disulfide labeled WPU have appeared as a new class of biocompatible and redox-degradable nanovehicle for efficient intracellular drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sub-10-nm intracellular bioelectronic probes from nanowire-nanotube heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian-Ming; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhe; Dai, Xiaochuan; Xie, Ping; Cheng, Zengguang; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-01-28

    The miniaturization of bioelectronic intracellular probes with a wide dynamic frequency range can open up opportunities to study biological structures inaccessible by existing methods in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of intracellular bioelectronic devices with probe sizes less than 10 nm. The devices are based on a nanowire-nanotube heterostructure in which a nanowire field-effect transistor detector is synthetically integrated with a nanotube cellular probe. Sub-10-nm nanotube probes were realized by a two-step selective etching approach that reduces the diameter of the nanotube free-end while maintaining a larger diameter at the nanowire detector necessary for mechanical strength and electrical sensitivity. Quasi-static water-gate measurements demonstrated selective device response to solution inside the nanotube, and pulsed measurements together with numerical simulations confirmed the capability to record fast electrophysiological signals. Systematic studies of the probe bandwidth in different ionic concentration solutions revealed the underlying mechanism governing the time response. In addition, the bandwidth effect of phospholipid coatings, which are important for intracellular recording, was investigated and modeled. The robustness of these sub-10-nm bioelectronics probes for intracellular interrogation was verified by optical imaging and recording the transmembrane resting potential of HL-1 cells. These ultrasmall bioelectronic probes enable direct detection of cellular electrical activity with highest spatial resolution achieved to date, and with further integration into larger chip arrays could provide a unique platform for ultra-high-resolution mapping of activity in neural networks and other systems.

  10. Contrast-enhanced digital holographic imaging of cellular structures by manipulating the intracellular refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Christina E; Dierker, Christian; Schmidt, Lisa; Przibilla, Sabine; von Bally, Gert; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of biological reactions and evaluation of the significance for living cells strongly depends on the ability to visualize and quantify these processes. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative phase contrast imaging for high resolution and minimal invasive live cell analysis without the need of labeling or complex sample preparation. However, due to the rather homogeneous intracellular refractive index, the phase contrast of subcellular structures is limited and often low. We analyze the impact of the specific manipulation of the intracellular refractive index by microinjection on the DHM phase contrast. Glycerol is chosen as osmolyte, which combines high solubility in aqueous solutions and biological compatibility. We show that the intracellular injection of glycerol causes a contrast enhancement that can be explained by a decrease of the cytosolic refractive index due to a water influx. The underlying principle is proven by experiments inducing cell shrinkage and with fixated cells. The integrity of the cell membrane is considered as a prerequisite and allows a reversible cell swelling and shrinking within a certain limit. The presented approach to control the intracellular phase contrast demonstrated for the example of DHM opens prospects for applications with other quantitative phase contrast imaging methods.

  11. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  12. Intracellular magnesium detection: imaging a brighter future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Valentina; Farruggia, Giovanna; Marraccini, Chiara; Iotti, Stefano; Cittadini, Achille; Wolf, Federica I

    2010-08-01

    A wide variety of biochemical reactions and physiological functions are known to require magnesium; nonetheless, its regulatory mechanisms (both at the cellular and systemic level) are still poorly characterised. Derangement of magnesium homeostasis is associated with several relevant human pathologies, e.g. diabetes, neuromuscular disorders, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. The study of the regulation of magnesium has gained particular interest in the last decades thanks to the molecular characterisation of specific magnesium transporters and the exploitation of molecular biology techniques to clarify their cellular and physiological function(s). In contrast, experimental tools to trace cellular magnesium and to define its homeostasis in living cells have not witnessed a corresponding progress. It was not until recently that efforts were paid to design more appropriate fluorescent indicators that could translate the advances of live imaging techniques into the field of magnesium research. Herein we critically summarise the state of the art in intracellular magnesium detection by fluorescent probes and focus on the need for improving methods and techniques in this area. We highlight the advantages of last-generation fluorescent indicators and discuss a number of challenges and opportunities that the development of novel and better sensors for magnesium still faces.

  13. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  14. Development of bacterial cell-based system for intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our hypothesis was that the lower intracellular antioxidant activity possibly occurs due to poor permeability of compounds into biological membrane based on their structures. Moreover, our results demonstrated that intracellular antioxidant activity of three plant extracts well correlated to results from DPPH assay.

  15. ZnO Nanostructure-Based Intracellular Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Asif

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently ZnO has attracted much interest because of its usefulness for intracellular measurements of biochemical species by using its semiconducting, electrochemical, catalytic properties and for being biosafe and biocompatible. ZnO thus has a wide range of applications in optoelectronics, intracellular nanosensors, transducers, energy conversion and medical sciences. This review relates specifically to intracellular electrochemical (glucose and free metal ion biosensors based on functionalized zinc oxide nanowires/nanorods. For intracellular measurements, the ZnO nanowires/nanorods were grown on the tip of a borosilicate glass capillary (0.7 µm in diameter and functionalized with membranes or enzymes to produce intracellular selective metal ion or glucose sensors. Successful intracellular measurements were carried out using ZnO nanowires/nanorods grown on small tips for glucose and free metal ions using two types of cells, human fat cells and frog oocytes. The sensors in this study were used to detect real-time changes of metal ions and glucose across human fat cells and frog cells using changes in the electrochemical potential at the interface of the intracellular micro-environment. Such devices are helpful in explaining various intracellular processes involving ions and glucose.

  16. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  17. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  18. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Devices for Intracellular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju Mohan

    Scientific investigations on individual cells have gained increasing attention in recent years as efforts are being made to understand cellular functioning in complex processes, such as cell division during embryonic development, and owing to realization of heterogeneity amongst a population of a single cell type (for instance, certain individual cancer cells being immune to chemotherapy). Therefore devices enabling electrochemical detection, spectroscopy, optical observations, and separation techniques, along with cell piercing and fluid transfer capabilities at the intra-cellular level, are required. Glass pipettes have conventionally been used for single cell interrogation, however their poor mechanical properties and an intrusive conical geometry have led to limited precision and frequent cell damage or death, justifying research efforts to develop novel, non-intrusive cell probes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known for their superior physical properties and tunable chemical structure. They possess a high aspect ratio and offer minimally invasive thin carbon walls and tubular geometry. Moreover, possibility of chemical functionalization of CNTs enables multi-functional probes. In this dissertation, novel nanofluidic instruments that have nanostructured carbon tips will be presented along with techniques that utilize the exceptional physical properties of carbon nanotubes, to take miniature biomedical instrumentation to the next level. New methods for fabricating the probes were rigorously developed and their operation was extensively studied. The devices were mechanically robust and were used to inject liquids to a single cell, detect electrochemical signals and enable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) while inducing minimal harm to the cell. Particular attention was focused on the CVD process-which was used to deposit carbon, fluid flow through the nanotubes, and separation of chemical species (atto-liter chromatography) at the nanometer scale that

  20. Intracellular GPCRs Play Key Roles in Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; Harmon, Steven K; O'Malley, Karen L

    2018-02-16

    The trillions of synaptic connections within the human brain are shaped by experience and neuronal activity, both of which underlie synaptic plasticity and ultimately learning and memory. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play key roles in synaptic plasticity by strengthening or weakening synapses and/or shaping dendritic spines. While most studies of synaptic plasticity have focused on cell surface receptors and their downstream signaling partners, emerging data point to a critical new role for the very same receptors to signal from inside the cell. Intracellular receptors have been localized to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome, and mitochondria. From these intracellular positions, such receptors may couple to different signaling systems, display unique desensitization patterns, and/or show distinct patterns of subcellular distribution. Intracellular GPCRs can be activated at the cell surface, endocytosed, and transported to an intracellular site or simply activated in situ by de novo ligand synthesis, diffusion of permeable ligands, or active transport of non-permeable ligands. Current findings reinforce the notion that intracellular GPCRs play a dynamic role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. As new intracellular GPCR roles are defined, the need to selectively tailor agonists and/or antagonists to both intracellular and cell surface receptors may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic tools.

  1. Cyanobacterial formation of intracellular Ca-carbonates in undersaturated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, N; Benzerara, K; Georgelin, T; Jaber, M; Lambert, J-F; Poinsot, M; Skouri-Panet, F; Moreira, D; López-García, P; Raimbault, E; Cordier, L; Jézéquel, D

    2018-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have long been thought to induce the formation of Ca-carbonates as secondary by-products of their metabolic activity, by shifting the chemical composition of their extracellular environment to conditions favoring mineral precipitation. Some cyanobacterial species forming Ca-carbonates intracellularly were recently discovered. However, the environmental conditions under which this intracellular biomineralization process can occur and the impact of cyanobacterial species forming Ca-carbonates intracellularly on extracellular carbonatogenesis are not known. Here, we show that these cyanobacteria can form Ca-carbonates intracellularly while growing in extracellular solutions undersaturated with respect to all Ca-carbonate phases, that is, conditions thermodynamically unfavorable to mineral precipitation. This shows that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is an active process; that is, it costs energy provided by the cells. The cost of energy may be due to the active accumulation of Ca intracellularly. Moreover, unlike cyanobacterial strains that have been usually considered before by studies on Ca-carbonate biomineralization, cyanobacteria forming intracellular carbonates may slow down or hamper extracellular carbonatogenesis, by decreasing the saturation index of their extracellular solution following the buffering of the concentration of extracellular calcium to low levels. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles in macrophages: intracellular uptake, exocytosis, and intercellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li Qun; Wang, Ting Yu; Webster, Thomas J; Duan, Hua-Jian; Qiu, Jing Ying; Zhao, Zi Ming; Yin, Xiao Xing; Zheng, Chun Li

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable nanomaterials have been widely used in numerous medical fields. To further improve such efforts, this study focused on the intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles (CsNPs) in macrophages, a primary cell of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). Such interactions with the MPS determine the nanoparticle retention time in the body and consequently play a significant role in their own clinical safety. In this study, various dye-labeled CsNPs (about 250 nm) were prepared, and a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) was selected as a model macrophage. The results showed two mechanisms of macrophage incorporation of CsNPs, ie, a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway (the primary) and phagocytosis. Following internalization, the particles partly dissociated in the cells, indicating cellular digestion of the nanoparticles. It was proved that, after intracellular uptake, a large proportion of CsNPs were exocytosed within 24 h; this excretion induced a decrease in fluorescence intensity in cells by 69%, with the remaining particles possessing difficulty being cleared. Exocytosis could be inhibited by both wortmannin and vacuolin-1, indicating that CsNP uptake was mediated by lysosomal and multivesicular body pathways, and after exocytosis, the reuptake of CsNPs by neighboring cells was verified by further experiments. This study, thus, elucidated the fate of CsNPs in macrophages as well as identified cellular disposition mechanisms, providing the basis for how CsNPs are recognized by the MPS; such information is crucial to numerous medical applications of CsNPs.

  3. Neuronal recordings with solid-conductor intracellular nanoelectrodes (SCINEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Matthew R; Schaefer, Andreas T

    2012-01-01

    Direct electrical recording of the neuronal transmembrane potential has been crucial to our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms subserving neuronal computation. Existing intracellular recording techniques, however, limit the accuracy and duration of such measurements by changing intracellular biochemistry and/or by damaging the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that nanoengineered electrodes can be used to record neuronal transmembrane potentials in brain tissue without causing these physiological perturbations. Using focused ion beam milling, we have fabricated Solid-Conductor Intracellular NanoElectrodes (SCINEs), from conventional tungsten microelectrodes. SCINEs have tips that are neuroscience.

  4. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  5. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    native forms in responses to reducing conditions such as the cytoplasm. Rationally designed non- covalent protein nanocapsules, incorporating copper-free...the tumor cells towards other various treatments ( radio - and chemotherapy) (Blagosklonny, 2002). Different strategies pursuing this goal have been...target protein to form a non- covalent shell that encapsulates the protein. The monomer acrylamide (1) is used as a general building block of the water

  6. Intracellular trafficking of new anticancer therapeutics: antibody–drug conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalim, Muhammad; Chen, Jie; Wang, Shenghao; Lin, Caiyao; Ullah, Saif; Liang, Keying; Ding, Qian; Chen, Shuqing; Zhan, Jinbiao

    2017-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugate (ADC) is a milestone in targeted cancer therapy that comprises of monoclonal antibodies chemically linked to cytotoxic drugs. Internalization of ADC takes place via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and pinocytosis. Conjugation strategies, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking optimization, linkers, and drugs chemistry present a great challenge for researchers to eradicate tumor cells successfully. This inventiveness of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking has given considerable momentum recently to develop specific antibodies and ADCs to treat cancer cells. It is significantly advantageous to emphasize the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking pathways efficiently and to design potent engineered conjugates and biological entities to boost efficient therapies enormously for cancer treatment. Current studies illustrate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of ADC, protein, and linker strategies in unloading and also concisely evaluate practically applicable ADCs. PMID:28814834

  7. Intracellular trafficking of new anticancer therapeutics: antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalim, Muhammad; Chen, Jie; Wang, Shenghao; Lin, Caiyao; Ullah, Saif; Liang, Keying; Ding, Qian; Chen, Shuqing; Zhan, Jinbiao

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a milestone in targeted cancer therapy that comprises of monoclonal antibodies chemically linked to cytotoxic drugs. Internalization of ADC takes place via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and pinocytosis. Conjugation strategies, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking optimization, linkers, and drugs chemistry present a great challenge for researchers to eradicate tumor cells successfully. This inventiveness of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking has given considerable momentum recently to develop specific antibodies and ADCs to treat cancer cells. It is significantly advantageous to emphasize the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking pathways efficiently and to design potent engineered conjugates and biological entities to boost efficient therapies enormously for cancer treatment. Current studies illustrate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of ADC, protein, and linker strategies in unloading and also concisely evaluate practically applicable ADCs.

  8. Intracellular targets of RGDS peptide in melanoma cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aguzzi, Maria Simona; Fortugno, Paola; Giampietri, Claudia; Ragone, Gianluca; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    .... Given the role RGDS-peptides play in controlling proliferation and apoptosis in several cell types, investigating intracellular targets of RGDS in melanoma cells may un-reveal novel molecular targets...

  9. CMOS nanoelectrode array for all-electrical intracellular electrophysiological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Qin, Ling; Jorgolli, Marsela; Gertner, Rona S.; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2017-05-01

    Developing a new tool capable of high-precision electrophysiological recording of a large network of electrogenic cells has long been an outstanding challenge in neurobiology and cardiology. Here, we combine nanoscale intracellular electrodes with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits to realize a high-fidelity all-electrical electrophysiological imager for parallel intracellular recording at the network level. Our CMOS nanoelectrode array has 1,024 recording/stimulation 'pixels' equipped with vertical nanoelectrodes, and can simultaneously record intracellular membrane potentials from hundreds of connected in vitro neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that this network-level intracellular recording capability can be used to examine the effect of pharmaceuticals on the delicate dynamics of a cardiomyocyte network, thus opening up new opportunities in tissue-based pharmacological screening for cardiac and neuronal diseases as well as fundamental studies of electrogenic cells and their networks.

  10. Dynamic colocalization microscopy to characterize intracellular trafficking of nanomedicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercauteren, Dries; Deschout, Hendrik; Remaut, Katrien; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Jones, Arwyn T.; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C.; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of intracellular processing of nanomedicines, we employed quantitative live-cell fluorescence colocalization microscopy to study endosomal trafficking of polyplexes in retinal pigment epithelium cells. A new, dynamic colocalization algorithm was developed, based on

  11. Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus: the Trojan horse of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Neil C-W; Foreman, Andrew; Jardeleza, Camille; Douglas, Richard; Vreugde, Sarah; Wormald, Peter-John

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent evidence suggesting that Staphylococcus aureus exists within the sinonasal epithelium of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients, certain questions remain. The intracellular environment may provide a protective niche for pathogenic bacteria to evade host immunity and yet provide a reservoir for reinfection. To date, no studies have examined the impact of this bacterial phenotype; therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the role of intracellular S. aureus on postsurgical outcomes. This study included 51 patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for medically-recalcitrant CRS. Sinonasal mucosa harvested at the time of surgery was dually stained with fluorescent molecular probes and imaged using confocal scanning laser microscopy for biofilm and intracellular status. Patients were followed in their early and late postoperative course for evidence of ongoing disease and signs of clinical relapse. Intracellular S. aureus was identified in 20 of 51 (39%) patients, and all were associated with surface biofilm. Biofilm alone was found in 16 of 51 (31%) patients and 15 of 51 (29%) patients had no evidence of S. aureus. Intracellular positive patients had a significantly higher risk of late clinical and microbiological relapse (p = 0.014). In this study, biofilm status without coexisting intracellular bacteria did not appear to impact on outcomes. Clinical and microbiological relapse of disease following ESS is significantly associated with intracellular S. aureus. Evidence suggests that this disease association is independent to surface biofilm status. Intracellular bacteria should be taken into consideration when designing novel treatment strategies to lessen the chance of reinfection. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  12. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electr...

  13. Citric acid production by Candida strains under intracellular nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, S; Aivasidis, A; Wandrey, C

    2002-10-01

    A suitable strain and important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts were identified. Candida oleophila ATCC 20177 was chosen as the best citric acid producer from several Candida strains. Yields of 50 g/l citric acid were produced in shake flask and 80 g/l in fed-batch fermentations with 1.5 and 3 g/l NH(4)Cl under non-optimized conditions. Ammonium nitrogen was identified as the limiting substrate for citrate formation. Citric acid excretion begins a few hours after exhaustion of nitrogen in the medium. The importance of intracellular nitrogen limitation was clarified by elemental analysis of C. oleophila biomass. The nitrogen content of C. oleophila biomass decreased from 7.45% during the growth phase to 3.96% in the production phase. The biomass contained less carbon and more trace elements in the growth phase compared with the production phase. Relatively high intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration of about 1.2 mg/g biomass (~37.4 mM) was found during the production phase. The low intracellular nitrogen content and increase of intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration, possibly caused by proteolysis following extracellular nitrogen exhaustion, trigger citric acid production. Intracellular nitrogen limitation and the increase in intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration are the most important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts.

  14. Nanoparticles and intracellular applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jack; Huefner, Anna; Li, Li; Wingfield, Jonathan; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectrocopy (SERS) offers ultrasensitive vibrational fingerprinting at the nanoscale. Its non-destructive nature affords an ideal tool for interrogation of the intracellular environment, detecting the localisation of biomolecules, delivery and monitoring of therapeutics and for characterisation of complex cellular processes at the molecular level. Innovations in nanotechnology have produced a wide selection of novel, purpose-built plasmonic nanostructures capable of high SERS enhancement for intracellular probing while microfluidic technologies are being utilised to reproducibly synthesise nanoparticle (NP) probes at large scale and in high throughput. Sophisticated multivariate analysis techniques unlock the wealth of previously unattainable biomolecular information contained within large and multidimensional SERS datasets. Thus, with suitable combination of experimental techniques and analytics, SERS boasts enormous potential for cell based assays and to expand our understanding of the intracellular environment. In this review we trace the pathway to utilisation of nanomaterials for intracellular SERS. Thus we review and assess nanoparticle synthesis methods, their toxicity and cell interactions before presenting significant developments in intracellular SERS methodologies and how identified challenges can be addressed.

  15. Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. McEwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21.

  16. Intracellular trafficking of new anticancer therapeutics: antibody–drug conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalim M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Kalim,1 Jie Chen,1 Shenghao Wang,1 Caiyao Lin,1 Saif Ullah,1 Keying Liang,1 Qian Ding,1 Shuqing Chen,2 Jinbiao Zhan1 1Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Antibody–drug conjugate (ADC is a milestone in targeted cancer therapy that comprises of monoclonal antibodies chemically linked to cytotoxic drugs. Internalization of ADC takes place via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and pinocytosis. Conjugation strategies, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking optimization, linkers, and drugs chemistry present a great challenge for researchers to eradicate tumor cells successfully. This inventiveness of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking has given consi­derable momentum recently to develop specific antibodies and ADCs to treat cancer cells. It is significantly advantageous to emphasize the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking pathways efficiently and to design potent engineered conjugates and biological entities to boost efficient therapies enormously for cancer treatment. Current studies illustrate endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of ADC, protein, and linker strategies in unloading and also concisely evaluate practically applicable ADCs. Keywords: antibody–drug conjugate, antibody, endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, clathrin

  17. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  18. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  19. Intracellular Neural Recording with Pure Carbon Nanotube Probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inho Yoon

    Full Text Available The computational complexity of the brain depends in part on a neuron's capacity to integrate electrochemical information from vast numbers of synaptic inputs. The measurements of synaptic activity that are crucial for mechanistic understanding of brain function are also challenging, because they require intracellular recording methods to detect and resolve millivolt- scale synaptic potentials. Although glass electrodes are widely used for intracellular recordings, novel electrodes with superior mechanical and electrical properties are desirable, because they could extend intracellular recording methods to challenging environments, including long term recordings in freely behaving animals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can theoretically deliver this advance, but the difficulty of assembling CNTs has limited their application to a coating layer or assembly on a planar substrate, resulting in electrodes that are more suitable for in vivo extracellular recording or extracellular recording from isolated cells. Here we show that a novel, yet remarkably simple, millimeter-long electrode with a sub-micron tip, fabricated from self-entangled pure CNTs can be used to obtain intracellular and extracellular recordings from vertebrate neurons in vitro and in vivo. This fabrication technology provides a new method for assembling intracellular electrodes from CNTs, affording a promising opportunity to harness nanotechnology for neuroscience applications.

  20. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  1. Intracellular transport of fat-soluble vitamins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nozomu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that are essential for the normal growth, reproduction and functioning of the human body. Of the 13 known vitamins, vitamins A, D, E and K are lipophilic compounds and are therefore called fat-soluble vitamins. Because of their lipophilicity, fat-soluble vitamins are solubilized and transported by intracellular carrier proteins to exert their actions and to be metabolized properly. Vitamin A and its derivatives, collectively called retinoids, are solubilized by intracellular retinoid-binding proteins such as cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) and cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP). These proteins act as chaperones that regulate the metabolism, signaling and transport of retinoids. CRALBP-mediated intracellular retinoid transport is essential for vision in human. α-Tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E found in the body, is transported by α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) in hepatic cells. Defects of α-TTP cause vitamin E deficiency and neurological disorders in humans. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction of α-TTP with phosphoinositides plays a critical role in the intracellular transport of α-tocopherol and is associated with familial vitamin E deficiency. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and biological significance of the intracellular transport of vitamins A and E. © 2014 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  3. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria. PMID:25009182

  4. Direct Determination of the Intracellular Oxidation State of Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) measurements were used to determine directly, for the first time, the oxidation state of intracellular plutonium in individual 0.1 μm2 areas within single rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). The living cells were incubated in vitro for 3 hours in the presence of Pu added to the media in different oxidation states (Pu(III), Pu(IV), and Pu(VI)) and in different chemical forms. Regardless of the initial oxidation state or chemical form of Pu presented to the cells, the XANES spectra of the intracellular Pu deposits was always consistent with tetravalent Pu even though the intracellular milieu is generally reducing. PMID:21755934

  5. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zhang, Ellisa W.; Dudley, Anne G.; Dixon, Beverly R. E. A.; Guckes, Kirsten R.; Breland, Erin J.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Casella, Daniel P.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Clayton, Douglass B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. PMID:27795353

  6. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed.

  7. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz.

  8. Cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E Tvermoes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+](i and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca(2+](i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60, which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca(2+](i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription.

  9. Connecting extracellular metabolomic measurements to intracellular flux states in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrgård Markus J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful tool in the quantitative identification of physiological and disease-induced biological states. Extracellular metabolome or metabolic profiling data, in particular, can provide an insightful view of intracellular physiological states in a noninvasive manner. Results We used an updated genome-scale metabolic network model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, iMM904, to investigate how changes in the extracellular metabolome can be used to study systemic changes in intracellular metabolic states. The iMM904 metabolic network was reconstructed based on an existing genome-scale network, iND750, and includes 904 genes and 1,412 reactions. The network model was first validated by comparing 2,888 in silico single-gene deletion strain growth phenotype predictions to published experimental data. Extracellular metabolome data measured in response to environmental and genetic perturbations of ammonium assimilation pathways was then integrated with the iMM904 network in the form of relative overflow secretion constraints and a flux sampling approach was used to characterize candidate flux distributions allowed by these constraints. Predicted intracellular flux changes were consistent with published measurements on intracellular metabolite levels and fluxes. Patterns of predicted intracellular flux changes could also be used to correctly identify the regions of the metabolic network that were perturbed. Conclusion Our results indicate that integrating quantitative extracellular metabolomic profiles in a constraint-based framework enables inferring changes in intracellular metabolic flux states. Similar methods could potentially be applied towards analyzing biofluid metabolome variations related to human physiological and disease states.

  10. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  11. Active site structure and catalytic mechanism of phosphodiesterase for degradation of intracellular second messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2002-03-01

    Phosphodiesterases are clinical targets for a variety of biological disorders, because this superfamily of enzymes regulate intracellular concentration of cyclic nucleotides that serve as the second messengers playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes. Understanding structure and mechanism of a phosphodiesterase will provide a solid basis for rational design of the more efficient therapeutics. Although a three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human phosphodiesterase 4B2B was recently reported, it was uncertain whether a critical bridging ligand in the active site is a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. The identity of this bridging ligand has been determined by performing first-principles quantum chemical calculations on models of the active site. All the results obtained indicate that this critical bridging ligand in the active site of the reported X-ray crystal structure is a hydroxide ion, rather than a water molecule, expected to serve as the nucleophile to initialize the catalytic degradation of the intracellular second messengers.

  12. Eurycoma longifolia extract increases intracellular production activity of luteinizing hormone (LH) in pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratomo, H.

    2017-07-01

    Administration of the boiled water (extract) of Eurycoma longifolia (E. Longifolia) 18 mg/200 g body weight (bw) actually increases basophil cells in the anterior pituitary. Meanwhile, it is observed that basophil cells in anterior pituitary are producer cells of LH and FSH. Cell activity rate producing intracellular FSH does not increase in the amount significantly after administration of the E. longifolia onto the third day. The research attempts to prove the performance of E. longifolia to producer cells of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the anterior pituitary. Applied approach by a technical method of immunohistochemistry staining uses an antibody anti-LH. Observation is established to the treatment group of the E longifolia in a dose of 18 mg/200 g a bw on the 1st day and 3rd day, compared to control group of 1 ml distilled water on the 1st day and 3rd day. Research results that administration of the extract of E longifolia onto the third day has increased the activity of producer cells of LH in the pituitary, the synthesizing intracellular LH obviously. It can be concluded that E longifolia constitutes strong trigger in producer cells of LH to synthesize LH hormone.

  13. Purification of an Intracellular Fibrinolytic Protease from Ganoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Method: The intracellular fibrinolytic protease produced by Ganoderma lucidum VK12 was isolated from the mycelia grown in MCDBF broth ... The inhibitory effect of different metal ions and commercial protease inhibitors on enzyme activity was studied. ... sodium hydroxide and 2.9 %w/v sodium carbonate in glass-distilled ...

  14. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intracellular trafficking and localization studies of spike protein from SARS and OC43 showed that SARS spikeprotein is localized in the ER or ERGIC compartment and OC43 spike protein is predominantly localized in thelysosome. Differential localization can be explained by signal sequence. The sequence alignment ...

  15. Planar Nanoneedles on-chip for intracellular measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, Jurjen; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Andersson, Helene; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time a functional planar SiN-nanoneedle system for intracellular mass transport and in vivo electrophysiological measurements on-chip. Though several micro- or nanoneedles for cell research have been described in literature, no needles of this small size equipped with

  16. Antibody- and TRIM21-dependent intracellular restriction of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakebrandt, Nikolas; Lentes, Sabine; Neumann, Heinz; James, Leo C; Neumann-Staubitz, Petra

    2014-11-01

    TRIM21 ('tripartite motif-containing protein 21', Ro52) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic Fc receptor, which has a potent role in protective immunity against nonenveloped viruses. TRIM21 mediates intracellular neutralisation of antibody-coated viruses, a process called ADIN (antibody-dependent intracellular neutralisation). Our results reveal a similar mechanism to fight bacterial infections. TRIM21 is recruited to the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica in epithelial cells early in infection. TRIM21 does not bind directly to S. enterica, but to antibodies opsonising it. Most importantly, bacterial restriction is dependent on TRIM21 as well as on the opsonisation state of the bacteria. Finally, Salmonella and TRIM21 colocalise with the autophagosomal marker LC3, and intracellular defence is enhanced in starved cells suggesting an involvement of the autophagocytic pathway. Our data extend the protective role of TRIM21 from viruses to bacteria and thereby strengthening the general role of ADIN in cellular immunity. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  18. Association between VDAC1 mRNA expression and intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One way in which xenobiotics induce apoptotic cell death is to alter the selective permeability of the intracellular voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) in the mitochondrial membrane. In this study, we explored the association between VDAC1 mRNA expression and mitochondrial function during hexavalent chromium ...

  19. Biomineralization Patterns of Intracellular Carbonatogenesis in Cyanobacteria: Molecular Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of intracellular carbonatogenesis in several cyanobacteria species has challenged the traditional view that this process was extracellular and not controlled. However, a detailed analysis of the size distribution, chemical composition and 3-D-arrangement of carbonates in these cyanobacteria is lacking. Here, we characterized these features in Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora C7 and Candidatus Synechococcus calcipolaris G9 by conventional transmission electron microscopy, tomography, ultramicrotomy, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Both Ca. G. lithophora C7 and Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 formed numerous polyphosphate granules adjacent or engulfing Ca-carbonate inclusions when grown in phosphate-rich solutions. Ca-carbonates were scattered within Ca. G. lithophora C7 cells under these conditions, but sometimes arranged in one or several chains. In contrast, Ca-carbonates formed at cell septa in Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 and were segregated equally between daughter cells after cell division, arranging as distorted disks at cell poles. The size distribution of carbonates evolved from a positively to a negatively skewed distribution as particles grew. Conventional ultramicrotomy did not preserve Ca-carbonates explaining partly why intracellular calcification has been overlooked in the past. All these new observations allow discussing with unprecedented insight some nucleation and growth processes occurring in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria with a particular emphasis on the possible involvement of intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton.

  20. Intracellular localization of Na + /H + antiporter from Malus zumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined the intracellular localization of the product of Na+/H+ antiporter gene (MzNHX1) cloned from Malus zumi. Analysis using yeast cells expressing a fusion protein of MzNHX1 and green fluorescent protein confirmed the localization of MzNHX1 on the tonoplast.

  1. Bioinspired Nanocarriers Designed to Enhance Intracellular Delivery of Biotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    therapeutic and vaccine development. Keywords - gene therapy, vaccine, bioinspired, biotherapeutic I. INTRODUCTION The efficacy of many protein and DNA...DNA, RNA and proteins . While these therapeutics have tremendous potential, effectively formulating and delivering them has also been a widely...intracellular trafficking that is inspired by biological polymers, i.e. proteins , that are involved in controlling vesicular trafficking pathways. For

  2. Modulating cancer cell survival by targeting intracellular cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Omer F; Gowda, Raghavendra; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-08-08

    Demand for cholesterol is high in certain cancers making them potentially sensitive to therapeutic strategies targeting cellular cholesterol homoeostasis. A potential approach involves disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport, which occurs in Niemann-Pick disease as a result of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. Hence, a class of lysosomotropic compounds that were identified as functional ASM inhibitors (FIASMAs) might exhibit chemotherapeutic activity by disrupting cancer cell cholesterol homoeostasis. Here, the chemotherapeutic utility of ASM inhibition was investigated. The effect of FIASMAs on intracellular cholesterol levels, cholesterol homoeostasis, cellular endocytosis and signalling cascades were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of ASM inhibition was demonstrated using melanoma xenografts and a nanoparticle formulation was developed to overcome dose-limiting CNS-associated side effects of certain FIASMAs. Functional ASM inhibitors inhibited intracellular cholesterol transport leading to disruption of autophagic flux, cellular endocytosis and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Consequently, major oncogenic signalling cascades on which cancer cells were reliant for survival were inhibited. Two tested ASM inhibitors, perphenazine and fluphenazine that are also clinically used as antipsychotics, were effective in inhibiting xenografted tumour growth. Nanoliposomal encapsulation of the perphenazine enhanced its chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing CNS-associated side effects. This study suggests that disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting ASM could be utilised as a potential chemotherapeutic approach for treating cancer.

  3. Facilitating Intracellular Drug Delivery by Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, BHA

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to investigate the combination of ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) for intracellular delivery of (model) drugs in vitro. We have focused on clinically approved drugs, i.e. cisplatin, and microbubbles, i.e. SonoVue™, to facilitate clinical translation. In addition, model

  4. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-05

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of Intracellular, Extracellular and Production of Pro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the detailed time course of intracellular, extracellular and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-8) in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods: PBMC were isolated from human whole blood, stimulated by 0.1 μg/ml lipopolysaccharide.

  6. Intracellular complement - the complosome - in immune cell regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbore, Giuseppina; Kemper, Claudia; Kolev, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The complement system was defined over a century ago based on its ability to "complement" the antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune responses against pathogens. Today our understanding of this ancient part of innate immunity has changed substantially and we know now that complement plays an undisputed pivotal role in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. The complement system consists of over 50 blood-circulating, cell-surface expressed and intracellular proteins. It is key in the recognition and elimination of invading pathogens, also in the removal of self-derived danger such as apoptotic cells, and it supports innate immune responses and the initiation of the general inflammatory reactions. The long prevailing classic view of complement was that of a serum-operative danger sensor and first line of defence system, however, recent experimental and clinical evidences have demonstrated that "local" tissue and surprisingly intracellular complement (the complosome) activation impacts on normal cell physiology. This review will focus on novel aspects of intracellular complement activation and its unexpected roles in basic cell processes such as metabolism. We also discuss what the existence of the complosome potentially means for how the host handles intracellular pathogens such as viruses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3 buff...

  8. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    -Galpha(q)-coupled GPCRs can be tweaked to modulate intracellular calcium by co-transfection with promiscuous or chimeric/mutated G proteins making the calcium assays broadly applicable in GPCR research. Third, the price of instruments capable of measuring fluorescent-based calcium indicators has become significantly less...

  9. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-18

    Apr 18, 2017 ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) sorts to the basolateral domain (Owens and Compans 1989), but a prototype glyco- protein, hemagglutinin from the influenza virus, sorts to the apical domain (Mora et al. 2002). To mediate budding of infectious viral particles through the intracellular mem- branes, viral ...

  10. [Bursitis due to Mycobacterium intracellulare in an immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastiaux, H; Maillard, H; Bara, C; Catala, S; Steff, M; Célérier, P

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Mycobacterium intracellulare are infrequent. We report a case of bursitis in an immunocompetent patient. A 80-year-old patient with a history of tuberculosis reported swelling of the elbow for six months with effusion due to olecranon bursitis, progressing to an abscess and skin ulceration. Examination of the synovial fluid revealed the presence of M. intracellulare. Histologic investigations showed epithelioid and gigantocellular granulations. Screening for immunodepression was negative. Treatment with clarithromycin and rifabutin proved effective, with partial healing at three months, although hepatic and ocular side effects occurred. While osteomyelitis, arthritis and cutaneous infections due to M. intracellulare have been described in immunocompromised patients, there are very few reported cases concerning immunocompetent individuals, and these suggest the possibility of special individual sensitivity to mycobacterial infections. Genetic mutations of the interleukin-12-interferon-gamma pathway involved in the immune response to mycobacterial infections have been demonstrated. Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma have also been described. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is resistant to the classical antibiotics used in tuberculosis. As in pulmonary infections, antibiotics with proven in vivo and in vitro efficacy must be used, taking into account the antibiogram and potential side effects, particularly for combined clarithromycin and rifabutin. This case report emphasizes the benefits of routine mycobacterial investigation of synovial fluid samples.

  11. Galectin-3 guides intracellular trafficking of some human serotransferrin glycoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Carl Michael; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena

    2013-01-01

    these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3 bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting...

  12. Manipulation of Host Cholesterol by Obligate Intracellular Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhritiman Samanta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a multifunctional lipid that plays important metabolic and structural roles in the eukaryotic cell. Despite having diverse lifestyles, the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens Chlamydia, Coxiella, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia all target cholesterol during host cell colonization as a potential source of membrane, as well as a means to manipulate host cell signaling and trafficking. To promote host cell entry, these pathogens utilize cholesterol-rich microdomains known as lipid rafts, which serve as organizational and functional platforms for host signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis. Once a pathogen gains entrance to the intracellular space, it can manipulate host cholesterol trafficking pathways to access nutrient-rich vesicles or acquire membrane components for the bacteria or bacteria-containing vacuole. To acquire cholesterol, these pathogens specifically target host cholesterol metabolism, uptake, efflux, and storage. In this review, we examine the strategies obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens employ to manipulate cholesterol during host cell colonization. Understanding how obligate intracellular pathogens target and use host cholesterol provides critical insight into the host-pathogen relationship.

  13. Yeast whole-cell biocatalyst constructed by intracellular overproduction of Rhizopus oryzae lipase is applicable to biodiesel fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T.; Fukuda, H. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Graduate School of Science and Technology, Division of Molecular Science; Takahashi, S.; Ueda, M.; Tanaka, A. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Synthetic Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering; Kaieda, M.; Kondo, A. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering, Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Yeast whole-cell biocatalysts for lipase-catalyzed reactions were constructed by intracellularly overproducing Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae MT8-1. The gene encoding lipase from R. oryzae IFO4697 was cloned, and intracellular overproduction systems of a recombinant ROL with a pro-sequence (rPRoROL) were constructed. When rProROL from R. oryzae IFO4697 was produced under the control of the 5'-upstream region of the isocitrate lyase gene of Candida tropicalis (UPR-ICL) at 30 C for 98 h by two-stage cultivation using SDC medium (SD medium with 2% casamino acids) containing 2.0% and 0.5% glucose, intracellular lipase activity reached levels up to 474.5 IU/l. These whole-cell biocatalysts were permeabilized by air-drying and used for the synthesis of methyl esters (MEs), a potential biodiesel fuel, from plant oil and methanol in a solvent-free and water-containing system. The ME content in the reaction mixture was 71 wt% after a 165-h reaction at 37 C with stepwise addition of methanol. These results indicate that an efficient whole-cell biocatalyst can be prepared by intracellular overproduction of lipase in yeast cells and their permeabilization. (orig.)

  14. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-12-09

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

  15. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Troemel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

  16. Intracellular origin and ultrastructure of platelet-derived microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Rauova, L; Litvinov, R I; Weisel, J W

    2017-08-01

    Essentials Platelet microparticles play a major role in pathologies, including hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelet microparticles have been analyzed and classified based on their ultrastructure. The structure and intracellular origin of microparticles depend on the cell-activating stimulus. Thrombin-treated platelets fall apart and form microparticles that contain cellular organelles. Background Platelet-derived microparticles comprise the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the (patho)physiological roles of platelet-derived microparticles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain largely unknown. Objectives Here we studied the formation, ultrastructure and composition of platelet-derived microparticles from isolated human platelets, either quiescent or stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, thrombin or calcium ionophore A23187. Methods Using flow cytometry, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, we analyzed the intracellular origin, structural diversity and size distributions of the subcellular particles released from platelets. Results The structure, dimensions and intracellular origin of microparticles depend on the cell-activating stimulus. The main structural groups include a vesicle surrounded by one thin membrane or multivesicular structures. Thrombin, unlike other stimuli, induced formation of microparticles not only from the platelet plasma membrane and cytoplasm but also from intracellular structures. A fraction of these vesicular particles having an intracellular origin contained organelles, such as mitochondria, glycogen granules and vacuoles. The size of platelet-derived microparticles depended on the nature of the cell-activating stimulus. Conclusion The results obtained provide a structural basis for the qualitative differences of various platelet activators, for specific

  17. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:27708772

  18. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  19. Atomic scale investigation of planar defects in 0.95Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}–0.05BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Lu [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Mi, Shao-Bo, E-mail: shaobo.mi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Cheng, Sheng; Liu, Ming [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jia, Chun-Lin [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Peter Grünberg Institute and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Thin films of lead-free piezoelectric 0.95Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}–0.05BaTiO{sub 3} (0.95NBT–0.05BT) are epitaxially grown on single crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates at 800 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C, respectively, by a high-pressure sputtering deposition technique. The microstructure of the thin films is investigated by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Planar defects are observed and the density of the defects increases with the increase of the film-growth temperature. Two types of planar defects in the films are studied at the atomic scale. One consists of groups of edge-sharing TiO{sub 6} octahedra with Bi atoms located between the TiO{sub 6} octahedral groups, and the other exists in the form of Na/Bi(Ba)−O{sub 2}−Na/Bi(Ba) layer parallel to the (010) plane of the films. Based on the structure feature of the planar defects, the propagation of the planar defects related to edge-sharing TiO{sub 6} octahedra within the films and from the film-substrate interface is discussed. Furthermore, the ordering of the planar defects is expected to form new structures. In comparison with the microstructure of 0.95NBT–0.05BT bulk materials, the appearance of the high-density planar defects observed within the films could be considered to be responsible for the difference in the physical properties between the bulk materials and the films. - Highlights: • NBT–BT films have been successfully prepared on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates. • Complex planar defects of zigzag-like and Aurivillius-type have been determined. • The propagation of the planar defects in the films has been characterized. • The intergrowth of planar faults with NBT–BT structure units results in the formation of new structures. • The NBT–BT/SrTiO{sub 3} interface structure has been determined at the atomic scale.

  20. Supramolecular nanoreactors for intracellular singlet-oxygen sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Tang, Sicheng; Fraix, Aurore; Burjor, Captain; Sortino, Salvatore; Callan, John F.; Raymo, Françisco M.

    2015-08-01

    An amphiphilic polymer with multiple decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains attached to a common poly(methacrylate) backbone assembles into nanoscaled particles in aqueous environments. Hydrophobic anthracene and borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) chromophores can be co-encapsulated within the self-assembling nanoparticles and transported across hydrophilic media. The reversible character of the noncovalent bonds, holding the supramolecular containers together, permits the exchange of their components with fast kinetics in aqueous solution. Incubation of cervical cancer (HeLA) cells with a mixture of two sets of nanoparticles, pre-loaded independently with anthracene or BODIPY chromophores, results in guest scrambling first and then transport of co-entrapped species to the intracellular space. Alternatively, incubation of cells with the two sets of nanocarriers in consecutive steps permits the sequential transport of the anthracene and BODIPY chromophores across the plasma membrane and only then allows their co-encapsulation within the same supramolecular containers. Both mechanisms position the two sets of chromophores with complementary spectral overlap in close proximity to enable the efficient transfer of energy intracellularly from the anthracene donors to the BODIPY acceptors. In the presence of iodine substituents on the BODIPY platform, intersystem crossing follows energy transfer. The resulting triplet state can transfer energy further to molecular oxygen with the concomitant production of singlet oxygen to induce cell mortality. Furthermore, the donor can be excited with two near-infrared photons simultaneously to permit the photoinduced generation of singlet oxygen intracellularly under illumination conditions compatible with applications in vivo. Thus, these supramolecular strategies to control the excitation dynamics of multichromophoric assemblies in the intracellular environment can evolve into valuable protocols for photodynamic therapy.An amphiphilic

  1. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  2. Fundamental Enabling Issues in Nanotechnology: Stress at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Foiles, Stephen Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hearne, Sean Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoyt, Jeffrey John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seel, Steven Craig [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Edmund Blackburn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morales, Alfredo Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Zimmerman, Jonathan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-10-01

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also support the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g., continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in nanostructures and, eventually, integrated nanocomponents.

  3. Atomic Scale Mixing for Inertial Confinement Fusion Associated Hydro Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-26

    removed by consideration of the Prandtl number. Detonation waves allowmultiple solutions, as weak or strong detonations [30], while some dissipative...andmixture concentrations provide the main input to a thermonuclear (TN) burn computation [3]. The in- terest in mix is brought about by current...mechanism often selects the weak deto- nation. Equations suggested by three phase flow for petroleum reservoirs show nonuniqueness for wave interaction

  4. Rolling a single molecular wheel at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, L.; Rieder, K.-H.; Moresco, F.; Rapenne, G.; Stojkovic, S.; Bouju, X.; Joachim, C.

    2007-02-01

    The design of a single-molecule machine consisting of functional components requires a detailed understanding of its mechanical motion. The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) is the only available tool for driving and imaging such a nanoscale machine on a surface. Both lateral hopping motions and conformational changes of single molecules can be induced using the STM tip. However, no rolling of a wheel has been demonstrated so far at the nanoscale, even though this is a very useful motion at the macroscopic scale. Here we show how the rolling of a single molecule equipped with two wheels (0.8 nm in diameter) can be induced by the STM tip. The characteristics of the rolling are recorded in the STM feedback loop manipulation signal and in real time. We capture unambiguous signatures of the conformational change happening during the rolling. Our approach of controlling the intramolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more complex molecular machines.

  5. Capturing atomic-scale carrier dynamics with electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Peter; Krausz, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    Light-driven electronic motion unfolds on times as short as the cycle period of light and on length scales as small as the distance between two neighboring atoms in a molecule. Visualizing fundamental light-matter interactions therefore requires access to attosecond and picometer dimensions. Here we report on a potential unification of electron diffraction and microscopy with attosecond technology, which could provide a full space-time access to elementary electronic processes in matter and materials. We review recent progress in ultrafast diffraction and microscopy towards temporal resolutions approaching 10 fs by use of state-of-the-art microwave technology and discuss our latest findings on all-optical compression approaches for reaching sub-femtosecond, sub-optical-cycle resolution. Four-dimensional electron diffraction with attosecond-picometer resolution will access all dynamics outside the atomic core, offering an all-embracing insight into fundamental electron-nuclear dynamics of complex materials.

  6. Atomic-scale electron microscopy at ambient pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creemer, J.F. [DIMES-ECTM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5053, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.creemer@tudelft.nl; Helveg, S. [Haldor Topsoe A/S, Nymollevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hoveling, G.H. [DEMO, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Ullmann, S.; Molenbroek, A.M. [Haldor Topsoe A/S, Nymollevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Sarro, P.M. [DIMES-ECTM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5053, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands); Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, HREM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-08-15

    We demonstrate a novel nanoreactor for performing atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) of nanostructured materials during exposure to gases at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. The nanoreactor is a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and is functionalized with a micrometer-sized gas-flow channel, electron-transparent windows and a heating device. It fits into the tip of a dedicated sample holder that can be used in a normal CM microscope of Philips/FEI Company. The nanoreactor performance was demonstrated by ETEM imaging of a Cu/ZnO catalyst for methanol synthesis during exposure to hydrogen. Specifically, the nanoreactor facilitated the direct observation of Cu nanocrystal growth and mobility on a sub-second time scale during heating to 500 deg. C and exposure to 1.2 bar of H{sub 2}. For the same gas reaction environment, ETEM images show atomic lattice fringes in the Cu nanocrystals with spacing of 0.18 nm, attesting the spatial resolution limit of the system. The nanoreactor concept opens up new possibilities for in situ studies of nanomaterials and the ways they interact with their ambient working environment in diverse areas, such as heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, nanofabrication, materials science and biology.

  7. Atomic-scale Simulation of Solid-Liquid Interface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deyan; Asta, Mark; Hoyt, J. J.; Karma, Alain

    2003-03-01

    Quantitative modeling of the dendritic growth of a crystal from its melt can be achieved through a hierarchical multiscale simulation approach combining atomistic-simulations of solid-liquid interface properties with phase-field modeling of microstructure evolution. Under rapid-solidification conditions the solid-liquid interface kinetic coefficient, and its associated crystalline anisotropy, are key parameters controlling the growth velocity and morphological evolution of a dendritic crystal. The kinetic coefficient is defined as the proportionality constant between the growth rate of a solid-liquid interface and its undercooling. In this talk the kinetic coefficient and its anisotropy are studied by both non-equilibrium and equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations. Two new MD-based methods for calculating kinetic coefficient are proposed, and results obtained from the different approaches are found to be consistent. The relative strengths of each method will be discussed. The anisotropy of kinetic coefficient is studied in detail for both FCC metal and BCC metal, and comparing with the previously proposed theoretical models.

  8. Shrinking light to allow forbidden transitions on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Kaminer, Ido; Zhen, Bo; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of light-matter interactions accessible to a system is limited by the small size of an atom relative to the wavelength of the light it emits, as well as by the small value of the fine-structure constant. We developed a general theory of light-matter interactions with two-dimensional systems supporting plasmons. These plasmons effectively make the fine-structure constant larger and bridge the size gap between atom and light. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions—such as extremely high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and singlet-triplet phosphorescence processes—can occur on very short time scales comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings may lead to new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, and broadband light generation, a potential testing ground for quantum electrodynamics (QED) in the ultrastrong coupling regime, and the ability to take advantage of the full electronic spectrum of an emitter.

  9. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  10. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  11. Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, R.; Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J.; Meyer, E; Gnecco, E.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superim...

  12. Quantum Coherent Multielectron Processes in an Atomic Scale Contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Peter-Jan; Xu, Fei; Kaasbjerg, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    The light emission from a scanning tunneling microscope operated on a Ag(111) surface at 6 K is analyzed from low conductances to values approaching the conductance quantum. Optical spectra recorded at sample voltages V reveal emission with photon energies hv > 2eV. A model of electrons interacting...

  13. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  14. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  15. Tangier disease: a disorder of intracellular membrane traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, G.; Assmann, G.; Robenek, H.; Brennhausen, B.

    1985-09-01

    The interaction of human high density lipoproteins (HDL) with isolated human monocytes from control and Tangier patients was studied in tissue culture experiments. It was observed that normal monocytes, similar to mouse peritoneal macrophages, bind HDL to a cell surface receptor, internalize the bound HDL particles, transport the internalized HDL intracellularly through the cytoplasmic compartment without significant degradation, and ultimately resecrete intact HDL. The cellular interaction of Tangier monocytes with normal HDL was markedly different from control monocytes. HDL binding to Tangier monocytes was moderately increased and cell associated /sup 125/I-HDL was 6- to 10-fold enhanced in Tangier monocytes. The bulk of the internalized HDL, however, was detected in secondary lysosomes. These data suggest that the cellular metabolism of HDL is abnormal in Tangier monocytes. It is postulated that Tangier disease may be a disorder of intracellular membrane traffic in which HDL is diverted into the lysosomal compartment and degraded instead of being secreted through its regular transcellular route.

  16. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    CERN Document Server

    Appert-Rolland, Cecile; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Cells are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems driven by continuous energy supply. They carry out many vital functions requiring active transport of various ingredients and organelles, some being small, others being large. The cytoskeleton, composed of three types of filaments, determines the shape of the cell and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for the so-called cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated, in particular because its breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. We first review some biological facts obtained from experiments, and present some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We start with background knowledge on the origi...

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Erin J.; Chen, Chen; Mertens, Katja; Weber, Mary M.; Samuel, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The agent of Q fever, Coxiella burnetii, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute and chronic infections. The study of C. burnetii pathogenesis has benefited from two recent fundamental advances: improved genetic tools and the ability to grow the bacterium in extracellular media. In this Review, we describe how these recent advances have improved our understanding of C. burnetii invasion and host cell modulation, including the formation of replication-permissive Coxiella-containing vacuoles. Furthermore, we describe the Dot/Icm (defect in organelle trafficking/intracellular multiplication) system, which is used by C. burnetii to secrete a range of effector proteins into the host cell, and we discuss the role of these effectors in remodelling the host cell. PMID:23797173

  18. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... and insulin signalling transduction remain elusive. We believe that one of the reasons is that the role of intracellular compartmentalization as a regulator of metabolic pathways and signalling transduction has been rather ignored. This paper briefly reviews the literature to discuss the role of intracellular...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...

  19. Controlling and Monitoring Intracellular Delivery of Anticancer Polymer Nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Claudia; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-10-01

    Polymer nanomedicines are very attractive to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutics. Polymer conjugates and other polymer-based nanocarriers allow to increase plasma half-life and drug bioavailability and can also be guided toward tumors using passive and active targeting strategies. Since many chemotherapeutics act on targets that are located in well-defined subcellular compartments, other important factors that contribute to an efficient therapy include cellular internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of the polymer nanomedicines and/or its payload to the appropriate organelle in the cytoplasm. This article provides an overview of the different approaches that have been developed to control intracellular delivery of polymer nanomedicines and discusses the different techniques that can be used to monitor these processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. An early-branching microbialite cyanobacterium forms intracellular carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Benzerara, Karim; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Moreira, David; Bernard, Sylvain; Brown, Gordon E; López-García, Purificación

    2012-04-27

    Cyanobacteria have affected major geochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) on Earth for billions of years. In particular, they have played a major role in the formation of calcium carbonates (i.e., calcification), which has been considered to be an extracellular process. We identified a cyanobacterium in modern microbialites in Lake Alchichica (Mexico) that forms intracellular amorphous calcium-magnesium-strontium-barium carbonate inclusions about 270 nanometers in average diameter, revealing an unexplored pathway for calcification. Phylogenetic analyses place this cyanobacterium within the deeply divergent order Gloeobacterales. The chemical composition and structure of the intracellular precipitates suggest some level of cellular control on the biomineralization process. This discovery expands the diversity of organisms capable of forming amorphous calcium carbonates.

  1. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L; Jensen, Kaare H; Knoblauch, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods.......Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells......, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped...

  3. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    -induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent...... alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic...... redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A...

  4. Biology of Symbioses between Marine Invertebrates and Intracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-21

    ADDRESS (City, State, and 7IP Code) 7b ADDRESS (City. State. and ZIP Code) Marine Biology Research Division Resident Representative Scripps Institution...St. ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO Arlington, VA 22217-5000 11 TITLE (In~lude Security Classification) Biology o, Symbioses Between Mlarine... Invertebrates and Intracellular Bacteria 2 PERSONAL AUTHIOR(S) Horst Felbeck 13a TYPE OF REPORT 131) TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15S PAGE

  5. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spati...

  6. Nanoparticles and intracellular applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Jack; Huefner, Anna; Li, Li; Wingfield, Jonathan; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectrocopy (SERS) offers ultrasensitive vibrational fingerprinting at the nanoscale. Its non-destructive nature affords an ideal tool for interrogation of the intracellular environment, detecting the localisation of biomolecules, delivery and monitoring of therapeutics and for characterisation of complex cellular processes at the molecular level. Innovations in nanotechnology have produced a wide selection of novel, purpose-built plasmonic nanostructures capable of hig...

  7. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  8. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) for Intracellular Targeting Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Raimondi, Giorgio; Benkoski, Jason J.; Patrone, Julia B.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery vehicles have shown great promise for intracellular targeting applications, providing a mechanism to specifically alter cellular signaling and gene expression. In a previous investigation, the synthesis of ultra-small solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for topical drug delivery and biomarker detection applications was demonstrated. SLNs are a well-studied example of a nanoparticle delivery system that has emerged as a promising drug delivery vehicle. In this study, S...

  9. Evaluation of two novel methods for assessing intracellular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Catrin F.; Kombrabail, M.; Vijayalakshmi, K.; White, Nick; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Lloyd, David

    2012-08-01

    The ability to resolve the spatio-temporal complexity of intracellular O2 distribution is the ‘Holy Grail’ of cellular physiology. In an effort to obtain a non-invasive approach of mapping intracellular O2 tensions, two methods of phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy were examined in the current study. These were picosecond time-resolved epiphosphorescence microscopy (single 0.5 µm focused spot) and two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy with pinhole shifting. Both methods utilized nanoparticle-embedded Ru complex (45 nm diameter) as the phosphorescent probe, excited using pulsed outputs of Ti-sapphire Tsunami lasers (710-1050 nm). The former method used a 1 ps pulse width excitation beam with vertical polarization via a dichroic mirror (610 nm, XF43) and a 20× objective (NA 0.55, Nikon). Transmitted luminescence (1-2 × 104 counts s-1) was collected and time-correlated single photon counted decay times measured. Alternatively, an unmodified Zeiss LSM510 Confocal NLO microscope with 40× objective (NA 1.3) used successively shifted pinhole positions to collect image data from the lagging trail of the raster scan. Images obtained from two-photon excitation of a yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and a flagellate fish parasite (Spironucleus vortens), electroporated with Ru complex, indicated the intracellular location and magnitude of O2 gradients, thus confirming the feasibility of optical mapping under different external O2 concentrations. Both methods gave similar lifetimes for Ru complex phosphorescence under aerobic and anaerobic gas phases. Estimation of O2 tensions within individual fibroblasts (human dermal fibroblast (HDF)) and mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells was possible using epiphosphorescence microscopy. MCF-7 cells showed lower intracellular O2 concentrations than HDF cells, possibly due to higher metabolic rates in the former. Future work should involve construction of higher resolution 3D maps of Ru coordinate complex lifetime

  10. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  11. Carbon nanosyringe array as a platform for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangjin; Kim, Youn-Su; Kim, Won Bae; Jon, Sangyong

    2009-04-01

    We report a novel platform for intracellular delivery of genetic material and nanoparticles, based on vertically aligned carbon nanosyringe arrays (CNSAs) of controllable height. Using this technology, we have shown that plasmid and quantum dots can be efficiently delivered to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. The CNSA platform holds great promise for a myriad of applications including cell-based therapy, imaging, and tracking in vivo, and in biological studies aimed at understanding cellular function.

  12. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-10-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca(2+) ] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca(2+) ] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca(2+) ] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca(2+) ] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra which demonstrated that GPA NPs with a diameter of approximately 180 nm were uniform. The loading manner and release behaviors were also investigated. The generated GPA NPs maintained their antibiotic activities against planktonic bacteria, but more effective to damage established biofilms and inhibited biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, GPA NPs were observed to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 cells and readily engulfed by the macrophages, which facilitated the killing of intracellular bacteria in infected macrophages. These results suggested GPA NPs might be a promising antibacterial agent for effective treatment of chronic infections due to microbial biofilm and intracellular bacteria.

  14. Intracellular Trafficking Network of Protein Nanocapsules: Endocytosis, Exocytosis and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxie; Zhang, Xudong; Liu, Gan; Chang, Danfeng; Liang, Xin; Zhu, Xianbing; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane vesicle system is a complex transport system that includes endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. However, the details of the intracellular trafficking pathway of nanoparticles in cells have been poorly investigated. Here, we investigate in detail the intracellular trafficking pathway of protein nanocapsules using more than 30 Rab proteins as markers of multiple trafficking vesicles in endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. We observed that FITC-labeled protein nanoparticles were internalized by the cells mainly through Arf6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated micropinocytosis. In addition to this classic pathway: early endosome (EEs)/late endosome (LEs) to lysosome, we identified two novel transport pathways: micropinocytosis (Rab34 positive)-LEs (Rab7 positive)-lysosome pathway and EEs-liposome (Rab18 positive)-lysosome pathway. Moreover, the cells use slow endocytosis recycling pathway (Rab11 and Rab35 positive vesicles) and GLUT4 exocytosis vesicles (Rab8 and Rab10 positive) transport the protein nanocapsules out of the cells. In addition, protein nanoparticles are observed in autophagosomes, which receive protein nanocapsules through multiple endocytosis vesicles. Using autophagy inhibitor to block these transport pathways could prevent the degradation of nanoparticles through lysosomes. Using Rab proteins as vesicle markers to investigation the detail intracellular trafficking of the protein nanocapsules, will provide new targets to interfere the cellular behaver of the nanoparticles, and improve the therapeutic effect of nanomedicine.

  15. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L; Zhang, Ellisa W; Dudley, Anne G; Dixon, Beverly R E A; Guckes, Kirsten R; Breland, Erin J; Floyd, Kyle A; Casella, Daniel P; Algood, Holly M Scott; Clayton, Douglass B; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Probing cytoskeleton dynamics by intracellular particle transport analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, M.; Hodeck, K. F.; Witzel, P.; Nandi, A.; Lindner, B.; Heinrich, D.

    2015-07-01

    All cellular functions arise from the transport of molecules through a heterogeneous, highly dynamic cell interior for intracellular signaling. Here, the impact of intracellular architecture and cytoskeleton dynamics on transport processes is revealed by high-resolution single particle tracking within living cells, in combination with time-resolved local mean squared displacement (I-MSD) analysis. We apply the I-MSD analysis to trajectories of 200 nm silica particles within living cells of Dictyostelium discoideum obtained by high resolution spinning disc confocal microscopy with a frame rate of 100 fps and imaging in one fixed focal plane. We investigate phases of motor-driven active transport and subdiffusion, normal diffusion, as well as superdiffusion with high spatial and temporal resolution. Active directed intracellular motion is attributed to microtubule associated molecular motor driven transport with average absolute velocities of 2.8 μm s-1 for 200 nm diameter particles. Diffusion processes of these particles within wild-type cells are found to exhibit diffusion constants ranging across two orders of magnitude from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. This type of analysis might prove of ample importance for medical applications, like targeted drug treatment of cells by nano-sized carriers or innovative diagnostic assays.

  17. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  18. Twenty years of fluorescence imaging of intracellular Chloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eArosio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chloride homeostasis has a pivotal role in controlling neuronal excitability in the adult brain and during development. The intracellular concentration of chloride is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between passive fluxes through membrane conductances and the active transport mediated by importers and exporters. In cortical neurons, chloride fluxes are coupled to network activity by the opening of the ionotropic GABAA receptors that provides a direct link between the activity of interneurons and chloride fluxes. These molecular mechanisms are not evenly distributed and regulated over the neuron surface and this fact can lead to a compartmentalized control of the intracellular concentration of chloride. The inhibitory drive provided by the activity of the GABAA receptors depends on the direction and strength of the associated currents, which are ultimately dictated by the gradient of chloride, the main charge carrier flowing through the GABAA channel. Thus, the intracellular distribution of chloride determines the local strength of ionotropic inhibition and influences the interaction between converging excitation and inhibition. The importance of chloride regulation is also underlined by its involvement in several brain pathologies, including epilepsy and disorders of the autistic spectra.The full comprehension of the physiological meaning of GABAergic activity on neurons requires the measure of the spatiotemporal dynamics of chloride fluxes across the membrane. Nowadays, there are several available tools for the task, and both synthetic and genetically encoded indicators have been successfully used for chloride imaging. Here, we will review the available sensors analyzing their properties and outlining desirable future developments.

  19. Remote light-controlled intracellular target recognition by photochromic fluorescent glycoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junji; Fu, Youxin; Han, Hai-Hao; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; He, Xiao-Peng; Feringa, Ben L; Tian, He

    2017-10-17

    Development of powerful fluorescence imaging probes and techniques sets the basis for the spatiotemporal tracking of cells at different physiological and pathological stages. While current imaging approaches rely on passive probe-analyte interactions, here we develop photochromic fluorescent glycoprobes capable of remote light-controlled intracellular target recognition. Conjugation between a fluorophore and spiropyran produces the photochromic probe, which is subsequently equipped with a glycoligand "antenna" to actively localize a target cell expressing a selective receptor. We demonstrate that the amphiphilic glycoprobes that form micelles in water can selectively enter the target cell to operate photochromic cycling as controlled by alternate UV/Vis irradiations. We further show that remote light conversion of the photochromic probe from one isomeric state to the other activates its reactivity toward a target intracellular analyte, producing locked fluorescence that is no longer photoisomerizable. We envision that this research may spur the use of photochromism for the development of bioimaging probes.Fluorescence sensing in biological environments is prone to background signal interference. Here the authors design a photochromic fluorescent glycoprobe for light-controlled photo-switchable cell imaging and photo-activated target recognition, resulting in an increased sensing precision.

  20. Intracellular freezing in the infective juveniles of Steinernema feltiae: an entomopathogenic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of their optical transparency, we clearly observed the third stage infective juveniles (IJs of Steinernema feltiae freezing under a cryo-stage microscope. The IJs froze when the water surrounding them froze at -2°C and below. However, they avoid inoculative freezing at -1°C, suggesting cryoprotective dehydration. Freezing was evident as a sudden darkening and cessation of IJs' movement. Freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the IJs of S. feltiae freeze intracellularly. Ice crystals were found in every compartment of the body. IJs frozen at high sub-zero temperatures (-1 and -3°C survived and had small ice crystals. Those frozen at -10°C had large ice crystals and did not survive. However, the pattern of ice formation was not well-controlled and individual nematodes frozen at -3°C had both small and large ice crystals. IJs frozen by plunging directly into liquid nitrogen had small ice crystals, but did not survive. This study thus presents the evidence that S. feltiae is only the second freeze tolerant animal, after the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi, shown to withstand extensive intracellular freezing.

  1. Intracellular Proton-Transfer Mutants in a CLC Cl-/H+ Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.; Miller, C

    2009-01-01

    CLC-ec1, a bacterial homologue of the CLC family's transporter subclass, catalyzes transmembrane exchange of Cl- and H+. Mutational analysis based on the known structure reveals several key residues required for coupling H+ to the stoichiometric countermovement of Cl-. E148 (Gluex) transfers protons between extracellular water and the protein interior, and E203 (Gluin) is thought to function analogously on the intracellular face of the protein. Mutation of either residue eliminates H+ transport while preserving Cl- transport. We tested the role of Gluin by examining structural and functional properties of mutants at this position. Certain dissociable side chains (E, D, H, K, R, but not C and Y) retain H+/Cl- exchanger activity to varying degrees, while other mutations (V, I, or C) abolish H+ coupling and severely inhibit Cl- flux. Transporters substituted with other nonprotonatable side chains (Q, S, and A) show highly impaired H+ transport with substantial Cl- transport. Influence on H+ transport of side chain length and acidity was assessed using a single-cysteine mutant to introduce non-natural side chains. Crystal structures of both coupled (E203H) and uncoupled (E203V) mutants are similar to wild type. The results support the idea that Gluin is the internal proton-transfer residue that delivers protons from intracellular solution to the protein interior, where they couple to Cl- movements to bring about Cl-/H+ exchange.

  2. Intracellular angiotensin II elicits Ca2+ increases in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Kok, JW; Henning, RH; De Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II can act within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane angiotensin II receptors. The signal transduction of intracellular angiotensin LI is unclear. Therefore. we investigated the effects of

  3. KRIT1 regulates the homeostasis of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Goitre

    Full Text Available KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM, a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1(-/- cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1(-/- cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45alpha, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by

  4. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  5. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  6. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  7. Shiga Toxins: Intracellular Trafficking to the ER Leading to Activation of Host Cell Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Seung Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to improve hygenic conditions and regulate food and drinking water safety, the enteric pathogens, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC and Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 remain major public health concerns due to widespread outbreaks and the severity of extra-intestinal diseases they cause, including acute renal failure and central nervous system complications. Shiga toxins are the key virulence factors expressed by these pathogens mediating extra-intestinal disease. Delivery of the toxins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER results in host cell protein synthesis inhibition, activation of the ribotoxic stress response, the ER stress response, and in some cases, the induction of apoptosis. Intrinsic and/or extrinsic apoptosis inducing pathways are involved in executing cell death following intoxication. In this review we provide an overview of the current understanding Shiga toxin intracellular trafficking, host cellular responses to the toxin and ER stress-induced apoptosis with an emphasis on recent findings.

  8. Nano hydroxyapatite-blasted titanium surface affects pre-osteoblast morphology by modulating critical intracellular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Fábio; Ferreira, Marcel R; Fontes, Giselle N; da Costa Fernandes, Célio Jr; Andia, Denise C; Cruz, Nilson C; da Silva, Rodrigo A; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2017-08-01

    Although, intracellular signaling pathways are proposed to predict the quality of cell-surface relationship, this study addressed pre-osteoblast behavior in response to nano hydroxyapatite (HA)-blasted titanium (Ti) surface by exploring critical intracellular pathways and pre-osteoblast morphological change. Physicochemical properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and wettability considering water contact angle of three differently texturized Ti surfaces: Machined (Mac), Dual acid-etching (DAE), and nano hydroxyapatite-blasted (nHA). The results revealed critical differences in surface topography, impacting the water contact angle and later the osteoblast performance. In order to evaluate the effect of those topographical characteristics on biological responses, we have seeded pre-osteoblast cells on the Ti discs for up to 4 h and subjected the cultures to biological analysis. First, we have observed pre-osteoblasts morphological changes resulting from the interaction with the Ti texturized surfaces whereas the cells cultured on nHA presented a more advanced spreading process when compared with the cells cultured on the other surfaces. These results argued us for analyzing the molecular machinery and thus, we have shown that nHA promoted a lower Bax/Bcl2 ratio, suggesting an interesting anti-apoptotic effect, maybe explained by the fact that HA is a natural element present in bone composition. Thereafter, we investigated the potential effect of those surfaces on promoting pre-osteoblast adhesion and survival signaling by performing crystal violet and immunoblotting approaches, respectively. Our results showed that nHA promoted a higher pre-osteoblast adhesion supported by up-modulating FAK and Src activations, both signaling transducers involved during eukaryotic cell adhesion. Also, we have shown Ras-Erk stimulation by the all evaluated surfaces. Finally, we showed that all Ti-texturing surfaces were able to promote osteoblast differentiation

  9. Systematic investigation on the intracellular trafficking network of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxie; Chang, Danfeng; Yang, Yao; Zhang, Xudong; Tao, Wei; Jiang, Lijuan; Liang, Xin; Tsai, Hsiangi; Huang, Laiqiang; Mei, Lin

    2017-03-02

    Polymeric nanoparticles such as PLGA-based nanoparticles are emerging as promising carriers for controlled drug delivery. However, little is known about the intracellular trafficking network of polymeric nanoparticles. Here, more than 30 Rab proteins were used as markers of multiple trafficking vesicles in endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy to investigate in detail the intracellular trafficking pathways of PLGA nanoparticles. We observed that coumarin-6-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were internalized by the cells mainly through caveolin and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated macropinocytosis. Then the PLGA nanoparticles were transported to early endosomes (EEs), late endosomes (LEs), and finally to lysosomes. Two novel transport pathways were identified in our research: the macropinocytosis (Rab34 positive)-LE (Rab7 positive)-lysosome pathway and the EE-liposome (Rab18)-lysosome pathway. Moreover, the slow (Rab11 and Rab35 positive), fast (Rab4 positive) and apical (Rab20 and Rab25 positive) endocytic recycling endosome pathways could transport the PLGA nanoparticles to lysosomes. The PLGA nanoparticles were transported out of the cells by GLUT4 transport vesicles (Rab8, Rab10 positive), classic secretory vesicles (Rab3, Rab27 positive vesicles) and melanosomes (Rab32, Rab38 positive vesicles). Besides, the PLGA nanoparticles were observed in autophagosomes (LC3 positive), which means that the nanoparticles can be delivered by the autophagy pathway. Multiple cross-talk pathways were identified connecting autophagy and endocytosis or exocytosis by screening the co-localization of the Rab proteins with the LC3 protein. Degradation of nanoparticles through lysosomes can be blocked by autophagy inhibitors (3 MA and CQ). A better understanding of intracellular trafficking mechanisms involved in polymeric nanoparticle-based drug delivery is a prerequisite to clinical application.

  10. Transient fluctuations of intracellular zinc ions in cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Maret, Wolfgang, E-mail: womaret@utmb.edu [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Zinc is essential for cell proliferation, differentiation, and viability. When zinc becomes limited for cultured cells, DNA synthesis ceases and the cell cycle is arrested. The molecular mechanisms of actions of zinc are believed to involve changes in the availability of zinc(II) ions (Zn{sup 2+}). By employing a fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, FluoZin-3 acetoxymethyl ester, intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations were measured in undifferentiated and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations are pico- to nanomolar in PC12 cells and are higher in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated cells. When following cellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations for 48 h after the removal of serum, a condition that is known to cause cell cycle arrest, Zn{sup 2+} concentrations decrease after 30 min but, remarkably, increase after 1 h, and then decrease again to about one half of the initial concentration. Cell proliferation, measured by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, decreases after both serum starvation and zinc chelation. Two peaks of Zn{sup 2+} concentrations occur within one cell cycle: one early in the G1 phase and the other in the late G1/S phase. Thus, fluctuations of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations and established modulation of phosphorylation signaling, via an inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases at commensurately low Zn{sup 2+} concentrations, suggest a role for Zn{sup 2+} in the control of the cell cycle. Interventions targeted at these picomolar Zn{sup 2+} fluctuations may be a way of controlling cell growth in hyperplasia, neoplasia, and diseases associated with aberrant differentiation.

  11. Quantitative Proteomics of Intracellular Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Liu

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in the USA and Europe. An important virulence attribute of this bacterial pathogen is its ability to enter and survive within host cells. Here we show through a quantitative proteomic analysis that upon entry into host cells, C. jejuni undergoes a significant metabolic downshift. Furthermore, our results indicate that intracellular C. jejuni reprograms its respiration, favoring the respiration of fumarate. These results explain the poor ability of C. jejuni obtained from infected cells to grow under standard laboratory conditions and provide the bases for the development of novel anti microbial strategies that would target relevant metabolic pathways.

  12. A microfluidic device with fluorimetric detection for intracellular components analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwapiszewski, Radosław; Skolimowski, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Karina

    2011-01-01

    An integrated microfluidic system that coupled lysis of two cell lines: L929 fibroblasts and A549 epithelial cells, with fluorescence-based enzyme assay was developed to determine β-glucocerebrosidase activity. The microdevice fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) consists of three main parts......: a chemical cell lysis zone based on the sheath flow geometry, a micromeander and an optical fibers detection zone. Unlike many methods described in literature that are designed to analyse intracellular components, the presented system enables to perform enzyme assays just after cell lysis process. It reduces...

  13. Tatp-mediated intracellular delivery of pharmaceutical nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchilin, V P

    2007-08-01

    CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides), including Tatp (transactivator of transcription peptide), have been successfully used for intracellular delivery of a wide variety of cargoes including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers such as liposomes, micelles and nanoparticles. Here, we will consider the major results obtained in this area with emphasis on Tatp-mediated delivery of liposomes and various transfection vectors. We will also address the development of 'smart' stimuli-sensitive nanocarriers, where the cell-penetrating function can only be activated when the nanocarrier is inside the biological target, thus minimizing the interaction with non-target cells.

  14. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  15. An intracellular transcriptomic atlas of the giant coenocyte Caulerpa taxifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Convergent morphologies have arisen in plants multiple times. In non-vascular and vascular land plants, convergent morphology in the form of roots, stems, and leaves arose. The morphology of some green algae includes an anchoring holdfast, stipe, and leaf-like fronds. Such morphology occurs in the absence of multicellularity in the siphonous algae, which are single cells. Morphogenesis is separate from cellular division in the land plants, which although are multicellular, have been argued to exhibit properties similar to single celled organisms. Within the single, macroscopic cell of a siphonous alga, how are transcripts partitioned, and what can this tell us about the development of similar convergent structures in land plants? Here, we present a de novo assembled, intracellular transcriptomic atlas for the giant coenocyte Caulerpa taxifolia. Transcripts show a global, basal-apical pattern of distribution from the holdfast to the frond apex in which transcript identities roughly follow the flow of genetic information in the cell, transcription-to-translation. The analysis of the intersection of transcriptomic atlases of a land plant and Caulerpa suggests the recurrent recruitment of transcript accumulation patterns to organs over large evolutionary distances. Our results not only provide an intracellular atlas of transcript localization, but also demonstrate the contribution of transcript partitioning to morphology, independent from multicellularity, in plants.

  16. Imaging the intracellular degradation of biodegradable polymer nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Barthel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of smart drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles has become of great interest. Drug-loaded nanoparticles can be introduced into the cell interior via endocytotic processes followed by the slow release of the drug due to degradation of the nanoparticle. In this work, poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA was chosen as the biodegradable polymer. Although common degradation of PLLA has been studied in various biological environments, intracellular degradation processes have been examined only to a very limited extent. PLLA nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 120 nm were decorated with magnetite nanocrystals and introduced into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The release of the magnetite particles from the surface of the PLLA nanoparticles during the intracellular residence was monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM over a period of 14 days. It was demonstrated by the release of the magnetite nanocrystals from the PLLA surface that the PLLA nanoparticles do in fact undergo degradation within the cell. Furthermore, even after 14 days of residence, the PLLA nanoparticles were found in the MSCs. Additionally, the ultrastructural TEM examinations yield insight into the long term intercellular fate of these nanoparticles. From the statistical analysis of ultrastructural details (e.g., number of detached magnetite crystals, and the number of nanoparticles in one endosome, we demonstrate the importance of TEM studies for such applications in addition to fluorescence studies (flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) for Intracellular Targeting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Raimondi, Giorgio; Benkoski, Jason J.; Patrone, Julia B.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery vehicles have shown great promise for intracellular targeting applications, providing a mechanism to specifically alter cellular signaling and gene expression. In a previous investigation, the synthesis of ultra-small solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for topical drug delivery and biomarker detection applications was demonstrated. SLNs are a well-studied example of a nanoparticle delivery system that has emerged as a promising drug delivery vehicle. In this study, SLNs were loaded with a fluorescent dye and used as a model to investigate particle-cell interactions. The phase inversion temperature (PIT) method was used for the synthesis of ultra-small populations of biocompatible nanoparticles. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was utilized in order to establish appropriate dosing levels prior to the nanoparticle-cell interaction studies. Furthermore, primary human dermal fibroblasts and mouse dendritic cells were exposed to dye-loaded SLN over time and the interactions with respect to toxicity and particle uptake were characterized using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. This study demonstrated that ultra-small SLNs, as a nanoparticle delivery system, are suitable for intracellular targeting of different cell types. PMID:26650036

  18. Reusable titanium nitride plasmonic microstructures for intracellular delivery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raun, Alexander J.; Saklayen, Nabiha; Zgrabik, Christine M.; Vulis, Daryl I.; Madrid, Marinna; Shen, Weilu; Hu, Evelyn L.; Mazur, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Efficient drug and biomolecular delivery into cells is an important area of biomedical research. Intracellular delivery relies on porating cell membranes to allow exterior molecules to enter the cell efficiently and viably. Various methods, including optoporation, electroporation, and viral techniques, can deliver molecules to cells, but come with significant drawbacks such as low efficiency, low throughput, and low viability. We present a new laser-based delivery method that uses laser pulses to excite plasmonic, Titanium Nitride (TiN) microstructures for cell poration and offers high efficiency, throughput, and viability. TiN is a promising plasmonic material for laser-based delivery methods due to its high levels of hardness and thermal stability. We fabricate these microstructures by sputtering thin films of TiN on patterned sapphire substrates. We then optimize plasmonic enhancement and stability by investigating different fabrication conditions. We deliver dye molecules, siRNA, and microspheres to cells to quantify poration efficiency and viability by using flow cytometry and by imaging the target cells at defined time intervals post laser irradiation. Additionally, we study temperature effects via simulations and experiments, as well as oxidation of the TiN films over time. We also use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to study microstructure damage and cell adhesion. Overall, TiN presents a promising opportunity for use as a reusable material in future biomedical devices for intracellular biomolecular delivery and regenerative medicine.

  19. Intracellular spectral recompositioning of light enhances algal photosynthetic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weiqi; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Khraiwesh, Basel; Sultana, Mehar; Jaiswal, Ashish; Jijakli, Kenan; Nelson, David R; Al-Hrout, Ala'a; Baig, Badriya; Amin, Amr; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2017-09-01

    Diatoms, considered as one of the most diverse and largest groups of algae, can provide the means to reach a sustainable production of petrochemical substitutes and bioactive compounds. However, a prerequisite to achieving this goal is to increase the solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency of photosynthesis, which generally remains less than 5% for most photosynthetic organisms. We have developed and implemented a rapid and effective approach, herein referred to as intracellular spectral recompositioning (ISR) of light, which, through absorption of excess blue light and its intracellular emission in the green spectral band, can improve light utilization. We demonstrate that ISR can be used chemogenically, by using lipophilic fluorophores, or biogenically, through the expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Engineered P. tricornutum cells expressing eGFP achieved 28% higher efficiency in photosynthesis than the parental strain, along with an increased effective quantum yield and reduced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) induction levels under high-light conditions. Further, pond simulator experiments demonstrated that eGFP transformants could outperform their wild-type parental strain by 50% in biomass production rate under simulated outdoor sunlight conditions. Transcriptome analysis identified up-regulation of major photosynthesis genes in the engineered strain in comparison with the wild type, along with down-regulation of NPQ genes involved in light stress response. Our findings provide a proof of concept for a strategy of developing more efficient photosynthetic cell factories to produce algae-based biofuels and bioactive products.

  20. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  1. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  2. CIRRHOSIS INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN RENAL TISSUE THROUGH INTRACELLULAR OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristina Simões da SILVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Methods Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. Results In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. Conclusions These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  3. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  4. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqin Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications.

  5. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that sideroc......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... that siderocalin expression is upregulated following M.tb infection of mouse macrophage cell lines and primary murine alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, siderocalin added exogenously as a recombinant protein or overexpressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line inhibited the intracellular growth of the pathogen....... A variant form of siderocalin, which is expressed only in the macrophage cytosol, inhibited intracellular M.tb growth as effectively as the normal, secreted form, an observation that provides mechanistic insight into how siderocalin might influence iron acquisition by the bacteria in the phagosome. Our...

  6. A model for membrane potential and intracellular ion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitrin, A K; Khitrin, K A; Model, M A

    2014-12-01

    Most cells carry a negative electric charge. It produces a potential difference across the membrane, which regulates voltage-sensitive ion transport and ATP synthesis in mitochondria. The negative charge comes partly from an excess of negative ions in the cell interior (Donnan potential) and partly from ionized groups on the membrane (surface potential). In this work we propose some important modifications to the existing theory of membrane potential. First, we calculate the concentration profile of intracellular positive ions and derive a simple equation to assess the submembrane depletion of positive ions that gives rise to the Donnan potential. The extent of depletion varies with potential, which may provide a regulatory mechanism for ion pumps and channels. Next we consider the surface component of the potential and note that the standard Gouy-Chapman theory has been developed for planar membranes, whereas real cell membranes have a closed geometry. In this case, charges on the membrane surface are not expected to generate fields extending into the cell interior. This fact calls for reinterpretation of some theoretical points as well as experimental data. In particular, the experimentally demonstrated electrostatic attraction between cationic proteins and the negative membrane must now be explained without invoking intracellular fields, and we suggest a new mechanism that can account for this interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterization, calibration, and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Arpan S; Chauhan, Veeren M; Johnston, Angus P R; Esler, Tim; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore, nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer) and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard) immobilized in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesized using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessible imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular, special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: (1) synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors, (2) nanosensor calibration and (3) performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Fluorescent nanosensors for intracellular measurements: synthesis, characterisation, calibration and measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpan Shailesh Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of intracellular acidification is important for understanding fundamental biological pathways as well as developing effective therapeutic strategies. Fluorescent pH nanosensors are an enabling technology for real-time monitoring of intracellular acidification. The physicochemical characteristics of nanosensors can be engineered to target specific cellular compartments and respond to external stimuli. Therefore nanosensors represent a versatile approach for probing biological pathways inside cells. The fundamental components of nanosensors comprise a pH-sensitive fluorophore (signal transducer and a pH-insensitive reference fluorophore (internal standard immobilised in an inert non-toxic matrix. The inert matrix prevents interference of cellular components with the sensing elements as well as minimizing potentially harmful effects of some fluorophores on cell function. Fluorescent nanosensors are synthesised using standard laboratory equipment and are detectable by non-invasive widely accessibly imaging techniques. The outcomes of studies employing this technology are dependent on reliable methodology for performing measurements. In particular special consideration must be given to conditions for sensor calibration, uptake conditions and parameters for image analysis. We describe procedures for: 1 synthesis and characterisation of polyacrylamide and silica based nanosensors 2 nanosensor calibration and 3 performing measurements using fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Combined S-33 and O-18 Isotope Tracing of Intracellular Sulfur Metabolism during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antler, Gilad; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei; Sivan, Orit; Turchyn, Alexandra V.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a key player in the global carbon cycle, oxidizing nearly 50% of organic matter in marine sediments. The biochemical pathway of microbial sulfate reduction fractionates sulfur and oxygen isotopes and these fractionations can be used to reconstruct S cycling in sediments. Sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction, which partitions lighter sulfur (32S) into sulfide and heavier sulfur (33S and 34S) into the residual sulfate, can be as high as 72o for 34S/32S. The availability and type of organic substrate control the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation by influencing the fluxes of and the transfer of electrons to different S species. The partitioning of oxygen in sulfate during microbial sulfate reduction appears to be strongly influenced by the oxygen isotopic composition of water in which the bacteria grow, but its magnitude also seems to correlate with the magnitude of 34S/32S isotope fractionation. In addition, the fractionation of 33S/32S is thought to reflect the reversibility of some intercellular fluxes. We wanted to investigate whether the 18O/16O, 34S/32S and 33S/32S isotope fractionations in sulfate are controlled by the same intracellular processes and conditions. This was done by investigating the combined sulfur and oxygen isotope partitioning by a marine Desulfovibrio sp. grown in pure culture on different organic substrates and in water with different isotopic composition of oxygen. The isotope fractionations of oxygen and sulfur correlated with the cell specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), where slower rates yielded higher sulfur fractionation (as high as 60) and higher oxygen isotope fractionation. The trends in 33S/32S and 34S/32S with the changing csSRR was similar to the trends in 18O/16O with the csSRR, suggesting that the same intercellular pathways controlled both oxygen and sulfur isotope signatures during microbial sulfate reduction. The use of water with different isotopic

  10. The composition of intracellular granules from the metal-accumulating cells of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, B; Mitchell, P C; Ritchie, A; Simkiss, K; Taylor, M

    1981-01-01

    Certain cells in the hepatopancreas of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa) contain intracellular granules that are sites of metal-ion accumulation. These granules have been extracted and investigated by u.v. and i.r. spectroscopy, atomic-absorption spectroscopy, X-ray microanalysis, thermogravimetric analysis, enzymic assay and microanalysis. The deposits contain about 18% (w/w) water, 5% (w/w) organic matter and 76% (w/w) inorganic material of which the main components are Ca2+, Mg2+ and P2O7(4)-. The possible origin of these granules is discussed, as is their role in detoxifying heavy-metal ions. PMID:6272732

  11. Tumour Cell Labelling by Magnetic Nanoparticles with Determination of Intracellular Iron Content and Spatial Distribution of the Intracellular Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cuschieri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically labelled cells are used for in vivo cell tracking by MRI, used for the clinical translation of cell-base therapies. Studies involving magnetic labelled cells may include separation of labelled cells, targeted delivery and controlled release of drugs, contrast enhanced MRI and magnetic hyperthermia for the in situ ablation of tumours. Dextran-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO ferumoxides are used clinically as an MR contrast agents primarily for hepatic imaging. The material is also widely used for in vitro cell labelling, as are other SPIO-based particles. Our results on the uptake by human cancer cell lines of ferumoxides indicate that electroporation in the presence of protamine sulphate (PS results in rapid high uptake of SPIO nanoparticles (SPIONs by parenchymal tumour cells without significant impairment of cell viability. Quantitative determination of cellular iron uptake performed by colorimetric assay is in agreement with data from the literature. These results on intracellular iron content together with the intracellular distribution of SPIONs by magnetic force microscopy (MFM following in vitro uptake by parenchymal tumour cells confirm the potential of this technique for clinical tumour cell detection and destruction.

  12. Cotransporters as molecular water pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna

    2002-01-01

    Molecular water pumps are membrane proteins of the cotransport type in which a flux of water is coupled to substrate fluxes by a mechanism within the protein. Free energy can be exchanged between the fluxes. Accordingly, the flux of water may be relatively independent of the external water chemical...... for such cotransport can be ruled out for both experimental and theoretical reasons. Indeed, substrate fluxes mediated by channels or ionophores generate much smaller water fluxes than those observed with cotransporters. Theoretical models, using reasonable values for the intracellular diffusion coefficient, indicate...

  13. High prevalence, genetic diversity and intracellular growth ability of Legionella in hot spring environments.

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    Tian Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. METHODS: Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and sequence-based typing (SBT were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. RESULTS: Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (p<0.01. The Legionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (p<0.01. Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%, 6 (23.4%, 5 (19.2%, 1 (18.5%, 2 (10.2%, 8 (0.4%, 10 (0.8%, 9 (1.9% and 12 (0.4%. Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control

  14. High Prevalence, Genetic Diversity and Intracellular Growth Ability of Legionella in Hot Spring Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Huanxin; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Mingqiang; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. Methods Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing (SBT) were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. Results Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (pLegionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (pLegionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%), and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%), 6 (23.4%), 5 (19.2%), 1 (18.5%), 2 (10.2%), 8 (0.4%), 10 (0.8%), 9 (1.9%) and 12 (0.4%). Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. Conclusions Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are

  15. Autophagy Induced by Intracellular Infection of Propionibacterium acnes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruko Nakamura

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is caused by Th1-type immune responses to unknown agents, and is linked to the infectious agent Propionibacterium acnes. Many strains of P. acnes isolated from sarcoid lesions cause intracellular infection and autophagy may contribute to the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. We examined whether P. acnes induces autophagy.Three cell lines from macrophages (Raw264.7, mesenchymal cells (MEF, and epithelial cells (HeLa were infected by viable or heat-killed P. acnes (clinical isolate from sarcoid lymph node at a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 100 or 1000 for 1 h. Extracellular bacteria were killed by washing and culturing infected cells with antibiotics. Samples were examined by colony assay, electron-microscopy, and fluorescence-microscopy with anti-LC3 and anti-LAMP1 antibodies. Autophagy-deficient (Atg5-/- MEF cells were also used.Small and large (≥5 μm in diameter LC3-positive vacuoles containing few or many P. acnes cells (LC3-positive P. acnes were frequently found in the three cell lines when infected by viable P. acnes at MOI 1000. LC3-positive large vacuoles were mostly LAMP1-positive. A few small LC3-positive/LAMP1-negative vacuoles were consistently observed in some infected cells for 24 h postinfection. The number of LC3-positive P. acnes was decreased at MOI 100 and completely abolished when heat-killed P. acnes was used. LC3-positive P. acnes was not found in autophagy-deficient Atg5-/- cells where the rate of infection was 25.3 and 17.6 times greater than that in wild-type Atg5+/+ cells at 48 h postinfection at MOI 100 and 1000, respectively. Electron-microscopic examination revealed bacterial cells surrounded mostly by a single-membrane including the large vacuoles and sometimes a double or multi-layered membrane, with occasional undigested bacterial cells in ruptured late endosomes or in the cytoplasm.Autophagy was induced by intracellular P. acnes infection and contributed to intracellular bacterial killing as an

  16. Intracellular targets of RGDS peptide in melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capogrossi Maurizio C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RGD-motif acts as a specific integrins-ligand and regulates a variety of cell-functions via extracellular action affecting cell-adhesion properties. However, increasing evidence identifies additional RGDS-functions at intracellular level. Previous reports show RGDS-internalization in endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and lymphocytes, indicating intracellular targets such as caspase-8 and caspase-9, and suggest RGDS specific activity at cytoplasmic level. Given the role RGDS-peptides play in controlling proliferation and apoptosis in several cell types, investigating intracellular targets of RGDS in melanoma cells may un-reveal novel molecular targets and key pathways, potentially useful for a more effective approach to melanoma treatment. Results In the present study we show for the first time that RGDS-peptide is internalized in melanoma cells in a time-dependent way and exerts strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects independently from its extracellular anti-adhesive action. RGES control-peptide did not show biological effects, as expected; nevertheless it is internalized, although with slower kinetics. Survivin, a known cell-cycle and survival-regulator is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in cell lysates and overlay assays with the purified proteins showed that RGDS interacts with survivin, as well as with procaspase-3, -8 and -9. RGDS-peptide binding to survivin was found to be specific, at high affinity (Kd 27.5 μM and located at the survivin C-terminus. RGDS-survivin interaction appeared to play a key role, since RGDS lost its anti-mitogenic effect in survivin-deprived cells with a specific siRNA. Conclusions RGDS inhibits melanoma growth with an adhesion-independent mechanism; it is internalized in melanoma cells and specifically interacts with survivin. The present data may indicate a novel role of RGDS-containing peptides physiologically released from the extracellular

  17. PEGylated long circulating nanostructured lipid carriers for Amoitone B: preparation, cytotoxicity and intracellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaoye; Chu, Lianjun; Xi, Yanwei; Zhai, Guangxi

    2014-08-15

    Amoitone B is a newly synthesized derivative of antitumor drug cytosporone B, which exhibits excellent anticancer activity in vivo. Nevertheless, the water-insolubility and short biological half-life limit its further development. In the present study, polyethylene glycol-modified, Amoitone B-loaded long circulating nanostructured lipid carriers (AmB-PEG-NLC) were prepared by the emulsion-evaporation and low temperature-solidification method. The in vitro antitumor activity and intracellular uptake of AmB-PEG-NLC in the human colon cancer SW620 cells and liver cancer HepG2 cells were evaluated in detail. MTT assay was employed to investigate the inhibition effect on cellular viability. Propidium iodide and DAPI staining were performed to visually examine the fluorescent morphology changes of the cells incubated with AmB-PEG-NLC. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine the influence of AmB-PEG-NLC on apoptosis of SW620. The intracellular uptake was observed by rhodamine B, a fluorescent maker. Cytotoxicity assay, observation of morphological changes and apoptosis examination revealed that AmB-PEG-NLC could markedly enhance the cytotoxicity of AmB against cancer cell compared to AmB solution and AmB-NLC. An increased uptake of PEG-NLC was obtained compared with NLC in SW620 cells, which might attribute to the effect of PEG. Based on these results, AmB-PEG-NLC could be a promising delivery system for AmB with effective cancer therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    -based sensor systems that are internalized by endocytosis, and elucidated important factors in nanosensor design that should be considered in future development of new sensors. From our experiments it is clear that it is highly important to use sensors that have a broad measurement range, as erroneous......Particle-based nanosensors have over the last decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors is challenging...... and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle...

  19. [Invertors--intracellular regulators of plasma membrane function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frol'kis, V V

    1999-01-01

    It has been found that the activation of protein biosynthesis in various cells (hepatocytes, adrenocorticocytes, thyrocytes and myocardiocytes), caused by different factors such as multiple hormones, regeneration, hyperfunction etc., leads to the development of plasmatic membrane hyperpolarization. It has also been shown that during protein biosynthesis activation under genome control there have been synthesized the intracellular regulators of plasmatic membrane state, called invertors. The invertors regulate the activity of membrane enzymes and ion channels, as well as adapt plasma membrane state to the needs of cell. With increasing age, the invertors synthesis alters, and this becomes an important genome-membraneous mechanism of aging. An experimental lifespan prolongation promotes to maintain the synthesis of invertors.

  20. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-09-25

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  2. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  3. Mechanics of Intracellular Stress Fibers: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Atsushi; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Machida, Shinichi; Saito, Masakazu; Afrin, Rehana

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical response of living cells against external stimuli depends largely on the physical and biochemical properties of an intracellular structure called cytoskeleton. Three main kinds of filamentous protein structures, namely, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and actin thin filaments comprise the cytoskeleton. In the case of cells cultured on an adhesive substrate, the development of actin-based cytoskeleton, especially linearly bundled actin filaments called stress fibers (SFs), is well established. SFs are formed close to the cell membrane with one or both of their ends associated with the transmembrane structure called the focal adhesion (FA). In this article, we review some fundamental facts about SFs in live cells starting from the early description of the bundled filaments as observed under optical and electron microscopies. The morphology, chemical components, and biological functions of SFs, and recent work on the mechanical nature of SFs are reviewed.

  4. Effects of microgravity environment on intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De CHANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity environment is a stress and extracellular signal that affects cellular morphology and function through signal transduction system, thus leading to certain biological effect. At present, many signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in the regulation of cell function under microgravity environment, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, Notch signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway, HSP signaling pathway and so on, and these reports have laid a foundation for the molecular studies of cytolergy under outer space environment. The recent progress in the researches on intracellular signaling pathways affected by microgravity is herewith reviewed in present paper in the hope of providing references for understanding the cell activity in space environment, and to find the ways to alleviate the harmful effects caused by the microgravity environment.

  5. Elevated Cholesterol in the Coxiella burnetii Intracellular Niche Is Bacteriolytic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulye, Minal; Samanta, Dhritiman; Winfree, Seth; Heinzen, Robert A; Gilk, Stacey D

    2017-02-28

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and a significant cause of culture-negative endocarditis in the United States. Upon infection, the nascent Coxiella phagosome fuses with the host endocytic pathway to form a large lysosome-like vacuole called the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV membrane is rich in sterols, and drugs perturbing host cell cholesterol homeostasis inhibit PV formation and bacterial growth. Using cholesterol supplementation of a cholesterol-free cell model system, we found smaller PVs and reduced Coxiella growth as cellular cholesterol concentration increased. Further, we observed in cells with cholesterol a significant number of nonfusogenic PVs that contained degraded bacteria, a phenotype not observed in cholesterol-free cells. Cholesterol had no effect on axenic Coxiella cultures, indicating that only intracellular bacteria are sensitive to cholesterol. Live-cell microscopy revealed that both plasma membrane-derived cholesterol and the exogenous cholesterol carrier protein low-density lipoprotein (LDL) traffic to the PV. To test the possibility that increasing PV cholesterol levels affects bacterial survival, infected cells were treated with U18666A, a drug that traps cholesterol in lysosomes and PVs. U18666A treatment led to PVs containing degraded bacteria and a significant loss in bacterial viability. The PV pH was significantly more acidic in cells with cholesterol or cells treated with U18666A, and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin blocked cholesterol-induced PV acidification and bacterial death. Additionally, treatment of infected HeLa cells with several FDA-approved cholesterol-altering drugs led to a loss of bacterial viability, a phenotype also rescued by bafilomycin. Collectively, these data suggest that increasing PV cholesterol further acidifies the PV, leading to Coxiella death.IMPORTANCE The intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii is a significant cause of culture-negative infectious

  6. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  7. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  8. Improved Fourier-based characterization of intracellular fractal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylas, Joanna; Quinn, Kyle P.; Hunter, Martin; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A novel Fourier-based image analysis method for measuring fractal features is presented which can significantly reduce artifacts due to non-fractal edge effects. The technique is broadly applicable to the quantitative characterization of internal morphology (texture) of image features with well-defined borders. In this study, we explore the capacity of this method for quantitative assessment of intracellular fractal morphology of mitochondrial networks in images of normal and diseased (precancerous) epithelial tissues. Using a combination of simulated fractal images and endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, our method is shown to more accurately characterize the exponent of the high-frequency power spectral density (PSD) of these images in the presence of artifacts that arise due to cellular and nuclear borders. PMID:23188308

  9. Silicon chips detect intracellular pressure changes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M; Duch, Marta; Vázquez, Patricia; Zinoviev, Kirill; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Esteve, Jaume; Suárez, Teresa; Plaza, José A

    2013-07-01

    The ability to measure pressure changes inside different components of a living cell is important, because it offers an alternative way to study fundamental processes that involve cell deformation. Most current techniques such as pipette aspiration, optical interferometry or external pressure probes use either indirect measurement methods or approaches that can damage the cell membrane. Here we show that a silicon chip small enough to be internalized into a living cell can be used to detect pressure changes inside the cell. The chip, which consists of two membranes separated by a vacuum gap to form a Fabry-Pérot resonator, detects pressure changes that can be quantified from the intensity of the reflected light. Using this chip, we show that extracellular hydrostatic pressure is transmitted into HeLa cells and that these cells can endure hypo-osmotic stress without significantly increasing their intracellular hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Intracellular regulation of TNF activity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Vucic, Domagoj

    2018-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα, TNF) is a key mediator and regulator of mammalian immune responses in healthy organisms and in diseased conditions. TNF governs development of the immune system, cell survival signaling pathways, proliferation and regulates metabolic processes. Whereas TNF-induced NF-κB and MAP pro-survival kinase activities constitute its major biochemical functions, TNF can also stimulate cell death in certain pathological situations. TNF-induced signal transduction pathways are tightly regulated through ubiquitination and phosphorylation of molecules partaking in all TNF-dependent membrane-associated and intracellular protein signaling complexes. Deregulated TNF signaling in individuals carrying naturally occurring genetic mutations in proteins that mediate TNF signaling, or in corresponding genetically modified animal models, results in severe pathologies. In this review we will describe the current knowledge of TNF signaling and its relevance for human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Galectin-3 Guides Intracellular Trafficking of Some Human Serotransferrin Glycoforms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Michael C.; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena; Leffler, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Transferrin internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and subsequent recycling after iron delivery has been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate a previously unrecognized parameter regulating this recycling, the binding of galectin-3 to particular glycoforms of transferrin. Two fractions of transferrin, separated by affinity chromatography based on their binding or not to galectin-3, are targeted to kinetically different endocytic pathways in HFL-1 cells expressing galectin-3 but not in SKBR3 cells lacking galectin-3; the SKBR3 cells, however, can acquire the ability to target these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3-bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting a pathophysiological regulation. These are novel aspects of transferrin cell biology, which has previously considered only a degree of iron loading, but not other forms of heterogeneity. PMID:23926108

  12. Galectin-3 guides intracellular trafficking of some human serotransferrin glycoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Michael C; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena; Leffler, Hakon

    2013-09-27

    Transferrin internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and subsequent recycling after iron delivery has been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate a previously unrecognized parameter regulating this recycling, the binding of galectin-3 to particular glycoforms of transferrin. Two fractions of transferrin, separated by affinity chromatography based on their binding or not to galectin-3, are targeted to kinetically different endocytic pathways in HFL-1 cells expressing galectin-3 but not in SKBR3 cells lacking galectin-3; the SKBR3 cells, however, can acquire the ability to target these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3-bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting a pathophysiological regulation. These are novel aspects of transferrin cell biology, which has previously considered only a degree of iron loading, but not other forms of heterogeneity.

  13. Intracellular Signaling Mediators in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to phenomenological models of nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms when the vessel lumen caliber varies markedly. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volume 4 is devoted to major sets of intracellular mediators that transmit signals upon stimulation of cell-surface receptors.  Activation of...

  14. Extraction of intracellular protein from Glaciozyma antarctica for proteomics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizura, S. Nor; Farahayu, K.; Faizal, A. B. Mohd; Asmahani, A. A. S.; Amir, R.; Nazalan, N.; Diba, A. B. Farah; Muhammad, M. Nor; Munir, A. M. Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Two preparation methods of crude extracts of psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica were compared in order to obtain a good recovery of intracellular proteins. Extraction with mechanical procedures using sonication was found to be more effective for obtaining good yield compare to alkaline treatment method. The procedure is simple, rapid, and produce better yield. A total of 52 proteins were identified by combining both extraction methods. Most of the proteins identified in this study involves in the metabolic process including glycolysis pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruyate decarboxylation and also urea cyle. Several chaperons were identified including probable cpr1-cyclophilin (peptidylprolyl isomerase), macrolide-binding protein fkbp12 and heat shock proteins which were postulate to accelerate proper protein folding. Characteristic of the fundamental cellular processes inferred from the expressed-proteome highlight the evolutionary and functional complexity existing in this domain of life.

  15. Intracellular trafficking of MDR transporters and relevance of SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Letizia; Lemos, Clara; Peters, Godefridus J; Paradiso, Angelo; Azzariti, Amalia

    2009-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) frequently contributes to the failure of chemotherapeutic treatments in cancer patients. Mechanisms underlying the development of MDR have been extensively studied and are considered multifactorial. Among them, the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) family of proteins plays a pivotal role. Processes of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of MDR-ABC proteins are not yet well explored and to enlighten these topics could be crucial to understand cellular drug uptake and retention. In this review, we analysed literature data concerning i) intracellular trafficking of MDR-ABC proteins (BCRP, P-gp and MRP1) and ii) mechanisms altering their cellular localization and trafficking. Moreover, we describe single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that have been reported for some multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters, such as BCRP and P-gp, emphasizing their ability to affect the expression, function and localization of the transporters, with implications on drug resistance phenotypes.

  16. Adenosine diphosphate as an intracellular regulator of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, C G; Shyng, S L; Nestorowicz, A; Glaser, B; Clement, J P; Gonzalez, G; Aguilar-Bryan, L; Permutt, M A; Bryan, J

    1996-06-21

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels couple the cellular metabolic state to electrical activity and are a critical link between blood glucose concentration and pancreatic insulin secretion. A mutation in the second nucleotide-binding fold (NBF2) of the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) of an individual diagnosed with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy generated KATP channels that could be opened by diazoxide but not in response to metabolic inhibition. The hamster SUR, containing the analogous mutation, had normal ATP sensitivity, but unlike wild-type channels, inhibition by ATP was not antagonized by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Additional mutations in NBF2 resulted in the same phenotype, whereas an equivalent mutation in NBF1 showed normal sensitivity to MgADP. Thus, by binding to SUR NBF2 and antagonizing ATP inhibition of KATP++ channels, intracellular MgADP may regulate insulin secretion.

  17. Axotomy depletes intracellular calcium stores in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Marcel; Gemes, Geza; Weyker, Paul D; Cruikshank, James M; Kawano, Takashi; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2009-08-01

    The cellular mechanisms of neuropathic pain are inadequately understood. Previous investigations have revealed disrupted Ca signaling in primary sensory neurons after injury. The authors examined the effect of injury on intracellular Ca stores of the endoplasmic reticulum, which critically regulate the Ca signal and neuronal function. Intracellular Ca levels were measured with Fura-2 or mag-Fura-2 microfluorometry in axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) dorsal root ganglion neurons and adjacent L4 neurons isolated from hyperalgesic rats after L5 spinal nerve ligation, compared to neurons from control animals. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores released by the ryanodine-receptor agonist caffeine decreased by 46% in axotomized small neurons. This effect persisted in Ca-free bath solution, which removes the contribution of store-operated membrane Ca channels, and after blockade of the mitochondrial, sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase and the plasma membrane Ca ATPase pathways. Ca released by the sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase blocker thapsigargin and by the Ca-ionophore ionomycin was also diminished by 25% and 41%, respectively. In contrast to control neurons, Ca stores in axotomized neurons were not expanded by neuronal activation by K depolarization, and the proportionate rate of refilling by sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase was normal. Luminal Ca concentration was also reduced by 38% in axotomized neurons in permeabilized neurons. The adjacent neurons of the L4 dorsal root ganglia showed modest and inconsistent changes after L5 spinal nerve ligation. Painful nerve injury leads to diminished releasable endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores and a reduced luminal Ca concentration. Depletion of Ca stores may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  18. Vector-free intracellular delivery by reversible permeabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley O'Dea

    Full Text Available Despite advances in intracellular delivery technologies, efficient methods are still required that are vector-free, can address a wide range of cargo types and can be applied to cells that are difficult to transfect whilst maintaining cell viability. We have developed a novel vector-free method that uses reversible permeabilization to achieve rapid intracellular delivery of cargos with varying composition, properties and size. A permeabilizing delivery solution was developed that contains a low level of ethanol as the permeabilizing agent. Reversal of cell permeabilization is achieved by temporally and volumetrically controlling the contact of the target cells with this solution. Cells are seeded in conventional multi-well plates. Following removal of the supernatant, the cargo is mixed with the delivery solution and applied directly to the cells using an atomizer. After a short incubation period, permeabilization is halted by incubating the cells in a phosphate buffer saline solution that dilutes the ethanol and is non-toxic to the permeabilized cells. Normal culture medium is then added. The procedure lasts less than 5 min. With this method, proteins, mRNA, plasmid DNA and other molecules have been delivered to a variety of cell types, including primary cells, with low toxicity and cargo functionality has been confirmed in proof-of-principle studies. Co-delivery of different cargo types has also been demonstrated. Importantly, delivery occurs by diffusion directly into the cytoplasm in an endocytic-independent manner. Unlike some other vector-free methods, adherent cells are addressed in situ without the need for detachment from their substratum. The method has also been adapted to address suspension cells. This delivery method is gentle yet highly reproducible, compatible with high throughput and automated cell-based assays and has the potential to enable a broad range of research, drug discovery and clinical applications.

  19. Intracellular Ascorbate Prevents Endothelial Barrier Permeabilization by Thrombin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William H.; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular ascorbate (vitamin C) has previously been shown to tighten the endothelial barrier and maintain barrier integrity during acute inflammation in vitro. However, the downstream effectors of ascorbate in the regulation of endothelial permeability remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated ascorbate as a mediator of thrombin-induced barrier permeabilization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their immortalized hybridoma line, EA.hy926. We found that the vitamin fully prevented increased permeability to the polysaccharide inulin by thrombin in a dose-dependent manner, and it took effect both before and after subjection to thrombin. Thrombin exposure consumed intracellular ascorbate but not the endogenous antioxidant GSH. Likewise, the antioxidants dithiothreitol and tempol did not reverse permeabilization. We identified a novel role for ascorbate in preserving cAMP during thrombin stimulation, resulting in two downstream effects. First, ascorbate maintained the cortical actin cytoskeleton in a Rap1- and Rac1-dependent manner, thus preserving stable adherens junctions between adjacent cells. Second, ascorbate prevented actin polymerization and formation of stress fibers by reducing the activation of RhoA and phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Although ascorbate and thrombin both required calcium for their respective effects, ascorbate did not prevent thrombin permeabilization by obstructing calcium influx. However, preservation of cAMP by ascorbate was found to depend on both the production of nitric oxide by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, which ascorbate is known to activate, and the subsequent generation cGMP by guanylate cyclase. Together, these data implicate ascorbate in the prevention of inflammatory endothelial barrier permeabilization and explain the underlying signaling mechanism. PMID:26152729

  20. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  1. Force fluctuations and polymerization dynamics of intracellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangwynne, Clifford

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are dynamic biopolymers within the cytoskeleton of living cells. They play a central role in many biological processes including cell division, migration, and cargo transport. Microtubules are significantly more rigid than other cytoskeletal biopolymers, such as actin filaments, and are insensitive to thermal fluctuations on cellular length scales. However, we show that intracellular microtubules exhibit bending amplitudes with a surprisingly thermal-like wavevector dependence, but with an apparent persistence length about 100 times smaller than that measured in vitro. By studying the time-dependent bending fluctuations of individual filaments, we find that the thermal-like bends are fluctuating significantly only on short length scales, while they are frozen-in on longer length scales [1], reminiscent of non-ergodic behavior seen in systems far from equilibrium. Long wavelength bends are suppressed by the surrounding elastic cytoskeleton, which confines bending to short length scales on the order of a few microns [2]. These short wavelength bending fluctuations naturally cause fluctuations in the orientation of the microtubule tip. Tip fluctuations result in a persistent random walk trajectory of microtubule growth, but with a small non-equilibrium persistence length, explaining the origin of quenched thermal-like bends. These results suggest that intracellular motor activity has a highly fluctuating character that dominates over thermal fluctuations, with important consequences for fundamental biological processes. [1] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, DA Weitz, PNAS, 104:16128 (2007). [2] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, S Kumar, NA Geisse, J Talbot, L. Mahadevan, KK Parker, DE Ingber, DA Weitz, JCB, 173:733 (2006).

  2. Calculation of Intracellular Pressure of Red Blood Cells at Jaundice According to Atomic Force Microscopy Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yu.S. Nagornov; I.V. Zhilyaev

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the analysis of three-dimensional data of atomic force microscopy for research of the morphology of red blood cells. In this paper we built a biomechanical model of the erythrocyte, which allowed calculating the intracellular pressure of erythrocyte based on data of atomic force microscopy. As a result, we obtained the dependence intracellular pressure on the morphology of red blood cell. We have proposed a method of estimating of intracellular pressure of eryth...

  3. Role of intracellular contents to facilitate supercooling capability in beech (Fagus crenata) xylem parenchyma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Miyaji, Natsuko; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2006-01-01

    In order to find the possible role of intracellular contents in facilitating the supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells, changes in the temperature of supercooling levels were compared before and after the release of intracellular substances from beech xylem parenchyma cells by DTA. Various methods were employed to release intracellular substances from xylem parenchyma cells and all resulted in a reduction of supercooling ability. It was concluded that the reduction of supercooling...

  4. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise: GLYCOLYTIC RATE IN MOUSE ASTROCYTES IS PAVED BY INTRACELLULAR ALKALINIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-09-02

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H(+)], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H(+)] or [HCO3 (-)]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H(+)] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3 (-)], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H(+)] and [CO2]/[HCO3 (-)]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H(+)], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Transport of HCO3 (-) into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3 (-)], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Bronchial reactivity and intracellular magnesium: a possible mechanism for the bronchodilating effects of magnesium in asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dominguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Di Lorenzo, G; Drago, A; Scola, S; Morici, G; Caruso, C

    1998-01-01

    .... In the present study we investigated the relationship between bronchial reactivity, assessed by methacholine-provocation test, and magnesium concentrations both at extracellular and intracellular...

  6. An improved sampling protocol for analysis of intracellular metabolites in Mortierella alpina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hongman; Ji, Xiaojun; Zheng, Hongbo; Zhang, Xin; Fu, Ninghua; Huang, He

    2012-12-01

    Sampling of intracellular metabolites in Mortierella alpina was investigated as part of a metabolomics study. After comparison of four sampling protocols, rapid filtration of the culture using a laboratory-made nylon filter and absorbent gauze under normal pressure followed by quenching in liquid N(2) and grinding (the improved protocol) was the most effective. Rapid filtration under normal pressure decreased intracellular metabolites leakage and subsequent grinding of cells contributed to intracellular metabolites extraction. The above quenching method together with 75 % (v/v) ethanol, buffered with 60 mM HEPES, at 80 °C for 3 min is therefore suitable for sampling intracellular metabolites in M. alpina.

  7. Comparative Salt Stress Study on Intracellular Ion Concentration in Marine and Salt-adapted Freshwater Strains of Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farhad TALEBI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity imposes significant stresses in various living organisms including microalgae. High extracellular concentration of Na+ directly influences ionic balance inside the cell and subsequently the cellular activities. In the present study, the effect of such stress on growth and intracellular ions concentration (IIC of Dunaliella salina and Chlorella Spp. was investigated. IIC was analyzed using Ion chromatography technique. D. salina showed the highest degree of resistance to increase in salinity as little changes occurred both in IIC and in growth parameters. D. salina could maintain the balance of K+ inside the cell and eject the excess Na+ even at NaCl concentrations above 1M. Moreover, D. salina accumulated β-carotene in order to protect its photosynthetic apparatus. Among Chlorella species, C. vulgaris showed signs of adaptation to high content of salinity, though it is a fresh water species by nature. Moreover, the response shown by C. vulgaris to rise in salinity was even stronger than that of C. salina, which is presumably a salt-water resistant species. In fact, C. vulgaris could maintain intracellular K+ better than C. salina in response to increasing salinity, and as a result, it could survive at NaCl concentrations as high as 0.75 M. Marine strains such as D. salina well cope with the fluctuations in salinity through the existing adaptation mechanisms i.e. maintaining the K+/N+ balance inside the cell, K+ accumulation and Na+ ejection, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments like β-carotene.

  8. A red-emitting ratiometric fluorescent probe based on a benzophosphole P-oxide scaffold for the detection of intracellular sodium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Masayasu; Ogasawara, Hiroaki; Osaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Aiko; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Ogasawara, Kimi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2015-07-28

    We disclose the development of a ratiometric fluorescent probe based on a benzophosphole P-oxide and its application for the detection of intracellular Na(+) ions. Excitation by visible light induced red emission from this probe in water, which was subjected to a hypsochromic shift upon complexation with Na(+). Based on this change, a ratiometric analysis enabled us to visualise changes in the Na(+) concentration in living mammalian cells.

  9. Intracellular trafficking of silicon particles and logic-embedded vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Mack, Aaron; Chiappini, Ciro; Liu, Xuewu; Bean, Andrew J.; Ferrari, Mauro; Serda, Rita E.

    2010-08-01

    Mesoporous silicon particles show great promise for use in drug delivery and imaging applications as carriers for second-stage nanoparticles and higher order particles or therapeutics. Modulation of particle geometry, surface chemistry, and porosity allows silicon particles to be optimized for specific applications such as vascular targeting and avoidance of biological barriers commonly found between the site of drug injection and the final destination. In this study, the intracellular trafficking of unloaded carrier silicon particles and carrier particles loaded with secondary iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Following cellular uptake, membrane-encapsulated silicon particles migrated to the perinuclear region of the cell by a microtubule-driven mechanism. Surface charge, shape (spherical and hemispherical) and size (1.6 and 3.2 μm) of the particle did not alter the rate of migration. Maturation of the phagosome was associated with an increase in acidity and acquisition of markers of late endosomes and lysosomes. Cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticle-loaded silicon particles resulted in sorting of the particles and trafficking to unique destinations. The silicon carriers remained localized in phagosomes, while the second stage iron oxide nanoparticles were sorted into multi-vesicular bodies that dissociated from the phagosome into novel membrane-bound compartments. Release of iron from the cells may represent exocytosis of iron oxide nanoparticle-loaded vesicles. These results reinforce the concept of multi-functional nanocarriers, in which different particles are able to perform specific tasks, in order to deliver single- or multi-component payloads to specific sub-cellular compartments.Mesoporous silicon particles show great promise for use in drug delivery and imaging applications as carriers for second-stage nanoparticles and higher order particles or therapeutics. Modulation of particle geometry, surface chemistry, and porosity allows silicon

  10. [Role of defective intracellular proteolysis in human degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezelof, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Although intracellular protein synthesis has been studied extensively, protein degradation and disposal, know as proteolysis, has been relatively neglected. Modern studies which led two Nobel prizes (de Duve in 1950 and Herschko, Rose and Ciechanover in 1980) established that proteolysis is ensured by two separate but complementary mechanisms: lysosomes responsible for auto and heterophagy and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The UPS involves ubiquitin, a small molecule consisting of 76 amino acids found in all eukaryotic cells that ensures the identification of the protein to be degraded and its transport to the proteasome, an intracellular complex with enzymes which degrade unneeded or damaged proteins. The proteasome, acting as a composting agent, ensures the enzymatic dissociation of the protein. In this degradation process, as infinite screw, ubiquitin, peptides and amino acids are released and made available for a new cycle. Knowledge of the UPS and its related disorders is continually expanding. Concurrent with lysosomes which work in acidic environment, it is currently known that the UPS provides 80% to 90% of the proteolysis of the short-life proteins and ensures, as chaperon-molecules, the right conformation and hence the correct function of the proteins. The proteolytic activity generates abnormal residues (tau protein, amyloid and related proteins) and various soluble and insoluble wastes. Some are precipitated as inclusion-bodies or aggregosomes, identified years ago by pathologists. These aggregosomes affect almost exclusively long-lived cells (nervous and muscular, macophages). Pigment deposits, such as lipofuscines made by the peroxydation of cell membranes, are the most abundant. Due to their diverse chemical composition, they cannot be empoyed for a scientific classification. Failures of these systems are numerous. They vary not according to the chemical nature of the abnormal protein and wastes but the life span of the targeted cells and

  11. A FRET chemsensor based on graphene quantum dots for detecting and intracellular imaging of Hg²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoping; Liu, Tao; Li, Yang; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Baozhan; Wang, Dongmei; Du, Juan; Xiao, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The detection of Hg(2+) has attracted considerable attention because of the serious health and environmental problems caused by it. Herein, a novel ratiometric fluorescent chemsensor (GQDs-SR) based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process for detecting of Hg(2+) was designed and synthesized with rhodamine derivative covalently linked onto graphene quantum dots. In this sensor, the graphene quantum dots (GQDs) served as energy donor and the rhodamine derivative turned into an energy acceptor when encountered Hg(2+). The chemsensor exhibited high selectivity, low cytotoxicity, biocompatibility and good water solubility. The results of intracellular imaging experiment demonstrated that GQDs-SR was cell permeable and could be used for monitoring Hg(2+) in living cells, and it was also successfully applied to the detection of Hg(2+) in practical water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular modelling studies of clay-exopolysaccharide complexes: Soil aggregation and water retention phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henao, Lina J. [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS), BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Mazeau, Karim, E-mail: karim.mazeau@cermav.cnrs.fr [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS), BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2009-10-15

    In soils, the bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) aggregate mineral particles, enhancing their cohesion and their ability to retain water. These phenomena have been studied at the atomic scale by molecular modelling; we have considered seven rhizospheric polysaccharides interacting with the basal surfaces of montmorillonite. Models accounted for the aggregation phenomena induced by EPS: some segments of the polysaccharide were adsorbed on the mineral surfaces while others formed loops and bridges linking two surfaces. Adsorption energies were favourable and depended mostly on the interacting area. Cohesion of aggregates was estimated by the adhesion work, predicted values differed from one EPS to the other, suggesting that the chemical structure influences interaction strength with the mineral surface. Mechanisms of water uptake and release have also been investigated: hydration energies revealed that EPS strongly retain water at low water concentrations.

  13. Ordered water structure at hydrophobic graphite interfaces observed by 4D, ultrafast electron crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial water has unique properties in various functions. Here, using 4-dimensional (4D), ultrafast electron crystallography with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution, we report study of structure and dynamics of interfacial water assembly on a hydrophobic surface. Structurally, vertically stacked bilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface were determined to be ordered, contrary to the expectation that the strong hydrogen bonding of water on hydrophobic surfaces would dominate with suppressed interfacial order. Because of its terrace morphology, graphite plays the role of a template. The dynamics is also surprising. After the excitation of graphite by an ultrafast infrared pulse, the interfacial ice structure undergoes nonequilibrium “phase transformation” identified in the hydrogen-bond network through the observation of structural isosbestic point. We provide the time scales involved, the nature of ice-graphite structural dynamics, and relevance to properties related to confined water. PMID:19246378

  14. Occurrence of intracellular and extracellular antibiotic resistance genes in coastal areas of Bohai Bay (China) and the factors affecting them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongpeng; Niu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Kai

    2018-01-29

    Coastal areas are the transition zones between ocean and land where intracellular antibiotic resistance genes (iARGs) and extracellular antibiotic resistance genes (eARGs) could spread among marine organisms, and between humans and marine organisms. However, little attention has been paid to the combined research on iARGs and eARGs in marine environment. In this context, we collected water and sediment samples from the coastal areas of the Bohai Bay in China and performed molecular and chemical analyses. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed that the relative abundance of eARGs was up to 4.3 ± 1.3 × 10 -1 gene copies/16S rRNA copies in the water samples and 2.6 ± 0.3 × 10 -3 gene copies/16S rRNA copies in the sediment samples. Also, the abundance of eARGs was significantly higher than that of iARGs. Furthermore, the average abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs, include iARGs and eARGs) were the highest in both the water and sediment samples from the estuaries. The results of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that the concentrations of antibiotics in estuaries and areas near the mariculture site were higher than that in the other sites. The class 1 integron gene (int1) and sul1 in the intracellular DNA were significantly correlated in the water samples. Moreover, significant correlation between int1 and sul2 in the extracellular DNA was also found in the sediment samples. The combination of sulfamerazine and tetracycline as well as the combination of sulfamethazine and dissolved oxygen can both explain the abundance of ARGs, implying the combined effects of multiple stresses on ARGs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyarginine nanocapsules: a new platform for intracellular drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, M. V.; Lollo, G. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Spain); Alonso-Nocelo, M. [Complexo Hospitalario, Universitario de Santiago de Compostela/SERGAS, Translational Laboratory, Medical Oncology Department (Spain); Brea, J. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Spain); Vidal, A. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Physiology (Spain); Torres, D.; Alonso, M. J., E-mail: mariaj.alonso@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    This report describes the development of a new nanocarrier, named as polyarginine (PArg) nanocapsules, specifically designed for overcoming cellular barriers. These nanocapsules are composed of an oily core and a PArg corona. The attachment of the PArg corona was mediated by its interaction with the oily core, which was conveniently stabilized with phosphatidylcholine. Hybrid PArg/PEG nanocapsules could also be obtained by introducing PEG-stearate in the nanocapsules formation process. The nanocapsules had an average size in the range of 120-160 nm, and a positive surface charge, which varied between +56 and +28 mV for PArg and PArg/PEG nanocapsules, respectively. They could accommodate significant amounts of lipophilic drugs, i.e., docetaxel, in their core, and also polar negatively charged molecules, i.e., plasmid DNA, on their coating. As a preliminary proof-of-principle, we explored the ability of these nanocarriers to enter cancer cells and to inhibit proliferation in the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cell line, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analysis. The results indicated that PArg nanocapsules are rapidly and massively accumulated into the NCI-H460 cells and that the PArg shell plays a critical role in the internalization process. Moreover, the incubation with docetaxel-loaded nanocapsules with NCI-H460 cells led to an enhanced inhibition of their proliferation, as compared to the free drug. Overall, this is the first report of the potential of PArg nanocapsules as intracellular drug delivery vehicles.

  16. Insight into nanoparticle cellular uptake and intracellular targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yameen, Basit; Choi, Won Il; Vilos, Cristian; Swami, Archana; Shi, Jinjun; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative efforts from the fields of biology, materials science, and engineering are leading to exciting progress in the development of nanomedicines. Since the targets of many therapeutic agents are localized in subcellular compartments, modulation of nanoparticle-cell interactions for an efficient cellular uptake through the plasma membrane, and the development of nanomedicines for precise delivery to subcellular compartments remain formidable challenges. The cellular internalization routes have a determining effect on the post-internalization fate and intracellular localization of nanoparticles. This review highlights the cellular uptake routes most relevant to the field of non-targeted nanomedicine, and presents an account of ligand targeted nanoparticles for receptor mediated cellular internalization as a strategy for modulating the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Ligand targeted nanoparticles have been the main impetus behind the progress of nanomedicines towards the clinic. This strategy has even resulted in a remarkable development towards effective oral delivery of nanomedicines that can overcome the intestinal epithelial cellular barrier. A detailed overview of the recent developments towards subcellular targeting that is emerging as a platform for the next generation organelle specific nanomedicines is also provided. Each section of the review includes prospect, potential, and concrete expectations from the field of targeted nanomedicines and strategies to meet those expectations. PMID:24984011

  17. Intracellular Oceanospirillales bacteria inhabit gills of Acesta bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Duperron, Sébastien; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin

    2010-12-01

    A novel bacterium was discovered in the gills of the large bivalve Acesta excavata (Limidae) from coral reefs on the northeast Atlantic margin near the shelf break of the fishing ground Haltenbanken of Norway, and confirmed present in A. excavata from a rock-wall in the Trondheimsfjord. Purified gill DNA contained one dominant bacterial rRNA operon as indicated from analysis of broad range bacterial PCR amplicons in denaturant gradient gels, in clone libraries and by direct sequencing. The sequences originated from an unknown member of the order Oceanospirillales and its 16S rRNA gene fell within a clade of strictly marine invertebrate-associated Gammaproteobacteria. Visual inspection by fluorescent in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy indicated a pleomorphic bacterium with no visible cell wall, located in aggregates inside vacuoles scattered within the gill cells cytoplasm. Intracellular Oceanospirillales exist in bathymodiolin mussels (parasites), Osedax worms and whiteflies (symbionts). This bacterium apparently lives in a specific association with the Acesta. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal structures of the TRIC trimeric intracellular cation channel orthologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Go; Hiraizumi, Masahiro; Maturana, Andrés D; Kumazaki, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Liu, Keihong; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Iwata, So; Tsukada, Keisuke; Komori, Tomotaka; Uemura, Sotaro; Goto, Yuhei; Nakane, Takanori; Takemoto, Mizuki; Kato, Hideaki E; Yamashita, Keitaro; Wada, Miki; Ito, Koichi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for muscle contraction, cell growth, apoptosis, learning and memory. The trimeric intracellular cation (TRIC) channels were recently identified as cation channels balancing the SR and ER membrane potentials, and are implicated in Ca 2+ signaling and homeostasis. Here we present the crystal structures of prokaryotic TRIC channels in the closed state and structure-based functional analyses of prokaryotic and eukaryotic TRIC channels. Each trimer subunit consists of seven transmembrane (TM) helices with two inverted repeated regions. The electrophysiological, biochemical and biophysical analyses revealed that TRIC channels possess an ion-conducting pore within each subunit, and that the trimer formation contributes to the stability of the protein. The symmetrically related TM2 and TM5 helices are kinked at the conserved glycine clusters, and these kinks are important for the channel activity. Furthermore, the kinks of the TM2 and TM5 helices generate lateral fenestrations at each subunit interface. Unexpectedly, these lateral fenestrations are occupied with lipid molecules. This study provides the structural and functional framework for the molecular mechanism of this ion channel superfamily.

  19. Intracellular Adenosine Triphosphate Deprivation through Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Zeng, Xiao; Xie, Xiaoji; Han, Sanyang; Liew, Oi-Wah; Chen, Yei-Tsung; Wang, Lianhui; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-05-27

    Growing interest in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles for biological and medical uses has brought particular attention to their safety concerns. However, the intrinsic toxicity of this new class of optical nanomaterials in biological systems has not been fully evaluated. In this work, we systematically evaluate the long-term cytotoxicity of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles (NaGdF4 and NaYF4) to HeLa cells by monitoring cell viability (mitochondrial activity), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level, and cell membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase release), respectively. Importantly, we find that ligand-free lanthanide-doped nanoparticles induce intracellular ATP deprivation of HeLa cells, resulting in a significant decrease in cell viability after exposure for 7 days. We attribute the particle-induced cell death to two distinct cell death pathways, autophagy and apoptosis, which are primarily mediated via the interaction between the nanoparticle and the phosphate group of cellular ATP. The understanding gained from the investigation of cytotoxicity associated with lanthanide-doped nanoparticles provides keen insights into the safe use of these nanoparticles in biological systems.

  20. Intracellular distribution of Tankyrases as detected by multicolor immunofluorescence techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Bottone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of NAD+ into ADP-ribose. Among them, Tankyrases have been found to bind to centrosome, mitotic spindle and microsome proteins, in the cytoplasm, and to telomeres in the nucleus, where they play a relevant role in telomere metabolism. However, their precise intracellular localization during interphase has not been so far fully elucidated. We investigated this aspect in situ by double immunofluorescence experiments using antibodies recognizing Tankyrases 1-2 or other proteins residing in specific organelles (Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum. We used HeLa cells as a model system in vitro, before and after treatment with either actinomycin D or etoposide, to also investigate the possible relocation of Tankyrases during apoptosis. We observed that Tankyrases are distributed both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm; in this latter compartment, they were found to colocate with the Golgi apparatus but never with the mitochondria; a pool of Tankyrases also colocates with the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. Interestingly, in cells with clear signs of apoptosis, Tankyrases were detectable in the cytoplasmic blebs: this suggests that they are not massively cleaved during apoptosis and persist in the largely heterogeneous apoptotic remnants which are known to contain components of cytoplasmic and nuclear origin.

  1. Analysis of Intracellular Transport by Teams of Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Talukdar, Saurav; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    Intracellular transport of cargoes, such as organelles, are enabled by nano-scale bio-mechanical agents called 'motor proteins', which attach to the cargo and transport it to their destination by 'walking' over filaments. The motors carry cargoes against load forces that are less than their characteristic 'stalling force'. Often transport is mediated by teams of motors, possibly of the same or different types. We develop a semi-analytical method to analyze the emergent transport properties of motor ensembles, by investigating the relative arrangements of motors while carrying a cargo. Study reveals that the relative configurations approach a unique steady state distribution, enforcing the robustness of the motor-cargo assembly. As the load on the cargo increases, motors tend to cluster together. Under high loads, akin to sudden obstacles, motors assume configurations that favor immediate cargo translocation when the load eventually subsides. Furthermore, participation by motors with varying stall forces reveals surprising results. Results indicate that a minority of motors with altered stall forces can determine average run-length and velocity of the cargo. Such mutations are related to neurological disorders, providing a potential insight into the onset of neuro-degeneration.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor: The novel intracellular target of neuropsychotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptor ligands have been long expected to serve as drugs for treatment of human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, depression, idiopathic pain, drug abuse, and cancer. Recent research exploring the molecular function of the sigma-1 receptor started unveiling underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of those ligands. Via the molecular chaperone activity, the sigma-1 receptor regulates protein folding/degradation, ER/oxidative stress, and cell survival. The chaperone activity is activated or inhibited by synthetic sigma-1 receptor ligands in an agonist-antagonist manner. Sigma-1 receptors are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes that are physically associated with the mitochondria (MAM: mitochondria-associated ER membrane. In specific types of neurons (e.g., those at the spinal cord, sigma-1 receptors are also clustered at ER membranes that juxtapose postsynaptic plasma membranes. Recent studies indicate that sigma-1 receptors, partly in sake of its unique subcellular localization, regulate the mitochondria function that involves bioenergetics and free radical generation. The sigma-1 receptor may thus provide an intracellular drug target that enables controlling ER stress and free radical generation under pathological conditions.

  3. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of pH......(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV......3, B16V, NIH3T3, MDCK-F1, EA.hy926) along the axis of movement. Differences in pH(i) between the front and the rear end (¿pH(i) front-rear) were present in all cell lines, and inhibition of NHE1 either with HOE642 or by absence of extracellular Na(+) caused the pH(i) gradient to flatten or disappear...

  4. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    Precise measurements of pH in cells and intracellular compartments are of importance to both the fundamental understanding of metabolism and to the development of drugs that are released from the endosomes-lysome pathway. We have developed polymer gel nanoparticles as carriers of covalently bound...... fluorophores for ratiometric measurements of pH. One pH insensitive fluorophore serves as a reference while one or more pH sensitive fluorophores serve to give the desired pH dependence of the output. With one pH sensitive fluorophore a dynamic range of ~2 pH units is achieved. The physiologically interesting...... pH range is approximately 4 pH units and thus a nanoparticle sensor with two pH sensitive fluorophores is appropriate. With one pH sensitive fluorophore the output from the sensor follows R=R0+R1/10(pKa-pH), where R is the ratio of fluorescence for the two fluorophores, R0 is the minimum value of R...

  5. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  6. Immunity to Intracellular Salmonella Depends on Surface-associated Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudi, Beatrice; Mazé, Alain; Schemmer, Anne K.; Kirchhoff, Dennis; Schmidt, Alexander; Burton, Neil; Bumann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23093937

  7. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Yde, Pernille; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2009-06-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent α that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent α was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences in the subdiffusive exponents from granules measured in different stages of cell division. Also, our results for the exponent displayed no significant dependence on the position of the granule within the cell. The observation that the cytoplasm is more elastic during interphase than during mitotic cell division is consistent with the fact that elastic cytoskeletal elements such as microtubules are less abundantly present during cell division than during interphase.

  8. MC1R signaling. Intracellular partners and pathophysiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; Olivares, Conchi

    2017-10-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) preferentially expressed in melanocytes is best known as a key regulator of the synthesis of epidermal melanin pigments. Its paracrine stimulation by keratinocyte-derived melanocortins also activates DNA repair pathways and antioxidant defenses to build a complex, multifaceted photoprotective response. Many MC1R actions rely on cAMP-dependent activation of two transcription factors, MITF and PGC1α, but pleiotropic MC1R signaling also involves activation of mitogen-activated kinases and AKT. MC1R partners such as β-arrestins, PTEN and the E3 ubiquitin ligase MGRN1 differentially regulate these pathways. The MC1R gene is complex and polymorphic, with frequent variants associated with skin phenotypes and increased cancer risk. We review current knowledge of signaling from canonical MC1R, its splice isoforms and natural polymorphic variants. Recently discovered intracellular targets and partners are also discussed, to highlight the diversity of mechanisms that may contribute to normal and pathological variation of pigmentation and sensitivity to solar radiation-induced damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Melanocortin Receptors - edited by Ya-Xiong Tao. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. How complex are intracellular immune receptor signaling complexes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eBonardi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs are the major class of intracellular immune receptors in plants. NLRs typically function to specifically recognize pathogen effectors and to initiate and control defense responses that severely limit pathogen growth in plants (termed effector triggered immunity, or ETI. Despite numerous reports supporting a central role in innate immunity, the molecular mechanisms driving NLR activation and downstream signaling remain largely elusive. Recent reports shed light on the pre- and post-activation dynamics of a few NLR-containing protein complexes. Recent technological advances in the use of proteomics may enable high-resolution definition of immune protein complexes and possible activation-relevant post-translational modifications of the components in these complexes. In this mini-review, we focus on research aimed at characterizing pre- and post-activation NLR protein complexes and the molecular events that follow activation. We discuss the use of new or improved technologies as tools to unveil the molecular mechanisms that define NLR-mediated pathogen recognition.

  10. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Voigt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. RESULTS: A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  11. The Chlamydia psittaci Genome: A Comparative Analysis of Intracellular Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluz, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. Results A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. Conclusions This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions. PMID:22506068

  12. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  13. Measuring intracellular ion concentrations with multi-barrelled microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony J; Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Ion-selective microelectrodes can be used to measure intracellular ion concentrations. The use of multi-barrelled electrodes enables the identification of the cellular compartment. For example, the inclusion of a pH-selective electrode enables the cytoplasm and vacuole to be distinguished. The ion-selective barrels of microelectrodes are filled with a sensor cocktail containing several different components. An ion-selective molecule, sensor or exchanger. Membrane solvent or plasticizer. Additives, e.g., lipophilic cation/anion. Membrane matrix to solidify the ion-selective membrane; essential for measurements in plant cells with a cell wall and turgor. For many ions, the ready-made membrane cocktail can be purchased, but the individual chemical components can be bought from suppliers and mixing the cocktail oneself is cheaper. For commercially available liquid membrane cocktails, the membrane matrix is not normally included. A matrix is needed if the microelectrodes are to be used in plants because cell turgor will displace a liquid membrane from the electrode tip, thereby changing or eliminating the sensitivity to the measuring ion. The matrix used is usually a high molecular weight poly(vinyl chloride), but can include other polymers, such as nitrocellulose for additional strength.

  14. Cell density modulates intracellular mass transport in neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintora, Patricia; Arikkath, Jyothi; Kandel, Mikhail; Popescu, Gabriel; Best-Popescu, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    In order to fully understand brain connectivity and elucidate the mechanisms involved in central nervous system disease, the field of neuroscience depends on quantitative studies of neuronal structure and function. Cell morphology and neurite (axonal and dendritic) arborization are typically studied by immunohistochemical and fluorescence techniques. However, dry mass content and intracellular mass transport rates have largely been under-investigated given the inherent difficulties in their measurement. Here, spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) and dispersion-relation phase spectroscopy (DPS) were used to measure pathlength fluctuations that report on the dry mass and transport within cultured primary neurons across low, medium, and high cell density conditions. It was found that cell density (confluence) affects significantly both the growth rate and mass transport. The analysis method is label-free and does not require neuronal tracing, particle tracking, or neuron reconstruction. Since SLIM can upgrade any existing phase contrast microscope and the imaging and analysis are high-throughput, we anticipate that this approach will be embraced by neuroscientists for broad scale studies. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Intracellular modulation of NMDA receptor function by antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, J C; Macías, W; Rajadhyaksha, A; Carlson, R R; Barczak, A; Kang, S; Li, X M; Coyle, J T; Huganir, R L; Heckers, S; Konradi, C

    2000-06-01

    The present study deals with the functional interaction of antipsychotic drugs and NMDA receptors. We show that both the conventional antipsychotic drug haloperidol and the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine mediate gene expression via intracellular regulation of NMDA receptors, albeit to different extents. Data obtained in primary striatal culture demonstrate that the intraneuronal signal transduction pathway activated by haloperidol, the cAMP pathway, leads to phosphorylation of the NR1 subtype of the NMDA receptor at (897)Ser. Haloperidol treatment is likewise shown to increase (897)Ser-NR1 phosphorylation in rats in vivo. Mutation of (896)Ser and (897)Ser to alanine, which prevents phosphorylation at both sites, inhibits cAMP-mediated gene expression. We conclude that antipsychotic drugs have the ability to modulate NMDA receptor function by an intraneuronal signal transduction mechanism. This facilitation of NMDA activity is necessary for antipsychotic drug-mediated gene expression and may contribute to the therapeutic benefits as well as side effects of antipsychotic drug treatment.

  16. The mechanical environment modulates intracellular calcium oscillation activities of myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Godbout

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair.

  17. Intracellular analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using CLSM after ultrasonic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Takuo; Nakakura, Shinya; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2005-06-01

    The effect of ultrasonic treatments (28, 45, and 100 kHz) as sterilization on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated both by colony-forming ability and by a confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), using a fluorescence staining approach with MDY-64 for endoplasmic reticula and Rhodamine B for mitochondria. The ultrasonic treatments, especially at the lower frequency of 28 kHz, were effective for sterilizing S cerevisiae, thus inducing the remarkable decrease in colony counts of S cerevisiae on YPD plate medium, but with some inactive (dead) cells. The CLSM images of fluorescence-stained organelles in the cell showed the intracellular fracture and the increase in fluorescent intensities of MDY-64 for endoplasmic reticula and Rhodamine B for mitochondria without cell membrane collapse by the ultrasonic treatments, especially at 28 kHz. The effect of the conditions (frequency, power, medium, and so on) of the ultrasonic treatments on cell components such as biological membranes would be different, thus inducing the effective and selective sterilization of some types of microorganisms.

  18. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  19. Real-Time monitoring of intracellular wax ester metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Matti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wax esters are industrially relevant molecules exploited in several applications of oleochemistry and food industry. At the moment, the production processes mostly rely on chemical synthesis from rather expensive starting materials, and therefore solutions are sought from biotechnology. Bacterial wax esters are attractive alternatives, and especially the wax ester metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. has been extensively studied. However, the lack of suitable tools for rapid and simple monitoring of wax ester metabolism in vivo has partly restricted the screening and analyses of potential hosts and optimal conditions. Results Based on sensitive and specific detection of intracellular long-chain aldehydes, specific intermediates of wax ester synthesis, bacterial luciferase (LuxAB was exploited in studying the wax ester metabolism in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Luminescence was detected in the cultivation of the strain producing wax esters, and the changes in signal levels could be linked to corresponding cell growth and wax ester synthesis phases. Conclusions The monitoring system showed correlation between wax ester synthesis pattern and luminescent signal. The system shows potential for real-time screening purposes and studies on bacterial wax esters, revealing new aspects to dynamics and role of wax ester metabolism in bacteria.

  20. Repurposing bacterial toxins for intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Melnyk, Roman A

    2017-10-15

    Despite enormous efforts, achieving efficacious levels of proteins inside mammalian cells remains one of the greatest challenges in biologics-based drug discovery and development. The inability of proteins to readily cross biological membranes precludes access to the wealth of intracellular targets and applications that lie within mammalian cells. Existing methods of delivery commonly suffer from an inability to target specific cells and tissues, poor endosomal escape, and limited in vivo efficacy. The aim of the present commentary is to highlight the potential of certain classes of bacterial toxins, which naturally deliver a large protein into the cytosolic compartment of target cells after binding a host cell-surface receptor with high affinity, as robust protein delivery platforms. We review the progress made in recent years toward demonstrating the utility of these systems at delivering a wide variety of protein cargo, with special attention paid to three distinct toxin-based platforms. We contend that with recent advances in protein deimmunization strategies, bacterial toxins are poised to introduce biologics into the inner sanctum of cells and treat a wealth of heretofore untreatable diseases with a new generation of therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thioredoxin 80-Activated-Monocytes (TAMs) Inhibit the Replication of Intracellular Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes-Bratti, Ximena; Brasseres, Eugenie; Herrera-Rodriquez, Fabiola

    2011-01-01

    for a role of TAMs in the control of intracellular bacterial infections. As model pathogens we have chosen Listeria monocytogenes and Brucella abortus which replicate in the cytosol and the endoplasmic reticulum respectively. Our data indicate that TAMs efficiently inhibit intracellular growth of both L...

  2. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  3. Microscopy tools for the investigation of intracellular lipid storage and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Daemen

    2016-03-01

    Major conclusions: The continuous development of lipid probes in combination with the rapid development of microscopic techniques can provide new insights in the role and dynamics of intracellular lipids. Moreover, in situ identification of intracellular lipids is now possible and promises to add a new dimensionality to analysis of lipid biochemistry, and its relation to (pathophysiology.

  4. A Thapsigargin-Resistant Intracellular Calcium Sequestering Compartment in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-31

    Inesi, G., Characterization of the inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ transport ATPases by thapsigargin, J Bioi Chern, 267 (1992) 12606-13. 116 Salvador ...J.M. and Mata , A.M., Characterization of the intracellular and the plasma membrane Ca2+- ATPases in fractionated pig brain membranes using calcium

  5. Effect of mycophenolate mofetil on the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs and on intracellular nucleoside triphosphate pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankatsing, Sanjay U. C.; Hoggard, Patrick G.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Sparidans, Rolf W.; Kewn, Stephen; Crommentuyn, Kristel M. L.; Lange, Joep M. A.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Back, David J.; Prins, Jan M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of mycophenolate mofetil therapy on the pharmacokinetic parameters of a number of antiretroviral drugs, on intracellular pools of deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) and deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP), and on intracellular concentrations of the triphosphate of

  6. Photoactivatable Drug-Caged Fluorophore Conjugate Allows Direct Quantification of Intracellular Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Rainer H.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We report here a method that utilizes photoactivatable drug-caged fluorophore conjugate to quantify intracellular drug trafficking processes at single cell resolution. Photoactivation is performed in labeled cellular compartments to visualize intracellular drug exchange at physiologic conditions, without the need for washing, facilitating its translation to in vivo cancer models. PMID:24135896

  7. DMPD: Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16785490 Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. La...gnaling: a structural perspective on human disease. PubmedID 16785490 Title Intracellular TLR signaling: a s...tructural perspective on human disease. Authors Lasker MV, Nair SK. Publication J

  8. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    -bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly...

  9. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare cellulitis occurring with septic arthritis after joint injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdoch David M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulitis caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has rarely been described. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is a rare cause of septic arthritis after intra-articular injection, though the causative role of injection is difficult to ascertain in such cases. Case presentation A 57-year-old with rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone and azathioprine developed bilateral painful degenerative shoulder arthritis. After corticosteroid injections into both acromioclavicular joints, he developed bilateral cellulitis centered over the injection sites. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas, and culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Joint aspiration also revealed Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Conclusion Although rare, skin and joint infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare should be considered in any immunocompromised host, particularly after intra-articular injection. Stains for acid-fast bacilli may be negative in pathologic samples even in the presence of infection; cultures of tissue specimens should always be obtained.

  10. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  11. Inhibition of Salmonella intracellular proliferation by non-phagocytic eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moya, M; de Pedro, M A; Schwarz, H; García-del Portillo, F

    1998-05-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is an intracellular pathogen capable of proliferating within vacuolar compartments of non-phagocytic eucaryotic cells. This process has been shown to be essential for virulence in the mouse typhoid model (Leung and Finlay, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 88, 11470-11474, 1990). Here we present evidence that certain non-phagocytic eucaryotic cell lines, such as 3T3 (mouse fibroblasts) and NRK (rat fibroblasts) cells, are not permissive for S. typhimurium intracellular proliferation. Moreover, viability of intracellular bacteria residing within both cell types notably decreases at late postinfection times (72 h). These results clearly demonstrate that non-phagocytic eucaryotic cells are capable of destroying intracellular S. typhimurium. Experimentation with 3T3 and NRK cell lines might provide an appropriate in vitro model for identifying new bacterial and/or eucaryotic factors regulating Salmonella intracellular proliferation within vacuoles of the host eucaryotic cell.

  12. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  13. Interactions between intracellular chloride concentrations, intracellular pH and energetic status in rat lactotrope cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, P; Madec, F; Garcia, L; Dejean, L; Beauvoit, B; Dufy, B; Rigoulet, M

    2004-06-01

    Rat lactotrope cells in primary cultures have a higher intracellular Cl- concentration ([Cl-]i) than that predicted by a passive distribution across the membrane. This suggests that active cellular mechanisms ensure this ionic equilibrium. In this study, we examined the interactions between pHi, [Cl-]i regulation and cell energetics. We analyzed: 1. the interactions between extracellular Cl- concentrations, [Cl-]i and cellular energy; 2. the influence of [Cl-]i on respiratory chain function; 3. the correlation with glycolysis and; 4. the role played by pHi in these cellular mechanisms. We show that low [Cl-]i decreases ATP cell content, ATP/ADP ratio and modify phosphorylative oxidations. ATP production is rather due to the anaerobic pathway of the glucose metabolism than the aerobic one and depends also on other metabolic substrates among which glutamine probably has a special role. Finally, pHi appears as a determinant in the balance between aerobic and anaerobic pathways. These results are discussed in relation to the role of Cl- in normal and pathological (effect of hypoxia on mature and immature neurons) cell situations.

  14. Intracellular energy depletion triggers programmed cell death during petal senescence in tulip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A K; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Y; Shibata, H

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in petals provides a model system to study the molecular aspects of organ senescence. In this study, the very early triggering signal for PCD during the senescence process from young green buds to 14-d-old petals of Tulipa gesneriana was determined. The opening and closing movement of petals of intact plants increased for the first 3 d and then gradually decreased. DNA degradation and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release were clearly observed in 6-d-old flowers. Oxidative stress or ethylene production can be excluded as the early signal for petal PCD. In contrast, ATP was dramatically depleted after the first day of flower opening. Sucrose supplementation to cut flowers maintained their ATP levels and the movement ability for a longer time than in those kept in water. The onset of DNA degradation, Cyt c release, and petal senescence was also delayed by sucrose supplementation to cut flowers. These results suggest that intracellular energy depletion, rather than oxidative stress or ethylene production, may be the very early signal to trigger PCD in tulip petals.

  15. A new technique for reversible permeabilization of live cells for intracellular delivery of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medepalli, Krishnakiran; Alphenaar, Bruce W.; Keynton, Robert S.; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-05-01

    A major challenge with the use of quantum dots (QDs) for cellular imaging and biomolecular delivery is the attainment of QDs freely dispersed inside the cells. Conventional methods such as endocytosis, lipids based delivery and electroporation are associated with delivery of QDs in vesicles and/or as aggregates that are not monodispersed. In this study, we demonstrate a new technique for reversible permeabilization of cells to enable the introduction of freely dispersed QDs within the cytoplasm. Our approach combines osmosis driven fluid transport into cells achieved by creating a hypotonic environment and reversible permeabilization using low concentrations of cell permeabilization agents like Saponin. Our results confirm that highly efficient endocytosis-free intracellular delivery of QDs can be accomplished using this method. The best results were obtained when the cells were treated with 50 μg ml-1 Saponin in a hypotonic buffer at a 3:2 physiological buffer:DI water ratio for 5 min at 4 ° C.

  16. Biodegradable "Smart" Polyphosphazenes with Intrinsic Multifunctionality as Intracellular Protein Delivery Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Andre P; Qamar, Bareera; Fuerst, Thomas R; Muro, Silvia; Andrianov, Alexander K

    2017-06-12

    A series of biodegradable drug delivery polymers with intrinsic multifunctionality have been designed and synthesized utilizing a polyphosphazene macromolecular engineering approach. Novel water-soluble polymers, which contain carboxylic acid and pyrrolidone moieties attached to an inorganic phosphorus-nitrogen backbone, were characterized by a suite of physicochemical methods to confirm their structure, composition, and molecular sizes. All synthesized polyphosphazenes displayed composition-dependent hydrolytic degradability in aqueous solutions at neutral pH. Their formulations were stable at lower temperatures, potentially indicating adequate shelf life, but were characterized by accelerated degradation kinetics at elevated temperatures, including 37 °C. It was found that synthesized polyphosphazenes are capable of environmentally triggered self-assembly to produce nanoparticles with narrow polydispersity in the size range of 150-700 nm. Protein loading capacity of copolymers has been validated via their ability to noncovalently bind avidin without altering biological functionality. Acid-induced membrane-disruptive activity of polyphosphazenes has been established with an onset corresponding to the endosomal pH range and being dependent on polymer composition. The synthesized polyphosphazenes facilitated cell-surface interactions followed by time-dependent, vesicular-mediated, and saturable internalization of a model protein cargo into cancer cells, demonstrating the potential for intracellular delivery.

  17. Intracellular trafficking pathways of Cx43 gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifantseva, Irina; Shaw, Robin M

    2017-05-30

    Gap Junction (GJ) channels, including the most common Connexin 43 (Cx43), have fundamental roles in excitable tissues by facilitating rapid transmission of action potentials between adjacent cells. For instance, synchronization during each heartbeat is regulated by these ion channels at the cardiomyocyte cell-cell border. Cx43 protein has a short half-life, and rapid synthesis and timely delivery of those proteins to particular subdomains are crucial for the cellular organization of gap junctions and maintenance of intracellular coupling. Impairment in gap junction trafficking contributes to dangerous complications in diseased hearts such as the arrhythmias of sudden cardiac death. Of recent interest are the protein-protein interactions with the Cx43 carboxy-terminus. These interactions have significant impact on the full length Cx43 lifecycle and also contribute to trafficking of Cx43 as well as possibly other functions. We are learning that many of the known non-canonical roles of Cx43 can be attributed to the recently identified six endogenous Cx43 truncated isoforms which are produced by internal translation. In general, alternative translation is a new leading edge for proteome expansion and therapeutic drug development. This review highlights recent mechanisms identified in the trafficking of gap junction channels, involvement of other proteins contributing to the delivery of channels to the cell-cell border, and understanding of possible roles of the newly discovered alternatively translated isoforms in Cx43 biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Gap Junction Proteins edited by Jean Claude Herve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. INTRACELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN RAT LIVER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Arthur J.; Dounce, Alexander L.

    1955-01-01

    1. Cytochemical studies of the intracellular distribution of alkaline phosphatase in rat liver have been made, using a fractionation procedure recently developed in this laboratory (8) and a similar but modified method not described previously. Aqueous media were used in both cases. 2. The alkaline phosphatase was found to consist of two forms, one of which is strongly activated by magnesium and one of which is not sensitive to this metal. 3. The form of the enzyme that is not activated by magnesium occurs mainly in the nuclear fraction, where it seems to be rather firmly bound. Some of this form of the enzyme is also found in the microsomes, but very little if any occurs in the soluble supernatant fraction. 4. The form of alkaline phosphatase which is activated by magnesium occurs mainly in the soluble supernatant fraction, but what is believed are significant amounts also occur in nuclei. A significant portion of this form of the enzyme can be extracted from the isolated nuclei with cold, isotonic saline solution. Some activity of this form of the enzyme is also found in the microsomal fraction. 5. Mitochondria appear to contain relatively little alkaline phosphatase of either kind. 6. The concept of a porous nuclear membrane has been invoked to explain some of the results obtained in this work. It is postulated that part at least of the form of the enzyme that is activated by magnesium is free to diffuse back and forth through pores in the nuclear membrane, whereas this is considered not to be possible for the form of the enzyme that is insensitive to magnesium as a result of the firm binding of the latter to nuclear substance. PMID:13242596

  19. Intracellular ESAT-6: A new biomarker for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulakis, Nikolaos; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Ploussi, Maria; Leventopoulos, Michail; Papageorgiou, Chrysovalantis V; Anastasopoulos, Andreas; Constantoulakis, Pantelis; Karabela, Simona; Vogiatzakis, Evangelos; Tsilivakos, Vassilis

    2016-05-01

    Early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6) is a virulent factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The identification of intracellular (i/c) ESAT-6 in host cells would be a direct marker of MTB infection. We developed a method to detect i/cESAT-6 by flow cytometry. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of i/cESAT-6 in the host cells of individuals with MTB infection. The expression of i/cESAT-6 was examined in the blood of 58 active TB patients, in 10 naïve to TB infection controls, in 17 patients who completed anti-TB treatment, and in 56 close contacts with an index TB case. Additionally, it was examined in the sputum of 12 active TB patients. The i/cESAT-6 was positively detected in the blood of 52 out of 58 (90%) active TB patients. All naïve to TB infection controls were negative. Three out of 17 (18%) patients at the end of anti-TB treatment were positive. Twenty-six out of 56 (46%) close contacts tested positive. The i/cESAT-6 was detected in all culture positive TB sputum specimens. The i/cESAT-6 is a promising biomarker of MTB infection that could be used in the evaluation of active TB patients and in the diagnosis of latent TB infection. Further studies are needed to validate its potential diagnostic role. © 2014 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2014 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  20. Intracellular allosteric antagonism of the CCR9 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Christine; Rappas, Mathieu; Kean, James; Doré, Andrew S; Errey, James C; Bennett, Kirstie; Deflorian, Francesca; Christopher, John A; Jazayeri, Ali; Mason, Jonathan S; Congreve, Miles; Cooke, Robert M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-12-15

    Chemokines and their G-protein-coupled receptors play a diverse role in immune defence by controlling the migration, activation and survival of immune cells. They are also involved in viral entry, tumour growth and metastasis and hence are important drug targets in a wide range of diseases. Despite very significant efforts by the pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs, with over 50 small-molecule drugs directed at the family entering clinical development, only two compounds have reached the market: maraviroc (CCR5) for HIV infection and plerixafor (CXCR4) for stem-cell mobilization. The high failure rate may in part be due to limited understanding of the mechanism of action of chemokine antagonists and an inability to optimize compounds in the absence of structural information. CC chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9) activation by CCL25 plays a key role in leukocyte recruitment to the gut and represents a therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease. The selective CCR9 antagonist vercirnon progressed to phase 3 clinical trials in Crohn's disease but efficacy was limited, with the need for very high doses to block receptor activation. Here we report the crystal structure of the CCR9 receptor in complex with vercirnon at 2.8 Å resolution. Remarkably, vercirnon binds to the intracellular side of the receptor, exerting allosteric antagonism and preventing G-protein coupling. This binding site explains the need for relatively lipophilic ligands and describes another example of an allosteric site on G-protein-coupled receptors that can be targeted for drug design, not only at CCR9, but potentially extending to other chemokine receptors.

  1. Understanding CRY2 interactions for optical control of intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liting; Hope, Jen; Ong, Qunxiang; Lou, Hsin-Ya; Kim, Namdoo; McCarthy, Comfrey; Acero, Victor; Lin, Michael Z; Cui, Bianxiao

    2017-09-15

    Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) can simultaneously undergo light-dependent CRY2-CRY2 homo-oligomerization and CRY2-CIB1 hetero-dimerization, both of which have been widely used to optically control intracellular processes. Applications using CRY2-CIB1 interaction desire minimal CRY2 homo-oligomerization to avoid unintended complications, while those utilizing CRY2-CRY2 interaction prefer robust homo-oligomerization. However, selecting the type of CRY2 interaction has not been possible as the molecular mechanisms underlying CRY2 interactions are unknown. Here we report CRY2-CIB1 and CRY2-CRY2 interactions are governed by well-separated protein interfaces at the two termini of CRY2. N-terminal charges are critical for CRY2-CIB1 interaction. Moreover, two C-terminal charges impact CRY2 homo-oligomerization, with positive charges facilitating oligomerization and negative charges inhibiting it. By engineering C-terminal charges, we develop CRY2high and CRY2low with elevated or suppressed oligomerization respectively, which we use to tune the levels of Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced CRY2 interactions and enhance the controllability of CRY2-based optogenetic systems.Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) can form light-regulated CRY2-CRY2 homo-oligomers or CRY2-CIB1 hetero-dimers, but modulating these interactions is difficult owing to the lack of interaction mechanism. Here the authors identify the interactions facilitating homo-oligomers and introduce mutations to create low and high oligomerization versions.

  2. Late sodium current and intracellular ionic homeostasis in acute ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Carlotta; Torre, Eleonora; Rizzetto, Riccardo; Bernardi, Joyce; Rocchetti, Marcella; Zaza, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Blockade of the late Na+ current (I NaL) protects from ischemia/reperfusion damage; nevertheless, information on changes in I NaL during acute ischemia and their effect on intracellular milieu is missing. I NaL, cytosolic Na+ and Ca2+ activities (Nacyt, Cacyt) were measured in isolated rat ventricular myocytes during 7 min of simulated ischemia (ISC); in all the conditions tested, effects consistently exerted by ranolazine (RAN) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) were interpreted as due to I NaL blockade. The results indicate that I NaL was enhanced during ISC in spite of changes in action potential (AP) contour; I NaL significantly contributed to Nacyt rise, but only marginally to Cacyt rise. The impact of I NaL on Cacyt was markedly enhanced by blockade of the sarcolemmal(s) Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) and was due to the presence of (Na+-sensitive) Ca2+ efflux through mitochondrial NCX (mNCX). sNCX blockade increased Cacyt and decreased Nacyt, thus indicating that, throughout ISC, sNCX operated in the forward mode, in spite of the substantial Nacyt increment. Thus, a robust Ca2+ source, other than sNCX and including mitochondria, contributed to Cacyt during ISC. Most, but not all, of RAN effects were shared by TTX. (1) The paradigm that attributes Cacyt accumulation during acute ischemia to decrease/reversal of sNCX transport may not be of general applicability; (2) I NaL is enhanced during ISC, when the effect of Nacyt on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport may substantially contribute to I NaL impact on Cacyt; (3) RAN may act mostly, but not exclusively, through I NaL blockade during ISC.

  3. Production of intracellular selenium-enriched polysaccharides from thin stillage by Cordyceps sinensis and its bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thin stillage was used as the substrate to produce intracellular selenium-enriched polysaccharides (ISPS from Cordyceps sinensis to increase the value of agricultural coproducts. Methods: Fermentation parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM to improve the production of ISPS. Then, the effects of ISPS on the antioxidant activities in vitro, as well as the glycosylated serum protein concentration, malondialdehyde level, and total antioxidant capacity of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied. Results: The optimized conditions were as follows: sodium selenite concentration, 33.78 µg/L; incubation time, 8.24 days; and incubation temperature, 26.69°C. A maximum yield of 197.35 mg/g ISPS was obtained from the validation experiments, which was quite close to the predicted maximum yield of 198.6839 mg/g. FT-IR spectra indicated that ISPS has been successfully selenylation modified with similar structure to polysaccharide of intracellular polysaccharides. The in vitro scavenging effects of 1.0 mg/mL ISPS on hydroxyl, superoxide, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals were 74.62±4.05, 71.45±3.63, and 79.48±4.75%, respectively. The reducing power of ISPS was 0.45±0.01 (absorbance at 700 nm. Fasting blood glucose and glycosylated serum protein of group C (rats with diabetes that received drinking water with ISPS were significantly lower than those of group B (rats with diabetes (P<0.01 after treatment was administered for 2 and 4 weeks. Serum malonaldehyde content of group C was significantly lower than that of group B at 4 weeks (P<0.01. At 4 weeks, malonaldehyde contents in heart, liver, and kidney tissues of group C were significantly lower than those of group B; however, malonaldehyde content in pancreas tissue of group C was not significantly different. Total antioxidant capacities in liver, pancreas and kidney tissues of group C were significantly higher than those of group B, but total

  4. Modulation of host central carbon metabolism and in situ glucose uptake by intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Lentini, Gaelle; Dumoulin, Peter C; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2017-11-01

    Obligate intracellular pathogens satisfy their nutrient requirements by coupling to host metabolic processes, often modulating these pathways to facilitate access to key metabolites. Such metabolic dependencies represent potential targets for pathogen control, but remain largely uncharacterized for the intracellular protozoan parasite and causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Perturbations in host central carbon and energy metabolism have been reported in mammalian T. cruzi infection, with no information regarding the impact of host metabolic changes on the intracellular amastigote life stage. Here, we performed cell-based studies to elucidate the interplay between infection with intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes and host cellular energy metabolism. T. cruzi infection of non-phagocytic cells was characterized by increased glucose uptake into infected cells and increased mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis. While intracellular amastigote growth was unaffected by decreased host respiratory capacity, restriction of extracellular glucose impaired amastigote proliferation and sensitized parasites to further growth inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose. These observations led us to consider whether intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes utilize glucose directly as a substrate to fuel metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, isolated T. cruzi amastigotes transport extracellular glucose with kinetics similar to trypomastigotes, with subsequent metabolism as demonstrated in 13C-glucose labeling and substrate utilization assays. Metabolic labeling of T. cruzi-infected cells further demonstrated the ability of intracellular parasites to access host hexose pools in situ. These findings are consistent with a model in which intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes capitalize on the host metabolic response to parasite infection, including the increase in glucose uptake, to fuel their own metabolism and replication in the host cytosol. Our findings enrich

  5. Amphiphilic star PEG-Camptothecin conjugates for intracellular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Rawan; Bardoogo, Yael Leichtman; Corem-Salkmon, Enav; Mizrahi, Boaz

    2017-07-10

    Camptothecin (CPT) is a naturally occurring cytotoxic alkaloid having a broad spectrum of antitumor activity. Unfortunately, it has low bioavailability and encapsulation efficiency, limiting its clinical use. We report on our efforts to develop a novel drug delivery prototype composed of a short, star hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) backbone and hydrophobic CPT (PEG 4 -CPT). The amphiphilic bio-conjugate self-assembles in water into stable spherical nano-particles with a mean diameter of 200nm and CPT substitution percentage of 27%w/w. CPT is released in a sustained release profile without burst effect. In addition, PEG 4 -CPT nano-particles are able to load a co-drug, water soluble or non-water soluble doxorubicin and release them simultaneously with the free CPT. The biological evaluation of PEG 4 -CPT against HeLa cells showed improved cellular uptake and enhanced cytotoxicity compared to free CPT. Thus, in this approach CPT acts in two ways: As the hydrophobic segment that enables self-assembly in water and as a potent anticancer agent. This concept of combining hydrophobic drugs and short star polymers shows great potential for efficient delivery of hydrophobic chemotrophic drugs as well as for drugs with inherent stability and pharmacokinetic barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 16982211 Title Ubiqui

  7. Effect of Norepinephrine and Heart Rate on Intracellular Sodium Activity and Membrane Potential in Beating Guinea Pig Ventricular Muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilde, Arthur A.M; Kléber, André G

    1991-01-01

    The effect of 3 μM norepinephrine (NE) on intracellular sodium activity (aNa) and resting membrane potential was studied by continuous intracellular recordings with a conventional and an ion-selective microelectrode...

  8. Stoichiometry and intracellular fate of TRIM-containing TCR complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dopfer Elaine P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying the stoichiometry and intracellular trafficking of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR is pivotal in understanding its mechanisms of activation. The αβTCR includes the antigen-binding TCRαβ heterodimer as well as the signal transducing CD3εγ, CD3εδ and ζ2 subunits. Although the TCR-interacting molecule (TRIM is also part of the αβTCR complex, it has not been included in most reports so far. Results We used the native antibody-based mobility shift (NAMOS assay in a first dimension (1D blue native (BN-PAGE and a 2D BN-/BN-PAGE to demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the digitonin-solublized TRIM-containing αβTCR is TCRαβCD3ε2γδζ2TRIM2. Smaller αβTCR complexes possess a TCRαβ CD3ε2γδζ2 stoichiometry. Complexes of these sizes were detected in T cell lines as well as in primary human and mouse T cells. Stimulating the αβTCR with anti-CD3 antibodies, we demonstrate by confocal laser scanning microscopy that CD3ε colocalizes with ζ and both are degraded upon prolonged stimulation, possibly within the lysosomal compartment. In contrast, a substantial fraction of TRIM does not colocalize with ζ. Furthermore, TRIM neither moves to lysosomes nor is degraded. Immunoprecipitation studies and BN-PAGE indicate that TRIM also associates with the γδTCR. Conclusions Small αβTCR complexes have a TCRαβ CD3ε2γδζ2 stoichiometry; whereas those associated with one TRIM dimer are TCRαβ CD3ε2γδζ2TRIM2. TRIM is differentially processed compared to CD3 and ζ subunits after T cell activation and is not degraded. The γδTCR also associates with TRIM.

  9. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

  10. Real-time detection of viable microorganisms by intracellular phototautomerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, the detection of live microorganisms present in the environment or involved in infections is carried out by enumeration of colony forming units on agar plates, which is time consuming, laborious and limited to readily cultivable microorganisms. Although cultivation-independent methods are available, they involve multiple incubation steps and do mostly not discriminate between dead or live microorganisms. We present a novel generic method that is able to specifically monitor living microorganisms in a real-time manner. Results The developed method includes exposure of cells to a weak acid probe at low pH. The neutral probe rapidly permeates the membrane and enters the cytosol. In dead cells no signal is obtained, as the cytosolic pH reflects that of the acidic extracellular environment. In live cells with a neutral internal pH, the probe dissociates into a fluorescent phototautomeric anion. After reaching peak fluorescence, the population of live cells decays. This decay can be followed real-time as cell death coincides with intracellular acidification and return of the probe to its uncharged non-fluorescent state. The rise and decay of the fluorescence signal depends on the probe structure and appears discriminative for bacteria, fungi, and spores. We identified 13 unique probes, which can be applied in the real-time viability method described here. Under the experimental conditions used in a microplate reader, the reported method shows a detection limit of 106 bacteria ml-1, while the frequently used LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ Syto9 and propidium iodide stains show detection down to 106 and 107 bacteria ml-1, respectively. Conclusions We present a novel fluorescence-based method for viability assessment, which is applicable to all bacteria and eukaryotic cell types tested so far. The RTV method will have a significant impact in many areas of applied microbiology including research on biocidal activity, improvement of

  11. Fluorescent probes and nanoparticles for intracellular sensing of pH values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular pH regulates a number of cell metabolism processes and its sensing is thus of great importance for cell studies. Among various methods, fluorescent probes have been widely used for sensing intracellular pH values because of their high sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution capability. In this article, the development of fluorescent probes with good practicability in sensing intracellular pH values and pH variation during 2009 - 2014 is reviewed. These fluorescence probes are divided into two kinds: small molecules and nanoparticles. Photophysical properties, advantages/disadvantages and applications of the two kinds of probes are discussed in detail.

  12. Dynamic modulation of intracellular glucose imaged in single cells using a FRET-based glucose nanosensor

    OpenAIRE

    John, Scott A.; Ottolia, Michela; Weiss, James N.; Ribalet, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To study intracellular glucose homeostasis, the glucose nanosensor FLIPglu-600µM, which undergoes changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) upon interaction with glucose, was expressed in four mammalian cell lines: COS-7, CHO, HEK293, and C2C12. Upon addition of extracellular glucose, the intracellular FRET ratio decreased rapidly as intracellular glucose increased. The kinetics were fast (τ =5 to 15 s) in COS and C2C12 cells and slow (τ =20 to 40 s) in HEK and CHO cells. Upon ...

  13. Concentration-dependent fluorescence live-cell imaging and tracking of intracellular nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Joo, Sang-Woo [Department of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Keunchang [Logos Biosystems, Incorporated, Anyang 431-070 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Using live-cell imaging techniques we investigated concentration-dependent intracellular movements of fluorescence nanoparticles (NPs) in real-time after their entry into HeLa cells via incubation. Intracellular particle traces appeared to be a mixture of both random and fairly unidirectional movements of the particles. At rather low concentrations of NPs, a majority of the non-random intracellular particle trajectories are assumed to mostly go along microtubule networks after endocytosis, as evidenced from the inhibition test with nocodazole. On the other hand, as the concentrations of NPs increased, random motions were more frequently observed inside the cells.

  14. Impact of Gentamicin Concentration and Exposure Time on Intracellular Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiva T. VanCleave

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of intracellular bacterial pathogens in cell culture hinges on inhibiting extracellular growth of the bacteria in cell culture media. Aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, were originally thought to poorly penetrate eukaryotic cells, and thus, while inhibiting extracellular bacteria, these antibiotics had limited effect on inhibiting the growth of intracellular bacteria. This property led to the development of the antibiotic protection assay to study intracellular pathogens in vitro. More recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycosides slowly penetrate eukaryotic cells and can even reach intracellular concentrations that inhibit intracellular bacteria. Therefore, important considerations, such as antibiotic concentration, incubation time, and cell type need to be made when designing the antibiotic protection assay to avoid potential false positive/negative observations. Yersinia pestis, which causes the human disease known as the plague, is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can infect and replicate in macrophages. Y. pestis is sensitive to gentamicin and this antibiotic is often employed in the antibiotic protection assay to study the Y. pestis intracellular life cycle. However, a large variety of gentamicin concentrations and incubation periods have been reported in the Y. pestis literature without a clear characterization of the potential influences that variations in the gentamicin protection assay could have on intracellular growth of this pathogen. This raised concerns that variations in the gentamicin protection assay could influence phenotypes and reproducibility of data. To provide a better understanding of the potential consequences that variations in the gentamicin protection assay could have on Y. pestis, we systematically examined the impact of multiple variables of the gentamicin protection assay on Y. pestis intracellular survival in macrophages. We found that prolonged incubation periods with low concentrations

  15. [Evaluation of functional correlations of intracellular defense factors of neutrophils in children during postnatal ontogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, A Ia

    1989-01-01

    A total of 310 children aged 1 month to 15 years were examined for functional interrelations between components of the intracellular system of blood neutrophil defence based on the use of a discrete-dynamic analysis. The ontogenetic characteristics and regularities in the development of functional relations of intracellular defence factors were established. The periods of physiologic deficiency in children aged 1 month to 2 years and in those aged 2 to 15 years were defined. A screening scale was suggested for tracing the function of blood neutrophils and for identifying unbalances of intracellular defence factors in the course of the ontogenetic development of children.

  16. Relationship between intracellular ice formation in oocytes of the mouse and Xenopus and the physical state of the external medium--a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Peter; Kleinhans, F W

    2008-02-01

    We have previously reported that intracellular ice formation (IIF) in mouse oocytes suspended in glycerol/PBS solutions or ethylene glycol (EG)/PBS solutions and rapidly cooled to -50 degrees C or below occurs at temperatures where a critical fraction of the external water remains unfrozen [P. Mazur, S. Seki, I.L. Pinn, F.W. Kleinhans, K. Edashige, Extra- and intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes, Cryobiology 51 (2005) 29-53; P. Mazur, I.L. Pinn, F.W. Kleinhans, The temperature of intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes vs. the unfrozen fraction at that temperature, Cryobiology 54 (2007) 223-233]. For mouse oocytes in PBS or glycerol/PBS that fraction is 0.06; for oocytes in EG that fraction was calculated to be 0.13, more than double. The fractions unfrozen are computed from ternary phase diagrams. In the previous publication, we used the EG data of Woods et al. [E.J. Woods, M.A.J. Zieger, D.Y. Gao, J.K. Critser, Equations for obtaining melting points for the ternary system ethylene glycol/sodium chloride/Water and their application to cryopreservation., Cryobiology 38 (1999) 403-407]. Since then, we have determined that ternary phase diagrams for EG/NaCl/water synthesized by summing binary phase data for EG/water NaCl/water gives substantially different curves, which seem more realistic [F.W. Kleinhans, P. Mazur, Comparison of actual vs. synthesized ternary phase diagrams for solutes of cryobiological interest, Cryobiology 54 (2007) 212-222]. Unfrozen fractions at the temperatures of IIF computed from these synthesized phase diagrams are about half of those calculated from the Woods et al. data, and are in close agreement with the computations for glycerol; i.e., IIF occurs when about 92-94% of the external water is frozen. A parallel paper was published by Guenther et al. [J.F. Guenther, S. Seki, F.W. Kleinhans, K. Edashige, D.M. Roberts, P. Mazur, Extra-and intra-cellular ice formation in Stage I and II Xenopus laevis oocytes, Cryobiology 52 (2006

  17. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species...... store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom...... in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions...

  18. Cold glycerol-saline: the promising quenching solution for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis of microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Bruheim, Per

    2007-11-01

    Microbial metabolomics has been seriously limited by our inability to perform a reliable separation of intra- and extracellular metabolites with efficient quenching of cell metabolism. Microbial cells are sensitive to most (if not all) quenching agents developed to date, resulting in leakage of intracellular metabolites to the extracellular medium during quenching. Therefore, as yet we are unable to obtain an accurate concentration of intracellular metabolites from microbial cell cultures. However, knowledge of the in vivo concentrations of intermediary metabolites is of fundamental importance for the characterization of microbial metabolism so as to integrate meaningful metabolomics data with other levels of functional genomics analysis. In this article, we report a novel and robust quenching method for microbial cell cultures based on cold glycerol-saline solution as the quenching agent that prevents significant leakage of intracellular metabolites and, therefore, permits more accurate measurement of intracellular metabolite concentrations in microbial cells.

  19. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  20. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species...... store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria...... in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions...

  1. Identification of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex by PCR of AIDS and disseminated mycobacteriosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Degollado-Estrada, Edgar; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Cortés-Torres, Nancy; Arreguín-Reséndiz, Lilián; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2016-01-01

    .... intracellulare, respectively. Whole-cell DNAs obtained from 29 clinical isolates and clinical serum specimens from other 24 patients with AIDS and disseminated mycobacterial infection were extracted and amplified by PCR with the MAV and MIN primers...

  2. The effect of high pressure on the intracellular trehalose synthase activity of Thermus aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongsheng; Ma, Lei; Duan, Yuanliang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the effect of high pressure on the intracellular trehalose synthase activity, Thermus aquaticus (T. aquaticus) in the logarithmic growth phase was treated with high-pressure air, and its intracellular trehalose synthase (TSase) activity was determined. Our results indicated that pressure is a factor strongly affecting the cell growth. High pressure significantly attenuated the growth rate of T. aquaticus and shortened the duration of stationary phase. However, after 2 h of culture under 1.0 MPa pressure, the activity of intracellular TSase in T. aquaticus reached its maximum value, indicating that pressure can significantly increase the activity of intracellular TSase in T. aquaticus. Thus the present study provides an important guide for the enzymatic production of trehalose.

  3. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  4. Complementary roles of intracellular and pericellular collagen degradation pathways in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Miller, Rebecca A; Engelholm, Lars H; Gavard, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Collagen degradation is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Two key turnover pathways have been described for collagen: intracellular cathepsin-mediated degradation and pericellular collagenase-mediated degradation. However, the functional relationship between these ...

  5. Fast intracellular dissolution and persistent cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xiumei; Miclăuş, Teodora; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular stability and chemical state of Ag NPs are still not very well studied. In this work, we systematically investigated the cellular uptake pathways, intracellular dissolution and chemical...... species, and cytotoxicity of Ag NPs (15.9 ± 7.6 nm) in Chinese hamster ovary cell subclone K1 cells, a cell line recommended by the OECD for genotoxicity studies. Quantification of intracellular nanoparticle uptake and ion release was performed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. X......-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) was employed to assess the chemical state of intracellular silver. The toxic potential of Ag NPs and Ag+ was evaluated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and live–dead cell staining. The results suggest that cellular uptake of Ag NPs involves...

  6. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  7. Nanoscale-Tipped High-Aspect-Ratio Vertical Microneedle Electrodes for Intracellular Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshihiro; Oi, Hideo; Sawahata, Hirohito; Goryu, Akihiro; Ando, Yoriko; Numano, Rika; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular recording nanoscale electrode devices provide the advantages of a high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. However, the length of nanowire/nanotube-based nanoelectrodes is currently limited to fabrication issues for high-aspect-ratio nanoelectrodes. The concept reported here can address the technological limitations by fabricating >100 μm long nanoscale-tipped electrodes, which show intracellular recording capability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H; Nørregaard, Rikke; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-08-01

    To target bacterial pathogens that invade and proliferate inside host cells, it is necessary to design intervention strategies directed against bacterial attachment, cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. We present an automated microscopy-based, fast, high-throughput method for analyzing size and number of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected tissue culture cells. Cells are seeded in 48-well plates and infected with a GFP-expressing bacterial pathogen. Following gentamicin treatment to remove extracellular pathogens, cells are fixed and cell nuclei stained. This is followed by automated microscopy and subsequent semi-automated spot detection to determine the number of intracellular bacterial colonies, their size distribution, and the average number per host cell. Multiple 48-well plates can be processed sequentially and the procedure can be completed in one working day. As a model we quantified intracellular bacterial colonies formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) during infection of human kidney cells (HKC-8). Urinary tract infections caused by UPEC are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases in humans. UPEC can colonize tissues of the urinary tract and is responsible for acute, chronic, and recurrent infections. In the bladder, UPEC can form intracellular quiescent reservoirs, thought to be responsible for recurrent infections. In the kidney, UPEC can colonize renal epithelial cells and pass to the blood stream, either via epithelial cell disruption or transcellular passage, to cause sepsis. Intracellular colonies are known to be clonal, originating from single invading UPEC. In our experimental setup, we found UPEC CFT073 intracellular bacterial colonies to be heterogeneous in size and present in nearly one third of the HKC-8 cells. This high-throughput experimental format substantially reduces experimental time and enables fast screening of the intracellular bacterial load and cellular distribution of multiple

  9. Modelling intracellular signalling networks using behaviour-based systems and the blackboard architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Pedro Pablo Gonzalez; Gershenson, Carlos; Garcia, Maura Cardenas; Otero, Jaime Lagunez

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes to model the intracellular signalling networks using a fusion of behaviour-based systems and the blackboard architecture. In virtue of this fusion, the model developed by us, which has been named Cellulat, allows to take account two essential aspects of the intracellular signalling networks: (1) the cognitive capabilities of certain types of networks' components and (2) the high level of spatial organization of these networks. A simple example of modelling of Ca2+ signalli...

  10. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular and lysates (intracellular blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway.

  11. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation.

  12. Linking the transcriptional profiles and the physiological states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an extended intracellular infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H Rohde

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have evolved strategies for coping with the pressures encountered inside host cells. The ability to coordinate global gene expression in response to environmental and internal cues is one key to their success. Prolonged survival and replication within macrophages, a key virulence trait of M. tuberculosis, requires dynamic adaptation to diverse and changing conditions within its phagosomal niche. However, the physiological adaptations during the different phases of this infection process remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a multi-tiered approach to define the temporal patterns of gene expression in M. tuberculosis in a macrophage infection model that extends from infection, through intracellular adaptation, to the establishment of a productive infection. Using a clock plasmid to measure intracellular replication and death rates over a 14-day infection and electron microscopy to define bacterial integrity, we observed an initial period of rapid replication coupled with a high death rate. This was followed by period of slowed growth and enhanced intracellular survival, leading finally to an extended period of net growth. The transcriptional profiles of M. tuberculosis reflect these physiological transitions as the bacterium adapts to conditions within its host cell. Finally, analysis with a Transcriptional Regulatory Network model revealed linked genetic networks whereby M. tuberculosis coordinates global gene expression during intracellular survival. The integration of molecular and cellular biology together with transcriptional profiling and systems analysis offers unique insights into the host-driven responses of intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis.

  13. Semiconductor quantum dots as Förster resonance energy transfer donors for intracellularly-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Lauren D.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2017-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies currently comprise a significant portion of intracellularly based sensors. Although extremely useful, the fluorescent protein pairs typically utilized in such sensors are still plagued by many photophysical issues including significant direct acceptor excitation, small changes in FRET efficiency, and limited photostability. Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are characterized by many unique optical properties including size-tunable photoluminescence, broad excitation profiles coupled to narrow emission profiles, and resistance to photobleaching, which can cumulatively overcome many of the issues associated with use of fluorescent protein FRET donors. Utilizing QDs for intracellular FRET-based sensing still requires significant development in many areas including materials optimization, bioconjugation, cellular delivery and assay design and implementation. We are currently developing several QD-based FRET sensors for various intracellular applications. These include sensors targeting intracellular proteolytic activity along with those based on theranostic nanodevices for monitoring drug release. The protease sensor is based on a unique design where an intracellularly expressed fluorescent acceptor protein substrate assembles onto a QD donor following microinjection, forming an active complex that can be monitored in live cells over time. In the theranostic configuration, the QD is conjugated to a carrier protein-drug analogue complex to visualize real-time intracellular release of the drug from its carrier in response to an external stimulus. The focus of this talk will be on the design, properties, photophysical characterization and cellular application of these sensor constructs.

  14. Intracellular Accumulation of Gold Nanoparticles Leads to Inhibition of Macropinocytosis to Reduce the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Nuray; Ceylan, Hakan; Guler, Mustafa O.; Tekinay, Ayse B.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials remains largely limited to acute cellular response, i.e., short-term in vitro cell-death based assays, and analyses of tissue- and organ-level accumulation and clearance patterns in animal models, which have produced very little information about how these materials (from the toxicity point of view) interact with the complex intracellular machinery. In particular, understanding the mechanism of toxicity caused by the gradual accumulation of nanomaterials due to prolonged exposure times is essential yet still continue to be a largely unexplored territory. Herein, we show intracellular accumulation and the associated toxicity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for over two-months in the cultured vascular endothelial cells. We observed that steady exposure of AuNPs at low (non-lethal) dose leads to rapid intracellular accumulation without causing any detectable cell death while resulting in elevated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Above a certain intracellular AuNP threshold, inhibition of macropinocytosis mechanism ceases further nanoparticle uptake. Interestingly, the intracellular depletion of nanoparticles is irreversible. Once reaching the maximum achievable intracellular dose, a steady depletion is observed, while no cell death is observed at any stage of this overall process. This depletion is important for reducing the ER stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting active regulation of nanoparticle uptake by cells and the impact of long-term exposure to nanoparticles in vitro.

  15. Ciprofloxacin nano-niosomes for targeting intracellular infections: an in vitro evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Vajihe; Abedi, Daryoush [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pardakhty, Abbas [Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Pharmaceutics Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat, E-mail: sadeghi@pharm.mui.ac.ir [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In order to propose non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) for the treatment of intracellular infections, a remote loading method (active drug encapsulation) followed by sonication was used to prepare nano-niosome formulations containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Size analysis, size distribution and zeta potentials of niosomes were evaluated and then their antimicrobial activity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular distribution, and antibacterial activity against intracellular Staphylococcus aureus infection of murine macrophage-like, J774, cells were investigated in comparison to free drug. Our findings reveal that size and composition of the niosome formula can influence their in vitro biological properties. Vesicles in the 300-600 nm size range were phagocytosed to a greater degree by macrophages in comparison to other size vesicles. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPFX-loaded niosomes were two to eightfold lower than MICs of free CPFX. In addition, niosome encapsulation of CPFX provided high intracellular antimicrobial activities while free CPFX is ineffective for eradicating intracellular forms of S. aureus. Encapsulation of CPFX in niosomes generally decreased its in vitro cytotoxicity. Our results show that niosomes are suitable drug delivery systems with good efficacy and safety properties to be proposed for drug targeting against intracellular infections.

  16. Water, Water Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    Everybody knows that children love water and how great water play is for children. The author discusses ways to add water to one's playscape that fully comply with health and safety regulations and are still fun for children. He stresses the importance of creating water play that provides children with the opportunity to interact with water.

  17. Surface bioengineering of diatomite based nanovectors for efficient intracellular uptake and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Monica; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Rea, Ilaria; Lamberti, Annalisa; de Stefano, Luca; Santos, Hélder A.

    2015-11-01

    Diatomite is a natural porous silica material of sedimentary origin. Due to its peculiar properties, it can be considered as a valid surrogate of synthetic porous silica for nano-based drug delivery. In this work, we exploit the potential of diatomite nanoparticles (DNPs) for drug delivery with the aim of developing a successful dual-biofunctionalization method by polyethylene glycol (PEG) coverage and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) bioconjugation, to improve the physicochemical and biological properties of the particles, to enhance the intracellular uptake in cancer cells, and to increase the biocompatibility of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT) modified-DNPs. DNPs-APT-PEG-CPP showed hemocompatibility for up to 200 μg mL-1 after 48 h of incubation with erythrocytes, with a hemolysis value of only 1.3%. The cytotoxicity of the modified-DNPs with a concentration up to 200 μg mL-1 and incubation with MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells for 24 h, demonstrated that PEGylation and CPP-bioconjugation can strongly reduce the cytotoxicity of DNPs-APT. The cellular uptake of the modified-DNPs was also evaluated using the above mentioned cancer cell lines, showing that the CPP-bioconjugation can considerably increase the DNP cellular uptake. Moreover, the dual surface modification of DNPs improved both the loading of a poorly water-soluble anticancer drug, sorafenib, with a loading degree up to 22 wt%, and also enhanced the drug release profiles in aqueous solutions. Overall, this work demonstrates that the biofunctionalization of DNPs is a promising platform for drug delivery applications in cancer therapy as a result of its enhanced stability, biocompatibility, cellular uptake, and drug release profiles.Diatomite is a natural porous silica material of sedimentary origin. Due to its peculiar properties, it can be considered as a valid surrogate of synthetic porous silica for nano-based drug delivery. In this work, we exploit the potential of diatomite nanoparticles

  18. Long-circulating poly(ethylene glycol)-modified gelatin nanoparticles for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Goldie; Amiji, Mansoor

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize long-circulating, biodegradable, and biocompatible nanoparticulate formulation as an intracellular delivery vehicle. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified gelatin was synthesized by reacting Type-B gelatin with PEG-epoxide. The nanoparticles, prepared by pH and temperature controlled ethanol-water solvent displacement technique, were characterized for mean size, size distribution, and surface morphology. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) was used to confirm the surface presence of PEG chains. In vitro release of tetramethylrhodamine-labeled dextran (TMR-dextran, Mol. wt. 10,000 daltons) from the nanoparticle formulations was examined in PBS, with and without 0.2-mg/ml protease, at 37 degrees C. Relative cytotoxicity profile of control and PEGylated gelatin was evaluated in BT-20 a human breast cancer cell line. The nanoparticles were incubated with BT-20 cells to determine uptake and cellular distribution using confocal microscopy. Gelatin and PEGylated gelatin nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape with a smooth surface in a size range of 200-500 nm and a unimodal size distribution. ESCA results showed an increase in the ether carbon (-C-O-) peak in the PEGylated gelatin nanoparticles due to the presence of PEG chains. The presence of PEG chains decreased the percent release of TMR-dextran in the presence of proteolytic enzyme due to steric repulsion. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that both gelatin and PEGylated gelatin were completely non-toxic to the cells. A large fraction of the administered control gelatin and PEGylated gelatin nanoparticles were found to be concentrated in the perinuclear region of the BT-20 cells after 12 hours indicating possible vesicular transport through initial uptake by endocytosis and endosomal processing. The results of this study show that PEGylation of gelatin may prove beneficial as long-circulating delivery system in vivo. Additionally, the

  19. Laser selective microablation of sensitized intracellular components within auditory receptor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Evans, Burt N.; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1995-05-01

    A laser system can be coupled to a light microscope for laser microbeam ablation and trapping of single cells in vitro. We have extended this technology by sensitization of target structures with vital dyes to provide selective ablation of specific subcellular components. Isolated auditory receptor cells (outer hair cells, OHCs) are known to elongate and contract in response to electrical, chemical and mechanical stimulation. Various intracellular structures are candidate components mediating motility of OHCs, but the exact mechanism(s) is currently unknown. In ongoing studies of OHC motility, we have used the microbeam for selective ablation of lateral wall components and of an axial cytoskeletal core that extends from the nucleus to the cell apex. Both the area beneath the subsurface cistemae of the lateral wall and the core are rich in mitochondria. OHCs isolated from guinea pig cochlea are suspended in L- 15 medium containing 2.0 (mu) M Rhodamine 123, a porphyrin with an affinity for mitochondria. A spark-pumped nitrogen laser pumping a dye cell (Coumarin 500) was aligned on the optical axis of a Nikon Optiphot-2 to produce a 3 ns, 0.5 - 10 micrometers spot (diameter above ablation threshold w/50X water immersion, N.A. 0.8), and energy at the target approximately equals 10 (mu) J/pulse. At short incubation times in Rh123 irradiation caused local blebbing or bulging of cytoplastic membrane and thus loss of the OHC's cylindrical shape. At longer Rh123 incubation times when the central axis of the cell was targeted we observed cytoplasmic clearing, immediate cell elongation (approximately equals 5%) and clumping of core material at nuclear and apical attachments. Experiments are underway to examine the significance of these preliminary observations.

  20. Picosecond orientational dynamics of water in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tros, Martijn; Zheng, Linli; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Bonn, Daniel; Smits, Gertien J; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-10-12

    Cells are extremely crowded, and a central question in biology is how this affects the intracellular water. Here, we use ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy and dielectric-relaxation spectroscopy to observe the random orientational motion of water molecules inside living cells of three prototypical organisms: Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), and spores of Bacillus subtilis. In all three organisms, most of the intracellular water exhibits the same random orientational motion as neat water (characteristic time constants ~9 and ~2 ps for the first-order and second-order orientational correlation functions), whereas a smaller fraction exhibits slower orientational dynamics. The fraction of slow intracellular water varies between organisms, ranging from ~20% in E. coli to ~45% in B. subtilis spores. Comparison with the water dynamics observed in solutions mimicking the chemical composition of (parts of) the cytosol shows that the slow water is bound mostly to proteins, and to a lesser extent to other biomolecules and ions.The cytoplasm's crowdedness leads one to expect that cell water is different from bulk water. By measuring the rotational motion of water molecules in living cells, Tros et al. find that apart from a small fraction of water solvating biomolecules, cell water has the same dynamics as bulk water.

  1. A new dye uptake assay to test the activity of antibiotics against intracellular Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutera, Vivien; Caspar, Yvan; Boisset, Sandrine; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the aetiological agent of tularaemia. Antibiotic treatment of this zoonosis is based on the administration of a fluoroquinolone or a tetracycline for cases with mild to moderate severity, whereas an aminoglycoside (streptomycin or gentamicin) is advocated for severe cases. However, treatment failures and relapses remain frequent, especially in patients suffering from chronic lymph node suppuration. Therefore, new treatment alternatives are needed. We have developed a dye uptake assay for determination of minimal inhibitory extracellular concentrations (MIECs) of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis, and validated the method by comparing the results obtained using a CFU-enumerating method. We also compared MIECs with MICs of the same compounds determined using a CLSI broth microdilution method. We tested the activity of 11 antibiotics against two clinical strains of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolated in France. Both strains displayed low MICs (≤1 μg/mL) to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), gentamicin, doxycycline and rifampicin. Higher MICs (≥8 μg/mL) were found for carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem), daptomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin MICs were 4.0 and 16.0 μg/mL, respectively, for the two clinical strains. MIECs were almost the same with the two methods used. They were concordant with MICs, except for erythromycin and linezolid (respectively, four and eight times more active against intracellular F. tularensis) and gentamicin (four to eight times less active against intracellular F. tularensis). This study validated the dye uptake assay as a new tool for determination of the activity of a large panel of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis. This test confirmed the intracellular activity of first-line antibiotics used for tularaemia treatment, but also revealed significant activity of linezolid against intracellular F. tularensis.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic determinants of trace metal partitioning at biointerphases: the role of intracellular speciation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Présent, Romain M; Rotureau, Elise

    2016-11-09

    There is a large body of work evidencing the necessity to evaluate chemical speciation dynamics of trace metals in solution for an accurate definition of their bioavailability to microorganisms. In contrast, the integration of intracellular metal speciation dynamics in biouptake formalisms is still in its early stages. Accordingly, we elaborate here a rationale for the interplay between chemodynamics of intracellular metal complexes and dynamics of processes governing metal biouptake under non-complexing outer medium conditions. These processes include the conductive diffusion of metal ions to the charged soft biointerphase, metal internalisation, excretion of intracellular free metal species and metal depletion from bulk solution. The theory is formulated from Nernst-Planck equations corrected for electrostatic and reaction kinetic terms applied at the biosurface and in the intracellular volume. Computational illustrations demonstrate how biointerfacial metal distribution dynamics inherently reflects the chemodynamic properties of intracellular complexes. In the practical limits of high and weak metal affinity to biosurface internalisation sites, the metal concentration profile is explicitly solved under conditions of strong intracellular complexing agents. Exact analytical expression is further developed for metal partitioning at equilibrium. This provides a way to evaluate the metal biopartition coefficient from refined analysis of bulk metal depletion measured at various cell concentrations. Depending on here-defined dimensionless parameters involving rates of metal internalisation-excretion and complex formation, the formalism defines the nature of the different kinetic regimes governing bulk metal depletion and biouptake. In particular, the conditions leading to an internalisation flux limited by diffusion as a result of demanding intracellular metal complexation are identified.

  3. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that AP

  4. Effect of different chemical bonds in pegylation of zinc protoporphyrin that affects drug release, intracellular uptake, and therapeutic effect in the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukigawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Otagiri, Masaki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pegylated zinc protoporphyrin (PEG-ZnPP) is a water-soluble inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1. In this study, we prepared two types of PEG-ZnPP conjugates with different chemical bonds between PEG and ZnPP, i.e., ester bonds and ether bonds, where both conjugates also contain amide bonds. Cleavability of these bonds in vitro and in vivo, especially cancer tissue, and upon intracellular uptake, was investigated in parallel with biological activities of the conjugates. Each conjugate showed different cleavability by plasma esterases and tumor proteases, as revealed by HPLC analyses. PEG-ZnPP with ester bond (esPEG-ZnPP) was more sensitive than PEG-ZnPP with ether bond (etPEG-ZnPP) for cleavage of PEG chains. etPEG-ZnPP showed no cleavage of PEG chains and had lower intracellular uptake and antitumor activity than did esPEG-ZnPP. The degradation of esPEG-ZnPP appeared to be facilitated by both serine and cysteine proteases in tumor tissues, whereas it was significantly slower in normal organs except the liver. Depegylated products such as free ZnPP had higher intracellular uptake than did intact PEG-ZnPP. We also studied hydrolytic cleavage by blood plasma of different animal species; mouse plasma showed the fastest cleavage whereas human plasma showed the slowest. These results suggest that ester-linked conjugates manifest more efficient cleavage of PEG, and greater yield of the active principle from the conjugates in tumor tissues than in normal tissues. More efficient intracellular uptake and thus an improved therapeutic effect with ester-linked conjugates are thus anticipated with fain stability, particularly in human blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in base excision repair deficient cells in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Jun; Asakura, Shoji; Hester, Susan D.; de Murcia, Gilbert; Caldecott, Keith W.; Swenberg, James A.

    2003-01-01

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or during the base excision repair pathways. Here we established a new real-time assay to assess an imbalance of DNA SSB repair by indirectly measuring PARP-1 activation through the depletion of intracellular NAD(P)H. A water-soluble tetrazolium salt is used to monitor the amount of NAD(P)H in living cells through its reduction to a yellow colored water-soluble formazan dye. While this assay is not a direct method, it does not require DNA extraction or alkaline treatment, both of which could potentially cause an artifactual induction of SSBs. In addition, it takes only 4 h and requires less than a half million cells to perform this measurement. Using this assay, we demonstrated that the dose- and time-dependent depletion of NAD(P)H in XRCC1-deficient CHO cells exposed to methyl methanesulfonate. This decrease was almost completely blocked by a PARP inhibitor. Furthermore, methyl methanesulfonate reduced NAD(P)H in PARP-1+/+cells, whereas PARP-1–/– cells were more resistant to the decrease in NAD(P)H. These results indicate that the analysis of intracellular NAD(P)H level using water-soluble tetrazolium salt can assess an imbalance of SSB repair in living cells in real time. PMID:12930978

  6. Relationship between intracellular ice formation in oocytes of the mouse and Xenopus and the physical state of the external medium—a revisit

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, Peter; Kleinhans, F W

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that intracellular ice formation (IIF) in mouse oocytes suspended in glycerol/PBS solutions or ethylene glycol (EG)/PBS solutions and rapidly cooled to −50°C or below occurs at temperatures where a critical fraction of the external water remains unfrozen (Cryobiology 51, 2005, 29-53; 54, 2007, 223-233). For mouse oocytes in PBS or glycerol/PBS that fraction is 0.06; for oocytes in EG that fraction was calculated to be 0.13, more than double. The fractions unfrozen ...

  7. Electrolytes induce long-range orientational order and free energy changes in the H-bond network of bulk water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixing; Okur, Halil I; Gomopoulos, Nikolaos; Macias-Romero, Carlos; Cremer, Paul S; Petersen, Poul B; Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M; Liang, Chungwen; Ceriotti, Michele; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Electrolytes interact with water in many ways: changing dipole orientation, inducing charge transfer, and distorting the hydrogen-bond network in the bulk and at interfaces. Numerous experiments and computations have detected short-range perturbations that extend up to three hydration shells around individual ions. We report a multiscale investigation of the bulk and surface of aqueous electrolyte solutions that extends from the atomic scale (using atomistic modeling) to nanoscopic length scales (using bulk and interfacial femtosecond second harmonic measurements) to the macroscopic scale (using surface tension experiments). Electrolytes induce orientational order at concentrations starting at 10 μM that causes nonspecific changes in the surface tension of dilute electrolyte solutions. Aside from ion-dipole interactions, collective hydrogen-bond interactions are crucial and explain the observed difference of a factor of 6 between light water and heavy water.

  8. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  9. Manganese (Mn oxidation increases intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Banh

    Full Text Available Bacterial manganese (Mn oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection.

  10. Delivery of intracellular-acting biologics in pro-apoptotic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Nelson, Chris E; Evans, Brian C; Duvall, Craig L

    2011-01-01

    The recent elucidation of molecular regulators of apoptosis and their roles in cellular oncogenesis has motivated the development of biomacromolecular anticancer therapeutics that can activate intracellular apoptotic signaling pathways. Pharmaceutical scientists have employed a variety of classes of biologics toward this goal, including antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, small interfering RNA, proteins, antibodies, and peptides. However, stability in the in vivo environment, tumor-specific biodistribution, cell internalization, and localization to the intracellular microenvironment where the targeted molecule is localized pose significant challenges that limit the ability to directly apply intracellular-acting, pro-apoptotic biologics for therapeutic use. Thus, approaches to improve the pharmaceutical properties of therapeutic biomacromolecules are of great significance and have included chemically modifying the bioactive molecule itself or formulation with auxiliary compounds. Recently, promising advances in delivery of pro-apoptotic biomacromolecular agents have been made using tools such as peptide "stapling", cell penetrating peptides, fusogenic peptides, liposomes, nanoparticles, smart polymers, and synergistic combinations of these components. This review will discuss the molecular mediators of cellular apoptosis, the respective mechanisms by which these mediators are dysregulated in cellular oncogenesis, the history and development of both nucleic-acid and amino-acid based drugs, and techniques to achieve intracellular delivery of these biologics. Finally, recent applications where pro-apoptotic functionality has been achieved through delivery of intracellular-acting biomacromolecular drugs will be highlighted.

  11. The autofluorescence characteristics of bacterial intracellular and extracellular substances during the operation of anammox reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Liu, Sitong; Feng, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Anammox is a cost-effective process to treat nitrogenous wastewater. In this work, excitation–emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the intracellular and extracellular substances of anammox sludge during reactor operation of 276 days. Four main fluorophores were identified from the intracellular substances. Two main protein-like fluorophores were identified from the extracellular substances. Correlation analysis revealed that intracellular 420 peak and humic-like peak had strong correlation with nitrogen removal rate. The two intracellular protein-like peaks had high correlation with MLVSS and MLVSS growth rate. Correlation analysis between different fluorophores discovered that the two peaks in each of these three groups—two intracellular protein-like peaks, two humic acid-like peaks and the two extracellular protein-like peaks had strong intercorrelation, which gave evidence of their homology. A specific method for fluorescence monitoring of anammox reactor were put forward, which included typical fluorescence indexes and their possible values for different operation phases. PMID:28091530

  12. Hyaluronic acid conjugation facilitates clearance of intracellular bacterial infections by streptomycin with neglectable nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuanhao; Hou, Yilin; Sun, Feifei; Chen, Peng; Wang, Dongdong; Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Xiaoli; Ding, Kan; Duan, Jinyou

    2017-09-01

    Antibiotics such as β-lactams and aminoglycosides are often subtherapeutic to intracellular infections due to their high hydrophilicity, resulting in low effectiveness against intracellular pathogens and the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Here we reported that an endogenous aminoglycan, hyaluronic acid could be an effective carbohydrate carrier of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, streptomycin against intracellular pathogens. This conjugation could enhance phagocytic activity, and facilitated the entry of streptomycin into host cells via a CD44-mediated pathway. It appeared that this conjugate could clear intracellular bacteria in phagocytic or nonphagocytic cells in a short-term therapy (4 h) at a lower effective dose. In addition, this conjugate was more efficient in reducing bacteria burden in an in vivo acute infection model than streptomycin did. Interestingly, subcutaneous injection of this conjugate at an excess amount had undetectable side effects such as nephrotoxicity. These results suggested that hyaluronic acid might be an efficient Trojan horse for the delivery of hydrophilic antibiotics to deal with intracellular infections. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Plasticity of total and intracellular phosphorus quotas in Microcystis aeruginosa cultures and Lake Erie algal assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Saxton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis are common events globally, and as a result significant resources continue to be dedicated to monitoring and controlling these events. Recent studies have shown that a significant proportion total cell-associated phosphorus (P in phytoplankton can be surface adsorbed, and many of our current measurements do not accurately reflect the P demands of these organisms. In this study we measure the total cell-associated and intracellular P as well as growth rates of two toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa Kütz grown under a range of P concentrations. The results show that the intracellular P pool in Microcystis represents a percentage of total cell-associated P (50-90% similar to what has been reported for actively growing algae in marine systems. Intracellular P levels (39-147 fg cell-1 generally increased with increasing growth media P concentrations, but growth rate and the ratio of total cell-associated to intracellular P remained generally stable. Intracellular P quotas and growth rates in cells grown under the different P treatments illustrate the ability of this organism to successfully respond to changes in ambient P loads, and thus have implications for ecosystem scale productivity models employing P concentrations to predict algal bloom events.

  14. Take the tube: remodelling of the endosomal system by intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen residing in a unique host cell-derived membrane compartment, termed Salmonella-containing vacuole or SCV. By the activity of effector proteins translocated by the SPI2-endoced type III secretion system (T3SS), the biogenesis of the SCV is manipulated to generate a habitat permissive for intracellular proliferation. By taking control of the host cell vesicle fusion machinery, intracellular Salmonella creates an extensive interconnected system of tubular membranes arising from vesicles of various origins, collectively termed Salmonella-induced tubules (SIT). Recent work investigated the dynamic properties of these manipulations. New host cell targets of SPI2-T3SS effector proteins were identified. By applying combinations of live cell imaging and ultrastructural analyses, the detailed organization of membrane compartments inhabited and modified by intracellular Salmonella is now available. These studies provided unexpected new details on the intracellular environments of Salmonella. For example, one kind of SIT, the LAMP1-positive Salmonella-induced filaments (SIF), are composed of double-membrane tubules, with an inner lumen containing host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments, and an outer lumen containing endocytosed cargo. The novel findings call for new models for the biogenesis of SCV and SIT and give raise to many open questions we discuss in this review. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A conserved OmpA-like protein in Legionella pneumophila required for efficient intracellular replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Ian P; Kumova, Ogan K; Ninio, Shira

    2016-08-01

    The OmpA-like protein domain has been associated with peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and is often found in virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes for six proteins that contain the OmpA-like domain, among them the highly conserved uncharacterized protein we named CmpA. Here we set out to characterize the CmpA protein and determine its contribution to intracellular survival of L. pneumophila Secondary structure analysis suggests that CmpA is an inner membrane protein with a peptidoglycan-binding domain at the C-teminus. A cmpA mutant was able to replicate normally in broth, but failed to compete with an isogenic wild-type strain in an intracellular growth competition assay. The cmpA mutant also displayed significant intracellular growth defects in both the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii and in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, where uptake into the cells was also impaired. The cmpA phenotypes were completely restored upon expression of CmpA in trans The data presented here establish CmpA as a novel virulence factor of L. pneumophila that is required for efficient intracellular replication in both mammalian and protozoan hosts. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The influence of extracellular and intracellular calcium on the secretion of renin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Douglas K.; Beierwaltes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in plasma, extracellular and intracellular calcium can affect renin secretion from the renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Elevated intracellular calcium directly inhibits renin release from JG cells by decreasing the dominant second messenger intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) via actions on calcium-inhibitable adenylyl cyclases and calcium-activated phosphodiesterases. Increased extracellular calcium also directly inhibits renin release by stimulating the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on JG cells, resulting in parallel changes in the intracellular environment and decreasing intracellular cAMP. In vivo, acutely elevated plasma calcium inhibits plasma renin activity (PRA) via parathyroid hormone-mediated elevations in renal cortical interstitial calcium that stimulate the JG cell CaSR. However, chronically elevated plasma calcium or CaSR activation may actually stimulate PRA. This elevation in PRA may be a compensatory mechanism resulting from calcium-mediated polyuria. Thus, changing the extracellular calcium in vitro or in vivo results in inversely related acute changes in cAMP, and therefore renin release, but chronic changes in calcium may result in more complex interactions dependent upon the duration of changes and the integration of the body’s response to these changes. PMID:22538344

  17. Intracellular trafficking of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with TAT peptide: 3-dimensional electron tomography analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Baiju G.; Fukuda, Takahiro; Mizuki, Toru; Hanajiri, Tatsuro [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Maekawa, Toru, E-mail: maekawa@toyo.jp [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the intracellular localisation of TAT-SPIONs using 3-D electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D images of TAT-SPIONs in a cell are clearly shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Release of TAT-SPIONs from endocytic vesicles into the cytoplasm is clearly shown. -- Abstract: Internalisation of nanoparticles conjugated with cell penetrating peptides is a promising approach to various drug delivery applications. Cell penetrating peptides such as transactivating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptides derived from HIV-1 proteins are effective intracellular delivery vectors for a wide range of nanoparticles and pharmaceutical agents thanks to their amicable ability to enter cells and minimum cytotoxicity. Although different mechanisms of intracellular uptake and localisation have been proposed for TAT conjugated nanoparticles, it is necessary to visualise the particles on a 3-D plane in order to investigate the actual intracellular uptake and localisation. Here, we study the intracellular localisation and trafficking of TAT peptide conjugated superparamagnetic ion oxide nanoparticles (TAT-SPIONs) using 3-D electron tomography. 3-D tomograms clearly show the location of TAT-SPIONs in a cell and their slow release from the endocytic vesicles into the cytoplasm. The present methodology may well be utilised for further investigations of the behaviours of nanoparticles in cells and eventually for the development of nano drug delivery systems.

  18. Intracellular phase for an extracellular bacterial pathogen: MgtC shows the way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Bernut

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an extracellular pathogen known to impair host phagocytic functions. However, our recent results identify MgtC as a novel actor in P. aeruginosa virulence, which plays a role in an intramacrophage phase of this pathogen. In agreement with its intracellular function, P. aeruginosa mgtC gene expression is strongly induced when the bacteria reside within macrophages. MgtC was previously known as a horizontally-acquired virulence factor important for multiplication inside macrophages in several intracellular bacterial pathogens. MgtC thus provides a singular example of a virulence determinant that subverts macrophages both in intracellular and extracellular pathogens. Moreover, we demonstrate that P. aeru-ginosa MgtC is required for optimal growth in Mg2+ deprived medium, a property shared by MgtC factors from intracellular pathogens and, under Mg2+ limitation, P. aeruginosaMgtC prevents biofilm formation. We propose that MgtC has a similar function in intracellular and extracellular pathogens, which contributes to macrophage resistance and fine-tune adaptation to the host in relation to the different bacterial lifestyles. MgtC thus appears as an attractive target for antivirulence strategies and our work provides a natural peptide as MgtC antagonist, which paves the way for the development of MgtC inhibitors.

  19. Relationships between Free-Living Amoeba and their Intracellular Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubeniņa Ilze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of bacteria have been described as benefiting from interaction with free-living amoeba. The most common association between free-living amoeba and microorganisms is interaction of various non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species with amoeba. Various pathogenic bacterial species have capacity to resist digestion by free-living amoeba, which has been observed by many researchers. Also, several of these pathogens are able to resist digestion by macrophages. In addition, free-living amoeba have been associated with several diseases in humans. Acanthamniioeba castella is an important predator of bacteria. It is a ubiquitous organism in water, soil, and air. Attention from a public health perspective is needed by investigation of interaction of foodborne pathogens and free-living amoeba. Bacteria can use free-living amoeba as reservoirs, mediators or vehicles, an infection route, “biological gym” and evolutionary crib or interaction may result in a close endosymbiotic relationship. The purpose of this review is to describe the interaction mechanisms between free-living amoeba and common bacteria species that survive in host cells.

  20. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies suggest that the effects of thapsigargin on human platelets are mediated by changes in intracellular calcium but not by intracellular histamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, S P; McNicol, A; Becker, A B

    1992-01-01

    was observed at 1 microM Tg. Preincubation of platelets with inhibitors of histamine metabolizing enzymes had little effect on intracellular histamine levels in platelets stimulated by 0.5 microM Tg. In addition, the inhibitors of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), alpha-methyl histidine (alpha-MH) and alpha......-fluoromethyl histidine (alpha-FMH) failed to inhibit Tg-induced aggregation. The intracellular histamine receptor antagonist, N,N-diethyl-2-[4-(phenylmethyl)phenoxy] ethanamine. HCl (DPPE), inhibited Tg-induced aggregation but with IC50 values dependent on the concentration of agonist used. The inhibitory effects...... of DPPE on Tg-induced aggregation were not reversed by the addition of histamine to saponin-permeabilized platelets suggesting non-histamine mediated effects of DPPE on Tg-induced aggregation. Tg stimulated an increase in the cytosolic free calcium concentration which was unaffected by DPPE indicating...