WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic-scale intracellular water

  1. Atomic-Scale Sliding Friction on Graphene in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J G; Pimentel, Carlos; Pedraz, Patricia; Luo, Feng; Serena, Pedro A; Pina, Carlos M; Gnecco, Enrico; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-04-26

    The sliding of a sharp nanotip on graphene completely immersed in water is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) and atomic force microscopy. MD simulations predict that the atomic-scale stick-slip is almost identical to that found in ultrahigh vacuum. Furthermore, they show that water plays a purely stochastic role in sliding (solid-to-solid) friction. These observations are substantiated by friction measurements on graphene grown on Cu and Ni, where, oppositely of the operation in air, lattice resolution is readily achieved. Our results promote friction force microscopy in water as a robust alternative to ultra-high-vacuum measurements. PMID:26982997

  2. Atomic-Scale Analysis of the RuO2/Water Interface under Electrochemical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Rossmeisl, Jan; Björketun, Mårten;

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the interface between ruthenium oxide and water was examined using density functional theory calculations for a range of pH and electrode potential values, and the results were summarized in a surface Pourbaix diagram. The results indicate that pH affects the interfacial structur...

  3. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  4. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  5. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  6. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  7. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimenta...

  8. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  9. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied. Ki...

  10. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan;

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution in......Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  11. Defining Contact at the Atomic Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study different definitions of contact at the atomic scale. The roles of temperature, adhesive interactions and atomic structure are studied for simple geometries. An elastic, crystalline substrate contacts a rigid, atomically flat surface or a spherical tip. The rigid surface is formed from a commensurate or incommensurate crystal or an amorphous solid. Spherical tips are made by bending crystalline planes or removing material outside a sphere. In c...

  12. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    2015-01-01

    We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute c...

  13. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative humidi

  14. Plasmon resonances in atomic-scale gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kern, Johannes; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C; Hecht, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Gap modes in resonant plasmonic nanostructures exhibit optical fields whose spatial confinement and near-field enhancement strongly increases for smaller gaps[1]. In the context of augmented light-matter interaction, gap modes are of high interest for various applications such as single-emitter spectroscopy[2-4], quantum optics[5,6], extreme nonlinear optics[7,8], efficient optical switching[9], optical trapping10, and molecular opto-electronics[11]. By means of reproducible self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust gaps reaching well below 0.5 nm. For such atomic-scale gaps extreme splitting of the symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV is observed in white-light scattering experiments. Besides providing evidence for atomic-scale gap modes at visible wavelengths with correspondingly small mode volumes and strong field enhancement, our experimental results can serve as a benchmark for electromagnetic modeling beyond local Maxwell theory[12,...

  15. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  16. Nuclear reactor materials at the atomic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. Marquis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in nuclear energy, developing new materials able to respond to the stringent requirements of the next-generation fission and future fusion reactors has become a priority. An efficient search for such materials requires detailed knowledge of material behaviour under irradiation, high temperatures and corrosive environments. Minimizing the rates of materials degradation will be possible only if the mechanisms by which it occurs are understood. Atomic-scale experimental probing as well as modelling can provide some answers and help predict in-service behaviour. This article illustrates how this approach has already improved our understanding of precipitation under irradiation, corrosion behaviour, and stress corrosion cracking. It is also now beginning to provide guidance for the development of new alloys.

  17. Intracellular water and the cytomatrix: some methods of study and current views

    OpenAIRE

    Clegg, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The extent to which the properties of water in cells are like those of water in dilute aqueous solutions is a question of broad significance to cell biology. A detailed answer is not available at present, although evidence is accumulating that the properties of at least a large fraction of intracellular water are altered by interactions with cell ultrastructure, notably the cytomatrix. That and related evidence also suggests that the properties, composition, and activities of the "aqueous cyt...

  18. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  19. Interface of transition metal oxides at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Tong-Tong; Liu, Xin-Yu; Gu, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Remarkable phenomena arise at well-defined heterostructures, composed of transition metal oxides, which is absent in the bulk counterpart, providing us a paradigm for exploring the various electron correlation effects. The functional properties of such heterostructures have attracted much attention in the microelectronic and renewable energy fields. Exotic and unexpected states of matter could arise from the reconstruction and coupling among lattice, charge, orbital and spin at the interfaces. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is a powerful tool to visualize the lattice structure and electronic structure at the atomic scale. In the present study some novel phenomena of oxide heterostructures at the atomic scale are summarized and pointed out from the perspective of electron microscopy.

  20. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  1. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  2. Indentation-formed nanocontacts: an atomic-scale perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Grütter, Peter

    2014-05-14

    One-to-one comparisons between indentation experiments and atomistic modelling have until recently been hampered by the discrepancy in length scales of the two approaches. Here, we review progress in atomic-scale nanoindentation experiments employing scanning probe techniques to achieve depth-sensing indentation and field ion microscopy to permit detailed indenter characterization. This perspective addresses both mechanical (dislocation nucleation, defect structures, adhesion, indenter effects) and electronic (interface, disorder, and vacancy scattering) properties of indentation-formed contacts.

  3. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Feijó Delgado

    Full Text Available We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein, we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  4. Understanding the Atomic-Scale World with the Molecular Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert F.

    2006-12-01

    The Molecular Workbench (MW) is a sophisticated system for developing and delivering interactive learning activities to teach basic concepts that govern atomic and nanoscale phenomena. The system is based on a molecular dynamics model that calculates the motion of atoms, molecules, and other objects in real time as a result of the applicable forces, including Lennard-Jones potentials, electrostatic potentials, elastic bonds, and external fields. Light-atom interactions are modeled with photons of selectable energy that interact with the excited states of atoms. The built-in authoring functions can be used to create or modify learning activities. The ease of creating MW materials has led to over 200 activities contributed by staff and collaborators. Many are housed in a database with fields that include an overview, learning objectives, a description of the central concepts addressed, textbook references, and extensions. MW has been used extensively in classrooms in grades 7-14. In several settings student learning gains have been measured using a pre-posttest design. Research results will be reported that show Overall increases in understanding of atomic scale phenomena at high school and community college levels. The ability to transfer understanding of atomic-scale phenomena to new situations and to reason about macroscopic phenomena on the basis of atomic-scale interactions. Better understanding of difficult questions that required immersive visualization and prediction MW is written in Java, so it runs under all common operating systems, including Mac OSX, Windows, and Linux. It is open source, so it can be shared and copied by any user.

  5. Free-living amoebae and their intracellular pathogenic microorganisms: risks for water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vincent; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2010-05-01

    An increasing number of microorganisms, including bacteria but also viruses and eukaryotes, have been described as benefiting from interaction with free-living amoebae (FLA). Beneficial interaction can be due to resistance to predation conferring ecological advantage, intracellular survival and/or intracellular proliferation. This review highlights the potential risk associated with amoebae by listing all known pathogenic microbial species for which growth and/or survival promotion by FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba spp.) has been demonstrated. It focuses on the susceptibility of amoebal and intra-amoebal bacteria to various categories of biocides, the known mechanisms of action of these biocides against trophozoites and cysts and the various methods used to demonstrate efficacy of treatments against FLA. Brief descriptions of FLA ecology and prevalence in domestic/institutional water systems and their intrinsic pathogenicity are also presented. The intention is to provide an informed opinion on the environmental risks associated with the presence of FLA and on the survival of cysts following biocidal treatments, while also highlighting the need to conduct research on the roles of amoebae in aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular....... As a particularly intriguing example of this, the lateral pressure profiles of raft-like and non-raft systems indicate that the lipid composition of membrane domains may have a major impact on membrane protein activation....... another, thus acting as nucleation sites for the formation of highly ordered nanosized domains. Finally, the fourth part discusses the large-scale properties of raft-like membrane environments and compares them to the properties of non-raft membranes. The differences turn out to be substantial...

  7. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  8. An ignition key for atomic-scale engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Daniel; Cunningham, Brian; Buchanan, Claire; Terasawa, Asako; Paxton, Anthony T; Todorov, Tchavdar N

    2012-10-10

    A current-carrying resonant nanoscale device, simulated by non-adiabatic molecular dynamics, exhibits sharp activation of non-conservative current-induced forces with bias. The result, above the critical bias, is generalized rotational atomic motion with a large gain in kinetic energy. The activation exploits sharp features in the electronic structure, and constitutes, in effect, an ignition key for atomic-scale motors. A controlling factor for the effect is the non-equilibrium dynamical response matrix for small-amplitude atomic motion under current. This matrix can be found from the steady-state electronic structure by a simpler static calculation, providing a way to detect the likely appearance, or otherwise, of non-conservative dynamics, in advance of real-time modelling.

  9. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  10. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies. PMID:27183171

  11. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.

  12. Atomic-scale yield and dislocation nucleation in KBr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filleter, T.; Maier, S.; Bennewitz, R.

    2006-04-01

    Atomic-scale plastic deformation on a KBr(100) surface has been produced and characterized by use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ultrahigh vacuum. The structure of displaced material was imaged using noncontact mode AFM after first implementing the sharp silicon tip as an indenter. After indentation the KBr(100) surface is found to exhibit monatomic terraces which are formed via dislocation nucleation and glide. Discontinuities in the force-distance curves recorded during indentation are correlated to the creation of dislocation loops in the crystal. Incipient dislocation nucleation has been characterized as the abrupt monatomic layer displacement of the tip into the sample and the corresponding creation of monatomic terraces. The indenter radius has been found to significantly influence the lateral extent of the dislocation structure and the distribution of force discontinuities during indentation. The shear stress at the yield point was experimentally determined to be 2.5GPa which is consistent with recent theoretical predictions for the ideal shear stress of KBr.

  13. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation. PMID:27301317

  14. Artificial charge-modulationin atomic-scale perovskite titanate superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, A; Muller, D A; Grazul, J L; Hwang, H Y

    2002-09-26

    The nature and length scales of charge screening in complex oxides are fundamental to a wide range of systems, spanning ceramic voltage-dependent resistors (varistors), oxide tunnel junctions and charge ordering in mixed-valence compounds. There are wide variations in the degree of charge disproportionation, length scale, and orientation in the mixed-valence compounds: these have been the subject of intense theoretical study, but little is known about the microscopic electronic structure. Here we have fabricated an idealized structure to examine these issues by growing atomically abrupt layers of LaTi(3+)O(3) embedded in SrTi(4+)O(3). Using an atomic-scale electron beam, we have observed the spatial distribution of the extra electron on the titanium sites. This distribution results in metallic conductivity, even though the superlattice structure is based on two insulators. Despite the chemical abruptness of the interfaces, we find that a minimum thickness of five LaTiO(3) layers is required for the centre titanium site to recover bulk-like electronic properties. This represents a framework within which the short-length-scale electronic response can be probed and incorporated in thin-film oxide heterostructures.

  15. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  16. Tuning magnetotransport in a compensated semimetal at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Barreteau, Céline; Ubrig, Nicolas; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2015-11-01

    Either in bulk form, or in atomically thin crystals, layered transition metal dichalcogenides continuously reveal new phenomena. The latest example is 1T'-WTe2, a semimetal found to exhibit the largest known magnetoresistance in the bulk, and predicted to become a topological insulator in strained monolayers. Here we show that reducing the thickness through exfoliation enables the electronic properties of WTe2 to be tuned, which allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed magnetotransport down to the atomic scale. The longitudinal resistance and the unconventional magnetic field dependence of the Hall resistance are reproduced quantitatively by a classical two-band model for crystals as thin as six monolayers, whereas a crossover to an Anderson insulator occurs for thinner crystals. Besides establishing the origin of the magnetoresistance of WTe2, our results represent a complete validation of the classical theory for two-band electron-hole transport, and indicate that atomically thin WTe2 layers remain gapless semimetals.

  17. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles

  18. Atomic-scale investigations of the struct. and dynamics of complex catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl Sohlberg, Drexel University

    2007-05-16

    By some accounts, catalysis impacts ≥ 30% of GDP in developed countries [Maxwell, I. E. Nature 394, 325-326 (1998)]. Catalysis is the enabling technology for petroleum production, for control of gaseous emissions from petroleum combustion, and for the production of industrial and consumer chemicals. Future applications of catalysis are potentially even more far reaching. There is an ever-growing need to move the economy from a fossil-fuel energy base to cleaner alternatives. Hydrogen-based combustion systems and fuel cells could play a dominant role, given a plentiful and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Photocatalysis is the most promising clean technology for hydrogen production, relying solely on water and sunlight, but performance enhancements in photocatalysis are needed to make this technology economically competitive. Given the enormously wide spread utilization of catalysts, even incremental performance enhancements would have far-reaching benefits for multiple end-use sectors. In the area of fuel and chemical production, such improvements would translate into vast reductions in energy consumption. At the consumption end, improvements in the catalysts involved would yield tremendous reductions in pollution. In the area of photocatalysis, such efficiency improvements could finally render hydrogen an economically viable fuel. Prerequisite to the non-empirical design and refinement of improved catalysts is the identification of the atomic-scale structure and properties of the catalytically active sites. This has become a major industrial research priority. The focus of this research program was to combine atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy with first-principles density functional theory calculations to deliver an atomic-scale description of heterogeneous catalytic systems that could form the basis for non-empirical design of improved catalysts with greater energy efficiency.

  19. The ratio total body potassium/total body water as a measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratios total body potassium (TBK)/total body water (TBW) and TBK/(TBW-82Br-R) are compared as a measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration. TBK (40K), THO-distribution volume (TBW) and 82Br space (82Br-R) were measured in 28 controls, in 15 patients with cirrhosis of the liver, and in 37 rsp. 42 mechanically ventilated patients of the intensive care unit. Effects of dehydration, hyperhydration and increased membraneous permeability concerning the ratios 82Br-R/TBW, TBK/TBW and TBK/(TBW-82Br-R) are discussed and evaluated by a theoretical model. In cirrhosis of the liver we found a significantly lowered TBK and simultaneously increased values of TBW and 82Br-R. In critically ill patients TBK was lowered whereas the TBW was normal and the bromide space was increased. We believe that this was due to an increased bromide penetration into cells and to a potassium depletion. It is concluded that: a) In homeostasis of water and electrolytes TBK/TBW is a better measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration; this is because of a lower standard error and a lower radiation dose. b) In the case of isotonic hyperhydration TBK/(TBW-82Br-R) is a better measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration than TBK/TBW; within the next 2 weeks it is not possible to make a TBK follow-up. c) In a pathophysiological state with an increased permeability of cells to tracers of the extracellular space TBK/TBW is the better measure for the mean intracellular potassium concentration in patients with normal TBW values. (orig.)

  20. Ratio total body potassium/total body water as a measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, O.; Ollech, J.; Lehr, L.; Hundeshagen, H.

    1981-10-01

    The ratios total body potassium (TBK)/total body water (TBW) and TBK/(TBW-/sup 82/Br-R) are compared as a measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration. TBK (/sup 40/K), THO-distribution volume (TBW) and /sup 82/Br space (/sup 82/Br-R) were measured in 28 controls, in 15 patients with cirrhosis of the liver, and in 37 rsp. 42 mechanically ventilated patients of the intensive care unit. Effects of dehydration, hyperhydration and increased membraneous permeability concerning the ratios /sup 82/Br-R/TBW, TBK/TBW and TBK/(TBW-/sup 82/Br-R) are discussed and evaluated by a theoretical model. In cirrhosis of the liver we found a significantly lowered TBK and simultaneously increased values of TBW and /sup 82/Br-R. In critically ill patients TBK was lowered whereas the TBW was normal and the bromide space was increased. We believe that this was due to an increased bromide penetration into cells and to a potassium depletion. It is concluded that: a) In homeostasis of water and electrolytes TBK/TBW is a better measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration; this is because of a lower standard error and a lower radiation dose. b) In the case of isotonic hyperhydration TBK/(TBW-/sup 82/Br-R) is a better measure of the mean intracellular potassium concentration than TBK/TBW; within the next 2 weeks it is not possible to make a TBK follow-up. c) In a pathophysiological state with an increased permeability of cells to tracers of the extracellular space TBK/TBW is the better measure for the mean intracellular potassium concentration in patients with normal TBW values.

  1. [Acanthamoeba, naturally intracellularly infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after their isolation from a microbiologically contaminated drinking water system in a hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R; Burghardt, H; Bergmann, H

    1995-03-01

    The drinking water system of a new hospital building that was highly contaminated with bacteria before opening was investigated too for the prevalence of small free living amoebae. Germ counts resulted in > 100 CFU/ml in 100% of the cold water samples, that showed also growth of P. aeruginosa, whereas E. coli and coliforme bacteria could not be identified. The investigation of 37 water samples for protozoa revealed growth of small freeliving amoebae in 20 samples (54%) belonging to 10 species of the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Hartmannella, Echinamoeba among others. In addition 2 Ciliate- and 2 Microflagellate-species could be observed. While all Naegleria strains isolated belonged to the N. gruberi-complex two of 16 Acanthamoeba-isolates proved to be pathogenic for laboratory mice. From 7 watersamples positive with P. aeruginosa 5 Acanthamoeba- and 2 Echinamoeba strains could be isolated which revealed intracellular multiplication of P. aeruginosa. Because of their well known resistances against chlorine, the amoebae and their cysts are considered to be vectors for these intracellular bacteria. A complete sanitation of the incriminated drinking water system was accomplished by combined chemical and thermic disinfection measures.

  2. Expression of VAMP-2-like protein in kidney collecting duct intracellular vesicles. Colocalization with Aquaporin-2 water channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S; Marples, D; Birn, H; Mohtashami, M; Dalby, N O; Trimble, M; Knepper, M

    1995-01-01

    Body water balance is controlled by vasopressin, which regulates Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels in kidney collecting duct cells by vesicular trafficking between intracellular vesicles and the plasma membrane. To examine the molecular apparatus involved in vesicle trafficking and vasopressin regulation of AQP2 in collecting duct cells, we tested if targeting proteins expressed in the synaptic vesicles, namely vesicle-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (VAMP1 and 2), are expressed in kidney collecting duct. Immunoblotting revealed specific labeling of VAMP2 (18-kD band) but not VAMP1 in membrane fractions prepared from kidney inner medulla. Controls using preadsorbed antibody or preimmune serum were negative. Bands of identical molecular size were detected in immunoblots of brain membrane vesicles and purified synaptic vesicles. VAMP2 in kidney membranes was cleaved by tetanus toxin, revealing a tetanus toxin-sensitive VAMP homologue. Similarly, tetanus toxin cleaved VAMP2 in synaptic vesicles. In kidney inner medulla, VAMP2 was predominantly expressed in the membrane fraction enriched for intracellular vesicles, with little or no VAMP2 in the plasma membrane enriched fraction. This was confirmed by immunocytochemistry using semithin cryosections, which showed mainly vesicular labeling in collecting duct principal cells, with no labeling of intercalated cells. VAMP2 immunolabeling colocalized with AQP2 labeling in intracellular vesicles, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy after double immunolabeling of isolated vesicles. Quantitative analysis of 1,310 vesicles revealed a highly significant association of both AQP2 and VAMP2 in the same vesicles (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the presence of AQP2 in vesicles immunoisolated with anti-VAMP2 antibodies was confirmed by immunoblotting. In conclusion, VAMP2, a component of the neuronal SNARE complex, is expressed in vesicles carrying AQP2, suggesting a role in vasopressin-regulated vesicle trafficking of AQP2

  3. Atomic Scale Computer Simulation for Early Precipitation Process of Ni75Al6Vi9 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhong ZHAO; Hua HOU; Hong XU; Yongxin WANG; Zheng CHEN; Xiaodong SUN

    2003-01-01

    The atomic scale computer simulation for initial precipitation mechanism of Ni75Al6V19 alloy was carried out for the first time by employing the microscopic diffusion equation. The initial precipitation process was invest igated throughsimulating the atom

  4. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  5. Segmental extracellular and intracellular water distribution and muscle glycogen after 72-h carbohydrate loading using spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiose, Keisuke; Yamada, Yosuke; Motonaga, Keiko; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-07-01

    Body water content increases during carbohydrate loading because 2.7-4-g water binds each 1 g of glycogen. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) allows separate assessment of extracellular and intracellular water (ECW and ICW, respectively) in the whole body and each body segment. However, BIS has not been shown to detect changes in body water induced by carbohydrate loading. Here, we aimed to investigate whether BIS had sufficient sensitivity to detect changes in body water content and to determine segmental water distribution after carbohydrate loading. Eight subjects consumed a high-carbohydrate diet containing 12 g carbohydrates·kg body mass(-1)·day(-1) for 72 h after glycogen depletion cycling exercise. Changes in muscle glycogen concentration were measured by (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and total body water (TBW) was measured by the deuterium dilution technique (TBWD2O). ICW and ECW in the whole body (wrist-to-ankle) and in each body segment (arm, trunk, and leg) were assessed by BIS. Muscle glycogen concentration [72.7 ± 10.0 (SD) to 169.4 ± 55.9 mmol/kg wet wt, P < 0.001] and TBWD2O (39.3 ± 3.2 to 40.2 ± 3.0 kg, P < 0.05) increased significantly 72 h after exercise compared with baseline, respectively. Whole-body BIS showed significant increases in ICW (P < 0.05), but not in ECW. Segmental BIS showed significant increases in ICW in the legs (P < 0.05), but not in the arms or trunk. Our results suggest that increase in body water after carbohydrate loading can be detected by BIS and is caused by segment-specific increases in ICW. PMID:27231310

  6. Sensing for intracellular thiols by water-insoluble two-photon fluorescent probe incorporating nanogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xudong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, Rui, E-mail: hurui@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: yili@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Optoelectronic Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Guoqiang, E-mail: gqyang@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A novel “turn-on” two-photon fluorescent probe based on a π-conjugated triarylboron luminogen was designed and synthesized. • Fast, selective and sensitive detection of biothiols in 100% aqueous solution by simply loaded on a nanogel. • Single-photon and two-photon fluorescent bioimaging of biothiols in NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. - Abstract: A novel “turn-on” two-photon fluorescent probe containing a π-conjugated triarylboron luminogen and a maleimide moiety DMDP-M based on the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism for biothiol detection was designed and synthesized. By simply loading the hydrophobic DMDP-M on a cross-linked Pluronic{sup ®} F127 nanogel (CL-F127), a probing system DMDP-M/CL-F127 was established, which shows quick response, high selectivity and sensitivity to cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) in aqueous phase. The DMDP-M/CL-F127 system presented the fastest response to Cys with a rate constant of 0.56 min{sup −1}, and the detection limit to Cys was calculated to be as low as 0.18 μM. The DMDP-M/CL-F127 system has been successfully applied to the fluorescence imaging of biothiols in NIH/3T3 fibroblasts either with single-photon or two-photon excitation because of its high biocompatibility and cell-membrane permeability. The present work provides a general, simple and efficient strategy for the application of hydrophobic molecules to sensing biothiols in aqueous phase, and a novel sensing system for intracellular biothiols fitted for both single-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging.

  7. Experimental atomic scale investigation of irradiation effects in CW 316SS and UFG-CW 316SS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareige, P.; Etienne, A.; Radiguet, B.

    2009-06-01

    Materials of the core internals of pressurized water reactor (austenitic stainless steels) are subject to neutron irradiation. To understand the ageing mechanisms associated with irradiation and propose life predictions of components or develop new materials, irradiation damage needs to be experimentally investigated. Atomic scale investigation of a neutron-irradiated CW316 SS with the laser pulsed atom probe gives a detailed description of the solute segregation in the austenitic grains. In order to understand the mechanism of solute segregation detected in the neutron-irradiated materials, ion irradiations were performed. These latest irradiations were realized on a CW 316SS as well as on a nanostructured CW 316SS. The study of irradiation effects in a nanograin material allows first, to easily analyse grain boundary segregation and second, to test the behaviour under irradiation of a new nanostructured material. The three aspects of this atomic scale investigation (neutron irradiation effect, model ion irradiation, new nanostructured CW 316 SS) are tackled in this paper.

  8. Intracellular water in Artemia cysts (brine shrimp): Investigations by deuterium and oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, S R; Seitz, P K; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1990-08-01

    The dormant cysts of Artemia undergo cycles of hydration-dehydration without losing viability. Therefore, Artemia cysts serve as an excellent intact cellular system for studying the dynamics of water-protein interactions as a function of hydration. Deuterium spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation times of water in cysts hydrated with D(2)O have been measured for hydrations between 1.5 and 0.1 g of D(2)O per gram of dry solids. When the relaxation rates (I/T(1), I/T(2)) of (2)H and (17)O are plotted as a function of the reciprocal of hydration (1/H), an abrupt change in slope is observed near 0.6 g of D(2)O (or H(2) (17)O)/gram of dry solids, the hydration at which conventional metabolism is activated in this system. The results have been discussed in terms of the two-site and multisite exchange models for the water-protein interaction as well as protein dynamics models. The (2)H and (17)O relaxation rates as a function of hydration show striking similarities to those observed for anisotropic motion of water molecules in protein crystals.It is suggested here that although the simple two-site exchange model or n-site exchange model could be used to explain our data at high hydration levels, such models are not adequate at low hydration levels (<0.6 g H(2)O/g) where several complex interactions between water and proteins play a predominant role in the relaxation of water nuclei. We further suggest that the abrupt change in the slope of I/T(1) as a function of hydration in the vicinity of 0.6 g H(2)O/g is due to a change in water-protein interactions resulting from a variation in the dynamics of protein motion. PMID:19431762

  9. Electronic friction at the atomic scale: Conduction, electrostatic and magnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5K) in the temperature range 65 - 293 K, to explore electronic contributions to friction at the atomic scale. The samples were prepared with oxygen-depleted surfaces, with thin semiconducting surface layers present atop the bulk. Below Tc, the friction coefficient was observed to be constant at 0.19 and exhibited no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces observed below Tc. The friction coefficient exhibited a change in slope within experimental error of Tc that increased progressively above Tc and reached 0.33 by room temperature. The results were analyzed within the context of underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction we conclude that contact electrification and static electricity play a significant role above Tc. Supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  10. Intracellular water in Artemia cysts (brine shrimp): Investigations by deuterium and oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Kasturi, S. R.; Seitz, P. K.; Chang, D. C.; Hazlewood, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    The dormant cysts of Artemia undergo cycles of hydration-dehydration without losing viability. Therefore, Artemia cysts serve as an excellent intact cellular system for studying the dynamics of water-protein interactions as a function of hydration. Deuterium spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times of water in cysts hydrated with D2O have been measured for hydrations between 1.5 and 0.1 g of D2O per gram of dry solids. When the relaxation rates (I/T1, I/T2) of 2H and 17O are plot...

  11. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J.V.; Lægsgaard, E.; Stensgaard, I.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Clausen, B.S, Helveg S; Topsøe, H.; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoparticles synthesized on Au(lll), and establishes a new picture of the active edge sires of the nanoclusters. The results demonstrate a way to get detailed atomic-scale information on catalysts in ...

  12. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt;

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...

  13. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.;

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  14. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated ele...

  15. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana;

    2009-01-01

    , the exceptional nature of cardiolipins is characterized by their small charged head group connected to typically four hydrocarbon chains. In this work, we present atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the inner mitochondrial membrane modeled as a mixture of cardiolipins (CLs), phosphatidylcholines (PCs...

  16. Is atomic-scale dissipation in NC-AFM real? Investigation using virtual atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope, that explicitly simulates the operation of a non-contact AFM experiment, we have performed calculations to investigate the formation of atomic-scale contrast in dissipation images. A non-conservative tip-surface interaction was implemented using the theory of dynamical response in scanning probe microscopy with energies and barriers derived from realistic atomistic modelling. It is shown how contrast in the damping signal is due to the hysteresis in the tip-surface force and not an artefact of the finite response of the complicated instrumentation. Topography and dissipation images of the CaO(001) surface are produced which show atomic-scale contrast in the dissipation with a corrugation of approximately 0.1 eV, which is typical of that observed in images of similar binary ionic surfaces. The effect of the fast-direction scanning speed on the image formation is also investigated and discussed

  17. Atomic-scale non-contact AFM studies of alumina supported nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Meinander, Kristoffer; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose;

    ATOMIC-SCALE NON-CONTACT ATOMIC FORCE STUDIES OF ALUMINA SUPPORTED NANOPARTICLES Thomas N. Jensen, Kristoffer Meinander, Flemming Besenbacher and Jeppe V. Lauritsen Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark Heterogeneous catalysis plays a crucial role...... materials is a prerequisite for the synthesis of more sintering stable catalysts and the realizations of nanocatalysts implementing catalyst particles with a tailored size and morphology. In the last two decades the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become one of the premier tools for studying surfaces...... at the nanometre scale [1]. When operated in the so-called non-contact mode (nc-AFM), this technique yields genuine atomic resolution and offers a unique tool for atomic-scale studies of clean surfaces, as well as, nanoparticles and thin films on these surfaces irrespective of the substrate being electrically...

  18. Engineering the magnetic anisotropy of atomic-scale nanostructure under electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanjiao; Ding, Hang-Chen; Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures are promising candidates for future information processing devices. Utilizing external electric field to manipulate their magnetic properties is an especially thrilling project. Here, by carefully identifying the different contributions of each atomic orbital to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the ferromagnetic metal films, we argue that it is possible to engineer both the MAE and the magnetic response to the electric field of atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures. Taking the iron monolayer as a matrix, we propose several interesting iron nanostructures with dramatically different magnetic properties. Such nanostructures could exhibit a strong magnetoelectric effect. Our work may open new avenues to the artificial design of electrically controlled magnetic devices.

  19. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  20. Sensing and atomic-scale structure analysis of single nuclear spin clusters in diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Fazhan; Kong, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Kong, Fei; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao; Du, Jiangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a crown-jewel challenge in the field of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and has important applications in chemical analysis and in quantum computing. Recently, it becomes possible to tackle this grand challenge thanks to experimental advances in preserving quantum coherence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond as a sensitive probe and theoretical proposals on atomic-scale magnetometry via dynamical decoupling control. Through dec...

  1. Finite Bias Calculations to Model Interface Dipoles in Electrochemical Cells at the Atomic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer;

    2016-01-01

    The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure...... to satisfy the thermodynamic constraints imposed by the environment. This is captured by the generalized computational hydrogen electrode model, which enables us to make efficient first-principles calculations of atomic scale properties of the electrochemical interface....

  2. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  3. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  4. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and graphene-like BN sheets

  5. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang, E-mail: chunqiang.zhuang@bjut.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Liu, Lei [Institute of Earthquake Science, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 10036 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  6. Temperature Dependent Dislocation Mobility in MgSiO3 Perovskite: An Atomic Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraych, A.; Hirel, P.; Carrez, P.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer through the mantle is carried by convection, which involves plastic flow of the mantle constituents. Among these constituents, (Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)O3 perovskite is known to be the most abundant. This material is deformed at very low strain rate (from 10-12 to 10-16 s-1), and under extreme pressure and temperature conditions (from 30 to 140GPa, 1500 to 4000°C). Its plastic behaviour is challenging to reproduce experimentally, but crucial for a better understanding of the Earth's dynamic. The recent progress in modelling the behaviours of materials, which until now have been mostly used on metals, are applied here on MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv). We characterize dislocations at the atomic scale, as the first step of a multi-scale modelling approach on Mg-Pv plastic deformation. We model dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (described within the Pbnm space group), which are the shortest lattice parameters in the orthorhombic structure. Dislocation cores are determined to be described at various pressures. The resistance to glide of the dislocations is quantified indicating that [100](010) and [010](100) are the easiest slip systems in Mg-Pv over the full pressure range of the lower mantle. The effect of temperature is introduced by assimilating the thermal activation on dislocation lines to vibrations of a string lying into a potential valley. These vibrations allow the dislocation to overcome locally the energy barrier that represents the lattice friction, and then propagates under the effect of stress. With this model, by combining elastic theory of dislocations and calculations at the atomic scale, a first expression of the strain rate produced by dislocation glide is provided.Left figure : Thermally activated propagation of dislocation over the energy barrierRight figure : Shape of the crossing dislocation obtained from atomic scale modelling

  7. Single atom-scale diamond defect allows a large Aharonov-Casher phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose an experiment that would produce and measure a large Aharonov-Casher (AC) phase in a solid-state system under macroscopic motion. A diamond crystal is mounted on a spinning disk in the presence of a uniform electric field. Internal magnetic states of a single nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) defect, replacing interferometer trajectories, are coherently controlled by microwave pulses. The AC phase shift is manifested as a relative phase, of up to 17 radians, between components of a superposition of magnetic substates, which is two orders of magnitude larger than that measured in any other atom-scale quantum system.

  8. Atomic-scale study of transformation paths in unmixing and ordering reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D.; Pareige-Schmuck, C.; Danoix, F. [CNRS, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Fac. des Sci. de Rouen; Stiller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The tomographic atom-probe (TAP) is a new high resolution nanoanalytical microscope, which provides three-dimensional maps of chemical heterogeneities in a metallic material on a near-atomic scale. Application of the TAP to unmixing and ordering in metallic alloys is discussed and illustrated through various examples (spinodal decomposition in FeCr ferritic phases, nucleation and growth of LI{sub 2} ordered precipitates in nickel based alloys, precipitation in maraging steels). The role of the TAP in the investigation of transformation paths in these systems is discussed. (orig.). 17 refs.

  9. Probing electronic state at atomic scale on the surface of SrVO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Ryota; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2014-03-01

    Probing electronic structure of atomically well controlled surface of Perovskite-type 3d transition-metal oxides have been attracting much interest because of their intriguing emergent physical properties by heterostructure engineering. In this study, we have especially focused on SrVO3, where importance of correlation effects has been considered. We successfully obtained atomically flat surfaces of SrVO3, which gave us the great opportunity to visualize correlated electronic state at atomic scale by means of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Based on the experimental data, we discuss spectroscopic signature of many body effects on the surface of SrVO3 system.

  10. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component in...... understanding particle size effects on the activity of catalytic nanoparticles.......We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends in...

  11. Homotopy-Theoretic Study &Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial "string-wall-bounded" topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a "string-wall-bounded" configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials.

  12. Spin-flip induction of Fano resonance upon electron tunneling through atomic-scale spin structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Val' kov, V. V., E-mail: vvv@iph.krasn.ru; Aksenov, S. V., E-mail: asv86@iph.krasn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Kirensky Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Ulanov, E. A. [Siberian State Aerospace University (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The inclusion of inelastic spin-dependent electron scatterings by the potential profiles of a single magnetic impurity and a spin dimer is shown to induce resonance features due to the Fano effect in the transport characteristics of such atomic-scale spin structures. The spin-flip processes leading to a configuration interaction of the system's states play a fundamental role for the realization of Fano resonance and antiresonance. It has been established that applying an external magnetic field and a gate electric field allows the conductive properties of spin structures to be changed radically through the Fano resonance mechanism.

  13. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  14. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco;

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations sh...... temperatures the material becomes softer in both the plastic and elastic regime. Porosity in the samples result in a softening of the material; this may be a significant effect in many experiments. [S0163-1829(99)05941-X]....

  15. Releasing intracellular product to prepare whole cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments in water-edible oil two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minglue; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2016-11-01

    Selective releasing intracellular product in Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution to prepare whole cell biocatalyst is a novel strategy for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments, in which cell suspension culture exhibits some advantages comparing with the corresponding growing cell submerged culture. In the present work, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 was successfully replaced by edible plant oils for releasing intracellular Monascus pigments. High concentration of Monascus pigments (with absorbance nearly 710 AU at 470 nm in the oil phase, normalized to the aqueous phase volume approximately 142 AU) was achieved by cell suspension culture in peanut oil-water two-phase system. Furthermore, the utilization of edible oil as extractant also fulfills the demand for application of Monascus pigments as natural food colorant.

  16. Modelling atomic scale manipulation with the non-contact atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of calculations performed to model the process of lateral manipulation of an oxygen vacancy in the MgO(001) surface using the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). The potential energy surfaces for the manipulation as a function of tip position are determined from atomistic modelling of the MgO(001) surface interacting with a Mg terminated MgO tip. These energies are then used to model the dynamical evolution of the system as the tip oscillates and at a finite temperature using a kinetic Monte Carlo method. The manipulation process is strongly dependent on the lateral position of the tip and the system temperature. It is also found that the expectation value of the point at which the vacancy jumps depends on the trajectory of the oscillating cantilever as the surface is approached. The effect of the manipulation on the operation of the NC-AFM is modelled with a virtual dynamic AFM, which explicitly simulates the entire experimental instrumentation and control loops. We show how measurable experimental signals can result from a single controlled atomic scale event and suggest the most favourable conditions for achieving successful atomic scale manipulation experimentally

  17. Ultralow-Noise Atomic-Scale Structures for Quantum Circuitry in Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Saquib; Weber, Bent; Thompson, Daniel W; Simmons, Michelle Y; Ghosh, Arindam

    2016-09-14

    The atomically precise doping of silicon with phosphorus (Si:P) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) promises ultimate miniaturization of field effect transistors. The one-dimensional (1D) Si:P nanowires are of particular interest, retaining exceptional conductivity down to the atomic scale, and are predicted as interconnects for a scalable silicon-based quantum computer. Here, we show that ultrathin Si:P nanowires form one of the most-stable electrical conductors, with the phenomenological Hooge parameter of low-frequency noise being as low as ≈10(-8) at 4.2 K, nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than even carbon-nanotube-based 1D conductors. A in-built isolation from the surface charge fluctuations due to encapsulation of the wires within the epitaxial Si matrix is the dominant cause for the observed suppression of noise. Apart from quantum information technology, our results confirm the promising prospects for precision-doped Si:P structures in atomic-scale circuitry for the 11 nm technology node and beyond. PMID:27525390

  18. Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Ahmet

    Cobalt oxides offer a rich ?eld for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of ful?lling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.

  19. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-01-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene. PMID:25434431

  20. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnohr, C. S., E-mail: c.schnohr@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As, GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x}, or CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  1. Atomic-scale studies of uranium oxidation and corrosion by water vapour

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, TL; Coe, C.; Bagot, PAJ; Morrall, P; Smith, GDW; Scott, T.; Moody, MP

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacia...

  2. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  3. Analysis of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties at Atomic Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at developing a mathematic model to characterize the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. The carbon-carbon (C–C bonds between two adjacent atoms are modeled as Euler beams. According to the relationship of Tersoff-Brenner force theory and potential energy acting on C–C bonds, material constants of beam element are determined at the atomic scale. Based on the elastic deformation energy and mechanical equilibrium of a unit in graphite sheet, simply form ED equations of calculating Young's modulus of armchair and zigzag graphite sheets are derived. Following with the geometrical relationship of SWCNTs in cylindrical coordinates and the structure mechanics approach, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of armchair and zigzag SWCNTs are also investigated. The results show that the approach to research mechanical properties of SWCNTs is a concise and valid method. We consider that it will be useful technique to progress on this type of investigation.

  4. Three-dimensional atomic-scale imaging of impurity segregation to line defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavette; Cadel; Fraczkiewicz; Menand

    1999-12-17

    Clouds of impurity atoms near line defects are believed to affect the plastic deformation of alloys. Three-dimensional atom probe techniques were used to image these so-called Cottrell atmospheres directly. Ordered iron-aluminum alloys (40 atomic percent aluminum) doped with boron (400 atomic parts per million) were investigated on an atomic scale along the direction. A boron enrichment was observed in the vicinity of an edge dislocation. The enriched region appeared as a three-dimensional pipe 5 nanometers in diameter, tangent to the dislocation line. The dislocation was found to be boron-enriched by a factor of 50 (2 atomic percent) relative to the bulk. The local boron enrichment is accompanied by a strong aluminum depletion of 20 atomic percent. PMID:10600736

  5. Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation

  6. Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, He; Wu, Shujing; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhao, Dongshan, E-mail: wang@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo, E-mail: wang@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Center for Electron Microscopy and MOE Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhao, Xingzhong [School of Physics and Technology, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation.

  7. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping; Van Benthem, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1411 (United States); Xiong, Jie; Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-04-29

    Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and antiferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

  8. Atomic-scale imaging of surfaces and interfaces. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, volume 295

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Smith, David J.; Tong, S. Y.

    The gap between imagining and imaging is getting ever smaller. The Atomic-Scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces, Symposium W at the 1992 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, brought together researchers using state-of-the-art imaging techniques capable of resolving atomic features. Methods represented were scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), transmission (TEM) and reflection (REM) electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM or POSAP), high and low energy external source electron holographies, and internal source electron holographies. Some highlights from the STM papers included discussions of the limitations and future potential of STM as well as current findings. Several papers presented work with STM at elevated temperatures. Jene Golovchenko reviewed STM work showing cooperative diffusion events (Pb on Ge) involving many tens of substrate atoms. Don Eigler focused on atomic manipulation and some of its uses to enable fundamental studies of small atomic clusters.

  9. Homotopy-Theoretic Study &Atomic-Scale Observation of Vortex Domains in Hexagonal Manganites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Zhen; Ma, Chao; Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2016-01-01

    Essential structural properties of the non-trivial "string-wall-bounded" topological defects in hexagonal manganites are studied through homotopy group theory and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of a "string-wall-bounded" configuration in RMnO3 is shown to be strongly linked with the transformation of the degeneracy space. The defect core regions (~50 Å) mainly adopt the continuous U(1) symmetry of the high-temperature phase, which is essential for the formation and proliferation of vortices. Direct visualization of vortex strings at atomic scale provides insight into the mechanisms and macro-behavior of topological defects in crystalline materials. PMID:27324701

  10. Atomic-Scale Engineering of Abrupt Interface for Direct Spin Contact of Ferromagnetic Semiconductor with Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyanov, Dmitry V.; Karateeva, Christina G.; Karateev, Igor A.; Tokmachev, Andrey M.; Vasiliev, Alexander L.; Zolotarev, Sergey I.; Likhachev, Igor A.; Storchak, Vyacheslav G.

    2016-01-01

    Control and manipulation of the spin of conduction electrons in industrial semiconductors such as silicon are suggested as an operating principle for a new generation of spintronic devices. Coherent injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si is a key to this novel technology. It is contingent on our ability to engineer flawless interfaces of Si with a spin injector to prevent spin-flip scattering. The unique properties of the ferromagnetic semiconductor EuO make it a prospective spin injector into silicon. Recent advances in the epitaxial integration of EuO with Si bring the manufacturing of a direct spin contact within reach. Here we employ transmission electron microscopy to study the interface EuO/Si with atomic-scale resolution. We report techniques for interface control on a submonolayer scale through surface reconstruction. Thus we prevent formation of alien phases and imperfections detrimental to spin injection. This development opens a new avenue for semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26957146

  11. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces. PMID:26743693

  12. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  13. Continuous description of a grain boundary in forsterite from atomic scale simulations: the role of disclinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Cordier, Patrick; Taupin, Vincent; Fressengeas, Claude; Jahn, Sandro

    2016-06-01

    We present continuous modelling at inter-atomic scale of a high-angle symmetric tilt boundary in forsterite. The model is grounded in periodic arrays of dislocation and disclination dipoles built on information gathered from discrete atomistic configurations generated by molecular dynamics simulations. The displacement, distortion (strain and rotation), curvature, dislocation and disclination density fields are determined in the boundary area using finite difference and interpolation techniques between atomic sites. The distortion fields of the O, Si and Mg sub-lattices are detailed to compare their roles in the accommodation of lattice incompatibility along the boundary. It is shown that the strain and curvature fields associated with the dislocation and disclination fields in the 'skeleton' O and Si sub-lattices accommodate the tilt incompatibility, whereas the elastic strain and rotation fields of the Mg sub-lattice are essentially compatible and induce stresses balancing the incompatibility stresses in the overall equilibrium.

  14. Thin Film of Perovskite Oxide with Atomic Scale p-n Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bin; HUANG Ke-ke; HOU Chang-min; YUAN Hong-ming; PANG Guang-sheng; FENG Shou-hua

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of perovskite manganese oxide La0.66Ca0.29K0.05MnO3(LCKMO) on Au/ITO(ITO=indium tin oxide) substrates were prepared by off-axis radio frequency magnetron sputtering and characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) at room temperature.The thin films with thickness ranged from 100 nm to 300 nm basically show cubic structures with a=0.3886 nm,the same as that of the raw material used,but the structures are highly modulated.C-AFM results revealed that the atomic scale p-n junction feature of the thin films was the same as that of the single crystals.The preparation of the thin films thus further confirms the possibility of their application extending from micrometer-sized single crystals to macroscopic thin film.

  15. Atomic-scale structure of grain boundaries: Correlations to grain boundary properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally believed that many properties of solid interfaces are ultimately determined by their structure and composition at the atomic level. We report here on work in two areas of grain boundary (GB) research in which structure-property correlations have been investigated recently. HREM observations in connection with computer modeling of GBs in fcc metals have given considerable insight into correlations between GB energy and atomic-scale GB structure. Efforts to understand and possibly control the supercurrent transport behavior across GBs in high-temperature superconductors require the combination of microstructure characterizations with investigations of electric transport properties. In both areas considerable progress is being made and has already lead to important insights concerning interfacial properties

  16. Atomic scale control and understanding of cubic silicon carbide surface reconstructions, nanostructures and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Enriquez, Hanna B.

    2004-05-01

    The atomic scale ordering and properties of cubic silicon carbide (bgr-SiC) surfaces and nanostructures are investigated by atom-resolved room and high-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), synchrotron radiation-based valence band and core level photoelectron spectroscopy (VB-PES, CL-PES) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). In this paper, we review the latest results on the atomic scale understanding of (i) the structure of bgr-SiC(100) surface reconstructions, (ii) temperature-induced metallic surface phase transition, (iii) one dimensional Si(C) self-organized nanostructures having unprecedented characteristics, and on (iv) nanochemistry at SiC surfaces with hydrogen. The organization of these surface reconstructions as well as the 1D nanostructures' self-organization are primarily driven by surface stress. In this paper, we address such important issues as (i) the structure of the Si-rich 3 × 2, the Si-terminated c (4 × 2), the C-terminated c (2 × 2) reconstructions of the bgr-SiC(100) surface, (ii) the temperature-induced reversible {\\mathrm {c}}(4\\times 2) \\Leftrightarrow 2\\times 1 metallic phase transition, (iii) the formation of highly stable (up to 900 °C) Si atomic and vacancy lines, (iv) the temperature-induced sp to sp3 diamond like surface transformation, and (v) the first example of H-induced semiconductor surface metallization on the bgr-SiC (100) 3 × 2 surface. The results are discussed and compared to other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  17. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCutTM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  18. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  19. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, 7dmLR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (Kd) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g−1 dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g−1 dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL−1 in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (Kd), MC

  20. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastepa, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.zastepa@gmail.com; Pick, Frances R.; Blais, Jules M.; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, {sup 7dm}LR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (K{sub d}) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g{sup −1} dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g{sup −1} dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL{sup −1} in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water

  1. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth. PMID:27617291

  2. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  3. Influence of Aromatic Residues on the Material Characteristics of Aβ Amyloid Protofibrils at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun Joon; Baek, Inchul; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2015-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils, which cause a number of degenerative diseases, are insoluble under physiological conditions and are supported by native contacts. Recently, the effects of the aromatic residues on the Aβ amyloid protofibril were investigated in a ThT fluorescence study. However, the relationship between the material characteristics of the Aβ protofibril and its aromatic residues has not yet been investigated on the atomic scale. Here, we successfully constructed wild-type (WT) and mutated types of Aβ protofibrils by using molecular dynamics simulations. Through principle component analysis, we established the structural stability and vibrational characteristics of F20L Aβ protofibrils and compared them with WT and other mutated models such as F19L and F19LF20L. In addition, structural stability was assessed by calculating the elastic modulus, which showed that the F20L model has higher values than the other models studied. From our results, it is shown that aromatic residues influence the structural and material characteristics of Aβ protofibrils. PMID:26037071

  4. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  5. Atomic-Scale Observations of Catalyst Structures under Reaction Conditions and during Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Crozier, Peter A

    2016-03-23

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a chemical process performed at a solid-gas or solid-liquid interface. Direct participation of catalyst atoms in this chemical process determines the significance of the surface structure of a catalyst in a fundamental understanding of such a chemical process at a molecular level. High-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) have been used to observe catalyst structure in the last few decades. In this review, instrumentation for the two in situ/operando techniques and scientific findings on catalyst structures under reaction conditions and during catalysis are discussed with the following objectives: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of in situ/operando studies of catalysts; (2) to interpret the observed restructurings of catalyst and evolution of catalyst structures; (3) to explore how HP-STM and ETEM can be synergistically used to reveal structural details under reaction conditions and during catalysis; and (4) to discuss the future challenges and prospects of atomic-scale observation of catalysts in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This Review focuses on the development of HP-STM and ETEM, the in situ/operando characterizations of catalyst structures with them, and the integration of the two structural analytical techniques for fundamentally understanding catalysis.

  6. Atomic-scale magnetometry of distant nuclear spin clusters via nitrogen-vacancy spin in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Hu, Jian-Liang; Ho, Sai-Wah; Wan, Jones T K; Liu, R B

    2011-04-01

    The detection of single nuclear spins is an important goal in magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Optically detected magnetic resonance can detect single nuclear spins that are strongly coupled to an electron spin, but the detection of distant nuclear spins that are only weakly coupled to the electron spin has not been considered feasible. Here, using the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond as a model system, we numerically demonstrate that it is possible to detect two or more distant nuclear spins that are weakly coupled to a centre electron spin if these nuclear spins are strongly bonded to each other in a cluster. This cluster will stand out from other nuclear spins by virtue of characteristic oscillations imprinted onto the electron spin decoherence profile, which become pronounced under dynamical decoupling control. Under many-pulse dynamical decoupling, the centre electron spin coherence can be used to measure nuclear magnetic resonances of single molecules. This atomic-scale magnetometry should improve the performance of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for applications in chemical, biological, medical and materials research, and could also have applications in solid-state quantum computing. PMID:21358646

  7. A theoretical study of the atomic and electronic structures of three prospective atomic scale wire systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevlin, S A

    2001-01-01

    transport properties of the line are also calculated. Finally we find which of the two models of the (4x1)-Si(111)-ln reconstruction is thermodynamically favoured in a supercell geometry. We use ab initio plane wave techniques in the Local-Density-Approximation, and calculate and compare the electronic structure of the two models with respect to the characteristic energies for electron dispersion along and across the chain structures. We also consider the effects of electronic structure on the in-plane transport properties of the indium lines. The structural and electronic properties of several candidate atomic scale wires are analysed. Three candidates are studied: the trans-polyacetylene molecule, the silicon line on the (001) face of cubic silicon carbide (the (nx2) series of reconstructions) and the indium chain on the (111) face of silicon carbide (the (4x1) reconstruction). We use the polyacetylene molecule as a test-bed for the techniques that we use to calculate transport properties in an empirically ...

  8. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  9. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  10. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2016-08-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  11. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  12. Atomic-scale computer simulation for ternary alloy Ni-Cr-Al during early precipitation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Zhong; CHEN Zheng; WANG Yongxin; LU Yanli; LI Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    The aging behaviors of Ni-Cr-Al ternary alloy are studied at temperature 873 K based on the mean-field theory, and the early precipitation process is simulated at atomic-scale with microscopic phase-field model. The precipitation mechanism of the low supersaturated alloy Ni-12.2at. % Cr-7.8at. % Al is non-classical nucleation and growth, the L12 structure (Ni3Al) and D022 structure (Ni3Cr)phases precipitate simultaneously, a part of D022 phase transmits to L12 structure phase, and other part retains its previous structure. For high supersaturated alloy, congruent ordering appears first, then followed by spinodal decomposition, the nonstoicheometric ordered phases are produced in this process, which occurs before clustering. The precipitation mechanism of Ni-8at. % Cr-18at. %Al alloy is similar to Ni-10at. % Cr-12at. %Al alloy, but the ordering process of the former is ahead of the latter.

  13. Atomic scale studies of the chemistry of the Cu/MgO {111} heterophase interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cu/MgO [111] heterophase interface is studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, high resolution electron microscopy and atom-probe field-ion microscopy techniques. Wire and foil specimens of a Cu-2.8 at.% Mg alloy were internally oxidized to produce MgO precipitates at a number density of 5·1015Cm-3 with a mean diameter of ∼200 Angstrom. The MgO precipitates have a semicoherent interface with the Cu matrix and they exhibit a cube-on-cube orientation relationship. The octahedral-shaped MgO precipitates were analyzed using APFIM by dissecting along a direction on an atomic scale. In this manner an MgO precipitate, with a [111] plane perpendicular to the axis of the APFIM, is uncovered after the Cu matrix has been mass analyzed. It was found that the terminating [222] plane of an MgO precipitate is pure oxygen, and the second [222] plane is pure Mg

  14. Characterization of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenide at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge structures and atomic defects are of fundamental importance since they can significantly affect the physical and chemical properties of low-dimensional materials, such as nanoribbons, and therefore merit thorough investigations at the atomic level. Recent developments of direct imaging and analytical techniques using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) have provided direct access to information on the local atomic structure and the chemical composition at the atomic scale. In this review, we report on the discrimination of single atoms including dopant atoms on a monolayered transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanoribbon and a single nitrogen adatom on graphene by time-resolved annular dark-field (ADF) imaging and spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We also show that in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy can be used to monitor the structural transformation between semiconducting (2H) and metallic (1T) phases in monolayer MoS2, and can enable direct observation of in-plane graphene growth at a step edge of a bi-layer graphene and domain boundary formation during growth with atomic-resolution. (author)

  15. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  16. Dissecting the Mechanism of Martensitic Transformation via Atomic-Scale Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) --> ɛ(hcp) --> α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ɛ/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ɛ martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  18. Dissecting the mechanism of martensitic transformation via atomic-scale observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-21

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) → ε(hcp) → α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ε/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ε martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  19. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2-δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner.

  20. Electronics and atomic scale properties of defects and dopants in 2H-MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, Maria; Ubaldini, Alberto; Giannini, Enrico; Bowler, David R.; Renner, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed STM/STS investigation and corresponding DFT modeling of native dopants and atomic scale defects and their influence on the local electron density of states of 2H-MoTe2. Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are attracting increasing interest in the field of electronics and optoelectronics owing to their layered structure and the indirect-to-direct band gap transition when approaching the single-layer limit. 2H-MoTe2 is a semiconducting TMD with a bulk band gap of around 1.0 eV. This compound shows very high mobility at room temperature and strong absorption throughout the solar spectrum. Previous studies demonstrated the possibility to achieve gate-induced ambipolar transport at the surface. 2H-MoTe2 is thus an attractive candidate for novel optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, photo detectors and solar cell technology. Controlling the atomic nature and density of defects and dopants is crucial for the development of the aforementioned applications and devices.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of atomic-scale frictional behavior of corrugated nano-structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2012-07-01

    Surface morphology is one of the critical parameters that affect the frictional behavior of two contacting bodies in relative motion. It is important because the real contact area as well as the contact stiffness is dictated by the micro- and nano-scale geometry of the surface. In this regard, the frictional behavior may be controlled by varying the surface morphology through nano-structuring. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of contact area and structural stiffness of corrugated nano-structures on the fundamental frictional behavior at the atomic-scale. The nano-structured surface was modeled as an array of corrugated carbon atoms with a given periodicity. It was found that the friction coefficient of the nano-structured surface was lower than that of a smooth surface under specific contact conditions. The effect of applied load on the friction coefficient was dependent on the size of the corrugation. Furthermore, stiffness of the nano-structure was identified to be an important variable in dictating the frictional behavior.

  2. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Sun; Yi-Zhou Qi; Wengen Ouyang; Xi-Qiao Feng; Qunyang Li

    2016-01-01

    Although atomic stick–slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competi-tion of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves nor-mally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effec-tively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  3. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Rama K., E-mail: rvv@ornl.gov; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Gianfrancesco, Anthony G. [UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  4. Characterization of Graphene and Transition Metal Dichalcogenide at the Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Lin, Yung-Chang; Warner, Jamie H.; Teng, Po-Yuan; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Chiu, Po-Wen; Iijima, Sumio; Suenga, Kazu

    2015-12-01

    Edge structures and atomic defects are of fundamental importance since they can significantly affect the physical and chemical properties of low-dimensional materials, such as nanoribbons, and therefore merit thorough investigations at the atomic level. Recent developments of direct imaging and analytical techniques using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) have provided direct access to information on the local atomic structure and the chemical composition at the atomic scale. In this review, we report on the discrimination of single atoms including dopant atoms on a monolayered transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanoribbon and a single nitrogen adatom on graphene by time-resolved annular dark-field (ADF) imaging and spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We also show that in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy can be used to monitor the structural transformation between semiconducting (2H) and metallic (1T) phases in monolayer MoS2, and can enable direct observation of in-plane graphene growth at a step edge of a bi-layer graphene and domain boundary formation during growth with atomic-resolution.

  5. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W [Columbia University

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single

  6. Atomic Scale Nanochemistry in Silicon Carbide Oxidation and H-induced Surface Metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band gap IV-IV compound semiconductor having strong interest in advanced device/sensor applications, and in nanotechnology. Cubic/hexagonal SiC surfaces and interfaces are investigated by i) core level/valence band photoemission (XPS/UPS) spectroscopies and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources, ii) atom-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) and iii) multiple-reflection infrared absorption spectroscopy (MR-IRAS). Such important issues as atomic scale surface oxidation, subsequent abrupt SiO2/SiC interface formation and H-induced surface metallization will be presented and discussed. In particular, the first observation of a semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen will be presented. This surprising result is evidenced through band gap closing in STS, electronic states built-up at Fermi level, and Ef pinning at the conduction band minimum, reactive component at Si 2p core level and specific spectral features in MR-IRAS. In addition, SR-based CL-XPS gives fine details about interatomic charge transfers within the surface and sub-surface regions with a strong reactive component at the Si 2p core level. The metallization process results from competition between H-termination of surface dangling bonds and H-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for H-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides means to develop electrical contacts on high band-gap chemically passive materials, particularly exciting for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, e.g. for nanomechanical devices

  7. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  8. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  9. Determining the quantum-coherent to semiclassical transition in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bent; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic-scale silicon wires, patterned by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and degenerately doped with phosphorus (P), have attracted significant interest owing to their exceptionally low resistivity and semiclassical Ohmic conduction at temperatures as low as T =4.2 K . Here, we investigate the transition from semiclassical diffusive to quantum-coherent conduction in a 4.6 nm wide wire as we decrease the measurement temperature. By analyzing the temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) and one-dimensional (1D) weak localization (WL)—fundamental manifestations of quantum-coherent transport in quasi-1D metals—we show that transport evolves from quantum coherent to semiclassical at T ˜4 K . Remarkably, our study confirms that universal concepts of mesoscopic physics such as UCF and 1D WL retain their validity in quasi-1D metallic conductors down to the atomic scale.

  10. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Atomic-Scale Energy Transport: From Heat Conduction to Thermal Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulation based on a plane wave/pseudopotential implementation of density functional theory is adopted to investigate atomic scale energy transport for semiconductors (silicon and germanium). By imposing thermostats to keep constant temperatures of the nanoscale thin layers, initial thermal non-equilibrium between the neighboring layers is established under the vacuum condition. Models with variable gap distances with an interval of lattice constant increment of the simulated materials are set up and statistical comparisons of temperature evolution curves are made. Moreover, the equilibration time from non-equilibrium state to thermal equilibrium state of different silicon or/and germanium layers combinations are calculated. The results show significant distinctions of heat transfer under different materials and temperatures combinations. Further discussions on the equilibrium time are made to explain the simulation results. As the first work of the atomic scale energy tra...

  11. Atomic-scale observation of parallel development of super elasticity and reversible plasticity in GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Peite; Du, Sichao; Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Wang, Yanbo; Liao, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Yen, Hung-Wei; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Ringer, Simon P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gao, Qiang; Hoe Tan, H.; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Liu, Hongwei [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zou, Jin [Materials Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2014-01-13

    We report the atomic-scale observation of parallel development of super elasticity and reversible dislocation-based plasticity from an early stage of bending deformation until fracture in GaAs nanowires. While this phenomenon is in sharp contrast to the textbook knowledge, it is expected to occur widely in nanostructures. This work indicates that the super recoverable deformation in nanomaterials is not simple elastic or reversible plastic deformation in nature, but the coupling of both.

  12. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  13. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  14. Atomic-scale control of TiO6 octahedra through solution chemistry towards giant dielectric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wanbiao; Li, Liping; Li, Guangshe; Liu, Yun; Withers, Ray L.

    2014-10-01

    The structures of many important functional oxides contain networks of metal-oxygen polyhedral units i.e. MOn. The correlation between the configurations and connectivities of these MOn to properties is essentially important to be well established to conduct the design, synthesis and application of new MOn-based functional materials. In this paper, we report on an atomic-scale solution-chemistry approach that for the first time enables TiO6 octahedral network control starting from metastable brookite TiO2 through simultaneously tuning pH values and interfering ions (Fe3+, Sc3+, and Sm3+). The relationship between solution chemistry and the resultant configuration/connectivity of TiO6 octahedra in TiO2 and lepidocrocite titanate is mapped out. Apart from differing crystalline phases and morphologies, atomic-scale TiO6 octahedral control also endows numerous defect dipoles for giant dielectric responses. The structural and property evolutions are well interpreted by the associated H+/OH- species in solution and/or defect states associated with Fe3+ occupation within TiO6 octahedra. This work therefore provides fundamental new insights into controlling TiO6 octahedral arrangement essential for atomic-scale structure-property design.

  15. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  16. Parallel Changes in Intracellular Water Volume and pH Induced by NH3/NH4+ Exposure in Single Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M. Blanco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased blood levels of ammonia (NH3 and ammonium (NH4+, i.e. hyperammonemia, leads to cellular brain edema in humans with acute liver failure. The pathophysiology of this edema is poorly understood. This is partly due to incomplete understanding of the osmotic effects of the pair NH3/NH4+ at the cellular and molecular levels. Cell exposure to solutions containing NH3/NH4+ elicits changes in intracellular pH (pHi, which can in turn affect cell water volume (CWV by activating transport mechanisms that produce net gain or loss of solutes and water. The occurrence of CWV changes caused by NH3/NH4+ has long been suspected, but the mechanisms, magnitude and kinetics of these changes remain unknown. Methods: Using fluorescence imaging microscopy we measured, in real time, parallel changes in pHi and CWV caused by brief exposure to NH3/NH4+ of single cells (N1E-115 neuroblastoma or NG-108 neuroblastoma X glioma loaded with the fluorescent indicator BCECF. Changes in CWV were measured by exciting BCECF at its intracellular isosbestic wavelength (∼438 nm, and pHi was measured ratiometrically. Results: Brief exposure to isosmotic solutions (i.e. having the same osmolality as that of control solutions containing NH4Cl (0.5- 30 mM resulted in a rapid, dose-dependent swelling, followed by isosmotic regulatory volume decrease (iRVD. NH4Cl solutions in which either extracellular [NH3] or [NH4+] was kept constant while the other was changed by varying the pH of the solution, demonstrated that [NH3]o rather than [NH4+]o is the main determinant of the NH4Cl-induced swelling. The iRVD response was sensitive to the anion channel blocker NPPB, and partly dependent on external Ca2+. Upon removal of NH4Cl, cells shrank and displayed isosmotic regulatory volume increase (iRVI. Regulatory volume responses could not be activated by comparable CWV changes produced by anisosmotic solutions, suggesting that membrane stretch or contraction by themselves are

  17. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions", as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as the cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. This provides a new standpoint to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  18. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity. PMID:26938931

  19. An Atomic-Scale X-ray View of Functional Oxide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, I.-Cheng

    atomically controlled synthesis of single-crystalline La3Ni2O7. By building upon this knowledge, I have completed the first to date study of in situ surface X-ray scattering during homoepitaxial MBE growth of SrTiO3, which demonstrates codeposition is consistent with a 2D island growth mode with SrTiO3 islands, but shuttered deposition proceeds by the growth of SrO islands which then restructure into atomically flat SrTiO3 layer during the deposition of the TiO2. From this point, we have conducted a detailed microscopic study of epitaxial LaNiO3 ultrathin films grown on SrTiO3 (001) by using reactive MBE with in situ surface X-ray diffraction and ex situ soft XAS to explore the influence of polar mismatch on the resulting structural and electronic properties. Overall, this thesis highlights the power of artificial confinement to harness control over competing phases in complex oxides with atomic-scale precision.

  20. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W [Columbia University

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single

  1. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  2. Atomic-Scale Characterization and Manipulation of Freestanding Graphene Using Adapted Capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Steven

    Graphene was the first two-dimensional material ever discovered, and it exhibits many unusual phenomena important to both pure and applied physics. To ensure the purest electronic structure, or to study graphene's elastic properties, it is often suspended over holes or trenches in a substrate. The aim of the research presented in this dissertation was to develop methods for characterizing and manipulating freestanding graphene on the atomic scale using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Conventional microscopy and spectroscopy techniques must be carefully reconsidered to account for movement of the extremely flexible sample. First, the acquisition of atomic-scale images of freestanding graphene using the STM and the ability to pull the graphene perpendicular to its plane by applying an electrostatic force with the STM tip are demonstrated. The atomic-scale images contained surprisingly large corrugations due to the electrostatic attractive force varying in registry with the local density of states. Meanwhile, a large range of control over the graphene height at a point was obtained by varying the tip bias voltage, and the application to strain engineering of graphene's so-called pseudomagnetic field is examined. Next, the effect of the tunneling current was investigated. With increasing current, the graphene sample moves away from the tip rather than toward it. It was determined that this must be due to local heating by the electric current, causing the graphene to contract because it has a negative coefficient of thermal expansion. Finally, by imaging a very small area, the STM can monitor the height of one location over long time intervals. Results sometimes exhibit periodic behavior, with a frequency and amplitude that depend on the tunneling current. These fluctuations are interpreted as low-frequency flexural phonon modes within elasticity theory. All of these findings set the foundation for employing a STM in the study of freestanding graphene.

  3. Atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning in severely deformed Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning behaviour in Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites. Profuse twinning activities in Ag supply partial dislocations to directly transmit across the Ag-Cu lamellar interface that promotes deformation twinning in the neighbouring Cu lamellae although the interface is severely deformed. The trans-interface twin bands change the local structure at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the orientation relationship and interfacial structure between neighbouring Ag-Cu lamellae play a crucial role in such special interface-facilitated twinning behaviour

  4. Atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning in severely deformed Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, X. H., E-mail: anxianghai@gmail.com, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydenye.edu.au; Cao, Y.; Liao, X. Z., E-mail: anxianghai@gmail.com, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydenye.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kawasaki, M. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ringer, S. P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Langdon, T. G. [Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1453 (United States); Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zhu, Y. T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2015-07-06

    We report an atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning behaviour in Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites. Profuse twinning activities in Ag supply partial dislocations to directly transmit across the Ag-Cu lamellar interface that promotes deformation twinning in the neighbouring Cu lamellae although the interface is severely deformed. The trans-interface twin bands change the local structure at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the orientation relationship and interfacial structure between neighbouring Ag-Cu lamellae play a crucial role in such special interface-facilitated twinning behaviour.

  5. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  6. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  7. Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA-Polycation Complexes: Two Distinct Binding Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondinskaia, Diana A; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Nesterenko, Alexey M; Antipina, Alexandra Yu; Gurtovenko, Andrey A

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic cationic polymers represent a promising class of delivery vectors for gene therapy. Here, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the structure and properties of complexes of DNA with four linear polycations: polyethylenimine (PEI), poly-l-lysine (PLL), polyvinylamine (PVA), and polyallylamine (PAA). These polycations differ in their polymer geometries, protonation states, and hydrophobicities of their backbone chains. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time the existence of two distinct patterns of binding of DNA with polycations. For PEI, PLL, and PAA, the complex is stabilized by the electrostatic attraction between protonated amine groups of the polycation and phosphate groups of DNA. In contrast, PVA demonstrates an alternative binding pattern as it gets embedded into the DNA major groove. It is likely that both the polymer topology and affinity of the backbone chain of PVA to the DNA groove are responsible for such behavior. The differences in binding patterns can have important biomedical implications: embedding PVA into a DNA groove makes it less sensitive to changes in the aqueous environment (pH level, ionic strength, etc.) and could therefore hinder the intracellular release of genetic material from a delivery vector, leading to lower transfection activity. PMID:27280954

  8. Atomic-Scale Variations of the Mechanical Response of 2D Materials Detected by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, B.; Ellner, M.; Pou, P.; Nicoara, N.; Pérez, Rubén; Gómez-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    We show that noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) is sensitive to the local stiffness in the atomic-scale limit on weakly coupled 2D materials, as graphene on metals. Our large amplitude AFM topography and dissipation images under ultrahigh vacuum and low temperature resolve the atomic and moiré patterns in graphene on Pt(111), despite its extremely low geometric corrugation. The imaging mechanisms are identified with a multiscale model based on density-functional theory calculations, where the energy cost of global and local deformations of graphene competes with short-range chemical and long-range van der Waals interactions. Atomic contrast is related with short-range tip-sample interactions, while the dissipation can be understood in terms of global deformations in the weakly coupled graphene layer. Remarkably, the observed moiré modulation is linked with the subtle variations of the local interplanar graphene-substrate interaction, opening a new route to explore the local mechanical properties of 2D materials at the atomic scale.

  9. Inclusion of pH and potential in atomic-scale simulations of the electrochemical interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen;

    2013-01-01

    potential and electric field at the interface via water layers, excess free charge, counter-ions, and counter electrodes. No existing approach addresses the effect of pH on the interfacial structure. Electrochemical reaction rates can, however, be strongly affected by solution pH, and there is increasing...... interest in the development of efficient electrocatalysts for alkaline environments [2]. Consideration of pH is thus a crucial challenge in ab initio simulations. Here we present a generalization of the computational hydrogen electrode to explicitly capture the respective pH and potential effects...... on the interface structure and its corresponding free energy. Using simple thermodynamic arguments, the method determines ground state interface structures as a function of pH and potential. As an example, we apply the method to a set of Pt(111)| water structures and determine the corresponding Pourbaix diagram...

  10. Atomic-scale configurations of synchroshear-induced deformation twins in the ionic MnS crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Xue, Y. B.; Chen, D.; Wang, Y. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Deformation twinning was thought as impossible in ionic compounds with rock-salt structure due to the charge effect on {111} planes. Here we report the presence and formation mechanism of deformation {111} twins in the rock-salt manganese sulphide (MnS) inclusions embedded in a hot-rolled stainless steel. Based on the atomic-scale mapping under aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, a dislocation-based mechanism involved two synchronized shear on adjacent atomic layers is proposed to describe the dislocation glide and consequently twinning formation. First-principles calculations of the energy barriers for twinning formation in MnS and comparing with that of PbS and MgO indicate the distinct dislocation glide scheme and deformation behaviors for the rock-salt compounds with different ionicities. This study may improve our understanding of the deformation mechanisms of rock-salt crystals and other ionic compounds. PMID:24874022

  11. Demonstration of atomic scale stick-slip events stimulated by the force versus distance mode using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory S.; Dinte, Bradley P.; Blach, Jolanta A.; Myhra, Sverre

    2002-08-01

    It has been shown that longitudinal deformation of the force-sensing/imposing lever can be stimulated by the conventional force versus distance (F-d), analytical mode of a scanning force microscope. Accordingly it is possible to measure simultaneously both in-plane and out-of-plane force components acting between a tip and a surface. Discrete atomic scale stick-slip events have been observed by F-d generated friction loop analysis of cleaved WTe2, Mica and HOPG single crystals, and of a Langmuir-Blodgett film. Due to the lever geometry, the lateral resolution arising from z-stage movement is better by an order of magnitude than that obtained from translation of the x-y-stage.

  12. Comparative atomic-scale hydration of the ceramide and phosphocholine headgroup in solution and bilayer environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-06-14

    Previous studies have used neutron diffraction to elucidate the hydration of the ceramide and the phosphatidylcholine headgroup in solution. These solution studies provide bond-length resolution information on the system, but are limited to liquid samples. The work presented here investigates how the hydration of ceramide and phosphatidylcholine headgroups in a solution compares with that found in a lipid bilayer. This work shows that the hydration patterns seen in the solution samples provide valuable insight into the preferential location of hydrating water molecules in the bilayer. There are certain subtle differences in the distribution, which result from a combination of the lipid conformation and the lipid-lipid interactions within the bilayer environment. The lipid-lipid interactions in the bilayer will be dependent on the composition of the bilayer, whereas the restricted exploration of conformational space is likely to be applicable in all membrane environments. The generalized description of hydration gathered from the neutron diffraction studies thus provides good initial estimation for the hydration pattern, but this can be further refined for specific systems. PMID:27306021

  13. Enabling the measurement of in-situ, atomic scale mineral transformation rates in supercritical CO2 through development of a high pressure AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Capture and storage of carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations represents one promising scenario for minimizing the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. The ability to demonstrate that CO2 will remain stored in the geological formation over the long-term is needed in support of widespread implementation decisions, and knowledge of mineral-fluid chemical transformation rates is an essential aspect. The majority of previous research on mineral-fluid interactions has focused primarily on the reactivity of minerals in aqueous solutions containing various amounts of dissolved CO2. Long-term caprock integrity, however, could also be dictated by mineral transformations occurring in low-water environments dominated by the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluid phase, which is expected to slowly displace or dessicate residual aqueous solution at the caprock-fluid interface. Many of the mechanisms of mineral interfacial reactions with hydrated or water-saturated scCO2 are unknown and there are unique challenges to obtain kinetic and thermodynamic data for mineral transformation reactions in these fluids. We are developing a high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that will enable in-situ, atomic scale measurements of metal carbonate nucleation and growth rates on mineral surfaces in contact with hydrated scCO2 fluids. This apparatus is based on the hydrothermal AFM that was developed by Higgins et al.1, but includes some enhancements and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 bar. The noise in our optically-based cantilever deflection detection scheme is subject to perturbations in the density (due to index of refraction dependence) of the compressible supercritical fluid. Consequently, variations in temperature and pressure within the fluid cell are a primary technical challenge with possible significant impact in imaging resolution. We demonstrate with our test fluid cell that the equivalent rms noise in the deflection signal is similar to (and in some cases

  14. In situ atomic scale mechanical microscopy discovering the atomistic mechanisms of plasticity in nano-single crystals and grain rotation in polycrystalline metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Wang, Lihua; Yue, Yonghai [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Zhang, Ze, E-mail: zezhang@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Department of Materials Science, National Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University (China)

    2015-04-15

    In this review, we briefly introduce our in situ atomic-scale mechanical experimental technique (ASMET) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can observe the atomic-scale deformation dynamics of materials. This in situ mechanical testing technique allows the deformation of TEM samples through a simultaneous double-tilt function, making atomic-scale mechanical microscopy feasible. This methodology is generally applicable to thin films, nanowires (NWs), tubes and regular TEM samples to allow investigation of the dynamics of mechanically stressed samples at the atomic scale. We show several examples of this technique applied to Pt and Cu single/polycrystalline specimens. The in situ atomic-scale observation revealed that when the feature size of these materials approaches the nano-scale, they often exhibit “unusual” deformation behaviours compared to their bulk counterparts. For example, in Cu single-crystalline NWs, the elastic–plastic transition is size-dependent. An ultra-large elastic strain of 7.2%, which approaches the theoretical elasticity limit, can be achieved as the diameter of the NWs decreases to ∼6 nm. The crossover plasticity transition from full dislocations to partial dislocations and twins was also discovered as the diameter of the single-crystalline Cu NWs decreased. For Pt nanocrystals (NC), the long-standing uncertainties of atomic-scale plastic deformation mechanisms in NC materials (grain size G less than 15 nm) were clarified. For larger grains with G<∼10 nm, we frequently observed movements and interactions of cross-grain full dislocations. For G between 6 and 10 nm, stacking faults resulting from partial dislocations become more frequent. For G<∼6 nm, the plasticity mechanism transforms from a mode of cross-grain dislocation to a collective grain rotation mechanism. This grain rotation process is mediated by grain boundary (GB) dislocations with the assistance of GB diffusion and shuffling. These in situ atomic-scale

  15. What dislocation modelling at the atomic scale tell us about the strength of MgSiO3 perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraych, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heat transfer through the mantle is carried by convection, which involves plastic flow of the mantle constituents. The plasticity of (Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)O3 Bridgmanite, the main constituent of the lower mantle, is therefore crucial to understand the Earth's dynamics. Its deformation occurs at extreme pressure and temperature conditons (from 30 to 140 GPa, 2000 to 3000 K) and very low strain rate (from 10-12 to 10-16 s-1), the latter being impossible to reach experimentally. Here we calculate the strength of MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv), by modelling [100] and [010] dislocations at the atomic scale with molecular statics calculation. To assess the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate action of stress and temperature, we describe their behaviour into a kink-pair model. We develop therefore a velocity model informed by atomistic calculations, taking into account P, T, stress and deformation strain-rate. We show that our model is consistent with deformation experiments on perovskite (see figure), and can also be used to calculate the strength of Mg-Pv induced by dislocation creep at natural strain rate relevant to the mantle.

  16. Low viscosity and high attenuation in MgSiO3 post-perovskite inferred from atomic-scale calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryaeva, Alexandra M.; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    This work represents a numerical study of the thermal activation for dislocation glide of the [100](010) slip system in MgSiO3 post-perovskite (Mg-ppv) at 120 GPa. We propose an approach based on a one-dimensional line tension model in conjunction with atomic-scale calculations. In this model, the key parameters, namely, the line tension and the Peierls barrier, are obtained from density functional theory calculations. We find a Peierls stress σp = 2.1 GPa and a line tension Γ = 9.2 eV/Å, which lead to a kink-pair enthalpy (under zero stress) of 2.69 eV. These values confirm that this slip system bears a very low lattice friction because it vanishes for temperatures above approximately 500 K under mantle conditions. In the Earth’s mantle, high-pressure Mg-ppv silicate is thus expected to become as ductile as ferropericlase. These results confirm the hypothesis of a weak layer in the D″ layer where Mg-ppv is present. Easy glide along [100](010) suggests strong preferred orientations with (010) planes aligned. Highly mobile [100] dislocations are also likely to respond to stresses related to seismic waves, leading to energy dissipation and strong attenuation.

  17. Crystallization, phase evolution and corrosion of Fe-based metallic glasses: An atomic-scale structural and chemical characterization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding phase changes, including their formation and evolution, is critical for the performance of functional as well as structural materials. We analyze in detail microstructural and chemical transformations of the amorphous steel Fe50Cr15Mo14C15B6 during isothermal treatments at temperatures ranging from 550 to 800 °C. By combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns together with the local chemical data obtained by atom probe tomography, this research provides relevant information at the atomic scale about the mechanisms of crystallization and the subsequent phases evolution. During the initial stages of crystallization a stable (Fe,Cr)23(C,B)6 precipitates as well as two metastable intermediates of M3(C,B) and the intermetallic χ-phase. When full crystallization is reached, only a percolated nano-scale Cr-rich (Fe,Cr)23(C,B)6 and Mo-rich η-Fe3Mo3C structure is detected, with no evidence to suggest that other phases appear at any subsequent time. Finally, the corrosion behavior of the developed phases is discussed from considerations of the obtained atomic information

  18. Phase Transitions and Atomic-Scale Migration During the Preoxidation of a Titania/Ferrous Oxide Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Xing, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Zheng-Jian; Zhang, Ya-Peng; Liu, Xing-Le; Liu, Yi-Ran

    2016-02-01

    The non-isothermal preoxidation of the titania/ferrous oxide solution (TFOS) was investigated between 300°C and 1200°C. To explore the TFOS preoxidation mechanism, the phase transitions, crystal structure behavior, subreactions, and atomic-scale migration and enrichment of the TFOS during preoxidation were studied. Two different titanium and iron solutions were distinguished by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The phase transitions from titanomagnetite (TTM) to titanohematite to pseudobrookite (PSB) were indicated by the separation and enrichment of Ti and Fe, which migrated into PSB and hematite, respectively. This occurred alongside the generation and destruction of FeTiO3. Multiple local maxima and shoulders were observed in the double-derivative thermogravimetric curves during the preoxidation process, indicating the existence and initial reaction temperatures of five stages of subreactions. Compared with the theoretical mass gain (3.28 wt.%), only 80.8 at.% of the Fe2+ was oxidized to Fe3+, leaving unoxidized TTM in the solid solution during non-isothermal oxidation at 1200°C. The concentration of Ti gradually increased in the lamellar structures. However, Fe, Al, and O were mostly restricted to the homogeneous regions. The segregation of Mg only became obvious when TFOS was oxidized at high temperatures. The enrichment reduced the impact of Ti when O migrated during the reduction process, thus, enhancing the reducibility of the TFOS after preoxidation.

  19. Nanomechanics analysis of perfect and defected graphene sheets via a novel atomic-scale finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakouti, M.; Montazeri, A.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their accuracy and reliability, atomistic-based methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have played an essential role in the field of predictive modeling of single layered graphene sheets (SLGSs) at the nanoscale. However, their applications are limited due to the computational costs. Additionally, consistent with the discrete nature of SLGSs, conventional continuum-based methods cannot be utilized to study the mechanical characteristics of these nanostructures. To overcome these issues, a new Atomic-scale Finite Element Method (AFEM) based on the Tersoff-Brenner potential has been developed in this study. Efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated employing several numerical examples and its applicability is carefully testified in the case of perfect and defected SLGSs. To facilitate a better comparison, the mechanical behavior obtained by this method is compared with the one determined via MD simulation in various case studies. The results reveal that the proposed method has the accuracy of MD simulations and the speed of continuum-based approaches, simultaneously.

  20. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using systems. Here, we present a novel approach based on atomic scale interface manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies. PMID:27267790

  1. Quantitative Z-Contrast Imaging of Supported Metal Complexes and Clusters - A Gateway to Understanding Catalysis on the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, Nigel D.; Aydin, C.; Lu, Jing; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Ortalan, V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-09-01

    Z-contrast imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to observe and quantify the sizes, shapes, and compositions of the metal frames in supported mono-, bi-, and multimetallic metal clusters and can even detect the metal atoms in single-metal-atom complexes, as well as providing direct structural information characterizing the metal-support interface. Herein, we assess the major experimental challenges associated with obtaining atomic resolution Z-contrast images of the materials that are highly beam-sensitive, that is, the clusters readily migrate and sinter on support surfaces, and the support itself can drastically change in structure if the experiment is not properly controlled. Calibrated and quantified Z-contrast images are used in conjunction with exsitu analytical measurements and larger-scale characterization methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to generate an atomic-scale understanding of supported catalysts and their function. Examples of the application of these methods include the characterization of a wide range of sizes and compositions of supported clusters, primarily those incorporating Ir, Os, and Au, on highly crystalline supports (zeolites and MgO).

  2. Does the intracellular ionic concentration or the cell water content (cell volume) determine the activity of TonEBP in NIH3T3 cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Tina; Schou, Kenneth; Friis, Martin Barfred;

    2008-01-01

    of the present investigation was to investigate whether cell shrinkage or high intracellular ionic concentration induced the activation of TonEBP. We designed a model system for isotonically shrinking cells over a prolonged period of time. Cells swelled in hypotonic medium and performed a regulatory...... volume decrease (RVD). Upon return to the original isotonic medium, cells shrank initially followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI). To maintain cell shrinkage, the RVI process was inhibited as follows: Ethyl-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA) inhibited the Na(+)/H(+) antiport, Bumetanide inhibited the Na......(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter, and Gadolinium inhibited shrinkage-activated Na(+) channels. Cells remained shrunken for at least 4 hours (isotonically shrunken cells). The activity of TonEBP was investigated with a Luciferase assay after isotonic shrinkage and after shrinkage in a high NaCl hypertonic...

  3. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  4. Atomic scale study of phase transformation in long term thermally aged duplex stainless steels: relation between microstructure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the ferrite of thermally aged CF3M duplex stainless steels is studied at the atomic scale. Accelerated ageing was performed at 350 C. Ingots of CF3M steel were aged in laboratory at 350 C up to 200 000 h (> 20 years). Spatial and chemical evolution of the microstructure of ferrite, characterised by 3D atom probe and micro-hardness values were compared to microstructural and mechanical characteristics of ferrite of the same ingots aged at 325 C (service temperature) and to ferrite of actual steel aged on site. This work has shown that: -) Accelerating the ageing at 350 C anticipates the on-site ageing at 323 C; -) The linear relation between micro-hardness and variation V is still valid after 200.000 h of ageing at 350 C (this corresponds to an equivalent ageing time of 190 years at 323 C); -) Activation energy is the same for both spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation: a value of 243 kJ/mol has been obtained; -) Time evolution of the wave length of the α/α' decomposition still follows a law proportional to t0.16 after 200.000 h of ageing (no increase of the effective time exponent is observed); -) After 30.000 h of ageing, coarsening of G-phase particles starts, the equilibrium volume fraction of G-phase is estimated to 8.5% and no modification of the time evolution of the radius of precipitates is observed; -) G-phase particles have no direct influence on the evolution of the ferrite micro-hardness. This does not exclude indirect effect due to synergetic precipitation of G-phase which leads to the decrease of the amount of Ni in ferrite matrix. Later could slower kinetics and then explain the absence of increase in the time exponent. (authors)

  5. Validation of Force Fields of Rubber through Glass-Transition Temperature Calculation by Microsecond Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pragati; Roy, Sudip; Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein Ali

    2016-02-25

    Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation has been employed to calculate the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of cis- and trans-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) and 1,4-polyisoprene (PI). Both all-atomistic and united-atom models have been simulated using force fields, already available in literature. The accuracy of these decade old force fields has been tested by comparing calculated glass-transition temperatures to the corresponding experimental values. Tg depicts the phase transition in elastomers and substantially affects various physical properties of polymers, and hence the reproducibility of Tg becomes very crucial from a thermodynamic point of view. Such validation using Tg also evaluates the ability of these force fields to be used for advanced materials like rubber nanocomposites, where Tg is greatly affected by the presence of fillers. We have calculated Tg for a total of eight systems, featuring all-atom and united-atom models of cis- and trans-PI and -PB, which are the major constituents of natural and synthetic rubber. Tuning and refinement of the force fields has also been done using quantum-chemical calculations to obtain desirable density and Tg. Thus, a set of properly validated force fields, capable of reproducing various macroscopic properties of rubber, has been provided. A novel polymer equilibration protocol, involving potential energy convergence as the equilibration criterion, has been proposed. We demonstrate that not only macroscopic polymer properties like density, thermal expansion coefficient, and Tg but also local structural characteristics like end-to-end distance (R) and radius of gyration (Rg) and mechanical properties like bulk modulus have also been equilibrated using our strategy. Complete decay of end-to-end vector autocorrelation function with time also supports proper equilibration using our strategy. PMID:26836395

  6. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  7. Inversion boundary induced grain growth in ZnO ceramics: from atomic-scale investigations to microstructural engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In semiconducting materials special boundaries play the key role in crystal growth. They introduce an abrupt structural and chemical anisotropy, which is readily reflected in an unusual microstructure evolution, whereas their local structure affects the physical properties of semiconducting materials. These effects, however, can be exploited to tailor the electronic and optical properties of the materials, as demonstrated in this review. The presented topic fits in the field of preparatory stage of phase transformations, manifested through evolution of chemically induced structural faults. In the noncentrosymmetric structure of ZnO, inversion boundaries (IBs) are the most common type of planar faults that can be triggered by the addition of specific spinel-forming dopants (Sb2O3, SnO2, TiO2). In addition to conventional HRTEM techniques several new methods were developed to resolve crystallography and atomic-scale chemistry of IBs. The absolute orientation of the polar c-axes on both sides of the IB was determined by a novel quantitative microdiffraction method, providing a reliable identification of crystal polarity in noncentrosymmetric crystals. To determine sub-monolayer quantities of dopants on the IB, we developed a special technique of analytical electron microscopy using concentric electron probe (CEP) in EDS or EELS mode, providing more accurate and precise results than any other available technique. Knowing the local crystal chemistry of IBs we were able to design experiments to identify their formation mechanism. IBs nucleate in the early stage of grain growth as a dopant-rich topotaxial 2D reaction product on Zn-terminated surfaces of ZnO grains. Soon after their nucleation, ZnO is epitaxially grown on the inherent 2D phase in an inverted orientation, which effectively starts to dictate anisotropic growth of the infected crystallite. In very short time the grains with IBs dominate the entire microstructure in ZnO ceramics via IB-induced exaggerated

  8. In vivo metabolite compartmentalization probed using intracellular GdDTPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Rowland, Ian

    Fast trans-membrane water exchange enables in- tracellular relaxation enhancement of water by contrast agents in the extracellular space. For me- tabolites not in fast exchange across membranes, intracellular metabolite relaxation enhancement will only occur if the contrast agent and metabolite a...... are in the same compartment. Extracellular contrast has utilized electroporation methods to deliver GdDTPA into the cytosol of rat muscle in vivo in order to probe the intracellular compart- mentalization of MR-visible metabolites....

  9. Atomic scale effects of alloying, partitioning, solute drag and austempering on the mechanical properties of high-carbon bainitic–austenitic TRIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding alloying and thermal processing at an atomic scale is essential for the optimal design of high-carbon (0.71 wt.%) bainitic–austenitic transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. We investigate the influence of the austempering temperature, chemical composition (especially the Si:Al ratio) and partitioning on the nanostructure and mechanical behavior of these steels by atom probe tomography. The effects of the austempering temperature and of Si and Al on the compositional gradients across the phase boundaries between retained austenite and bainitic ferrite are studied. We observe that controlling these parameters (i.e. Si, Al content and austempering temperature) can be used to tune the stability of the retained austenite and hence the mechanical behavior of these steels. We also study the atomic scale redistribution of Mn and Si at the bainitic ferrite/austenite interface. The observations suggest that either para-equilibrium or local equilibrium-negligible partitioning conditions prevail depending on the Si:Al ratio during bainite transformation.

  10. The atomic-scale mechanism for the enhanced glass-forming-ability of a Cu-Zr based bulk metallic glass with minor element additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Liu, C T; Yang, Y; Liu, J B; Dong, Y D; Lu, J

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the glass forming-ability (GFA) of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be greatly enhanced via minor element additions. However, direct evidence has been lacking to reveal its structural origin despite different theories hitherto proposed. Through the high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, here we show that the content of local crystal-like orders increases significantly in a Cu-Zr-Al BMG after a 2-at% Y addition. Contrasting the previous studies, our current results indicate that the formation of crystal-like order at the atomic scale plays an important role in enhancing the GFA of the Cu-Zr-Al base BMG. PMID:24721927

  11. Metallochaperones regulate intracellular copper levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lee Pang

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an important enzyme co-factor that is also extremely toxic at high intracellular concentrations, making active efflux mechanisms essential for preventing Cu accumulation. Here, we have investigated the mechanistic role of metallochaperones in regulating Cu efflux. We have constructed a computational model of Cu trafficking and efflux based on systems analysis of the Cu stress response of Halobacterium salinarum. We have validated several model predictions via assays of transcriptional dynamics and intracellular Cu levels, discovering a completely novel function for metallochaperones. We demonstrate that in addition to trafficking Cu ions, metallochaperones also function as buffers to modulate the transcriptional responsiveness and efficacy of Cu efflux. This buffering function of metallochaperones ultimately sets the upper limit for intracellular Cu levels and provides a mechanistic explanation for previously observed Cu metallochaperone mutation phenotypes.

  12. Palladium-mediated intracellular chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi M. Yusop; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Johansson, Emma M. V.; Rosario M. Sanchez-Martin; Bradley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many important intracellular biochemical reactions are modulated by transition metals, typically in the form of metalloproteins. The ability to carry out selective transformations inside a cell would allow researchers to manipulate or interrogate innumerable biological processes. Here, we show that palladium nanoparticles trapped within polystyrene microspheres can enter cells and mediate a variety of Pd-0-catalysed reactions, such as allylcarbamate cleavage and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling....

  13. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  14. Atomic scale modelling of nanosize Ni sub 3 Al cluster beam deposition on Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kharlamov, V S; Hou, M

    2002-01-01

    The slowing down of Ni sub 3 Al clusters on a Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces is studied by atomic scale modelling. The semi-grand canonical metropolis Monte Carlo is used for the preparation of isolated clusters at thermodynamic equilibrium. The cluster deposition on the surface is studied in detail by classical Molecular Dynamics simulations that include a model to account for electron-phonon coupling. Long- and short-range orders in the cluster are evaluated as functions of temperature in an impact energy range between 0 and 1.5 eV/atom. The interaction between the Ni sub 3 Al cluster and an Al surface is characterised low short range (chemical) disorder. No sizeable epitaxy is found, subsequent to the impact. In contrast, in the case of Ni and Ni sub 3 Al substrates, which are harder materials than aluminium, the chemical disorder is higher and epitaxial accommodation is possible. With these substrates, chemical disorder in the cluster is an increasing function of the impact energy, as well as of ...

  15. Atomic-scale insight into the interactions between hydroxyl radicals and DNA in solution using the ReaxFF reactive force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlackt, C. C. W.; Neyts, E. C.; Jacob, T.; Fantauzzi, D.; Golkaram, M.; Shin, Y.-K.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-10-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas have proven to provide an alternative treatment of cancer by targeting tumorous cells while leaving their healthy counterparts unharmed. However, the underlying mechanisms of the plasma-cell interactions are not yet fully understood. Reactive oxygen species, and in particular hydroxyl radicals (OH), are known to play a crucial role in plasma driven apoptosis of malignant cells. In this paper we investigate the interaction of OH radicals, as well as H2O2 molecules and HO2 radicals, with DNA by means of reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. Our results provide atomic-scale insight into the dynamics of oxidative stress on DNA caused by the OH radicals, while H2O2 molecules appear not reactive within the considered time-scale. Among the observed processes are the formation of 8-OH-adduct radicals, forming the first stages towards the formation of 8-oxoGua and 8-oxoAde, H-abstraction reactions of the amines, and the partial opening of loose DNA ends in aqueous solution.

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation on the atomic-scale friction behaviors between copper(0 0 1) and diamond(1 1 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to examine the atomic-scale friction behavior of an infinite flat-flat contact between copper(0 0 1) and diamond(1 1 1) surfaces. Two types of diamond surface, namely H-free and hydrogenated, are constructed and on each of them the copper counterface is brought to slide along the [1 1 -2] and [1 -1 0] crystallographic directions with a variety of loads. The simulation results demonstrate that the hydrogen atoms chemisorbed to the diamond surface can to large extent eliminate the directional dependency of its friction behavior with copper. Under pressures less than 30 GPa, the sliding between copper and hydrogenated is wearless. In this period, the shear stress of them just slightly increases to 0.6 GPa. Between 30 GPa and 32 GPa, copper atoms near the interface begin to be worn and incorporate into the diamond substrate and this causes a sharp shift from 0.6 GPa to 2.7 GPa in their shear stress. In contrast, the sliding process between copper and H-free diamond is always wearless even under pressure beyond 40 GPa. The H-free [1 -1 0] model exhibits much higher shear stress than H-free [1 1 -2] under pressures less than 35 GPa. Beyond 35 GPa, they present nearly consistent shear stress evolution. Moreover, the simulations for hydrogenated diamond models suggest that their friction behavior is independent on sliding velocity only under wearless sliding regime.

  17. Atomic scale structure of the 5-fold surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal: A quantitative X-Ray photoelectron diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Huan, C.H.A.; Wee, A.T.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.; Shi, F.J.; Rotenberg, E.; Barman, S.R.; Paggel, J.J.; Horn, K.; Ebert, Ph.; Urban, K.

    2004-02-11

    The atomic scale structure of the 5-fold symmetric surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal is investigated quantitatively by comparing x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) simulations to experiment. The observed 5-fold symmetry of the diffraction patterns indicates that the surface is quasicrystalline with no hint of a reconstruction from the bulk structure. In analyzing the experimental data, many possible bulk terminations have been tested. Those few that fit best to the data have in common that they contain an Al-rich surface layer followed by a dense mixed Al/Pd/Mn layer. These best terminations, while not identical to each other, are suggested to form terraces coexisting on a real surface. Structural relaxations of the quasicrystal surface are also analyzed: mixing several best-fit terminations gives average best-fit interlayer spacing changes of Dd12 = -0.057 Angstrom, Dd24 = +0.159 Angstrom. These results are in good agreement with a prior structure determination by LEED on a sample that was prepared in a different manner.

  18. Atomic-Scale Theoretical Studies of Fundamental Properties and Processes in CHNO Plastic-Bonded Explosive Constituent Materials under Static and Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The results of recent theoretical atomic-scale studies of CHNO plastic-bonded explosive constituent materials will be presented, emphasizing the effects of static and dynamic compression on structure, vibrational spectroscopy, energy redistribution, and dynamic deformation processes. Among the chemical compounds to be discussed are pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-s-triazine (RDX), nitromethane, and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Specific topics to be discussed include pressure-dependent terahertz IR absorption spectra in crystalline PETN and RDX, microscopic material flow characteristics and energy localization during and after pore collapse in shocked (100)-oriented RDX, establishment of local thermodynamic temperature and the approach to thermal equilibrium in shocked (100)-oriented nitromethane, and structural changes and relaxation phenomena that occur in shocked amorphous cis-HTPB. In the case of shocked HTPB, comparisons will be made between results obtained using fully-atomic and coarse-grained (united atom) molecular dynamics force field models. Rather than attempting to discuss any given topic in extended detail, 3-4 vignettes will be presented that highlight outstanding scientific questions and the predictive methods and tools we are developing to answer them. The U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Office of Naval Research supported this research.

  19. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  20. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  1. Intracardiac intracellular angiotensin system in diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, R.; Yong, Q.C.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Baker, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has mainly been categorized as a circulating and a local tissue RAS. A new component of the local system, known as the intracellular RAS, has recently been described. The intracellular RAS is defined as synthesis and action of ANG II intracellularly. This RAS appea

  2. Differentiating Intracellular from Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Soil by Sonication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.P.; Hu, C.S.; Oenema, O.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio

  3. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  4. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  5. Efficient plasma-enhanced method for layered LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathodes with sulfur atom-scale modification for superior-performance Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqian; Chen, Ning; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Shuangyin; Zhang, Han

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as a lithium insertion positive electrode material, atom-scale modification was realized to obtain the layered oxysulfide LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx using a novel plasma-enhanced doping strategy. The structure and electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx are investigated systematically, which confirms that the S doping can make the structure stable and benefit the electrochemical performance. The phys-chemical characterizations indicate that oxygen atoms in the initial LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 have been partially replaced by S atoms. It should be pointed out that the atom-scale modification does not significantly alter the intrinsic structure of the cathode. Compared to the pristine material, the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx shows a superior performance with a higher capacity (200.4 mA h g-1) and a significantly improved cycling stability (maintaining 94.46% of its initial discharge capacity after 100 cycles). Moreover, it has an excellent rate performance especially at elevated performance, which is probably due to the faster Li+ transportation after S doping into the layered structure. All the results show that the atom-scale modification with sulfur atoms on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, which significantly improved the electrochemical performance, offers a novel anionic doping strategy to realize the atom-scale modification of electrode materials to improve their electrochemical performance.In order to improve the electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as a lithium insertion positive electrode material, atom-scale modification was realized to obtain the layered oxysulfide LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx using a novel plasma-enhanced doping strategy. The structure and electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx are investigated systematically, which confirms that the S doping can make the structure stable and benefit the electrochemical performance. The phys

  6. Efficient plasma-enhanced method for layered LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathodes with sulfur atom-scale modification for superior-performance Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqian; Chen, Ning; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Shuangyin; Zhang, Han

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as a lithium insertion positive electrode material, atom-scale modification was realized to obtain the layered oxysulfide LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx using a novel plasma-enhanced doping strategy. The structure and electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx are investigated systematically, which confirms that the S doping can make the structure stable and benefit the electrochemical performance. The phys-chemical characterizations indicate that oxygen atoms in the initial LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 have been partially replaced by S atoms. It should be pointed out that the atom-scale modification does not significantly alter the intrinsic structure of the cathode. Compared to the pristine material, the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx shows a superior performance with a higher capacity (200.4 mA h g(-1)) and a significantly improved cycling stability (maintaining 94.46% of its initial discharge capacity after 100 cycles). Moreover, it has an excellent rate performance especially at elevated performance, which is probably due to the faster Li(+) transportation after S doping into the layered structure. All the results show that the atom-scale modification with sulfur atoms on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, which significantly improved the electrochemical performance, offers a novel anionic doping strategy to realize the atom-scale modification of electrode materials to improve their electrochemical performance.

  7. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  8. Dislocations and elementary processes of plasticity in FCC metals: atomic scale simulations; Dislocations et processus elementaires de la plasticite dans les metaux CFC: apports des simulations a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney, D

    2000-07-01

    We present atomic-scale simulations of two elementary processes of FCC crystal plasticity. The first study consists in the simulation by molecular dynamics, in a nickel crystal, of the interactions between an edge dislocation and glissile interstitial loops of the type that form under irradiation in displacement cascades. The simulations show various atomic-scale interaction processes leading to the absorption and drag of the loops by the dislocation. These reactions certainly contribute to the formation of the 'clear bands' observed in deformed irradiated materials. The simulations also allow to study quantitatively the role of the glissile loops in irradiation hardening. In particular, dislocation unpinning stresses for certain pinning mechanisms are evaluated from the simulations. The second study consists first in the generalization in three dimensions of the quasi-continuum method (QCM), a multi-scale simulation method which couples atomistic techniques and the finite element method. In the QCM, regions close to dislocation cores are simulated at the atomic-scale while the rest of the crystal is simulated with a lower resolution by means of a discretization of the displacement fields using the finite element method. The QCM is then tested on the simulation of the formation and breaking of dislocation junctions in an aluminum crystal. Comparison of the simulations with an elastic model of dislocation junctions shows that the structure and strength of the junctions are dominated by elastic line tension effects, as is assumed in classical theories. (author)

  9. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher F Harrison; Sébastien Kicka; Valentin Trofimov; Kathrin Berschl; Hajer Ouertatani-Sakouhi; Nikolaus Ackermann; Christian Hedberg; Pierre Cosson; Thierry Soldati; Hubert Hilbi

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumop...

  10. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  11. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-01

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  12. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  13. Intracellular structure and nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular movement of any solute or particle accords with one of two general schemes: either it takes place predominantly in the solution phase or it occurs by dynamic interactions with solid-state structures. If nucleocytoplasmic exchanges of macromolecules and complexes are predominantly solution-phase processes, i.e., if the former ("diffusionist") perspective applies, then the only significant structures in nucleocytoplasmic transport are the pore complexes. However, if such exchanges accord with the latter ("solid-state") perspective, then the roles of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton in nucleocytoplasmic transport are potentially, at least, as important as that of the pore complexes. The role of the nucleoskeleton in mRNA transport is more difficult to evaluate than that of the cytoskeleton because it is less well characterized, and current evidence does not exclude either perspective. However, the balance of evidence favors a solid-state scheme. It is argued that ribosomal subunits are also more likely to migrate by a solid-state rather than a diffusionist mechanism, though the opposite is true of proteins and tRNAs. Moreover, recent data on the effects of viral proteins on intranuclear RNA processing and migration accord with the solid-state perspective. In view of this balance of evidence, three possible solid-state mechanisms for nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport are described and evaluated. The explanatory advantage of solid-state models is contrasted with the heuristic advantage of diffusion theory, but it is argued that diffusion theory itself, even aided by modern computational techniques and numerical and graphical approaches, cannot account for data describing the movements of materials within the cell. Therefore, the mechanisms envisaged in a diffusionist perspective cannot be confined to diffusion alone, but must include other processes such as bulk fluid flow.

  14. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity.

  15. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  16. Effect of growth in biofilms upon antibiotic and chlorine susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare

    OpenAIRE

    Steed, Keesha

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare are environmental opportunistic pathogens whose source for human infection is water and soil. M. avium and M. intracellulare cause pulmonary infections (tuberculosis) in immunocompetent individuals and bacteremia in immunodeficient individuals (e.g. AIDS). One factor likely influencing the lack of success of antibiotic therapy in patients would be their ability to form biofilms. Growth in biofilms might result in antimicrob...

  17. Adaptor protein complexes and intracellular transport

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The AP (adaptor protein) complexes are heterotetrameric protein complexes that mediate intracellular membrane trafficking along endocytic and secretory transport pathways. There are five different AP complexes: AP-1, AP-2 and AP-3 are clathrin-associated complexes; whereas AP-4 and AP-5 are not. These five AP complexes localize to different intracellular compartments and mediate membrane trafficking in distinct pathways. They recognize and concentrate cargo proteins into vesicular carriers th...

  18. The Francisella intracellular life cycle: towards molecular mechanisms of intracellular survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eChong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tularemia-causing bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular organism with a complex intracellular lifecycle that ensures its survival and proliferation in a variety of mammalian cell types, including professional phagocytes. Because this cycle is essential to Francisella pathogenesis and virulence, much research has focused on deciphering the mechanisms of its intracellular survival and replication and characterizing both bacterial and host determinants of the bacterium’s intracellular cycle. Studies of various strains and host cell models have led to the consensual paradigm of Francisella as a cytosolic pathogen, but also to some controversy about its intracellular cycle. In this review, we will detail major findings that have advanced our knowledge of Francisella intracellular survival strategies and also attempt to reconcile discrepancies that exist in our molecular understanding of the Francisella-phagocyte interaction.

  19. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  20. Internal affairs: investigating the Brucella intracellular lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Salcedo, Suzana P

    2012-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Brucella are Gram-negative pathogens of several animal species that cause a zoonotic disease in humans known as brucellosis or Malta fever. Within their hosts, brucellae reside within different cell types where they establish a replicative niche and remain protected from the immune response. The aim of this article is to discuss recent advances in the field in the specific context of the Brucella intracellular 'lifestyle'. We initially discuss the different host cell targets and their relevance during infection. As it represents the key to intracellular replication, the focus is then set on the maturation of the Brucella phagosome, with particular emphasis on the Brucella factors that are directly implicated in intracellular trafficking and modulation of host cell signalling pathways. Recent data on the role of the type IV secretion system are discussed, novel effector molecules identified and how some of them impact on trafficking events. Current knowledge on Brucella gene regulation and control of host cell death are summarized, as they directly affect intracellular persistence. Understanding how Brucella molecules interplay with their host cell targets to modulate cellular functions and establish the intracellular niche will help unravel how this pathogen causes disease.

  1. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  2. Multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Hernán E; Imtiaz, Sarah; Zamir, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Cellular functions emerge from the collective action of a large number of different proteins. Understanding how these protein networks operate requires monitoring their components in intact cells. Due to intercellular and intracellular molecular variability, it is important to monitor simultaneously multiple components at high spatiotemporal resolution. However, inherent trade-offs narrow the boundaries of achievable multiplexed imaging. Pushing these boundaries is essential for a better understanding of cellular processes. Here the motivations, challenges and approaches for multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks are discussed. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27183498

  3. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  4. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Stochastic Kinetics of Intracellular Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昌胜; 曾仁端

    2003-01-01

    A stochastic model of intracellular calcium oscillations is put forward by taking into account the random opening-closing of Ca2+ channels in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The numerical results of the stochastic model show simple and complex calcium oscillations, which accord with the experiment results.

  6. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfoot, Andrew L; Rappleye, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  7. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  8. Biology and intracellular life of chlamydia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranin Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chlamydiae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. The developmental cycle of Chlamydiae is specific and different from other bacteria. The elementary body is the infectious form of the organism, responsible for attaching to the target host cell and promoting its entry. The reticulate body is the larger, metabolically active form of the organism, synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and proteins. The elementary body and reticulate body represent evolutionary adaptations to extracellular and intracellular environments. Intracellular persistence of Chlamydia. Predisposition of Chlamydia to persist within the host cell has been recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of chlamydial disease. The persistence implies a long-term association between chlamydiae and their host cell that may not manifest as clinically recognizable disease. The ability of chlamydia to remain within one morphological state for a long time in response to exogenous factors suggests an innate ability of these organisms to persist intracellulary in a unique developmental form. Chlamydiae induce interferon γ and exhibit growth inhibition in their presence. While the high levels of interferon γ completely restrict the development of chlamydia, its low levels induce the development of morphologically aberrant intracellular forms. The persistent forms contain reduced levels of major outer membrane protein but high levels of chlamydial heat shock protein. Conclusion. Immunopathogenesis of chlamydial infection is one of the main focal points of current research into Chlamydia. Chlamydial infections are highly prevalent, usually asymptomatic and associated with serious sequelae. Screening programmes are the most important in the prevention of a long-term sequele.

  9. Paclitaxel Arrests Growth of Intracellular Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Randee; Vogel, Nicolas; Mack, Douglas; McLeod, Rima

    1998-01-01

    Addition of paclitaxel (Taxol) at a concentration of 1 μM to Toxoplasma gondii-infected human foreskin fibroblasts arrested parasite multiplication. Division of the T. gondii tachyzoite nucleus was inhibited, leading to syncytium-like parasite structures within the fibroblasts by 24 h after infection and treatment of the cultures. By 4 days after infection and treatment of the cultures with paclitaxel, this inhibition was irreversible, since the arrested intracellular form was incapable of le...

  10. Intracellular serpins, firewalls and tissue necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2008-02-01

    Luke and colleagues have recently attributed a new role to a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors. They have used Caenorhabditis elegans to show that an intracellular serpin is crucial for maintaining lysosomal integrity. We examine the role of this firewall in preventing necrosis and attempt to integrate this with current theories of stress-induced protein degradation. We discuss how mutant serpins cause disease either through polymerization or now, perhaps, by unleashing necrosis. PMID:18215520

  11. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  12. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  13. Curcumin protects against intracellular amyloid toxicity in rat primary neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jelina; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether curcumin is protective against intracellular amyloid β (Aβ) toxicity, different concentrations of curcumin were applied to with intracellular Aβ in rat primary hippocampal neurons in culture. We find that at low dosages, curcumin effectively inhibits intracellular Aβ toxicity. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) is involved in mediating intracellular Aβ toxicity and possibly curcumin protection. Our results indicate that oxidative stress may mediate cell death induced by i...

  14. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-01-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn2+ into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn2+. Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes re-loading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn2+, FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn2+. There...

  15. Intracellular ethanol accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amore, T; C.J. Panchal; Stewart, G G

    1988-01-01

    An intracellular accumulation of ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during the early stages of fermentation (3 h). However, after 12 h of fermentation, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar. Increasing the osmotic pressure of the medium caused an increase in the ratio of intracellular to extracellular ethanol concentrations at 3 h of fermentation. As in the previous case, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar af...

  16. Curcumin protects against intracellular amyloid toxicity in rat primary neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Jelina; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether curcumin is protective against intracellular amyloid beta (A beta) toxicity, different concentrations of curcumin were applied to with intracellular A beta in rat primary hippocampal neurons in culture. We find that at low dosages, curcumin effectively inhibits intracellular A

  17. Solvent properties of ground substance studied by cryomicrodissection and intracellular reference-phase techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, S. B.; Miller, D S

    1984-01-01

    Water, sodium, potassium, ATP, amino acids, and sugars are not uniformly distributed in Rana pipiens oocytes. Concentration differences exist between nucleus (germinal vesicle) and ooplasm and between animal and vegetal ooplasmic regions. The mechanisms responsible for these differences were investigated using intracellular reference-phase (iRP) analysis. The iRP is an artificial "organelle" that has the solvent properties of a dilute salt solution and is in diffusional equilibrium with water...

  18. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of a...

  19. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed

  20. Strategies for Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Elizabeth M; Devenish, Rodney J; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive, and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterized mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defense mechanisms such as the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed. PMID:22007185

  1. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  2. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  3. Zirconium oxidation on the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Daniel; Cerezo, Alfred; Smith, George D W

    2009-04-01

    Zirconium alloys are used in the nuclear industry as fuel rod cladding. They are chosen for this role because of their good mechanical properties and low thermal neutron absorption. Oxidation of these alloys by coolant is one of the chief limiting factors of the fuel burn-up efficiency. The aim of the present study is to understand these oxidation mechanisms. As a first step, a fundamental study of the oxidation of commercially pure zirconium has been conducted using the 3D atom probe (3DAP). The current generation of 3DAPs allows both voltage and laser pulsing, providing data sets of many millions of ions. According to the literature the only stable oxide of zirconium is ZrO(2). However, the 3DAP shows that an initial layer a few nanometres thick forms with a composition of ZrO(1-)(x) when subjected to light oxidation. This result confirms and extends the work of Wadman et al. [Colloque de Physique 50 (1989) C8 303; Journal de Physique, 11 (1988) C6 49] and Wadman and Andrén [in: C.M. Euchen, A.M. Garde (Eds.), Zirconium in the Nuclear Industry: Ninth Symposium, ASTM STP 1132, ASTM, USA, 1991, p. 461], who used 1DAP techniques, obtaining reduced data sets. Segregation of hydrogen to the metal-oxide interface and a distinct ZrH phase were observed in this study. A novel kinetics study of the room temperature oxidation of zirconium showed the ZrO layer to be non-protective over the time period investigated (up to 1h). PMID:19101084

  4. Effect of supercooling and cell volume on intracellular ice formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Richelle C; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) has been linked to death of cells cryopreserved in suspension. It has been assumed that cells can be supercooled by 2 to 10°C before IIF occurs, but measurements of the degree of supercooling that cells can tolerate are often confounded by changing extracellular temperature and solutions of different osmolality (which affect the cell volume). The purpose of this study was to examine how the incidence of IIF in the absence of cryoprotectants is affected by the degree of supercooling and cell volume. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were suspended in isotonic (300 mOsm) and hypertonic (∼600 to 700 mOsm) solutions and exposed to supercooling ranging from 2 to 10°C before extracellular ice was nucleated. The number of cells undergoing IIF was examined in a cryostage (based on the darkening of cells upon intracellular freezing ("flashing")) as a function of the degree of supercooling, and cell survival post-thaw was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. We found that while the incidence of IIF increased with supercooling in both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, it was higher in the isotonic solution at any given degree of supercooling. Since cells in hypertonic solution were shrunken due to water efflux, we hypothesized that the difference in IIF behavior could be attributed to the decreased volume of cells in the hypertonic solution. Our results confirm that cells with a smaller diameter before extracellular ice nucleation have a decreased probability of IIF and suggest that cell volume could play a more significant role in the incidence of IIF than the extracellular ice nucleation temperature. PMID:25707695

  5. Intracellular signalling by C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes. PMID:18382618

  6. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  7. Cytoskeletal network morphology regulates intracellular transport dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, David; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable time scales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that r...

  8. Intracellular calcium release modulates polycystin-2 trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyakawa Ayako

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystin-2 (PC2, encoded by the gene that is mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, functions as a calcium (Ca2+ permeable ion channel. Considerable controversy remains regarding the subcellular localization and signaling function of PC2 in kidney cells. Methods We investigated the subcellular PC2 localization by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy in primary cultures of human and rat proximal tubule cells after stimulating cytosolic Ca2+ signaling. Plasma membrane (PM Ca2+ permeability was evaluated by Fura-2 manganese quenching using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Results We demonstrated that PC2 exhibits a dynamic subcellular localization pattern. In unstimulated human or rat proximal tubule cells, PC2 exhibited a cytosolic/reticular distribution. Treatments with agents that in various ways affect the Ca2+ signaling machinery, those being ATP, bradykinin, ionomycin, CPA or thapsigargin, resulted in increased PC2 immunostaining in the PM. Exposing cells to the steroid hormone ouabain, known to trigger Ca2+ oscillations in kidney cells, caused increased PC2 in the PM and increased PM Ca2+ permeability. Intracellular Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R inhibition with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB or Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibition with KN-93 completely abolished ouabain-stimulated PC2 translocation to the PM. Conclusions These novel findings demonstrate intracellular Ca2+-dependent PC2 trafficking in human and rat kidney cells, which may provide new insight into cyst formations in ADPKD.

  9. Antibody-Fc receptor interactions in protection against intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joller, Nicole; Weber, Stefan S; Oxenius, Annette

    2011-04-01

    Intracellular pathogen-specific antibodies (Abs) can contribute to host protection by a number of different mechanisms. Ab opsonization of pathogens residing outside a host cell can prevent infection of target cells either via neutralization of the critical surface epitopes required for host cell entry, complement-mediated degradation, or via subsequent intracellular degradation. In the case of intracellular localization, Abs can bind to infected cells and thus mark them for destruction by Fc receptor (FcR)-bearing effector cells. This review focuses on the protective role of Abs against intracellular bacteria and parasites involving FcR interactions that modulate the intracellular trafficking of the pathogen, the ability of FcRs to interfere with the establishment of an intracellular replicative niche and the involvement of FcRs to modulate pathogen-specific T-cell responses. PMID:21413006

  10. Biosensor Scheme for the Determination of Intracellular Pressure of Erythrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.S. Nagornov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a scheme of the biosensor for determining the intracellular pressure of erythrocytes. The possibility of measuring of the volume and area of the erythrocyte is provided in a biosensor to determine the value intracellular pressure. In MEMS this creates flow that enters into Coulter capacitive sensor through the rate control system and then in the system of signal transmitting. The definition of erythrocyte volume and calculation of intracellular pressure occur in the computer system.

  11. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-12-24

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  12. Modelling at the atomic scale of the irradiation effects in SiC: example of the stability of the Frenkel pairs and of the swelling due to the amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the structural and mechanical properties due to the defects induced by irradiation is an important problem for nuclear materials. The modelling at the atomic scale can bring pertinent data difficult to obtain experimentally on the implied processes. Several atomistic modelling studies on the behaviour of silicon carbide under irradiation have been carried out. Here are presented two examples of these studies. The first example is the study by the density functional method of the stability and of the recombination of the Frenkel pairs in the cubic silicon carbide. The use of this method called 'ab initio' allows to determine the energies and the geometries of these defects with a very good accuracy. The thermodynamic stability of the Frenkel pairs has been determined and compared to those of the intrinsic point defects. The recombination kinetics has then been studied by the calculation of the implied activation energies. With the migration mechanisms, the recombination processes plays indeed an essential role in the annealing of materials during and after irradiation. The second example is the study by classical molecular dynamics of the swelling due to amorphization in silicon carbide. The irradiation is modelled in two successive steps: (a)creation at a constant volume of an amorphous zone of structure, of variable size and shape (b)relaxation in volume allowing the swelling. The swelling is then determined in terms of the amorphous material fraction, and an elaborated analysis of the created disorder is carried out. These results are compared in one part to the RBS analyses results of implanted materials available in literature, and in another part with an elastic model. For that, two different definitions of the amorphous fraction are used. (O.M.)

  13. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  14. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...... of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H(2)O(2) signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits...... which diffusion-mediated signaling is possible. We show that purely diffusive transmission of intracellular information by H(2)O(2) over a distance of 1 μm (typical distance between organelles, which may function as relay stations) is possible at frequencies well above 1 Hz, which is the highest...

  15. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca2+ ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...... of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H2O2 signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits...... diffusion-mediated signaling is possible. We show that purely diffusive transmission of intracellular information by H2O2 over a distance of 1 μm (typical distance between organelles, which may function as relay stations) is possible at frequencies well above 1 Hz, which is the highest frequency observed...

  16. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mayne

    Full Text Available Collision-based computing (CBC is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  17. Duodenal Intracellular Bicarbonate and the 'CF Paradox'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaunitz JD

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available HCO(3(- secretion, which is believed to neutralize acid within the mucus gel, is the most studied duodenal defense mechanism. In general, HCO(3(- secretion rate and mucosal injury susceptibility correlate closely. Recent studies suggest that luminal acid can lower intracellular pH (pH(i of duodenal epithelial cells and that HCO(3(- secretion is unchanged during acid stress. Furthermore, peptic ulcers are rare in cystic fibrosis (CF, although, with impaired HCO(3(- secretion, increased ulcer prevalence is predicted, giving rise to the 'CF Paradox'. We thus tested the hypothesis that duodenal epithelial cell protection occurs as the result of pH(i regulation rather than by neutralization of acid by HCO(3(- in the pre-epithelial mucus. Cellular acidification during luminal acid perfusion, and unchanged HCO(3(- secretion during acid stress are inconsistent with pre-epithelial acid neutralization by secreted HCO(3(-. Furthermore, inhibition of HCO(3(- secretion by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino benzoic acid (NPPB despite preservation of pH(i and protection from acid-induced injury further question the pre-epithelial acid neutralization hypothesis. This decoupling of HCO(3(- secretion and injury susceptibility by NPPB (and possibly by CF further suggest that cellular buffering, rather than HCO(3(- exit into the mucus, is of primary importance for duodenal mucosal protection, and may account for the lack of peptic ulceration in CF patients.

  18. Intracellular Shuttle: The Lactate Aerobic Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos de Oliveira Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactate is a highly dynamic metabolite that can be used as a fuel by several cells of the human body, particularly during physical exercise. Traditionally, it has been believed that the first step of lactate oxidation occurs in cytosol; however, this idea was recently challenged. A new hypothesis has been presented based on the fact that lactate-to-pyruvate conversion cannot occur in cytosol, because the LDH enzyme characteristics and cytosolic environment do not allow the reaction in this way. Instead, the Intracellular Lactate Shuttle hypothesis states that lactate first enters in mitochondria and only then is metabolized. In several tissues of the human body this idea is well accepted but is quite resistant in skeletal muscle. In this paper, we will present not only the studies which are protagonists in this discussion, but the potential mechanism by which this oxidation occurs and also a link between lactate and mitochondrial proliferation. This new perspective brings some implications and comes to change our understanding of the interaction between the energy systems, because the product of one serves as a substrate for the other.

  19. Intracellular Signals of T Cell Costimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxun Song; Fengyang Tylan Lei; Xiaofang Xiong; Rizwanul Haque

    2008-01-01

    Ligation of T cell receptor (TCR) alone is insufficient to induce full activation of T lymphocytes. Additional ligand-receptor interactions (costimulation) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells are required. T cell costimulation has been shown to be essential for eliciting efficient T cell responses, involving all phases during T cell development. However, the mechanisms by which costimulation affects the function of T cells still need to be elucidated. In recent years, advances have been made in studies of costimulation as potential therapies in cancer, infectious disease as well as autoimmune disease. In this review, we discussed intracellular costimulation signals that regulate T cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cytokine production, survival, and memory development. In general, the pathway of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PBK)/protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) might be central to many costimulatory effects. Through these pathways, costimulation controls T-cell expansion and proliferation by maintenance of survivin and aurora B expression, and sustains long-term T-cell survival and memory development by regulating the expression of bci-2 family members. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2008;5(4):239-247.

  20. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Zarrabi; E. Mancini; J. Tay; S. Shahand; P.M.A. Sloot

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  1. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Laura A; Burnell, Erica S; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4'-dinitro-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  2. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  3. A universal strategy for stable intracellular antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaki-Loewenstein, Shelly; Zfania, Rahely; Hyland, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Benhar, Itai

    2005-08-01

    The expression of intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) in mammalian cells has provided a powerful tool to manipulate microbial and cellular signalling pathways in a highly precise manner. However, several technical hurdles have thus far restricted their more widespread use. In particular, single-chain antibodies (scFvs) have been reported to fold poorly in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm and as such there has been a reluctance to use scFv-phage libraries as a source of intrabodies unless a preselection step was applied to identify these rare scFvs that could fold properly in the absence of disulfide bonds. Recently, we reported that scFvs can be efficiently expressed within the cytoplasm of bacteria when fused at the C-terminus of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP). Here, we demonstrate that such MBP-scFvs are similarly stabilized when expressed in the mammalian cell cytoplasm as well as other compartments. This was demonstrated by comparing MBP-scFv fusions to the corresponding unfused scFvs that activate a defective beta-galactosidase enzyme, others that neutralize the wild-type beta-galactosidase enzyme, and an antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor. In all cases, the MBP-scFvs significantly outperformed their unfused counterparts. Our results suggest that fusion of scFvs to MBP, and possibly to other "chaperones in the context of a fusion protein", may provide a universal approach for efficient expression of intrabodies in the mammalian cell cytoplasm. This strategy should allow investigators to bypass much of the in vitro scFv characterization that is often not predictive of in vivo intrabody function and provide a more efficient use of large native and synthetic scFv-phage libraries already in existence to identify intrabodies that will be active in vivo.

  4. The Structural Pathway for Water Permeation through Sodium-Glucose Cotransporters

    OpenAIRE

    Sasseville, Louis J.; Cuervo, Javier E.; Lapointe, Jean-Yves; Noskov, Sergei Y.

    2011-01-01

    Although water permeation across cell membranes occurs through several types of membrane proteins, the only permeation mechanism resolved at atomic scale is that through aquaporins. Crystallization of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium-galactose transporter (vSGLT) allows investigation of putative water permeation pathways through both vSGLT and the homologous human Na-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) using computational methods. Grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations we...

  5. Comparative study of GDNF and methyl prednisolone on intracellular free calcium and containing water capacity after spinal cord injury in rats%GDNF与甲泼尼龙对脊髓损伤后细胞内游离钙含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海涛; 贾连顺; 陈哲宇; 田万成; 何成

    2001-01-01

    Objectives:To compare the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor(GDNF) and methylprednisolone(MP) on intracellular free calcium([Ca2+]i) and capacity of containing water(CCW) after spinal cord injury(SCI). Methods:Forty-two SD rats were divided into four groups: control, GDNF,MP and GDNF+MP.GDNF and MP were supplied through subarachnoid cavity, tail vein and both of the above after T12 segments spinal cord injury by modified Allen crush method. Animals were executed and specimens were collected at 24 h, 72 h and 168 h after SCI.[Ca2+]i and CCW were measured using Fura-2 method. Results:Both [Ca2+]i and CCW of injured spinal cord in GDNF,MP, and GDNF+MP groups were lower than that of the control group at 24 h and 72 h after SCI(P0.05) 24 hours after SCI. Seventy-two hours after SCI,[Ca2+]i in GDNF group was higher than that in MP group, MP group was higher than MP+GDNF group(P0.05). Conclusions: Both GDNF,MP and GDNF + MP groups might reduce [Ca2+]i and CCW of injured spinal cord. The curative effect of MP for SCI preponderate over that of GDNF, the effect of MP could be enhanced by adding GDNF.%目的:比较胶质细胞源性神经营养因子(GDNF)与甲泼尼龙(MP)对脊髓损伤组织细胞内游离钙及水含量的影响。 方法:SD大鼠分成对照组、GDNF组、MP组及GDNF+MP组,改良Allen法撞击致伤脊髓T13节段,蛛网膜下腔给予GDNF 20 μl,尾静脉给予MP 30 mg/kg,不同时间取伤段脊髓以Fura-2法测定细胞内钙[Ca2+]i及组织中水含量。 结果:治疗组[Ca2+]i及组织中水含量明显低于对照组(PMP组及GDNF+MP组(P0.05);伤后72 h的[Ca2+]i水平,GDNF组>MP组>GDNF+MP组(PMP组及MP+GDNF组(PMP组>GDNF+MP组(P0.05)。 结论:GDNF、MP及其联合应用均能降低脊髓组织[Ca2+]i水平,减轻组织水肿,作用效果MP超过GDNF,MP联合GDNF治疗脊髓损伤能增强MP的疗效。

  6. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  7. Vesicular demyelination induced by raised intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K J; Hall, S M; Schauf, C L

    1985-11-01

    myelin vesiculation. We conclude that vesicular demyelination can be initiated in vital Schwann cells by a raised intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Such demyelination does not necessarily lead to Schwann cell death. The possible relevance of the findings to vesicular demyelinating neuropathies is discussed, and a hypothesis regarding the mechanism of demyelination is advanced. PMID:3003255

  8. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host-pathogen interaction.

  9. Roles of autophagy in elimination of intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Kyeong eJo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As a fundamental intracellular catabolic process, autophagy is important and required for the elimination of protein aggregates and damaged cytosolic organelles during a variety of stress conditions. Autophagy is now being recognized as an essential component of innate immunity; i.e., the recognition, selective targeting, and elimination of microbes. Because of its crucial roles in the innate immune system, therapeutic targeting of bacteria by means of autophagy activation may prove a useful strategy to combat intracellular infections. However, important questions remain, including which molecules are critical in bacterial targeting by autophagy, and which mechanisms are involved in autophagic clearance of intracellular microbes. In this review, we discuss the roles of antibacterial autophagy in intracellular bacterial infections (Mycobacteria, Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria, and Legionella and present recent evidence in support of molecular mechanisms driving autophagy to target bacteria and eliminate invading pathogens.

  10. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  11. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungalrelated parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and...

  12. Acquisition of an animal gene by microsporidian intracellular parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Selman, Mohammed; Pombert, Jean-François; Solter, Leellen; Farinelli, Laurent; Weiss, Louis M.; Keeling, Patrick; Corradi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Parasites have adapted to their specialised way of life by a number of means, including the acquisition of genes by horizontal gene transfer. These newly acquired genes seem to come from a variety of sources, but seldom from the host, even in the most intimate associations between obligate intracellular parasite and host [1]. Microsporidian intracellular parasites have acquired a handful of genes, mostly from bacteria, that help them take energy from their hosts or protect them from the envir...

  13. Ethambutol plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics: A pharmacogenetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatiguso, Giovanna; Allegra, Sarah; Calcagno, Andrea; Baietto, Lorena; Motta, Ilaria; Favata, Fabio; Cusato, Jessica; Bonora, Stefano; Perri, Giovanni Di; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-01-30

    We evaluated ethambutol plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetic according to single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABCB1, OATP1B1, PXR, VDR, CYP24A1 and CYP27B1 genes. Mycobacterium tubercolosis infected patients were enrolled. Standard weight-adjusted antitubercular treatment was administered intravenously for 2 weeks and then orally. Allelic discrimination was performed by real-time PCR. Ethambutol plasma and intracellular concentrations were measured by UPLC-MS/MS methods. Twenty-four patients were included. Considering weeks 2 and 4, median plasma Ctrough were 73 ng/mL and 247 ng/mL, intracellular Ctrough were 16,863 ng/mL and 13,535 ng/mL, plasma Cmax were 5627 ng/mL and 2229 ng/mL, intracellular Cmax were 133,830 ng/mL and 78,544 ng/mL. At week 2, ABCB1 3435 CT/TT (p=0.023) and CYP24A1 8620 AG/GG (p=0.030) genotypes for plasma Ctrough, BsmI AA (p=0.036) for intracellular Ctrough and BsmI AA (pethambutol plasma and intracellular concentrations; this may further the potential use of pharmacogenetic for tailoring antitubercular treatment. PMID:26642947

  14. Spontaneous Protein Adsorption on Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Allowing Efficient Intracellular Vaccine Protein Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Fierens, Kaat; Zhang, Zhiyue; Vanparijs, Nane; Schuijs, Martijn J; Van Steendam, Katleen; Feiner Gracia, Natàlia; De Rycke, Riet; De Beer, Thomas; De Beuckelaer, Ans; De Koker, Stefaan; Deforce, Dieter; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Grooten, Johan; Lambrecht, Bart N; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-01-20

    Nanomaterials hold potential of altering the interaction between therapeutic molecules and target cells or tissues. High aspect ratio nanomaterials in particular have been reported to possess unprecedented properties and are intensively investigated for their interaction with biological systems. Graphene oxide (GOx) is a water-soluble graphene derivative that combines high aspect ratio dimension with functional groups that can be exploited for bioconjugation. Here, we demonstrate that GOx nanosheets can spontaneously adsorb proteins by a combination of interactions. This property is then explored for intracellular protein vaccine delivery, in view of the potential of GOx nanosheets to destabilize lipid membranes such as those of intracellular vesicles. Using a series of in vitro experiments, we show that GOx nanosheet adsorbed proteins are efficiently internalized by dendritic cells (DCs: the most potent class of antigen presenting cells of the immune system) and promote antigen cross-presentation to CD8 T cells. The latter is a hallmark in the induction of potent cellular antigen-specific immune responses against intracellular pathogens and cancer. PMID:26694764

  15. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-07-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn(2+) . Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes reloading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn(2+) , FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn(2+) . Therefore, Zn(2+) -releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn(2+) release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn(2+) ] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn(2+) -sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn(2+) but did chelate Cu(2+) ; the remaining ligands chelated Zn(2+) and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn(2+) release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn(2+) when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) , these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release. This study aimed at identifying intracellular stores which release Zn(2+) when pHi drops from 6.6 to 6.1. It was found that these stores are not mitochondria or acidic organelles, but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. When the pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes showed a rapid acceleration in the rate of Zn(2+) release. Therefore, the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release in neurons may be the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes

  16. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  17. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  18. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A., E-mail: David.Jans@monash.edu

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  19. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  20. Intracellular Neural Recording with Pure Carbon Nanotube Probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inho Yoon

    Full Text Available The computational complexity of the brain depends in part on a neuron's capacity to integrate electrochemical information from vast numbers of synaptic inputs. The measurements of synaptic activity that are crucial for mechanistic understanding of brain function are also challenging, because they require intracellular recording methods to detect and resolve millivolt- scale synaptic potentials. Although glass electrodes are widely used for intracellular recordings, novel electrodes with superior mechanical and electrical properties are desirable, because they could extend intracellular recording methods to challenging environments, including long term recordings in freely behaving animals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can theoretically deliver this advance, but the difficulty of assembling CNTs has limited their application to a coating layer or assembly on a planar substrate, resulting in electrodes that are more suitable for in vivo extracellular recording or extracellular recording from isolated cells. Here we show that a novel, yet remarkably simple, millimeter-long electrode with a sub-micron tip, fabricated from self-entangled pure CNTs can be used to obtain intracellular and extracellular recordings from vertebrate neurons in vitro and in vivo. This fabrication technology provides a new method for assembling intracellular electrodes from CNTs, affording a promising opportunity to harness nanotechnology for neuroscience applications.

  1. Intracellular multiplication of Legionella species and the influence of amoebae on their intracellular growth in human monocytes: mono mac 6 cells and Acanthamoeba castellanii as suitable in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Birgid

    2004-01-01

    Legionellae are important etiological agents of pneumonia. Legionella pneumophila (predominantly serogroup 1) is detected in most cases of legionellosis; other species only occasionally cause infections, predominantly in immunocompromized patients. Aquiferous technical systems are the primary source of infection (air-conditioning systems, refrigerators, showers, whirlpools, springs, taps, moisturizing equipment, medical nebulizers, and swimming pools). Legionellae are present in the water in these systems, within the amoebae, flagellates, and ciliates in which they replicate. After inhalation of contaminated aerosols, the bacteria multiply intracellularly within alveolar macrophages. The ability to multiply within monocytic host cells is usually considered to correspond to pathogenicity. The mechanisms of intracellular replication have been only partially characterized. Analysis of the molecular pathogenesis of Legionella infection, both in the pathogen itself and in the host cell, is the subject of current research and may lead to new options in prophylaxis and treatment. We have established the human Mono Mac 6 cell line (MM6) instead of the previously used histiocytic lymphoma cell line U 937 or the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 to investigate the intracellular replication of legionellae and the molecular pathogenesis of Legionella infection within human monocytic host cells. MM6 cells represent a more mature macrophage-like cell line that expresses phenotypic and functional properties of mature monocytes and that does not need to be stimulated by phorbol esters or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. A good correlation between the prevalence of a given Legionella species and its intracellular multiplication in MM6 cells could be demonstrated.In addition to Legionella, MM6 cells were found to support the intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two other important bacterial agents involved in induction of pneumonia. Therefore

  2. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  3. Direct determination of the intracellular oxidation state of plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha P; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E; Jensen, Mark P

    2011-08-15

    Microprobe X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) measurements were used to determine directly, for the first time, the oxidation state of intracellular plutonium in individual 0.1-μm(2) areas within single rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). The living cells were incubated in vitro for 3 h in the presence of Pu added to the media in different oxidation states (Pu(III), Pu(IV), and Pu(VI)) and in different chemical forms. Regardless of the initial oxidation state or chemical form of Pu presented to the cells, the XANES spectra of the intracellular Pu deposits were always consistent with tetravalent Pu even though the intracellular milieu is generally reducing. PMID:21755934

  4. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed. PMID:14051820

  5. Intracellular biology and virulence determinants of Francisella tularensis revealed by transcriptional profiling inside macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrly, Tara D.; Chong, Audrey; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Dan E.; Child, Robert; Edwards, Jessica A.; Brouwer, Dedeke; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Wicke, Luke; Curda, Alissa J.; Kupko, John J.; Martens, Craig; Crane, Deborah D.; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2009-01-01

    The highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, whose virulence requires proliferation inside host cells, including macrophages. Here we have performed a global transcriptional profiling of the highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 strain during its intracellular cycle within primary murine macrophages, to characterize its intracellular biology and identify pathogenic determinants based on their intracellular expression profile...

  6. Cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E Tvermoes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+](i and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca(2+](i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60, which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca(2+](i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription.

  7. Role of intracellular calcium in contraction of internal anal sphincter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a continuation of the smooth circular muscle layer thickened at the rectum, innervated by vegetative nerve. IAS is a special smooth muscle, which is different from colonic smooth muscle in physiology and pharmaology[1]. It was found that contraction of gastric smooth muscle depends on the influx of extracellular calcium and release of intracellular calcium[2]. In present study, we observed and compared the effects of extra- and intracellular calcium on the contraction of IAS and colonic smooth muscle.

  8. In vitro and ex vivo strategies for intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Martin P.; Sharei, Armon; Ding, Xiaoyun; Sahay, Gaurav; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular delivery of materials has become a critical component of genome-editing approaches, ex vivo cell-based therapies, and a diversity of fundamental research applications. Limitations of current technologies motivate development of next-generation systems that can deliver a broad variety of cargo to diverse cell types. Here we review in vitro and ex vivo intracellular delivery approaches with a focus on mechanisms, challenges and opportunities. In particular, we emphasize membrane-disruption-based delivery methods and the transformative role of nanotechnology, microfluidics and laboratory-on-chip technology in advancing the field.

  9. Intracellular accumulation of azithromycin by cultured human fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Gladue, R P; Snider, M E

    1990-01-01

    Azithromycin was shown to achieve high concentrations in human skin fibroblasts. Intracellular penetration occurred rapidly (10 micrograms/mg of cellular protein after 3 h) and then increased progressively over a 3-day period; azithromycin accumulated up to 21 times more than erythromycin (61.1 versus 2.9 micrograms/mg of protein). Uptake was dependent on the extracellular concentration, was inhibited at 4 degrees C, did not occur in nonviable cells, and was reduced by a low pH. Intracellular...

  10. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells.

  11. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes sensitive to changes in intracellular calcium have become increasingly popular in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug discovery for several reasons. First of all, the assays using the dyes are easy to perform and are of low cost compared to other assays. Second, most non......-Galpha(q)-coupled GPCRs can be tweaked to modulate intracellular calcium by co-transfection with promiscuous or chimeric/mutated G proteins making the calcium assays broadly applicable in GPCR research. Third, the price of instruments capable of measuring fluorescent-based calcium indicators has become significantly less...

  12. Correlation of Cell Strain in Single Osteocytes with Intracellular Calcium, but not Intracellular Nitric Oxide, in Response to Fluid Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, Amber L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Ling, Jian; Jiang, Jean X.; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; Nicolella, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Osteocytes compose 90–95% of all bone cells and are the mechanosensors of bone. In this study, the strain experienced by individual osteocytes resulting from an applied fluid flow shear stress was quantified and correlated to two biological responses measured in real-time within the same individual osteocytes: 1) the upregulation of intracellular calcium and 2) changes in intracellular nitric oxide. Osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells were loaded with Fluo-4 AM and DAR-4M and exposed to uniform lamin...

  13. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  14. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTRACELLULAR IONS TO Kv CHANNEL VOLTAGE SENSOR DYNAMICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGoodchild

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensing domains of Kv channels control ionic conductance through coupling of the movement of charged residues in the S4 segment to conformational changes at the cytoplasmic region of the pore domain, that allow K+ ions to flow. Conformational transitions within the voltage sensing domain caused by changes in the applied voltage across the membrane field are coupled to the conducting pore region and the gating of ionic conductance. However, several other factors not directly linked to the voltage dependent movement of charged residues within the voltage sensor impact the dynamics of the voltage sensor, such as inactivation, ionic conductance, intracellular ion identity and block of the channel by intracellular ligands. The effect of intracellular ions on voltage sensor dynamics is of importance in the interpretation of gating current measurements and the physiology of pore/voltage sensor coupling. There is a significant amount of variability in the reported kinetics of voltage sensor deactivation kinetics of Kv channels attributed to different mechanisms such as open state stabilization, immobilization and relaxation processes of the voltage sensor. Here we separate these factors and focus on the causal role that intracellular ions can play in allosterically modulating the dynamics of Kv voltage sensor deactivation kinetics. These considerations are of critical importance in understanding the molecular determinants of the complete channel gating cycle from activation to deactivation.

  15. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc.

  16. Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Fischer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases.

  17. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  18. Biomineralization Patterns of Intracellular Carbonatogenesis in Cyanobacteria: Molecular Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of intracellular carbonatogenesis in several cyanobacteria species has challenged the traditional view that this process was extracellular and not controlled. However, a detailed analysis of the size distribution, chemical composition and 3-D-arrangement of carbonates in these cyanobacteria is lacking. Here, we characterized these features in Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora C7 and Candidatus Synechococcus calcipolaris G9 by conventional transmission electron microscopy, tomography, ultramicrotomy, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Both Ca. G. lithophora C7 and Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 formed numerous polyphosphate granules adjacent or engulfing Ca-carbonate inclusions when grown in phosphate-rich solutions. Ca-carbonates were scattered within Ca. G. lithophora C7 cells under these conditions, but sometimes arranged in one or several chains. In contrast, Ca-carbonates formed at cell septa in Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 and were segregated equally between daughter cells after cell division, arranging as distorted disks at cell poles. The size distribution of carbonates evolved from a positively to a negatively skewed distribution as particles grew. Conventional ultramicrotomy did not preserve Ca-carbonates explaining partly why intracellular calcification has been overlooked in the past. All these new observations allow discussing with unprecedented insight some nucleation and growth processes occurring in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria with a particular emphasis on the possible involvement of intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton.

  19. Measurement of intracellular oxygen concentration during photodynamic therapy in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Mark A; Patterson, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    A technique is introduced that monitors the depletion of intracellular ground state oxygen concentration ([(3)O(2)]) during photodynamic therapy of Mat-LyLu cell monolayers and cell suspensions. The photosensitizer Pd(II) meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine (PdT790) is used to manipulate and indicate intracellular [(3)O(2)] in both of the in vitro models. The Stern-Volmer relationship for PdT790 phosphorescence was characterized in suspensions by flowing nitrogen over the suspension while short pulses of 405 nm light were used to excite the sensitizer. The bleaching of sensitizer and the oxygen consumption rate were also measured during continuous exposure of the cell suspension to the 405 nm laser. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was conducted in both cell suspensions and in cell monolayers under different treatment conditions while the phosphorescence signal was acquired. The intracellular [(3)O(2)] during PDT was calculated by using the measured Stern-Volmer relationship and correcting for sensitizer photobleaching. In addition, the amount of oxygen that was consumed during the treatments was calculated. It was found that even at large oxygen consumption rates, cells remain well oxygenated during PDT of cell suspensions. For monolayer treatments, it was found that intracellular [(3)O(2)] is rapidly depleted over the course of PDT.

  20. Galectin-3 guides intracellular trafficking of some human serotransferrin glycoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Carl Michael; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena;

    2013-01-01

    these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3 bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting...

  1. Environmental and intracellular regulation of Francisella tularensis ripA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft-Benz Sharon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, facultative intracellular pathogen and the etiologic agent of the zoonotic disease Tularemia. RipA is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that is conserved among Francisella species and is required for intracellular growth. F. tularensis ripA deletion mutants escape the phagosome of infected cells, but unlike wild type organisms fail to replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. Results Further analysis of ripA with respect to environmental effects on the growth of mutant strains and expression levels revealed that RipA is required for optimal growth at pH 7.5 but not pH 6.5. Using a combination of RT-PCR, ripA-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions, and a RipA-tetracysteine tag fusion protein we found that both ripA transcription and RipA protein levels were elevated in organisms grown at pH 7.5 as compared to organisms grown at pH 5.5. A number of genes, including iglA, that are required for intracellular growth are regulated by the transcriptional regulators MglA and SspA, and are induced upon infection of host cells. We quantified ripA and iglA expression at different stages of intracellular growth and found that the expression of each increased between 1 and 6 hours post infection. Given the similar intracellular expression patterns of ripA and iglA and that MglA and SspA are positive regulators of iglA we tested the impact of mglA and sspA deletions on ripA and iglA expression. In the deletion mutant strains iglA expression was reduced dramatically as expected, however ripA expression was increased over 2-fold. Conclusion Expression of ripA is required for growth at neutral pH, is pH sensitive, and is responsive to the intracellular environment. The intracellular expression pattern of ripA coincided with iglA, which is positively regulated by MglA and SspA. However, in contrast to their positive impact on iglA expression, MglA and SspA negatively impacted ripA expression in

  2. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  3. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Troemel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

  4. Supramolecular nanoreactors for intracellular singlet-oxygen sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Tang, Sicheng; Fraix, Aurore; Burjor, Captain; Sortino, Salvatore; Callan, John F.; Raymo, Françisco M.

    2015-08-01

    An amphiphilic polymer with multiple decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains attached to a common poly(methacrylate) backbone assembles into nanoscaled particles in aqueous environments. Hydrophobic anthracene and borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) chromophores can be co-encapsulated within the self-assembling nanoparticles and transported across hydrophilic media. The reversible character of the noncovalent bonds, holding the supramolecular containers together, permits the exchange of their components with fast kinetics in aqueous solution. Incubation of cervical cancer (HeLA) cells with a mixture of two sets of nanoparticles, pre-loaded independently with anthracene or BODIPY chromophores, results in guest scrambling first and then transport of co-entrapped species to the intracellular space. Alternatively, incubation of cells with the two sets of nanocarriers in consecutive steps permits the sequential transport of the anthracene and BODIPY chromophores across the plasma membrane and only then allows their co-encapsulation within the same supramolecular containers. Both mechanisms position the two sets of chromophores with complementary spectral overlap in close proximity to enable the efficient transfer of energy intracellularly from the anthracene donors to the BODIPY acceptors. In the presence of iodine substituents on the BODIPY platform, intersystem crossing follows energy transfer. The resulting triplet state can transfer energy further to molecular oxygen with the concomitant production of singlet oxygen to induce cell mortality. Furthermore, the donor can be excited with two near-infrared photons simultaneously to permit the photoinduced generation of singlet oxygen intracellularly under illumination conditions compatible with applications in vivo. Thus, these supramolecular strategies to control the excitation dynamics of multichromophoric assemblies in the intracellular environment can evolve into valuable protocols for photodynamic therapy.An amphiphilic

  5. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces, which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties.Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces

  6. Intracellular pH Modulates Autophagy and Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnov, Alexey V; Soutar, Marc P M; Fedotova, Evgeniya I; Frolova, Maria S; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Zinchenko, Valery P; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-04-15

    The specific autophagic elimination of mitochondria (mitophagy) plays the role of quality control for this organelle. Deregulation of mitophagy leads to an increased number of damaged mitochondria and triggers cell death. The deterioration of mitophagy has been hypothesized to underlie the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, most notably Parkinson disease. Although some of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial quality control are described in detail, physiological or pathological triggers of mitophagy are still not fully characterized. Here we show that the induction of mitophagy by the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP is independent of the effect of mitochondrial membrane potential but dependent on acidification of the cytosol by FCCP. The ionophore nigericin also reduces cytosolic pH and induces PINK1/PARKIN-dependent and -independent mitophagy. The increase of intracellular pH with monensin suppresses the effects of FCCP and nigericin on mitochondrial degradation. Thus, a change in intracellular pH is a regulator of mitochondrial quality control. PMID:26893374

  7. Intracellular Delivery of Nanoparticles with Cell Penetrating Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, Giuseppina; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitutes a breakthrough for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic payloads. In late 1998, a significant cellular uptake of a small protein from the HIV-1 virus, namely TAT peptide (TATp), was observed. Thereafter, research began on design of similarly acting peptides, and the coupling of NPs with these novel CPPs. Here, we describe recent methods used to modify the surface of NPs with CPPs and the in vitro and in vivo effects of such functionalization on the intracellular delivery of various cargos. In particular, we highlight recent advances aimed at reducing the non-selectivity of CPPs and the prevention of their enzymatic cleavage en route to target tissues. PMID:26202282

  8. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  9. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  10. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    variant form of siderocalin, which is expressed only in the macrophage cytosol, inhibited intracellular M.tb growth as effectively as the normal, secreted form, an observation that provides mechanistic insight into how siderocalin might influence iron acquisition by the bacteria in the phagosome. Our...... siderocalin expression is upregulated following M.tb infection of mouse macrophage cell lines and primary murine alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, siderocalin added exogenously as a recombinant protein or overexpressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line inhibited the intracellular growth of the pathogen. A......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that...

  11. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    CERN Document Server

    Appert-Rolland, Cecile; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Cells are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems driven by continuous energy supply. They carry out many vital functions requiring active transport of various ingredients and organelles, some being small, others being large. The cytoskeleton, composed of three types of filaments, determines the shape of the cell and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for the so-called cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated, in particular because its breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. We first review some biological facts obtained from experiments, and present some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We start with background knowledge on the origi...

  12. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  13. Isolation of peptide aptamers that inhibit intracellular processes

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Jonathan H.; Dove, Simon L.; Hochschild, Ann; Mekalanos, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method for isolation of random peptides that inhibit intracellular processes in bacteria. A library of random peptides expressed as fusions to Escherichia coli thioredoxin (aptamers) were expressed under the tight control of the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter. A selection was applied to the library to isolate aptamers that interfered with the activity of thymidylate synthase (ThyA) in vivo. Expression of an aptamer isolated by this method resulted in a ThyA− phenotype t...

  14. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Emily R Troemel; Marie-Anne Félix; Whiteman, Noah K.; Antoine Barrière; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2008-01-01

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular patho...

  15. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth

    OpenAIRE

    Cuomo, Christina A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Malina A Bakowski; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T.; Becnel, James J.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I.; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Emily R Troemel

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time ...

  16. Effect of mycobacteriophage to intracellular mycobateria in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is a pathogen associated with the deaths of millions of people worldwide annually. Although tuberculosis is a treatable disease, the emergence and increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens emphasizes the need for new and innovative anti-microbial strategies. Effective therapeutic regimens, which have existed, are limited by the emergence of drug resistance and the inability of antibiotics to kill dormant or intracellular organisms.

  17. Estrogen receptor of primary breast cancers: evidence for intracellular proteolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maaroufi, Younes; Lacroix, Marc; Lespagnard, Laurence; Journé, Fabrice; Larsimont, Denis; Leclercq, Guy

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: We previously reported that about two-thirds of [125I]oestradiol-labelled cytosolic ERs from breast cancer samples eluted as low-molecular-weight isoforms (≤ 37 kDa, size-exclusion fast pressure liquid chromatography [FPLC]). These isoforms failed to adsorb strongly to hydroxylapatite at high ionic strength, a property that was ascribed to receptors devoid of amino-terminal ABC domains. In view of recent data concerning intracellular proteolysis of several transcriptional regula...

  18. Legionella Pneumophila Transcriptome during Intracellular Multiplication in Human Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Faucher, Sébastien P.; Mueller, Catherine A.; Shuman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins into host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular envir...

  19. Nutrient Salvaging and Metabolism by the Intracellular Pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Maris V.; Michele S Swanson

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneum...

  20. Intracellular and circulating neuronal antinuclear antibodies in human epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Iffland, Philip H.; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Trigunaite, Abhishek; Man, Shumei; Rasmussen, Peter; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Ghosh, Chaitali; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    There are overwhelming data supporting the inflammatory origin of some epilepsies (e.g., Rasmussen's encephalitis and limbic encephalitis). Inflammatory epilepsies with an autoimmune component are characterized by autoantibodies against membrane-bound, intracellular or secreted proteins (e.g., voltage gated potassium channels). Comparably, little is known regarding autoantibodies targeting nuclear antigen. We tested the hypothesis that in addition to known epilepsy-related autoantigens, human...

  1. Dual Readout BRET/FRET Sensors for Measuring Intracellular Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded FRET-based sensor proteins have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the intracellular functions of Zn2+. However, the external excitation required for these fluorescent sensors can give rise to photobleaching and phototoxicity during long-term imaging, limits applications that suffer from autofluorescence and light scattering, and is not compatible with light-sensitive cells. For these applications, sensor proteins based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) would provide an attractive alternative. In this work, we used the bright and stable luciferase NanoLuc to create the first genetically encoded BRET sensors for measuring intracellular Zn2+. Using a new sensor approach, the NanoLuc domain was fused to the Cerulean donor domain of two previously developed FRET sensors, eCALWY and eZinCh-2. In addition to preserving the excellent Zn2+ affinity and specificity of their predecessors, these newly developed sensors enable both BRET- and FRET-based detection. While the dynamic range of the BRET signal for the eCALWY-based BLCALWY-1 sensor was limited by the presence of two competing BRET pathways, BRET/FRET sensors based on the eZinCh-2 scaffold (BLZinCh-1 and -2) yielded robust 25–30% changes in BRET ratio. In addition, introduction of a chromophore-silencing mutation resulted in a BRET-only sensor (BLZinCh-3) with increased BRET response (50%) and an unexpected 10-fold increase in Zn2+ affinity. The combination of robust ratiometric response, physiologically relevant Zn2+ affinities, and stable and bright luminescence signal offered by the BLZinCh sensors allowed monitoring of intracellular Zn2+ in plate-based assays as well as intracellular BRET-based imaging in single living cells in real time. PMID:27547982

  2. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  3. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  4. Effects of Francisella tularensis infection on macrophage intracellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Telepnev, Maxim

    2005-01-01

    Microbes contain a number of structural components, also known as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMP), which can be recognized by the host defense system. The PAMP serve as ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLR) expressed on phagocytic cells. Binding of PAMP to TLR leads to activation of a number of intracellular transduction pathways including NF-�B and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways (MAPK). Activation of those pathways in turn leads to activation of proinflammatory immun...

  5. Intracellular insulin in human tumors: examples and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Insulin is one of the major metabolic hormones regulating glucose homeostasis in the organism and a key growth factor for normal and neoplastic cells. Work conducted primarily over the past 3 decades has unravelled the presence of insulin in human breast cancer tissues and, more recently, in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). These findings have suggested that intracellular insulin is involved in the development of these highly prevalent human tumors. A potential mechanism...

  6. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-established methods for assaying total cellular heme (e.g., heme-proteins plus RH), currently there is no method available for measuring RH independently from the total heme (TH). The current study describes and validates a new method to measure intracellular RH. The method is based on the reconstitution of apo-horseradish peroxidase (apoHRP) with heme to form holoHRP. The resulting holoHRP activity is then measured with a colorimetric substrate. The results show that apoHRP specifically binds RH but not with heme from housekeeping heme-proteins. The RH assay detects intracellular RH. Furthermore, using conditions that create positive (hemin) or negative (N-methyl protoporphyrin IX) controls for heme in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90), the RH assay shows that RH is dynamic and independent from TH. We also demonstrated that short-term exposure to subcytotoxic concentrations of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), or amyloid-β(Aβ) significantly alters intracellular RH with little effect on TH. In conclusion the RH assay is an effective assay to investigate intracellular RH concentration and demonstrates that RH represents ~6% of total heme in IMR90 cells. PMID:25525887

  7. Hijacking of eukaryotic functions by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Ana; García del Portillo, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved as a group of microorganisms endowed with weapons to hijack many biological processes of eukaryotic cells. This review discusses how these pathogens perturb diverse host cell functions, such as cytoskeleton dynamics and organelle vesicular trafficking. Alteration of the cytoskeleton is discussed in the context of the bacterial entry process (invasion), which occurs either by activation of membrane-located host receptors ("zipper" mechani...

  8. Intracellular chloride concentration of the mouse vomeronasal neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sangseong; Ma, Limei; Unruh, Jay; McKinney, Sean; Yu, C. Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is specialized in detecting pheromone and heterospecific cues in the environment. Recent studies demonstrate the involvement of multiple ion channels in VNO signal transduction, including the calcium-activated chloride channels (CACCs). Opening of CACCs appears to result in activation of VNO neuron through outflow of Cl− ions. However, the intracellular Cl− concentration remains undetermined. Results We used the chloride ion quenching dye, MQAE, to measu...

  9. The Antidepressant Sertraline Targets Intracellular Vesiculogenic Membranes in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, Meredith M.; Korostyshevsky, Daniel; Lee, Sean; Perlstein, Ethan O.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the clinical antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft) is biologically active in model systems, including fungi, which do not express its putative protein target, the serotonin/5-HT transporter, thus demonstrating the existence of one or more secondary targets. Here we show that in the absence of its putative protein target, sertraline targets phospholipid membranes that comprise the acidic organelles of the intracellular vesicle transport system by a mechanism consi...

  10. Intracellular zinc distribution in mitochondria, ER and the Golgi apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Qiping; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Slepchenko, Kira G.; Stork, Christian; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn2+) is required for numerous cellular functions. As such, the homeostasis and distribution of intracellular zinc can influence cellular metabolism and signaling. However, the exact distribution of free zinc within live cells remains elusive. Previously we showed the release of zinc from thapsigargin/IP3-sensitive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) storage in cortical neurons. In the present study, we investigated if other cellular organelles also contain free chelatable zinc and function as o...

  11. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  12. Intracellular Trafficking Network of Protein Nanocapsules: Endocytosis, Exocytosis and Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxie; Zhang, Xudong; Liu, Gan; Chang, Danfeng; Liang, Xin; Zhu, Xianbing; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane vesicle system is a complex transport system that includes endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. However, the details of the intracellular trafficking pathway of nanoparticles in cells have been poorly investigated. Here, we investigate in detail the intracellular trafficking pathway of protein nanocapsules using more than 30 Rab proteins as markers of multiple trafficking vesicles in endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. We observed that FITC-labeled protein nanoparticles were internalized by the cells mainly through Arf6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated micropinocytosis. In addition to this classic pathway: early endosome (EEs)/late endosome (LEs) to lysosome, we identified two novel transport pathways: micropinocytosis (Rab34 positive)-LEs (Rab7 positive)-lysosome pathway and EEs-liposome (Rab18 positive)-lysosome pathway. Moreover, the cells use slow endocytosis recycling pathway (Rab11 and Rab35 positive vesicles) and GLUT4 exocytosis vesicles (Rab8 and Rab10 positive) transport the protein nanocapsules out of the cells. In addition, protein nanoparticles are observed in autophagosomes, which receive protein nanocapsules through multiple endocytosis vesicles. Using autophagy inhibitor to block these transport pathways could prevent the degradation of nanoparticles through lysosomes. Using Rab proteins as vesicle markers to investigation the detail intracellular trafficking of the protein nanocapsules, will provide new targets to interfere the cellular behaver of the nanoparticles, and improve the therapeutic effect of nanomedicine. PMID:27698943

  13. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  14. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Papackova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed.

  15. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  16. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  17. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  18. Intracellular calcium affects prestin's voltage operating point indirectly via turgor-induced membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent identification of a calmodulin binding site within prestin's C-terminus indicates that calcium can significantly alter prestin's operating voltage range as gauged by the Boltzmann parameter Vh (Keller et al., J. Neuroscience, 2014). We reasoned that those experiments may have identified the molecular substrate for the protein's tension sensitivity. In an effort to understand how this may happen, we evaluated the effects of turgor pressure on such shifts produced by calcium. We find that the shifts are induced by calcium's ability to reduce turgor pressure during whole cell voltage clamp recording. Clamping turgor pressure to 1kPa, the cell's normal intracellular pressure, completely counters the calcium effect. Furthermore, following unrestrained shifts, collapsing the cells abolishes induced shifts. We conclude that calcium does not work by direct action on prestin's conformational state. The possibility remains that calcium interaction with prestin alters water movements within the cell, possibly via its anion transport function.

  19. Surface functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for intracellular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero-Escoto, Juan Luis

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are a highly promising platform for intracellular controlled release of drugs and biomolecules. Despite that the application of MSNs in the field of intracellular drug delivery is still at its infancy very exciting breakthroughs have been achieved in the last years. A general review of the most recent progress in this area of research is presented, including a description of the latest findings on the pathways of entry into live mammalian cells together with the intracellular trafficking, a summary on the contribution of MSNs to the development of site-specific drug delivery systems, a report on the biocompatibility of this material in vitro andin vivo, and a discussion on the most recent breakthroughs in the synthesis and application of stimuli-responsive mesoporous silica-based delivery vehicles. A gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-capped MSNs-based intracellular photoinduced drug delivery system (PR-AuNPs-MSNs) for the controlled release of anticancer drug inside of human fibroblast and liver cells was synthesized and characterized. We found that the mesoporous channels of MSNs could be efficiently capped by the photoresponsive AuNPs without leaking the toxic drug, paclitaxel, inside of human cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the cargo-release property of this PR-AuNPs-MSNs system could be easily photo-controlled under mild and biocompatible conditions in vitro. In collaboration with Renato Mortera (a visiting student from Italy), a MSNs based intracellular delivery system for controlled release of cell membrane impermeable cysteine was developed. A large amount of cysteine molecules were covalently attached to the silica surface of MSNs through cleavable disulfide linkers. These cysteine-containing nanoparticles were efficiently endocytosed by human cervical cancer cells HeLa. These materials exhibit 450 times higher cell growth inhibition capability than that of the conventional N-acetylcysteine prodrug. The ability to

  20. Copper isotope fractionation during surface adsorption and intracellular incorporation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Jesica U; Borrok, David M; Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T

    2011-02-01

    Copper isotopes may prove to be a useful tool for investigating bacteria-metal interactions recorded in natural waters, soils, and rocks. However, experimental data which attempt to constrain Cu isotope fractionation in biologic systems are limited and unclear. In this study, we utilized Cu isotopes (δ(65)Cu) to investigate Cu-bacteria interactions, including surface adsorption and intracellular incorporation. Experiments were conducted with individual representative species of Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, as well as with wild-type consortia of microorganisms from several natural environments. Ph-dependent adsorption experiments were conducted with live and dead cells over the pH range 2.5-6. Surface adsorption experiments of Cu onto live bacterial cells resulted in apparent separation factors (Δ(65)Cu(solution-solid) = δ(65)Cu(solution) - δ(65)Cu(solid)) ranging from +0.3‰ to +1.4‰ for B. subtilis and +0.2‰ to +2.6‰ for E. coli. However, because heat-killed bacterial cells did not exhibit this behavior, the preference of the lighter Cu isotope by the cells is probably not related to reversible surface adsorption, but instead is a metabolically-driven phenomenon. Adsorption experiments with heat-killed cells yielded apparent separation factors ranging from +0.3‰ to -0.69‰ which likely reflects fractionation from complexation with organic acid surface functional group sites. For intracellular incorporation experiments the lab strains and natural consortia preferentially incorporated the lighter Cu isotope with an apparent Δ(65)Cu(solution-solid) ranging from ~+1.0‰ to +4.4‰. Our results indicate that live bacterial cells preferentially sequester the lighter Cu isotope regardless of the experimental conditions. The fractionation mechanisms involved are likely related to active cellular transport and regulation, including the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I). Because similar intracellular Cu

  1. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy of Intracellular Glucose Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veetil, Jithesh V.; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major hurdles in studying diabetes pathophysiology is the lack of adequate methodology that allows for direct and real-time determination of glucose transport and metabolism in cells and tissues. In this article, we present a new methodology that adopts frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) to visualize and quantify the dynamics of intracellular glucose within living cells using a biosensor protein based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Method The biosensor protein was developed by fusing a FRET pair, an AcGFP1 donor and a mCherry acceptor to N- and C- termini of a mutant glucose-binding protein (GBP), respectively. The probe was expressed and biosynthesized inside the cells, offering continuous monitoring of glucose dynamics in real time through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurement. Results We transfected the deoxyribonucleic acid of the AcGFP1-GBP-mCherry sensor into murine myoblast cells, C2C12, and continuously monitored the changes in intracellular glucose concentrations in response to the variation in extracellular glucose, from which we determined glucose uptake and clearance rates. The distribution of intracellular glucose concentration was also characterized. We detected a high glucose concentration in a region close to the cell membrane and a low glucose concentration in a region close to the nucleus. The monoexponential decay of AcGFP1 was distinguished using FD-FLIM. Conclusions This work enables continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) within living cells using FD-FLIM and a biosensor protein. The sensor protein developed offers a new means for quantitatively analyzing glucose homeostasis at the cellular level. Data accumulated from these studies will help increase our understanding of the pathology of diabetes. PMID:23294772

  2. Fluorescence detection of intracellular cadmium with Leadmium Green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaiyandi, Latha M; Sharthiya, Harsh; Dineley, Kirk E

    2016-08-01

    Leadmium Green is a commercially available, small molecule, fluorescent probe advertised as a detector of free intracellular cadmium (Cd(2+)) and lead (Pb(2+)). Leadmium Green has been used in various paradigms, such as tracking Cd(2+) sequestration in plant cells, heavy metal export in protozoa, and Pb(2+) absorption by vascular endothelial cells. However very little information is available regarding its affinity and selectivity for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and other metals. We evaluated the in vitro selectivity of Leadmium Green using spectrofluorimetry. Consistent with manufacturer's claims, Leadmium Green was sensitive to Cd(2+) (KD ~600 nM) and also Pb(2+) (KD ~9.0 nM) in a concentration-dependent manner, and furthermore proved insensitive to Ca(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). Leadmium Green also responded to Zn(2+) with a KD of ~82 nM. Using fluorescence microscopy, we evaluated Leadmium Green in live mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. We demonstrated that Leadmium Green detected ionophore-mediated acute elevations of Cd(2+) or Zn(2+) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the maximum fluorescence produced by ionophore-delivered Zn(2+) was much less than that produced by Cd(2+). When tested in a model of oxidant-induced liberation of endogenous Zn(2+), Leadmium Green responded weakly. We conclude that Leadmium Green is an effective probe for monitoring intracellular Cd(2+), particularly in models where Cd(2+) accumulates rapidly, and when concomitant fluctuations of intracellular Zn(2+) are minimal. PMID:27260023

  3. Transient fluctuations of intracellular zinc ions in cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Maret, Wolfgang, E-mail: womaret@utmb.edu [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Zinc is essential for cell proliferation, differentiation, and viability. When zinc becomes limited for cultured cells, DNA synthesis ceases and the cell cycle is arrested. The molecular mechanisms of actions of zinc are believed to involve changes in the availability of zinc(II) ions (Zn{sup 2+}). By employing a fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, FluoZin-3 acetoxymethyl ester, intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations were measured in undifferentiated and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations are pico- to nanomolar in PC12 cells and are higher in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated cells. When following cellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations for 48 h after the removal of serum, a condition that is known to cause cell cycle arrest, Zn{sup 2+} concentrations decrease after 30 min but, remarkably, increase after 1 h, and then decrease again to about one half of the initial concentration. Cell proliferation, measured by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, decreases after both serum starvation and zinc chelation. Two peaks of Zn{sup 2+} concentrations occur within one cell cycle: one early in the G1 phase and the other in the late G1/S phase. Thus, fluctuations of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations and established modulation of phosphorylation signaling, via an inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases at commensurately low Zn{sup 2+} concentrations, suggest a role for Zn{sup 2+} in the control of the cell cycle. Interventions targeted at these picomolar Zn{sup 2+} fluctuations may be a way of controlling cell growth in hyperplasia, neoplasia, and diseases associated with aberrant differentiation.

  4. Copper transporter 2 regulates intracellular copper and sensitivity to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Carlos P; Fofana, Mariama; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian cells express two copper (Cu) influx transporters, CTR1 and CTR2. CTR1 serves as an influx transporter for both Cu and cisplatin (cDDP). In mouse embryo fibroblasts, reduction of CTR1 expression renders cells resistant to cDDP whereas reduction of CTR2 makes them hypersensitive both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the role of CTR2 on intracellular Cu and cDDP sensitivity its expression was molecularly altered in the human epithelial 2008 cancer cell model. Intracellular exchangeable Cu(+) was measured with the fluorescent probe Coppersensor-3 (CS3). The ability of CS3 to report on changes in intracellular Cu(+) was validated by showing that Cu chelators reduced its signal, and that changes in signal accompanied alterations in expression of the major Cu influx transporter CTR1 and the two Cu efflux transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B. Constitutive knock down of CTR2 mRNA by ∼50% reduced steady-state exchangeable Cu by 22-23% and increased the sensitivity of 2008 cells by a factor of 2.6-2.9 in two separate clones. Over-expression of CTR2 increased exchangeable Cu(+) by 150% and rendered the 2008 cells 2.5-fold resistant to cDDP. The results provide evidence that CS3 can quantitatively assess changes in exchangeable Cu(+), and that CTR2 regulates both the level of exchangeable Cu(+) and sensitivity to cDDP in a model of human epithelial cancer. This study introduces CS3 and related sensors as novel tools for probing and assaying Cu-dependent sensitivity to anticancer therapeutics.

  5. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  6. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  7. Quantitative Proteomics of Intracellular Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Liu

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in the USA and Europe. An important virulence attribute of this bacterial pathogen is its ability to enter and survive within host cells. Here we show through a quantitative proteomic analysis that upon entry into host cells, C. jejuni undergoes a significant metabolic downshift. Furthermore, our results indicate that intracellular C. jejuni reprograms its respiration, favoring the respiration of fumarate. These results explain the poor ability of C. jejuni obtained from infected cells to grow under standard laboratory conditions and provide the bases for the development of novel anti microbial strategies that would target relevant metabolic pathways.

  8. Analysis of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péntek, Adrienn; Pászty, Katalin; Apáti, Ágota

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of changes in intracellular calcium concentration is one of the most common and useful tools for studying signal transduction pathways or cellular responses in basic research and drug screening purposes as well. Increasing number of such applications using human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives requires development of calcium signal measurements for this special cell type. Here we describe a modified protocol for analysis of calcium signaling events in human embryonic stem cells, which can be used for other pluripotent cell types (such as iPSC) or their differentiated offspring as well.

  9. Intracellular Ca(2+) release as irreversible Markov process.

    OpenAIRE

    Rengifo, Juliana; Rosales, Rafael; González, Adom; Cheng, Heping; Stern, Michael D.; Ríos, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    In striated muscles, intracellular Ca(2+) release is tightly controlled by the membrane voltage sensor. Ca(2+) ions are necessary mediators of this control in cardiac but not in skeletal muscle, where their role is ill-understood. An intrinsic gating oscillation of Ca(2+) release-not involving the voltage sensor-is demonstrated in frog skeletal muscle fibers under voltage clamp. A Markov model of the Ca(2+) release units is shown to reproduce the oscillations, and it is demonstrated that for ...

  10. Effects of Time Delay on Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Yang-Jun; HUANG Zu-Qia

    2001-01-01

    Based on the SS-model [Somogyi R and Stucki J W J. Biol. Chem. 266 (1991) 11 068] for the generation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration oscillations, we consider a time delay for the binding kinetics of the Ca2+ channel and find a significant phenomenon that the oscillation takes two quite different modes when a parameter of the system crosses a threshold. One is a quick oscillation mode and the other is a slow oscillation mode. The oscillation frequencies of these modes differ from each other by more than ten times. The change of oscillation form with parameters and its critical behaviour are illustrated by numerical simulation results.

  11. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Model and its Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应阳君; 李卫华

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ concentration oscillation is one of the typical nonlinear dynamical phenomena in biophysics.According to the experimental facts that when stimulated by different agonists, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations of hepatocytes show nearly constant amplitude for two different oscillation-form, simple spikes and complex bursts,we build a new 4-variables model based on the two models proposed by Hoefer [Biophys J. 77 (1999) 1244] and Kummer et al. [Biophys. J. 79 (2000) 1188] Our model can simulate both simple-spike and multi-spike-burst oscillations with amplitude of 0.5-0. 7μmol/L in a rather wide range of parameters.

  12. Direct Determination of the Intracellular Oxidation State of Plutonium

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E; Jensen, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) measurements were used to determine directly, for the first time, the oxidation state of intracellular plutonium in individual 0.1 μm2 areas within single rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). The living cells were incubated in vitro for 3 hours in the presence of Pu added to the media in different oxidation states (Pu(III), Pu(IV), and Pu(VI)) and in different chemical forms. Regardless of the initial oxidation state or chemical form of ...

  13. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  14. An intracellular transcriptomic atlas of the giant coenocyte Caulerpa taxifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Convergent morphologies have arisen in plants multiple times. In non-vascular and vascular land plants, convergent morphology in the form of roots, stems, and leaves arose. The morphology of some green algae includes an anchoring holdfast, stipe, and leaf-like fronds. Such morphology occurs in the absence of multicellularity in the siphonous algae, which are single cells. Morphogenesis is separate from cellular division in the land plants, which although are multicellular, have been argued to exhibit properties similar to single celled organisms. Within the single, macroscopic cell of a siphonous alga, how are transcripts partitioned, and what can this tell us about the development of similar convergent structures in land plants? Here, we present a de novo assembled, intracellular transcriptomic atlas for the giant coenocyte Caulerpa taxifolia. Transcripts show a global, basal-apical pattern of distribution from the holdfast to the frond apex in which transcript identities roughly follow the flow of genetic information in the cell, transcription-to-translation. The analysis of the intersection of transcriptomic atlases of a land plant and Caulerpa suggests the recurrent recruitment of transcript accumulation patterns to organs over large evolutionary distances. Our results not only provide an intracellular atlas of transcript localization, but also demonstrate the contribution of transcript partitioning to morphology, independent from multicellularity, in plants.

  15. Bordetella pertussis entry into respiratory epithelial cells and intracellular survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Yanina; Gorgojo, Juan; Massillo, Cintia; Rodriguez, Maria E

    2013-12-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of pertussis, aka whooping cough. Although generally considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been found inside respiratory epithelial cells, which might represent a survival strategy inside the host. Relatively little is known, however, about the mechanism of internalization and the fate of B. pertussis inside the epithelia. We show here that B. pertussis is able to enter those cells by a mechanism dependent on microtubule assembly, lipid raft integrity, and the activation of a tyrosine-kinase-mediated signaling. Once inside the cell, a significant proportion of the intracellular bacteria evade phagolysosomal fusion and remain viable in nonacidic lysosome-associated membrane-protein-1-negative compartments. In addition, intracellular B. pertussis was found able to repopulate the extracellular environment after complete elimination of the extracellular bacteria with polymyxin B. Taken together, these data suggest that B. pertussis is able to survive within respiratory epithelial cells and by this means potentially contribute to host immune system evasion.

  16. Intracellular speciation and transformation of inorganic mercury in marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-03-01

    Metal speciation is closely related to toxicity in aquatic organisms, but quantitative study of mercury transformation has rarely been reported. In this study, the ability of three marine phytoplankton species, including a green alga Chlorella autotrophica, a flagellate Isochrysis galbana and a diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, to convert inorganic mercury were examined. We found that all algae tested were able to transform Hg(II) into dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM), phytochelatin (PC) complexes and metacinnabar (β-HgS). The most tolerant species, T. weissflogii, generally produced the highest level of PCs and β-HgS. Attributed to the highest DGM production ability, C. autotrophica accumulated the least Hg, but was the most sensitive due to low PC induction and β-HgS formation. Of the added Hg(II), less than 5% was reduced to DGM per day in all species. Of the intracellular Hg, <20% and 20-90% were chelated by PCs and transformed into β-HgS, respectively. These results suggest that intracellular biotransformation might be more important than bioavailability regulation in Hg(II) detoxification in marine phytoplankton.

  17. Imaging the intracellular degradation of biodegradable polymer nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Barthel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of smart drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles has become of great interest. Drug-loaded nanoparticles can be introduced into the cell interior via endocytotic processes followed by the slow release of the drug due to degradation of the nanoparticle. In this work, poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA was chosen as the biodegradable polymer. Although common degradation of PLLA has been studied in various biological environments, intracellular degradation processes have been examined only to a very limited extent. PLLA nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 120 nm were decorated with magnetite nanocrystals and introduced into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The release of the magnetite particles from the surface of the PLLA nanoparticles during the intracellular residence was monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM over a period of 14 days. It was demonstrated by the release of the magnetite nanocrystals from the PLLA surface that the PLLA nanoparticles do in fact undergo degradation within the cell. Furthermore, even after 14 days of residence, the PLLA nanoparticles were found in the MSCs. Additionally, the ultrastructural TEM examinations yield insight into the long term intercellular fate of these nanoparticles. From the statistical analysis of ultrastructural details (e.g., number of detached magnetite crystals, and the number of nanoparticles in one endosome, we demonstrate the importance of TEM studies for such applications in addition to fluorescence studies (flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  18. Intracellular iron concentration of neurons with and without perineuronal nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Anja [Paul Flechsig Institute for Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany) and Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: afiedler@uni-leipzig.de; Reinert, Tilo [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Morawski, Markus [Paul Flechsig Institute for Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany); Brueckner, Gert [Paul Flechsig Institute for Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany); Arendt, Thomas [Paul Flechsig Institute for Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany); Butz, Tilman [Institute for Experimental Physics II, University of Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are characterized by abnormally high concentrations of iron in the affected brain areas. Iron is believed to contribute to oxidative stress by catalysing radical generation and subsequently causing neuronal death. Interestingly, subpopulations of neurons are less vulnerable against degeneration. One of these subpopulations possesses a specialized extracellular matrix arranged as a perineuronal net (PN), a structure with poorly understood functions. In order to differentiate between neurons with and without PN according to their iron concentrations we have performed a {mu}PIXE study at the Leipzig LIPSION laboratory. PN-ensheathed neurons in selected brain areas were detected by lectin-histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The staining was intensified by DAB-nickel by an established method enabling the visualisation of the PNs by nuclear microscopy. The cellular concentration of iron in the rat brain was about 1 mmol/l (ca. 30 {mu}g/g dw). First results of subcellular analysis showed that the intracellular iron concentration of PN-ensheathed neurons tends to be slightly increased in comparison to neurons without PNs. The difference in intracellular iron concentrations could be an effect of the PNs.

  19. Intracellular iron concentration of neurons with and without perineuronal nets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are characterized by abnormally high concentrations of iron in the affected brain areas. Iron is believed to contribute to oxidative stress by catalysing radical generation and subsequently causing neuronal death. Interestingly, subpopulations of neurons are less vulnerable against degeneration. One of these subpopulations possesses a specialized extracellular matrix arranged as a perineuronal net (PN), a structure with poorly understood functions. In order to differentiate between neurons with and without PN according to their iron concentrations we have performed a μPIXE study at the Leipzig LIPSION laboratory. PN-ensheathed neurons in selected brain areas were detected by lectin-histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The staining was intensified by DAB-nickel by an established method enabling the visualisation of the PNs by nuclear microscopy. The cellular concentration of iron in the rat brain was about 1 mmol/l (ca. 30 μg/g dw). First results of subcellular analysis showed that the intracellular iron concentration of PN-ensheathed neurons tends to be slightly increased in comparison to neurons without PNs. The difference in intracellular iron concentrations could be an effect of the PNs

  20. Production of intracellular enzymes by enzymatic treatment of yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zomer, E.; Er-El, Z.; Rokem, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Enzymatic extraction of intracellular enzymes from various yeasts by glucanase was investigated. Favourable conditions for lysis and release of intracellular enzymes were established. The effects of yeast concentration, growth phase of yeast, storage temperature and pretreatment of yeast were studied. The yeasts investigated can be divided into two groups. The first, Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces oviformis, Torulopsis glabrata, Hansenula polymorpha and local bakers' yeast, lysed relatively easily (70-80% of the cells), especially when cells from the logarithmic growth phase were treated. The second, Candida utilis and Candida vini, were more susceptible to lysis (40-50%) when cells were taken from the stationary phase. Release of two enzymes, glycerol kinase from Candida utilis grown on glycerol and formate dehydrogenase from Torulopsis glabrata grown on methanol was examined. The highest specific activities were obtained by incubating the cells with glucanase for 1.5 hours at 37 degrees C. Inactivation of the released enzyme was relatively low. After 12 hours of enzymatic treatment at 28 degrees C glycerol kinase maintained about 50%, and formate dehydrogenase over 80%, of the original activities. (Refs. 12).

  1. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  2. Intracellular iron concentration of neurons with and without perineuronal nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Morawski, Markus; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are characterized by abnormally high concentrations of iron in the affected brain areas. Iron is believed to contribute to oxidative stress by catalysing radical generation and subsequently causing neuronal death. Interestingly, subpopulations of neurons are less vulnerable against degeneration. One of these subpopulations possesses a specialized extracellular matrix arranged as a perineuronal net (PN), a structure with poorly understood functions. In order to differentiate between neurons with and without PN according to their iron concentrations we have performed a μPIXE study at the Leipzig LIPSION laboratory. PN-ensheathed neurons in selected brain areas were detected by lectin-histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The staining was intensified by DAB- nickel by an established method enabling the visualisation of the PNs by nuclear microscopy. The cellular concentration of iron in the rat brain was about 1 mmol/l (ca. 30 μg/g dw). First results of subcellular analysis showed that the intracellular iron concentration of PN-ensheathed neurons tends to be slightly increased in comparison to neurons without PNs. The difference in intracellular iron concentrations could be an effect of the PNs.

  3. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  4. Intracellular cytokine production and cognition in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ellen E A; Hodkinson, Claire F; Maylor, Elizabeth A; McCormack, Jacqueline M; Rae, Gordon; Strain, Sean; Alexander, H Denis; Wallace, Julie M W

    2013-10-01

    Elevated concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 have been associated with impaired cognitive performance. There are, however, few studies that have examined the relationship between cytokine production and specific aspects of cognition in healthy older individuals. Two-colour flow cytometry was used to determine intracellular cytokine production by activated monocytes, and neuropsychological tests were performed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) in 93 apparently healthy men and women aged 55-70 years. A series of hierarchical regression analyses was carried out to examine the contribution of IL-1β and IL-6 (% expression and production (antibody binding capacity (ABC))) to recognition, attention and working memory, after controlling for socio-demographic variables (age, sex and social class). IL-1β% expression and IL-6 production predicted aspects of working memory. Recognition memory was found to be sensitive to the affects of age and social class. The current study suggests that higher intracellular cytokine production by activated monocytes may be predictive of lower cognitive performance in working memory in healthy older individuals. These findings indicate that utilization of models for in vivo cytokine production upon immune challenge may be useful in studying specific aspects of memory affected during inflammatory responses, for example in individuals at risk for cognitive decline owing to age-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:23664267

  5. Intracellular demography and the dynamics of Salmonella enterica infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam P Brown

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of within-host dynamics of pathogen interactions with eukaryotic cells can shape the development of effective preventive measures and drug regimes. Such investigations have been hampered by the difficulty of identifying and observing directly, within live tissues, the multiple key variables that underlay infection processes. Fluorescence microscopy data on intracellular distributions of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium show that, while the number of infected cells increases with time, the distribution of bacteria between cells is stationary (though highly skewed. Here, we report a simple model framework for the intensity of intracellular infection that links the quasi-stationary distribution of bacteria to bacterial and cellular demography. This enables us to reject the hypothesis that the skewed distribution is generated by intrinsic cellular heterogeneities, and to derive specific predictions on the within-cell dynamics of Salmonella division and host-cell lysis. For within-cell pathogens in general, we show that within-cell dynamics have implications across pathogen dynamics, evolution, and control, and we develop novel generic guidelines for the design of antibacterial combination therapies and the management of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqin Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications.

  7. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  8. Multistability and dynamic transitions of intracellular Min protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fabai; Halatek, Jacob; Reiter, Matthias; Kingma, Enzo; Frey, Erwin; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Cells owe their internal organization to self-organized protein patterns, which originate and adapt to growth and external stimuli via a process that is as complex as it is little understood. Here, we study the emergence, stability, and state transitions of multistable Min protein oscillation patterns in live Escherichia coli bacteria during growth up to defined large dimensions. De novo formation of patterns from homogenous starting conditions is observed and studied both experimentally and in simulations. A new theoretical approach is developed for probing pattern stability under perturbations. Quantitative experiments and simulations show that, once established, Min oscillations tolerate a large degree of intracellular heterogeneity, allowing distinctly different patterns to persist in different cells with the same geometry. Min patterns maintain their axes for hours in experiments, despite imperfections, expansion, and changes in cell shape during continuous cell growth. Transitions between multistable Min patterns are found to be rare events induced by strong intracellular perturbations. The instances of multistability studied here are the combined outcome of boundary growth and strongly nonlinear kinetics, which are characteristic of the reaction-diffusion patterns that pervade biology at many scales. PMID:27279643

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and intracellular traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Cecilia; Bakke, Oddmund; Progida, Cinzia

    2012-12-01

    Mutations of genes whose primary function is the regulation of membrane traffic are increasingly being identified as the underlying causes of various important human disorders. Intriguingly, mutations in ubiquitously expressed membrane traffic genes often lead to cell type- or organ-specific disorders. This is particularly true for neuronal diseases, identifying the nervous system as the most sensitive tissue to alterations of membrane traffic. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common inherited peripheral neuropathies. It is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), which comprises a group of disorders specifically affecting peripheral nerves. This peripheral neuropathy, highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of the muscle of the foot, lower leg, hand and forearm, accompanied by sensory loss in the toes, fingers and limbs. More than 30 genes have been identified as targets of mutations that cause CMT neuropathy. A number of these genes encode proteins directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of intracellular traffic. Indeed, the list of genes linked to CMT disease includes genes important for vesicle formation, phosphoinositide metabolism, lysosomal degradation, mitochondrial fission and fusion, and also genes encoding endosomal and cytoskeletal proteins. This review focuses on the link between intracellular transport and CMT disease, highlighting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the different forms of this peripheral neuropathy and discussing the pathophysiological impact of membrane transport genetic defects as well as possible future ways to counteract these defects.

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics and their intracellular traffic in porcine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamochi, T; Hashimoto, S; Amo, A; Goto, H; Yamanaka, M; Inoue, M; Nakaoka, Y; Morimoto, Y

    2016-08-01

    Meiotic maturation of oocytes requires a variety of ATP-dependent reactions, such as germinal vesicle breakdown, spindle formation, and rearrangement of plasma membrane structure, which is required for fertilization. Mitochondria are accordingly expected be localized to subcellular sites of energy utilization. Although microtubule-dependent cellular traffic for mitochondria has been studied extensively in cultured neuronal (and some other somatic) cells, the molecular mechanism of their dynamics in mammalian oocytes at different stages of maturation remains obscure. The present work describes dynamic aspects of mitochondria in porcine oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage. After incubation of oocytes with MitoTracker Orange followed by centrifugation, mitochondria-enriched ooplasm was obtained using a glass needle and transferred into a recipient oocyte. The intracellular distribution of the fluorescent mitochondria was then observed over time using a laser scanning confocal microscopy equipped with an incubator. Kinetic analysis revealed that fluorescent mitochondria moved from central to subcortical areas of oocytes and were dispersed along plasma membranes. Such movement of mitochondria was inhibited by either cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D but not by colcemid, suggesting the involvement of microfilaments. This method of visualizing mitochondrial dynamics in live cells permits study of the pathophysiology of cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular traffic of mitochondria and associated energy metabolism during meiotic maturation of oocytes.

  11. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  12. Silica nanoparticles for cell imaging and intracellular sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, B.; Nooney, R.; Wencel, D.; McDonagh, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications. In particular, nanobiophotonic approaches using fluorescence offers the potential of high sensitivity and selectivity in applications such as cell imaging and intracellular sensing. In this review, we focus primarily on the use of fluorescent silica NPs for these applications and, in so doing, aim to enhance and complement the key recent review articles on these topics. We summarize the main synthetic approaches, namely the Stöber and microemulsion processes, and, in this context, we deal with issues in relation to both covalent and physical incorporation of different types of dyes in the particles. The important issue of NP functionalization for conjugation to biomolecules is discussed and strategies published in the recent literature are highlighted and evaluated. We cite recent examples of the use of fluorescent silica NPs for cell imaging in the areas of cancer, stem cell and infectious disease research, and we review the current literature on the use of silica NPs for intracellular sensing of oxygen, pH and ionic species. We include a short final section which seeks to identify the main challenges and obstacles in relation to the potential widespread use of these particles for in vivo diagnostics and therapeutics.

  13. Uptake and intracellular trafficking of superantigens in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Ganem

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens (SAgs are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS. According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II on the antigen-presenting cell (APC, thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS.

  14. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  15. CIRRHOSIS INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN RENAL TISSUE THROUGH INTRACELLULAR OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristina Simões da SILVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Methods Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. Results In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. Conclusions These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  16. Intracellular targets of RGDS peptide in melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capogrossi Maurizio C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RGD-motif acts as a specific integrins-ligand and regulates a variety of cell-functions via extracellular action affecting cell-adhesion properties. However, increasing evidence identifies additional RGDS-functions at intracellular level. Previous reports show RGDS-internalization in endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and lymphocytes, indicating intracellular targets such as caspase-8 and caspase-9, and suggest RGDS specific activity at cytoplasmic level. Given the role RGDS-peptides play in controlling proliferation and apoptosis in several cell types, investigating intracellular targets of RGDS in melanoma cells may un-reveal novel molecular targets and key pathways, potentially useful for a more effective approach to melanoma treatment. Results In the present study we show for the first time that RGDS-peptide is internalized in melanoma cells in a time-dependent way and exerts strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects independently from its extracellular anti-adhesive action. RGES control-peptide did not show biological effects, as expected; nevertheless it is internalized, although with slower kinetics. Survivin, a known cell-cycle and survival-regulator is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in cell lysates and overlay assays with the purified proteins showed that RGDS interacts with survivin, as well as with procaspase-3, -8 and -9. RGDS-peptide binding to survivin was found to be specific, at high affinity (Kd 27.5 μM and located at the survivin C-terminus. RGDS-survivin interaction appeared to play a key role, since RGDS lost its anti-mitogenic effect in survivin-deprived cells with a specific siRNA. Conclusions RGDS inhibits melanoma growth with an adhesion-independent mechanism; it is internalized in melanoma cells and specifically interacts with survivin. The present data may indicate a novel role of RGDS-containing peptides physiologically released from the extracellular

  17. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  18. Mechanism of H. pylori intracellular entry: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eLiu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of H. pylori reside on gastric epithelial cell surfaces and in the overlying mucus, but a small fraction of H. pylori enter host epithelial and immune cells. To explore the role of the nudA invasin in host cell entry, a ΔnudA deletion derivative of strain J99 was constructed and transformants were verified by PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. AGS cells were inoculated with either wild type (WT strain J99 or its ΔnudA mutant to determine the fraction of bacteria that were bound to the cells and inside these cells using the gentamicin protection assay. We observed no significant difference between either the density of H. pylori bound to AGS cell membranes or the density of intracellular H. pylori. To further explore this finding, separate chambers of each culture were fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and immunogold TEM. This addition to the classical gentamicin assay demonstrated that there were significantly more intracellular, and fewer membrane-bound, H. pylori in WT-infected AGS cells than in ΔnudA allele infected cells. Thus, the sum of intracellular and membrane-bound H. pylori was similar in the two groups. Since no other similar TEM study has been performed, it is at present unknown whether our observations can be reproduced by others Taken together however, our observations suggest that the classical gentamicin protection assay is not sufficiently sensitive to analyze H. pylori cell entry and that the addition of TEM to the test demonstrate that nudA plays a role in H. pylori entry into AGS cells in vitro. In addition, deletion of the invasin gene appears to limit H. pylori to the AGS cell surface, where it may be partly protected against gentamicin. In contrast, this specific environment may render H. pylori more vulnerable to host defense and therapeutic intervention, and less prone to trigger normal immune, carcinogenic, and other developmental response pathways.

  19. High prevalence, genetic diversity and intracellular growth ability of Legionella in hot spring environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. METHODS: Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and sequence-based typing (SBT were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. RESULTS: Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (p<0.01. The Legionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (p<0.01. Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%, 6 (23.4%, 5 (19.2%, 1 (18.5%, 2 (10.2%, 8 (0.4%, 10 (0.8%, 9 (1.9% and 12 (0.4%. Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control

  20. Intracellular transport mechanisms: a critique of diffusion theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Malone, P C; Wheatley, D N

    1995-09-21

    It is argued that Brownian motion makes a less significant contribution to the movements of molecules and particles inside cells than is commonly believed, and that the numbers of similar molecules and particles within any near-homogeneous subcompartment of the cell internum are insufficient to justify the statistical assumptions implicit in the derivation of the diffusion equation. For these reasons, it is contended that, contrary to accepted opinion, diffusion theory cannot provide an explanation for intracellular transport at the molecular level. Although attempts have been made to adapt diffusion theory to complex media, the conclusion is that none satisfactorily overcomes the problem of applying the theory to cell biology. However, the heuristic influence of the theory on cellular biophysics and physiology is noted, and possible alternative frameworks for interpreting the valuable experimental data obtained from such studies are outlined.

  1. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  2. Effects of microgravity environment on intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De CHANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity environment is a stress and extracellular signal that affects cellular morphology and function through signal transduction system, thus leading to certain biological effect. At present, many signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in the regulation of cell function under microgravity environment, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, Notch signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway, HSP signaling pathway and so on, and these reports have laid a foundation for the molecular studies of cytolergy under outer space environment. The recent progress in the researches on intracellular signaling pathways affected by microgravity is herewith reviewed in present paper in the hope of providing references for understanding the cell activity in space environment, and to find the ways to alleviate the harmful effects caused by the microgravity environment.

  3. Intracellular probes for imaging oxygen concentration: how good are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade a number of cell-permeable phosphorescence based probes for imaging of (intra)cellular oxygen (icO2) have been described. These small molecule, supramolecular and nanoparticle structures, although allowing analysis of hypoxia, local gradients and fluctuations in O2, responses to stimulation and drug treatment at sub-cellular level with high spatial and temporal resolution, differ significantly in their operational performance and applicability to different cell and tissue models. Here we discuss and compare these probes with respect to their staining efficiency, brightness, photostability, toxicity, cell specificity, compatibility with different cell and tissue models, and analytical performance. Merits and limitations of particular probes are highlighted and strategies for development of new high-performance O2 imaging probes defined. Key application areas in hypoxia research, stem cells, cancer biology and tissue physiology are also discussed.

  4. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S.; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R.; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. PMID:26269592

  5. Intracellular Signaling Mediators in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to phenomenological models of nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms when the vessel lumen caliber varies markedly. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volume 4 is devoted to major sets of intracellular mediators that transmit signals upon stimulation of cell-surface receptors.  Activation of...

  6. Semi-Discrete Systems and Intracellular Calcium Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, J.; Dawson, S.P.; Mitkov, I.

    1998-10-24

    Intracellular calcium is sequestered in closed membranes such as the sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticula and released at discretely distributed protein/receptor channels. The release kinetics can result in the propagation of waves of elevated calcium concentration. The main physical processes are reactions at the release sites and diffusion between the sites. The theory of chemical wave propagation in reaction-diffusion systems is in large part devoted to the study of systems in which there are no extrinsic inhomogeneities. The discrete distribution of the release sites plays a key role in determining the nature of the propagating wave. The authors analyze some simple reaction-diffusion models in order to elucidate the role of discreteness for chemical wave propagation.

  7. Intracellular insulin in human tumors: examples and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin is one of the major metabolic hormones regulating glucose homeostasis in the organism and a key growth factor for normal and neoplastic cells. Work conducted primarily over the past 3 decades has unravelled the presence of insulin in human breast cancer tissues and, more recently, in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC. These findings have suggested that intracellular insulin is involved in the development of these highly prevalent human tumors. A potential mechanism for such involvement is insulin's binding and inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB which in turn is likely controlled by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE. This model and its supporting data are collectively covered in this survey in order to provide further insight into insulin-driven oncogenesis and its reversal through future anticancer therapeutics.

  8. Extraction of intracellular protein from Glaciozyma antarctica for proteomics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizura, S. Nor; Farahayu, K.; Faizal, A. B. Mohd; Asmahani, A. A. S.; Amir, R.; Nazalan, N.; Diba, A. B. Farah; Muhammad, M. Nor; Munir, A. M. Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Two preparation methods of crude extracts of psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica were compared in order to obtain a good recovery of intracellular proteins. Extraction with mechanical procedures using sonication was found to be more effective for obtaining good yield compare to alkaline treatment method. The procedure is simple, rapid, and produce better yield. A total of 52 proteins were identified by combining both extraction methods. Most of the proteins identified in this study involves in the metabolic process including glycolysis pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruyate decarboxylation and also urea cyle. Several chaperons were identified including probable cpr1-cyclophilin (peptidylprolyl isomerase), macrolide-binding protein fkbp12 and heat shock proteins which were postulate to accelerate proper protein folding. Characteristic of the fundamental cellular processes inferred from the expressed-proteome highlight the evolutionary and functional complexity existing in this domain of life.

  9. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  10. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did......In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...

  11. Intracellular behaviour of samarium and europium in lactating mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayadi Ahlem; Maghraoui Samira; El Hili Ali; Galle Pierre; Tekaya Leila

    2012-01-01

    The subcellular localization of samarium and europium,two rare-earths,increasingly used in both medical and industrial fields,has been studied in several organs such as liver and kidney but never in the mammary gland despite of its importance in the biology of lactation and nutrition domains.The intracellular behaviour of samarium and europium after their intra-peritoneal administration in the lactating mammary gland cells was investigated.The results showed the presence of very electron dense deposits in the glandular epithelial cell lysosomes.These particular lysosomes were never observed in the marnrnary cell lysosomes of control rats.These intralysosomal deposits were probably composed of insoluble samarium or europium phosphates by analogy with previous studies,the transmission electron microscopy,the ion mass microscopy and the electron probe microanalysis,and other techniques allowing the identification of the chemical structure of the intralysosomal deposits.

  12. Endothelial tubes assemble from intracellular vacuoles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Makoto; Saunders, W Brian; Bayless, Kayla J; Dye, Louis; Davis, George E; Weinstein, Brant M

    2006-07-27

    The formation of epithelial tubes is crucial for the proper development of many different tissues and organs, and occurs by means of a variety of different mechanisms. Morphogenesis of seamless, properly patterned endothelial tubes is essential for the development of a functional vertebrate circulatory system, but the mechanism of vascular lumenization in vivo remains unclear. Evidence dating back more than 100 years has hinted at an important function for endothelial vacuoles in lumen formation. More than 25 years ago, in some of the first endothelial cell culture experiments in vitro, Folkman and Haudenschild described "longitudinal vacuoles" that "appeared to be extruded and connected from one cell to the next", observations confirmed and extended by later studies in vitro showing that intracellular vacuoles arise from integrin-dependent and cdc42/Rac1-dependent pinocytic events downstream of integrin-extracellular-matrix signalling interactions. Despite compelling data supporting a model for the assembly of endothelial tubes in vitro through the formation and fusion of vacuoles, conclusive evidence in vivo has been lacking, primarily because of difficulties associated with imaging the dynamics of subcellular endothelial vacuoles deep within living animals. Here we use high-resolution time-lapse two-photon imaging of transgenic zebrafish to examine how endothelial tubes assemble in vivo, comparing our results with time-lapse imaging of human endothelial-cell tube formation in three-dimensional collagen matrices in vitro. Our results provide strong support for a model in which the formation and intracellular and intercellular fusion of endothelial vacuoles drives vascular lumen formation. PMID:16799567

  13. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  14. Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels by Scorpaenidae venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Moldrich, Randal X; Beart, Philip M; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2003-05-01

    The crude venoms of the soldierfish (Gymnapistes marmoratus), the lionfish (Pterois volitans) and the stonefish (Synanceia trachynis) display pronounced neuromuscular activity. Since [Ca(2+)](i) is a key regulator in many aspects of neuromuscular function we sought to determine its involvement in the neuromuscular actions of the venoms. In the chick biventer cervicis muscle, all three venoms produced a sustained contraction (approx 20-30% of 1mM acetylcholine). Blockade of nicotinic receptors with tubocurarine (10 micro M) failed to attenuate the contractile response to either G. marmoratus venom or P. volitans venom, but produced slight inhibition of the response to S. trachynis venom. All three venoms produced a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) (approx. 200-300% of basal) in cultured murine cortical neurons. The Ca(2+)-channel blockers omega-conotoxin MVIIC, omega-conotoxin GVIA, omega-agatoxin IVa and nifedipine (each at 1 micro M) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to G. marmoratus venom and P. volitans venom, while attenuating the response to S. trachynis venom. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+), replacement of Ca(2+) with La(3+) (0.5mM), or addition of stonefish antivenom (3units/ml) inhibited both the venom-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured neurones and contraction in chick biventer cervicis muscle. Venom-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) correlated with an increased cell death of cultured neurones as measured using propidium iodide (1 micro g/ml). Morphological analysis revealed cellular swelling and neurite loss consistent with necrosis. These data indicate that the effects of all three venoms are due in part to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+), possibly via the formation of pores in the cellular membrane which, under certain conditions, can lead to necrosis. PMID:12727272

  15. Gold nanodome-patterned microchips for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytens, Pieter C; Subramanian, Ananth Z; De Vos, Winnok H; Skirtach, Andre G; Baets, Roel

    2015-12-21

    While top-down substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) offer outstanding control and reproducibility of the gold nanopatterns and their related localized surface plasmon resonance, intracellular SERS experiments heavily rely on gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles often result in varying and uncontrollable enhancement factors. Here we demonstrate the use of top-down gold-nanostructured microchips for intracellular sensing. We develop a tunable and reproducible fabrication scheme for these microchips. Furthermore we observe the intracellular uptake of these structures, and find no immediate influence on cell viability. Finally, we perform a proof-of-concept intracellular SERS experiment by the label-free detection of extraneous molecules. By bringing top-down SERS substrates to the intracellular world, we set an important step towards time-dependent and quantitative intracellular SERS.

  16. EFFECTS OF PDGF-BB ON INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM CONCENTRATION AND PROLIFERATION IN CULTURED GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Li-ping; ZHANG Chong; BIAN Fan; ZOU Jun; JIANG Geng-ru; ZHU Han-wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the alteration of intracellular calcium concentration and proliferation in cultured glomerular mesangial cells. Methods Rat mesangial cells were cultured.Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured by confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Fura-3 fluorescence dyeing techniques. Cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Results PDGF-BB increased intracellular calcium concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, and at the same time promote the proliferation of mesangial cells. After preincubation with calcium channel blocker nifedipine or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, both the increase of intracellular calcium concentrations and cell proliferations induced by PDGF-BB were inhibited. Tripterigium Wilfordii Glycosides (TMG) significantly inhibited the mesangial cell proliferations, but it had no significant effect on intracellular calcium concentrations. Conclusion There was a positive relationship between the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration and cell proliferation in glomerular mesangial cells, but the increase of in- tracellular calcium concentrations wasn't the only way for proliferation.

  17. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded cytoplasm of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverey, Julia F.; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Bao, Han; Leippe, Matthias; Metzler, Ralf; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved by actively driven motion, while purely thermally driven diffusion is negligible.

  18. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded space of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    CERN Document Server

    Reverey, J F; Bao, H; Leippe, M; Metzler, R; Selhuber-Unkel, C

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved ...

  19. Intracellular Ca2+ thresholds that determine survival or death of energy-deprived cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Z.; Saikumar, P; Griess, G A; Weinberg, J. M.; Venkatachalam, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Increase of intracellular ionized or free Ca2+ is thought to play a central role in cell death due to ATP depletion. However, concurrently operative mechanisms of injury that do not require intracellular Ca2+ increases have made it difficult to test this hypothesis or to determine the concentrations at which intracellular Ca2+ becomes lethal. The predominant Ca2+-independent mechanism of injury during ATP depletion involves the loss of cellular glycine. This type of damage can be fully inhibi...

  20. Intracellular Activity of Antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Peritonitis Model ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H. R.; Skov, Robert L.; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few ex...

  1. Nuclear spin pair coherence in diamond for atomic scale magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Nan; Hu, Jian-Liang; Ho, Sai-Wah; Wen, Tsz-Kai; Liu, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre, as a promising candidate solid state system of quantum information processing, its electron spin coherence is influenced by the magnetic field fluctuations due to the local environment. In pure diamonds, the environment consists of hundreds of C-13 nuclear spins randomly spreading in several nanometers range forming a spin bath. Controlling and prolonging the electron spin coherence under the influence of spin bath are challenging tasks for the quantum inform...

  2. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphou...

  3. Electronic and Atomic-Scale Properties of Ultraflat CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Rosenthal, Ethan; Dadgar, Ali; Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward; Shen, Kyle; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2014-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on copper foils has proven to be a reliable and cost-effective method for the production of graphene. However, most films grown by this method suffer from misoriented graphene grains as well as topographic roughness due to the polycrystallinity of the underlying copper foil substrate. Recent methods of copper foil treatment have allowed for the growth of graphene predominantly on large single crystal Cu(111) facets. In this talk we discuss scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements on such samples that reveal large terraces and atomically-resolved images that allow us to analyze the graphene-copper interaction during the growth. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements and mapping are further employed to probe the electronic interaction between the graphene and copper substrate.

  4. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure of...

  5. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  6. Shrinking light to allow forbidden transitions on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Kaminer, Ido; Zhen, Bo; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of light-matter interactions accessible to a system is limited by the small size of an atom relative to the wavelength of the light it emits, as well as by the small value of the fine-structure constant. We developed a general theory of light-matter interactions with two-dimensional systems supporting plasmons. These plasmons effectively make the fine-structure constant larger and bridge the size gap between atom and light. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions—such as extremely high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and singlet-triplet phosphorescence processes—can occur on very short time scales comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings may lead to new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, and broadband light generation, a potential testing ground for quantum electrodynamics (QED) in the ultrastrong coupling regime, and the ability to take advantage of the full electronic spectrum of an emitter.

  7. Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R. [Climate and Environment Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-24

    The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superimposed at finite temperature. Nevertheless, the peak values of the lateral force, and the total energy losses, are expected to increase with the excitation amplitude, which may limit the practical relevance of this effect.

  8. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Mechanical Science and Engineering and Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 1206 West Green Street MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  9. The study of materials at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atom probe is a projection microscope whose principle is based on the pin effect: the sample is shaped under the form of a very sharp pin and is submitted to a high electrical potential. Under the influence of the electrical field, the atoms are ejected and the sample surface can be peeled away atom by atom. The ejected atom carries 2 pieces of information: its trajectory and its speed. The knowledge of the trajectory allows the determination of the initial position site of the atom on the surface and the measurement of the time taken by the ion to reach the detector allows the identification of the atom through the use of a time-of-flight spectroscopy method. The development of new position detectors that can detect and record simultaneous impacts has led to the possibility of 3-dimensional imaging of the sample. The last generation of 3-dimensional atom probes has been used to study the position of the different species of atoms in an alloy and to study the formation of atom clusters around impurities in neutron irradiated ferritic steels. (A.C.)

  10. Evidence for contact delocalization in atomic scale friction

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, D; Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze an advanced two-spring model with an ultra-low effective tip mass to predict nontrivial and physically rich 'fine structure' in the atomic stick-slip motion in Friction Force Microscopy (FFM) experiments. We demonstrate that this fine structure is present in recent, puzzling experiments. This shows that the tip apex can be completely or partially delocalized, thus shedding new light on what is measured in FFM and, possibly, what can happen with the asperities that establish the con...

  11. Evidence for Contact Delocalization in Atomic Scale Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, D. G.; Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2007-10-01

    We analyze an advanced two-spring model with an ultralow effective tip mass to predict nontrivial and physically rich “fine structure” in the atomic stick-slip motion in friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments. We demonstrate that this fine structure is present in recent, puzzling experiments. This shows that the tip apex can be completely or partially delocalized, thus shedding new light on what is measured in FFM and, possibly, what can happen with the asperities that establish the contact between macroscopic sliding bodies.

  12. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  13. Tuning magnetotransport in a compensated semimetal at the atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin; Gutierrez Lezama, Ignacio; Barreteau, Céline; Ubrig, Nicolas; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Either in bulk form, or when exfoliated into atomically thin crystals, layered transition metal dichalcogenides are continuously leading to the discovery of new phenomena. The latest example is provided by 1T'-WTe$_2$, a semimetal recently found to exhibit the largest known magnetoresistance in bulk crystals, and predicted to become a two-dimensional topological insulator in strained monolayers. Here, we show that reducing the thickness through facile exfoliation provides an effective experim...

  14. Extra- and intracellular volume monitoring by impedance during haemodialysis using Cole-Cole extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrin, M Y; Maasrani, M; Le Gourrier, A; Boudailliez, B

    1997-05-01

    A method is presented for monitoring the relative variation of extracellular and intracellular fluid volumes using a multifrequency impedance meter and the Cole-Cole extrapolation technique. It is found that this extrapolation is necessary to obtain reliable data for the resistance of the intracellular fluid. The extracellular and intracellular resistances can be approached using frequencies of, respectively, 5 kHz and 1000 kHz, but the use of 100 kHz leads to unacceptable errors. In the conventional treatment the overall relative variation of intracellular resistance is found to be relatively small.

  15. Intracellular trafficking of silicon particles and logic-embedded vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Mack, Aaron; Chiappini, Ciro; Liu, Xuewu; Bean, Andrew J.; Ferrari, Mauro; Serda, Rita E.

    2010-08-01

    Mesoporous silicon particles show great promise for use in drug delivery and imaging applications as carriers for second-stage nanoparticles and higher order particles or therapeutics. Modulation of particle geometry, surface chemistry, and porosity allows silicon particles to be optimized for specific applications such as vascular targeting and avoidance of biological barriers commonly found between the site of drug injection and the final destination. In this study, the intracellular trafficking of unloaded carrier silicon particles and carrier particles loaded with secondary iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Following cellular uptake, membrane-encapsulated silicon particles migrated to the perinuclear region of the cell by a microtubule-driven mechanism. Surface charge, shape (spherical and hemispherical) and size (1.6 and 3.2 μm) of the particle did not alter the rate of migration. Maturation of the phagosome was associated with an increase in acidity and acquisition of markers of late endosomes and lysosomes. Cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticle-loaded silicon particles resulted in sorting of the particles and trafficking to unique destinations. The silicon carriers remained localized in phagosomes, while the second stage iron oxide nanoparticles were sorted into multi-vesicular bodies that dissociated from the phagosome into novel membrane-bound compartments. Release of iron from the cells may represent exocytosis of iron oxide nanoparticle-loaded vesicles. These results reinforce the concept of multi-functional nanocarriers, in which different particles are able to perform specific tasks, in order to deliver single- or multi-component payloads to specific sub-cellular compartments.Mesoporous silicon particles show great promise for use in drug delivery and imaging applications as carriers for second-stage nanoparticles and higher order particles or therapeutics. Modulation of particle geometry, surface chemistry, and porosity allows silicon

  16. Comparative Salt Stress Study on Intracellular Ion Concentration in Marine and Salt-adapted Freshwater Strains of Microalgae

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    Ahmad Farhad TALEBI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity imposes significant stresses in various living organisms including microalgae. High extracellular concentration of Na+ directly influences ionic balance inside the cell and subsequently the cellular activities. In the present study, the effect of such stress on growth and intracellular ions concentration (IIC of Dunaliella salina and Chlorella Spp. was investigated. IIC was analyzed using Ion chromatography technique. D. salina showed the highest degree of resistance to increase in salinity as little changes occurred both in IIC and in growth parameters. D. salina could maintain the balance of K+ inside the cell and eject the excess Na+ even at NaCl concentrations above 1M. Moreover, D. salina accumulated β-carotene in order to protect its photosynthetic apparatus. Among Chlorella species, C. vulgaris showed signs of adaptation to high content of salinity, though it is a fresh water species by nature. Moreover, the response shown by C. vulgaris to rise in salinity was even stronger than that of C. salina, which is presumably a salt-water resistant species. In fact, C. vulgaris could maintain intracellular K+ better than C. salina in response to increasing salinity, and as a result, it could survive at NaCl concentrations as high as 0.75 M. Marine strains such as D. salina well cope with the fluctuations in salinity through the existing adaptation mechanisms i.e. maintaining the K+/N+ balance inside the cell, K+ accumulation and Na+ ejection, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments like β-carotene.

  17. [Role of defective intracellular proteolysis in human degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezelof, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Although intracellular protein synthesis has been studied extensively, protein degradation and disposal, know as proteolysis, has been relatively neglected. Modern studies which led two Nobel prizes (de Duve in 1950 and Herschko, Rose and Ciechanover in 1980) established that proteolysis is ensured by two separate but complementary mechanisms: lysosomes responsible for auto and heterophagy and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The UPS involves ubiquitin, a small molecule consisting of 76 amino acids found in all eukaryotic cells that ensures the identification of the protein to be degraded and its transport to the proteasome, an intracellular complex with enzymes which degrade unneeded or damaged proteins. The proteasome, acting as a composting agent, ensures the enzymatic dissociation of the protein. In this degradation process, as infinite screw, ubiquitin, peptides and amino acids are released and made available for a new cycle. Knowledge of the UPS and its related disorders is continually expanding. Concurrent with lysosomes which work in acidic environment, it is currently known that the UPS provides 80% to 90% of the proteolysis of the short-life proteins and ensures, as chaperon-molecules, the right conformation and hence the correct function of the proteins. The proteolytic activity generates abnormal residues (tau protein, amyloid and related proteins) and various soluble and insoluble wastes. Some are precipitated as inclusion-bodies or aggregosomes, identified years ago by pathologists. These aggregosomes affect almost exclusively long-lived cells (nervous and muscular, macophages). Pigment deposits, such as lipofuscines made by the peroxydation of cell membranes, are the most abundant. Due to their diverse chemical composition, they cannot be empoyed for a scientific classification. Failures of these systems are numerous. They vary not according to the chemical nature of the abnormal protein and wastes but the life span of the targeted cells and

  18. Study on intracellular trafficking of Mac-1 by direct visualization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Ming; MAO; Jifang; WEI; Yi; ZHONG; Jigen; YANG; Shengs

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we constructed DNA vectors containing cDNA of Mac-1 subunits (CD11b or CD18b) fused with fluorescence protein (FP). cDNA fragments and the DNA constructs were then transfected into CHO cells (as CHO-Mac-1-FP). The structure and function of Mac-1-FP obtained from the CHO-Mac-1-FP cells are nearly identical to that expressed in wild type leukocytes. In the present study, the intracellular trafficking of Mac-1 was visualized directly by monitoring the fluorescent intensities of YFP-CD18 and PE-conjugated monoclonal antibody against CD11b under a confocal microscope in CHO-Mac-1-FP cells. The results indicate that: (ⅰ) although Mac-1 was not detected in the cell membrane at resting state, it had been translocated and clustered into the cell membrane by 1 h and internalized 2 h after PMA stimulation, at which point the fluorescence intensity began to diminish gradually, probably due to partial degradation of Mac-1. The fluorescence of CD18 and CD11b reappeared on the cell membrane 1 h after re-treatment with PMA, suggesting the recycling of non-degraded Mac-1. (ⅱ) The adhesion rate of CHO-Mac-1-FP to magnetic beads coupled ICAM-1 increased within 4 h after their initial interaction, accompanied by the clustering of Mac-1-FP. After 8 h,the adhesion rate declined and fluorescence also decreased simultaneously. The pattern of change in fluorescence in CHO-Mac-1-FP cells elicited by ICAM-1 beads was similar to that elicited by PMA, suggesting that endocytosis and degradation of Mac-1 occurred after the interaction with ICAM-1. Thus, we conclude that the intracellular trafficking of Mac-1 after activation is associated with membrane translocation, endocytosis, degradation and recycling. These changes are in parallel with the adhesion of CHO-Mac-1-FP cells with ICAM-1, and may be involved in the adhesion and detachment of leukocytes. The detachment of leukocytes may be caused by endocytosis of Mac-1.

  19. Intracellular activity of antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse peritonitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H R; Skov, Robert L; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few experimental animal models have been published. The mouse peritonitis/sepsis model was used as the basic in vivo model exploring a quantitative ex vivo extra- and intracellular differentiation assay. The intracellular presence of S. aureus was documented by electron microscopy. Five antibiotics, dicloxacillin, cefuroxime, gentamicin, azithromycin, and rifampin (rifampicin), were tested in the new in vivo model; and the model was able to distinguish between their extra- and intracellular effects. The intracellular effects of the five antibiotics could be ranked as follows as the mean change in the log(10) number of CFU/ml (Delta log(10) CFU/ml) between treated and untreated mice after 4 h of treatment: dicloxacillin (3.70 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > cefuroxime (3.56 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > rifampin (1.86 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > gentamicin (0.61 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > azithromycin (0.21 Delta log(10) CFU/ml). We could also show that the important factors during testing of intracellular activity in vivo are the size, number, and frequency of doses; the time of exposure; and the timing between the start of infection and treatment. A poor correlation between the intracellular accumulation of the antibiotics and the actual intracellular effect was found. This stresses the importance of performing experimental studies, like those with the new in vivo model described here, to measure actual intracellular activity instead of making predictions based on cellular pharmacokinetic and MICs. PMID

  20. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane. PMID:7057462

  1. Comparison of the intracellular trafficking itinerary of ctla-4 orthologues.

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    Satdip Kaur

    Full Text Available CTLA-4 is an essential inhibitor of T cell immune responses. At steady state, most CTLA-4 resides in intracellular compartments due to constitutive internalisation mediated via a tyrosine based endocytic motif (YVKM within the cytoplasmic domain. This domain is highly conserved in mammals suggesting strong selective pressure. In contrast, the C-terminal domain varies considerably in non-mammals such as fish, xenopus and birds. We compared the ability of the C-terminus of these species to direct the trafficking of CTLA-4 with human CTLA-4. Using a chimeric approach, endocytosis was found to be conserved between human, xenopus and chicken CTLA-4 but was reduced substantially in trout CTLA-4, which lacks the conserved YXXM motif. Nevertheless, we identified an alternative YXXF motif in trout CTLA-4 that permitted limited endocytosis. Post-internalisation, CTLA-4 was either recycled or targeted for degradation. Human and chicken CTLA-4, which contain a YVKM motif, showed efficient recycling compared to xenopus CTLA-4 which contains a less efficient YEKM motif. Specific mutation of this motif in human CTLA-4 reduced receptor recycling. These findings suggest evolutionary development in the endocytic and recycling potential of CTLA-4, which may facilitate more refined functions of CTLA-4 within the mammalian immune system.

  2. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  3. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens. PMID:27350620

  4. Manipulation of costimulatory molecules by intracellular pathogens: veni, vidi, vici!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargis Khan

    Full Text Available Some of the most successful pathogens of human, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, HIV, and Leishmania donovani not only establish chronic infections but also remain a grave global threat. These pathogens have developed innovative strategies to evade immune responses such as antigenic shift and drift, interference with antigen processing/presentation, subversion of phagocytosis, induction of immune regulatory pathways, and manipulation of the costimulatory molecules. Costimulatory molecules expressed on the surface of various cells play a decisive role in the initiation and sustenance of immunity. Exploitation of the "code of conduct" of costimulation pathways provides evolutionary incentive to the pathogens and thereby abates the functioning of the immune system. Here we review how Mtb, HIV, Leishmania sp., and other pathogens manipulate costimulatory molecules to establish chronic infection. Impairment by pathogens in the signaling events delivered by costimulatory molecules may be responsible for defective T-cell responses; consequently organisms grow unhindered in the host cells. This review summarizes the convergent devices that pathogens employ to tune and tame the immune system using costimulatory molecules. Studying host-pathogen interaction in context with costimulatory signals may unveil the molecular mechanism that will help in understanding the survival/death of the pathogens. We emphasize that the very same pathways can potentially be exploited to develop immunotherapeutic strategies to eliminate intracellular pathogens.

  5. Real-Time monitoring of intracellular wax ester metabolism

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    Karp Matti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wax esters are industrially relevant molecules exploited in several applications of oleochemistry and food industry. At the moment, the production processes mostly rely on chemical synthesis from rather expensive starting materials, and therefore solutions are sought from biotechnology. Bacterial wax esters are attractive alternatives, and especially the wax ester metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. has been extensively studied. However, the lack of suitable tools for rapid and simple monitoring of wax ester metabolism in vivo has partly restricted the screening and analyses of potential hosts and optimal conditions. Results Based on sensitive and specific detection of intracellular long-chain aldehydes, specific intermediates of wax ester synthesis, bacterial luciferase (LuxAB was exploited in studying the wax ester metabolism in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Luminescence was detected in the cultivation of the strain producing wax esters, and the changes in signal levels could be linked to corresponding cell growth and wax ester synthesis phases. Conclusions The monitoring system showed correlation between wax ester synthesis pattern and luminescent signal. The system shows potential for real-time screening purposes and studies on bacterial wax esters, revealing new aspects to dynamics and role of wax ester metabolism in bacteria.

  6. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  7. Intracellular distribution of Tankyrases as detected by multicolor immunofluorescence techniques

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    M.G. Bottone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of NAD+ into ADP-ribose. Among them, Tankyrases have been found to bind to centrosome, mitotic spindle and microsome proteins, in the cytoplasm, and to telomeres in the nucleus, where they play a relevant role in telomere metabolism. However, their precise intracellular localization during interphase has not been so far fully elucidated. We investigated this aspect in situ by double immunofluorescence experiments using antibodies recognizing Tankyrases 1-2 or other proteins residing in specific organelles (Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum. We used HeLa cells as a model system in vitro, before and after treatment with either actinomycin D or etoposide, to also investigate the possible relocation of Tankyrases during apoptosis. We observed that Tankyrases are distributed both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm; in this latter compartment, they were found to colocate with the Golgi apparatus but never with the mitochondria; a pool of Tankyrases also colocates with the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. Interestingly, in cells with clear signs of apoptosis, Tankyrases were detectable in the cytoplasmic blebs: this suggests that they are not massively cleaved during apoptosis and persist in the largely heterogeneous apoptotic remnants which are known to contain components of cytoplasmic and nuclear origin.

  8. Intracellular Action of a Secreted Peptide Required for Fungal Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Christina M; Summers, Diana K; Goranov, Alexi I; Clarke, Starlynn C; Wiesner, Darin L; Diedrich, Jolene K; Moresco, James J; Toffaletti, Dena; Upadhya, Rajendra; Caradonna, Ippolito; Petnic, Sarah; Pessino, Veronica; Cuomo, Christina A; Lodge, Jennifer K; Perfect, John; Yates, John R; Nielsen, Kirsten; Craik, Charles S; Madhani, Hiten D

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication mechanism in which secreted signaling molecules impact population function and gene expression. QS-like phenomena have been reported in eukaryotes with largely unknown contributing molecules, functions, and mechanisms. We identify Qsp1, a secreted peptide, as a central signaling molecule that regulates virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. QSP1 is a direct target of three transcription factors required for virulence, and qsp1Δ mutants exhibit attenuated infection, slowed tissue accumulation, and greater control by primary macrophages. Qsp1 mediates autoregulatory signaling that modulates secreted protease activity and promotes cell wall function at high cell densities. Peptide production requires release from a secreted precursor, proQsp1, by a cell-associated protease, Pqp1. Qsp1 sensing requires an oligopeptide transporter, Opt1, and remarkably, cytoplasmic expression of mature Qsp1 complements multiple phenotypes of qsp1Δ. Thus, C. neoformans produces an autoregulatory peptide that matures extracellularly but functions intracellularly to regulate virulence. PMID:27212659

  9. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  10. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  11. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, George J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent of, subcellular site of and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ or /sup 112/CdSO/sub 4/ accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissue followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. Particulate materials containing other cell components were also labeled. Of the /sup 109/Cd supplied to plants, 2 to 10% was recovered in both cytosol preparations and in particulate materials. Cytosol contained proteinaceous--Cd complexes, free metal and low molecular weight Cd complexes. Labeling of protoplasts gave similar results. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco.

  12. Iron in intracellular infection: to provide or to deprive?

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    Sandro eSilva-Gomes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their chemical versatility, transition metals were incorporated as cofactors for several basic metabolic pathways in living organisms. This same characteristic makes them potentially harmful, since they can be engaged in deleterious reactions like Fenton chemistry. As such, organisms have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to supply their own metal needs while keeping their toxic potential in check.This dual character comes into play in host-pathogen interactions, given that the host can either deprive the pathogen of these key nutrients or exploit them to induce toxicity towards the invading agent. Iron stands as the prototypic example of how a metal can be used to limit the growth of pathogens by nutrient deprivation, a mechanism widely studied in Mycobacterium infections. However, the host can also take advantage of iron-induced toxicity to control pathogen proliferation, as observed in infections caused by Leishmania. Whether we may harness either of the two pathways for therapeutical purposes is still ill-defined.In this review, we discuss how modulation of the host iron availability impacts the course of infections, focusing on those caused by two relevant intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium and Leishmania.

  13. Polyarginine nanocapsules: a new platform for intracellular drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the development of a new nanocarrier, named as polyarginine (PArg) nanocapsules, specifically designed for overcoming cellular barriers. These nanocapsules are composed of an oily core and a PArg corona. The attachment of the PArg corona was mediated by its interaction with the oily core, which was conveniently stabilized with phosphatidylcholine. Hybrid PArg/PEG nanocapsules could also be obtained by introducing PEG-stearate in the nanocapsules formation process. The nanocapsules had an average size in the range of 120–160 nm, and a positive surface charge, which varied between +56 and +28 mV for PArg and PArg/PEG nanocapsules, respectively. They could accommodate significant amounts of lipophilic drugs, i.e., docetaxel, in their core, and also polar negatively charged molecules, i.e., plasmid DNA, on their coating. As a preliminary proof-of-principle, we explored the ability of these nanocarriers to enter cancer cells and to inhibit proliferation in the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cell line, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analysis. The results indicated that PArg nanocapsules are rapidly and massively accumulated into the NCI-H460 cells and that the PArg shell plays a critical role in the internalization process. Moreover, the incubation with docetaxel-loaded nanocapsules with NCI-H460 cells led to an enhanced inhibition of their proliferation, as compared to the free drug. Overall, this is the first report of the potential of PArg nanocapsules as intracellular drug delivery vehicles.

  14. Immunity to intracellular Salmonella depends on surface-associated antigens.

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    Somedutta Barat

    Full Text Available Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens.

  15. pH sensing by intracellular Salmonella induces effector translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; McGourty, Kieran; Liu, Mei; Unsworth, Kate E; Holden, David W

    2010-05-21

    Salmonella enterica is an important intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and animals. It replicates within host-cell vacuoles by delivering virulence (effector) proteins through a vacuolar membrane pore made by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS assembly follows vacuole acidification, but when bacteria are grown at low pH, effector secretion is negligible. We found that effector secretion was activated at low pH from mutant strains lacking a complex of SPI-2-encoded proteins SsaM, SpiC, and SsaL. Exposure of wild-type bacteria to pH 7.2 after growth at pH 5.0 caused dissociation and degradation of SsaM/SpiC/SsaL complexes and effector secretion. In infected cells, loss of the pH 7.2 signal through acidification of host-cell cytosol prevented complex degradation and effector translocation. Thus, intravacuolar Salmonella senses host cytosolic pH, resulting in the degradation of regulatory complex proteins and effector translocation. PMID:20395475

  16. Involvement of myosin in intracellular motility and cytomorphogenesis in Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Anke; Holzinger, Andreas; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2003-01-01

    Myosin was detected on Western blots of Micrasterias denticulata extracts by use of antibodies from different sources. Inhibitors with different targets of the actomyosin system, such as the myosin ATPase-blockers N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), or the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexhydro-1,4-diazapine (ML7), had similar effects on intracellular motility during cell development in the green alga Micrasterias, thus pointing towards a participation of myosin in these processes. The drugs markedly altered the mode of postmitotic nuclear migration, slowed down cytoplasmic streaming, changed cell pattern development and prevented normal chloroplast distribution and spreading into the growing semicell. In addition, an increase and dilatations in ER cisternae and marked morphological changes of the Golgi system were observed by transmission electron microscopy after exposure of growing cells to BDM. Neither BDM nor ML7 exhibited any effect on the distribution or arrangement of the cortical F-actin network nor on the F-actin basket around the nucleus, characteristic of untreated growing Micrasterias cells (J Cell Sci 107 (1994) 1929). This is particularly interesting since BDM caused disintegration of the microtubule system co-localized to the F-actin cage during normal nuclear migration. Together with the fact that other microtubules not connected to the F-actin system remained uninfluenced by BDM, this observation is evidence of an integrative function of myosin between the cytoskeleton elements. PMID:14642529

  17. Initial intracellular proteome profile of Aspergillus niger biofilms

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    Gretty K. Villena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An initial profiling of the intracellular proteome of Aspergillus niger ATCC 10864 biofilm cultures developed on polyester cloth was carried out by using 2D-PAGE and MS-TOF analysis and it was compared to the proteome of conventionally grown free-living submerged cultures. A number of 2D-PAGE protein spots from both types of cultures were subjected to MS-TOF analysis and data interrogation of the NCBI nr database available for this species. Proteomic maps showed different expression patterns in both culture systems with differentially expressed proteins in each case. In biofilm cultures, 19% and 32% of the selected protein spots were over- expressed and differentially expressed, respectively. On the contrary, in free-living cultures, 44% and 7% of the selected protein spots were over-expressed and differentially expressed, respectively. Although preliminary, results presented in this paper show that there are significant differences between the proteomes of A. niger biofilm and free-living mycelia. It seems that cell adhesion is the most important stimulus responsible for biofilm development which is the basis of Surface Adhesion Fermentation.

  18. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  19. The mechanical environment modulates intracellular calcium oscillation activities of myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Godbout

    Full Text Available Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair.

  20. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens.

  1. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António J M; Durkin, Charlotte H; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Holden, David W

    2016-07-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine.

  2. DNA uptake, intracellular trafficking and gene transfection after ultrasound exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Jing; Santangelo, Philip J; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound has been studied as a promising tool for intracellular gene delivery. In this work, we studied gene transfection of a human prostate cancer cell line exposed to megahertz pulsed ultrasound in the presence of contrast agent and assessed the efficiency of fluorescently labelled DNA delivery into cell nuclei, which is necessary for gene transfection. At the sonication conditions studied, ~30% of cells showed DNA uptake 30min after sonication, but that fraction decreased over time to ~10% of cells after 24h. Most cells containing DNA had DNA in their nuclei, but the amount varied significantly. Transfection efficiency peaked at ~10% at 8h post sonication. Among those cells containing DNA, ~30% of DNA was localized in the cell nuclei, ~30% was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes and the remainder was "free" in the cytoplasm 30min after sonication. At later times up to 24h, ~30% of DNA continued to be found in the nuclei and most or all of the rest of the DNA was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. These results demonstrate that ultrasound can deliver DNA into cell nuclei shortly after sonication and that the rest of the DNA can be cleared by autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. PMID:27165808

  3. How do antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBasore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs represent the primary treatment available for human malaria, as caused by Plasmodium spp. Currently approved drugs and antimalarial drug leads generally work against parasite enzymes or activities within infected erythrocytes. To reach their specific targets, these chemicals must cross at least three membranes beginning with the host cell membrane. Uptake at each membrane may involve partitioning and diffusion through the lipid bilayer or facilitated transport through channels or carriers. Here, we review the features of available antimalarials and examine whether transporters may be required for their uptake. Our computational analysis suggests that most antimalarials have high intrinsic membrane permeability, obviating the need for uptake via transporters; a subset of compounds appear to require facilitated uptake. We also review parasite and host transporters that may contribute to drug uptake. Broad permeability channels at the erythrocyte and parasitophorous vacuolar membranes of infected cells relax permeability constraints on antimalarial drug design; however, this uptake mechanism is prone to acquired resistance as the parasite may alter channel activity to reduce drug uptake. A better understanding of how antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets is critical to prioritizing drug leads for antimalarial development and may reveal new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2016-01-01

    The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a K m of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a K m of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose. PMID:27190649

  5. Thioredoxin 80-Activated-Monocytes (TAMs) Inhibit the Replication of Intracellular Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes-Bratti, Ximena; Brasseres, Eugenie; Herrera-Rodriquez, Fabiola;

    2011-01-01

    for a role of TAMs in the control of intracellular bacterial infections. As model pathogens we have chosen Listeria monocytogenes and Brucella abortus which replicate in the cytosol and the endoplasmic reticulum respectively. Our data indicate that TAMs efficiently inhibit intracellular growth of both L...

  6. Expression and cellular localisation of chloride intracellular channel 3 in human placenta and fetal membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Money, T. T.; King, R. G.; Wong, M.H.; Stevenson, J. L.; Kalionis, B.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Huisman, Marcel; Timmer, A.; Hiden, U.; Desoye, G.; Gude, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Chloride channels regulate the movement of a major cellular anion and are involved in fundamental processes that are critical for cell viability. Regulation of intracellular chloride is achieved by multiple classes of channel proteins. One class of putative channels are the chloride intracellular ch

  7. The role of autophagy in the intracellular survival of Campylobacter concisus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Burgos-Portugal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Given the importance of autophagy for the elimination of intracellular bacteria and the subversion of this process by pathogenic bacteria, we investigated the role of autophagy in C. concisus intracellular survival. Gentamicin protection assays were employed to assess intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, following autophagy induction and inhibition. To assess the interaction between C. concisus and autophagosomes, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed. Expression levels of 84 genes involved in the autophagy process were measured using qPCR. Autophagy inhibition resulted in two- to four-fold increases in intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, while autophagy induction resulted in a significant reduction in intracellular levels or bacterial clearance. C. concisus strains with low intracellular survival levels showed a dramatic increase in these levels upon autophagy inhibition. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of the bacterium with autophagosomes, while transmission electron microscopy identified intracellular bacteria persisting within autophagic vesicles. Further, qPCR showed that following infection, 13 genes involved in the autophagy process were significantly regulated, and a further five showed borderline results, with an overall indication towards a dampening effect exerted by the bacterium on this process. Our data collectively indicates that while autophagy is important for the clearance of C. concisus, some strains may manipulate this process to benefit their intracellular survival.

  8. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg') shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg' survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg'. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  9. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  10. Photoactivatable Drug-Caged Fluorophore Conjugate Allows Direct Quantification of Intracellular Drug Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Agasti, Sarit S.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kohler, Rainer H.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We report here a method that utilizes photoactivatable drug-caged fluorophore conjugate to quantify intracellular drug trafficking processes at single cell resolution. Photoactivation is performed in labeled cellular compartments to visualize intracellular drug exchange at physiologic conditions, without the need for washing, facilitating its translation to in vivo cancer models.

  11. DMPD: Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16785490 Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. La...gnaling: a structural perspective on human disease. PubmedID 16785490 Title Intracellular TLR signaling: a s...tructural perspective on human disease. Authors Lasker MV, Nair SK. Publication J

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a novel intracellular invertase from Aspergillus niger with transfructosylating activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Xiao-Lian; van Munster, Jolanda M.; Ram, Arthur F. J.; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Goosen, C.

    2007-01-01

    A novel subfamily of putative intracellular invertase enzymes (glycoside hydrolase family 32) has previously been identified in fungal genomes. Here, we report phylogenetic, molecular, and biochemical characteristics of SucB, one of two novel intracellular invertases identified in Aspergillus niger.

  13. Microscopy tools for the investigation of intracellular lipid storage and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Daemen

    2016-03-01

    Major conclusions: The continuous development of lipid probes in combination with the rapid development of microscopic techniques can provide new insights in the role and dynamics of intracellular lipids. Moreover, in situ identification of intracellular lipids is now possible and promises to add a new dimensionality to analysis of lipid biochemistry, and its relation to (pathophysiology.

  14. Cotransporters as molecular water pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna

    2002-01-01

    between water transport and clamp current, cotransport of small hydrophilic molecules, and shifts in reversal potentials with osmolarity are discussed with examples from the Na+/glutamate and Na+/glucose cotransporters. Unstirred layers and electrode artifacts as alternative explanations...... for such cotransport can be ruled out for both experimental and theoretical reasons. Indeed, substrate fluxes mediated by channels or ionophores generate much smaller water fluxes than those observed with cotransporters. Theoretical models, using reasonable values for the intracellular diffusion coefficient, indicate...

  15. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  16. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare cellulitis occurring with septic arthritis after joint injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdoch David M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulitis caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has rarely been described. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is a rare cause of septic arthritis after intra-articular injection, though the causative role of injection is difficult to ascertain in such cases. Case presentation A 57-year-old with rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone and azathioprine developed bilateral painful degenerative shoulder arthritis. After corticosteroid injections into both acromioclavicular joints, he developed bilateral cellulitis centered over the injection sites. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas, and culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Joint aspiration also revealed Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Conclusion Although rare, skin and joint infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare should be considered in any immunocompromised host, particularly after intra-articular injection. Stains for acid-fast bacilli may be negative in pathologic samples even in the presence of infection; cultures of tissue specimens should always be obtained.

  17. Changes of intracellular Na~+ concentration in erythrocytes caused by pulsed electrical field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 孙彤; 陈雅; 周淑华; 陈云俊; 庞素珍

    1997-01-01

    Changes of sodium ionic concentration of human erythrocytes applied to pulsed electrical field (PEF) were studied by using shift reagent and NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the concentration of intracellular Na+ increases with the increasing intensity of PEF when the erythrocytes are applied to PEF with higher intensities. The relationship between intracellular Na concentrations and the intensities of PEF does not follow linear or exponen-tial behavior. As the intensities increase, the intracellular Na+ concentrations increase even faster by an exponential curve. However under effects of PEF at lower intensities, intracellular Na+ concentration decreases. Ouabain can in-hibit the decrease of intracellular Na concentration, and the inhibition increases with the increasing concentration of ouabain, suggesting that Na , K -ATPase on cell membrane can be activated by PEF at lower intensities. Direct measurement of activities of the enzyme by using Malachite green method has confirmed this observatio

  18. Development of viral nanoparticles for efficient intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuojun; Chen, Kevin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Dirksen, Anouk; Fischer, Rainer; Dawson, Philip E.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2012-05-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) based on plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications because they present a robust scaffold that allows functionalization by chemical conjugation and genetic modification, thereby offering an efficient drug delivery platform that can target specific cells and tissues. VNPs such as CPMV show natural affinity to cells; however, cellular uptake is inefficient. Here we show that chemical modification of the CPMV surface with a highly reactive, specific and UV-traceable hydrazone linker allows bioconjugation of polyarginine (R5) cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can overcome these limitations. The resulting CPMV-R5 particles were taken up into a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) more efficiently than native particles. Uptake efficiency was dependent on the density of R5 peptides on the surface of the VNP; particles displaying 40 R5 peptides per CPMV (denoted as CPMV-R5H) interact strongly with the plasma membrane and are taken up into the cells via an energy-dependent mechanism whereas particles displaying 10 R5 peptides per CPMV (CPMV-R5L) are only slowly taken up. The fate of CPMV-R5 versus native CPMV particles within cells was evaluated in a co-localization time course study. It was indicated that the intracellular localization of CPMV-R5 and CPMV differs; CPMV remains trapped in Lamp-1 positive endolysosomes over long time frames; in contrast, 30-50% of the CPMV-R5 particles transitioned from the endosome into other cellular vesicles or compartments. Our data provide the groundwork for the development of efficient drug delivery formulations based on CPMV-R5.Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) based on plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be used for a broad range of biomedical applications because they present a robust scaffold that allows functionalization by chemical conjugation and genetic modification, thereby offering an efficient drug delivery platform

  19. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  20. A new technique for reversible permeabilization of live cells for intracellular delivery of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major challenge with the use of quantum dots (QDs) for cellular imaging and biomolecular delivery is the attainment of QDs freely dispersed inside the cells. Conventional methods such as endocytosis, lipids based delivery and electroporation are associated with delivery of QDs in vesicles and/or as aggregates that are not monodispersed. In this study, we demonstrate a new technique for reversible permeabilization of cells to enable the introduction of freely dispersed QDs within the cytoplasm. Our approach combines osmosis driven fluid transport into cells achieved by creating a hypotonic environment and reversible permeabilization using low concentrations of cell permeabilization agents like Saponin. Our results confirm that highly efficient endocytosis-free intracellular delivery of QDs can be accomplished using this method. The best results were obtained when the cells were treated with 50 μg ml−1 Saponin in a hypotonic buffer at a 3:2 physiological buffer:DI water ratio for 5 min at 4 ° C. (paper)

  1. Dual-Cross-Linked Methacrylated Alginate Sub-Microspheres for Intracellular Chemotherapeutic Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Spencer L; Miao, Tianxin; Scherrer, Ryan M; Oldinski, Rachael A

    2016-07-20

    Intracellular delivery vehicles comprised of methacrylated alginate (Alg-MA) were developed for the internalization and release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). Alg-MA was synthesized via an anhydrous reaction, and a mixture of Alg-MA and DOX was formed into sub-microspheres using a water/oil emulsion. Covalently cross-linked sub-microspheres were formed via exposure to green light, in order to investigate effects of cross-linking on drug release and cell internalization, compared to traditional techniques, such as ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. Cross-linking was performed using light exposure alone or in combination with ionic cross-linking using calcium chloride (CaCl2). Alg-MA sub-microsphere diameters were between 88 and 617 nm, and ζ-potentials were between -20 and -37 mV. Using human lung epithelial carcinoma cells (A549) as a model, cellular internalization was confirmed using flow cytometry; different sub-microsphere formulations varied the efficiency of internalization, with UV-cross-linked sub-microspheres achieving the highest internalization percentages. While blank (nonloaded) Alg-MA submicrospheres were noncytotoxic to A549 cells, DOX-loaded sub-microspheres significantly reduced mitochondrial activity after 5 days of culture. Photo-cross-linked Alg-MA sub-microspheres may be a potential chemotherapeutic delivery system for cancer treatment. PMID:27378419

  2. A model system using confocal fluorescence microscopy for examining real-time intracellular sodium ion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jacqueline A; Collings, David A; Glover, Chris N

    2016-08-15

    The gills of euryhaline fish are the ultimate ionoregulatory tissue, achieving ion homeostasis despite rapid and significant changes in external salinity. Cellular handling of sodium is not only critical for salt and water balance but is also directly linked to other essential functions such as acid-base homeostasis and nitrogen excretion. However, although measurement of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)]i) is important for an understanding of gill transport function, it is challenging and subject to methodological artifacts. Using gill filaments from a model euryhaline fish, inanga (Galaxias maculatus), the suitability of the fluorescent dye CoroNa Green as a probe for measuring [Na(+)]i in intact ionocytes was confirmed via confocal microscopy. Cell viability was verified, optimal dye loading parameters were determined, and the dye-ion dissociation constant was measured. Application of the technique to freshwater- and 100% seawater-acclimated inanga showed salinity-dependent changes in branchial [Na(+)]i, whereas no significant differences in branchial [Na(+)]i were determined in 50% seawater-acclimated fish. This technique facilitates the examination of real-time changes in gill [Na(+)]i in response to environmental factors and may offer significant insight into key homeostatic functions associated with the fish gill and the principles of sodium ion transport in other tissues and organisms. PMID:27235170

  3. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, P.O. Box 352120, Seattle, Washington 98195-2120 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs’ size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  4. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs' size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ˜20.1 ± 0.98 to ˜18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  5. Intracellular mechanisms of hydroquinone toxicity on endotoxin-activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Pinedo, Fernanda Júdice; Bolonheis, Simone Marques; Ferreira, Zulma F; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolas; Teixeira, Simone Aparecida; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-11-01

    Circulating neutrophils promptly react to different substances in the blood and orchestrate the beginning of the innate inflammatory response. We have shown that in vivo exposure to hydroquinone (HQ), the most oxidative compound of cigarette smoke and a toxic benzene metabolite, affects circulating neutrophils, making them unresponsive to a subsequent bacterial infection. In order to understand the action of toxic molecular mechanisms on neutrophil functions, in vitro HQ actions on pro-inflammatory mediator secretions evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Neutrophils from male Wistar rats were cultured with vehicle or HQ (5 or 10 μM; 2 h) and subsequently incubated with LPS (5 μg/ml; 18 h). Hydroquinone treatment impaired LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 secretions by neutrophils. The toxic effect was not dependent on cell death, reduced expression of the LPS receptor or toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) or cell priming, as HQ did not induce reactive oxygen species generation or β(2)integrin membrane expression. The action of toxic mechanisms on cytokine secretion was dependent on reduced gene synthesis, which may be due to decreased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Conversely, this intracellular pathway was not involved in impaired NO production because HQ treatments only affected inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression and activity, suggesting posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational mechanisms of action. Altogether, our data show that HQ alters the action of different LPS-activated pathways on neutrophils, which may contribute to the impaired triggering of the host innate immune reaction detected during in vivo HQ exposure. PMID:22717997

  6. Diabetes alters intracellular calcium transients in cardiac endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Q Sheikh

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is a diabetic complication, which results in myocardial dysfunction independent of other etiological factors. Abnormal intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+](i homeostasis has been implicated in DCM and may precede clinical manifestation. Studies in cardiomyocytes have shown that diabetes results in impaired [Ca(2+](i homeostasis due to altered sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA and sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX activity. Importantly, altered calcium homeostasis may also be involved in diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction, including impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and a diminished capacity to generate nitric oxide (NO, elevated cell adhesion molecules, and decreased angiogenic growth factors. However, the effect of diabetes on Ca(2+ regulatory mechanisms in cardiac endothelial cells (CECs remains unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of diabetes on [Ca(2+](i homeostasis in CECs in the rat model (streptozotocin-induced of DCM. DCM-associated cardiac fibrosis was confirmed using picrosirius red staining of the myocardium. CECs isolated from the myocardium of diabetic and wild-type rats were loaded with Fura-2, and UTP-evoked [Ca(2+](i transients were compared under various combinations of SERCA, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (PMCA and NCX inhibitors. Diabetes resulted in significant alterations in SERCA and NCX activities in CECs during [Ca(2+](i sequestration and efflux, respectively, while no difference in PMCA activity between diabetic and wild-type cells was observed. These results improve our understanding of how diabetes affects calcium regulation in CECs, and may contribute to the development of new therapies for DCM treatment.

  7. Statistical significance of precisely repeated intracellular synaptic patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ikegaya

    Full Text Available Can neuronal networks produce patterns of activity with millisecond accuracy? It may seem unlikely, considering the probabilistic nature of synaptic transmission. However, some theories of brain function predict that such precision is feasible and can emerge from the non-linearity of the action potential generation in circuits of connected neurons. Several studies have presented evidence for and against this hypothesis. Our earlier work supported the precision hypothesis, based on results demonstrating that precise patterns of synaptic inputs could be found in intracellular recordings from neurons in brain slices and in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we devised a method for finding precise repeats of activity and compared repeats found in the data to those found in surrogate datasets made by shuffling the original data. Because more repeats were found in the original data than in the surrogate data sets, we argued that repeats were not due to chance occurrence. Mokeichev et al. (2007 challenged these conclusions, arguing that the generation of surrogate data was insufficiently rigorous. We have now reanalyzed our previous data with the methods introduced from Mokeichev et al. (2007. Our reanalysis reveals that repeats are statistically significant, thus supporting our earlier conclusions, while also supporting many conclusions that Mokeichev et al. (2007 drew from their recent in vivo recordings. Moreover, we also show that the conditions under which the membrane potential is recorded contributes significantly to the ability to detect repeats and may explain conflicting results. In conclusion, our reevaluation resolves the methodological contradictions between Ikegaya et al. (2004 and Mokeichev et al. (2007, but demonstrates the validity of our previous conclusion that spontaneous network activity is non-randomly organized.

  8. Changes in intracellular calcium in brain cells of aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Yunpeng Cao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that voltage-dependent calcium influx, and enhancement of certain calcium-dependent processes in neurons, is related to aging. OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in neurons of aged rats, and to compare with young rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized control experiment of neurophysiology was performed at the Central Laboratory of School of Pharmaceutical Science, China Medical University from June to August 2004. MATERIALS: Ten male, healthy, Wistar rats, 19 months old, were selected for the aged group. Ten male, 3-month-old, Wistar rats were selected for the young control group. Fura-2/AM was provided by the Institute of Pharmaceutical Research of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and the F-2000 fluorospectrophotometer was a product of Hitachi, Japan. METHODS: Fluorescence Fura-2 spectrophotometer was used to measure [Ca2+]i in acutely dissociated brain cells of aged and young rats. The concentration of extracellular potassium was controlled by adding different volumes of chloridated potassium solution of high concentration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats in the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular calcium concentration and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium. Absolute increase of [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats when extraceUular potassium was 5,10,20, 40 mmol/L. RESULTS: In the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular Ca2+ and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium, [Ca2+]i in the neurons of aged rats was significantly less than that in young rats (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: The overload of [Ca2+]i in neurons of aged rats is greater than that of young rats under the same circumstances.

  9. Intracellular fate of spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaochen A; Choi, Chung Hang J; Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-05-28

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates are a class of bionanomaterials that are extremely potent in many biomedical applications. Their unique ability to enter multiple mammalian cell types as single-entity agents arises from their novel three-dimensional architecture, which consists of a dense shell of highly oriented oligonucleotides chemically attached typically to a gold nanoparticle core. This architecture allows SNAs to engage certain cell surface receptors to facilitate entry. Here, we report studies aimed at determining the intracellular fate of SNAs and the trafficking events that occur inside C166 mouse endothelial cells after cellular entry. We show that SNAs traffic through the endocytic pathway into late endosomes and reside there for up to 24 h after incubation. Disassembly of oligonucleotides from the nanoparticle core is observed 16 h after cellular entry, most likely due to degradation by enzymes such as DNase II localized in late endosomes. Our observations point to these events being likely independent of core composition and treatment conditions, and they do not seem to be particularly dependent upon oligonucleotide sequence. Significantly and surprisingly, the SNAs do not enter the lysosomes under the conditions studied. To independently track the fate of the particle core and the fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides that comprise its shell, we synthesized a novel class of quantum dot SNAs to determine that as the SNA structures are broken down over the 24 h time course of the experiment, the oligonucleotide fragments are recycled out of the cell while the nanoparticle core is not. This mechanistic insight points to the importance of designing and synthesizing next-generation SNAs that can bypass the degradation bottleneck imposed by their residency in late endosomes, and it also suggests that such structures might be extremely useful for endosomal signaling pathways by engaging receptors that are localized within the endosome

  10. Antithrombotic activities of ferulic acid via intracellular cyclic nucleotide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qian; Ma, Zeng-Chun; Huang, Hao; Wang, Yu-Guang; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Liang, Qian-De; Zhang, Han-Ting; Gao, Yue

    2016-04-15

    Ferulic acid (FA) produces protective effects against cardiovascular dysfunctions. However, the mechanisms of FA is still not known. Here we examined the antithrombotic effects of FA and its potential mechanisms. Anticoagulation assays and platelet aggregation was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP), and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was determined using enzyme immunoassay kits. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured using the Griess reaction. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting analysis. Oral administration of FA prevented death caused by pulmonary thrombosis and prolonged the tail bleeding and clotting time in mice,while, it did not alter the coagulation parameters, including the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). In addition, FA (50-200µM) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation induced by various platelet agonists, including adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), and U46619. Further, FA attenuated intracellular Ca(2)(+) mobilization and TXB2 production induced by the platelet agonists. FA increased the levels of cAMP and cGMP and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) while decreased phospho-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) in washed rat platelets, VASP is a substrate of cyclic nucleotide and PDE is an enzyme family responsible for hydrolysis of cAMP/cGMP. These results suggest that antithrombotic activities of FA may be regulated by inhibition of platelet aggregation, rather than through inhibiting the release of thromboplastin or formation of thrombin. The mechanism of this action may involve activation of cAMP and cGMP signaling. PMID:26948317

  11. Physiological water model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The water of the human body can be categorized as existing in two main compartments: intracellular water and extracellular water. The intracellular water consists of all the water within the cells and constitutes over half of the total body water. Since red blood cells are surrounded by plasma, and all other cells are surrounded by interstitial fluid, the intracellular compartment has been subdivided to represent these two cell types. The extracellular water, which includes all of the fluid outside of the cells, can be further subdivided into compartments which represent the interstitial fluid, circulating blood plasma, lymph, and transcellular water. The interstitial fluid surrounds cells outside of the vascular system whereas plasma is contained within the blood vessels. Avascular tissues such as dense connective tissue and cartilage contain interstitial water which slowly equilibrates with tracers used to determine extracellular fluid volume. For this reason, additional compartments are sometimes used to represent these avascular tissues. The average size of each compartment, in terms of percent body weight, has been determined for adult males and females. These compartments and the forces which cause flow between them are presented. The kidneys, a main compartment, receive about 25 percent of the cardiac output and filters out a fluid similar to plasma. The composition of this filtered fluid changes as it flows through the kidney tubules since compounds are continually being secreted and reabsorbed. Through this mechanism, the kidneys eliminate wastes while conserving body water, electrolytes, and metabolites. Since sodium accounts for over 90 percent of the cations in the extracellular fluid, and the number of cations is balanced by the number of anions, considering the renal handling sodium and water only should sufficiently describe the relationship between the plasma compartment and kidneys. A kidney function model is presented which has been adapted from a

  12. Production of intracellular selenium-enriched polysaccharides from thin stillage by Cordyceps sinensis and its bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thin stillage was used as the substrate to produce intracellular selenium-enriched polysaccharides (ISPS from Cordyceps sinensis to increase the value of agricultural coproducts. Methods: Fermentation parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM to improve the production of ISPS. Then, the effects of ISPS on the antioxidant activities in vitro, as well as the glycosylated serum protein concentration, malondialdehyde level, and total antioxidant capacity of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied. Results: The optimized conditions were as follows: sodium selenite concentration, 33.78 µg/L; incubation time, 8.24 days; and incubation temperature, 26.69°C. A maximum yield of 197.35 mg/g ISPS was obtained from the validation experiments, which was quite close to the predicted maximum yield of 198.6839 mg/g. FT-IR spectra indicated that ISPS has been successfully selenylation modified with similar structure to polysaccharide of intracellular polysaccharides. The in vitro scavenging effects of 1.0 mg/mL ISPS on hydroxyl, superoxide, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals were 74.62±4.05, 71.45±3.63, and 79.48±4.75%, respectively. The reducing power of ISPS was 0.45±0.01 (absorbance at 700 nm. Fasting blood glucose and glycosylated serum protein of group C (rats with diabetes that received drinking water with ISPS were significantly lower than those of group B (rats with diabetes (P<0.01 after treatment was administered for 2 and 4 weeks. Serum malonaldehyde content of group C was significantly lower than that of group B at 4 weeks (P<0.01. At 4 weeks, malonaldehyde contents in heart, liver, and kidney tissues of group C were significantly lower than those of group B; however, malonaldehyde content in pancreas tissue of group C was not significantly different. Total antioxidant capacities in liver, pancreas and kidney tissues of group C were significantly higher than those of group B, but total

  13. Aluminum-dependent regulation of intracellular silicon in the aquatic invertebrate Lymnaea stagnalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Mahmoud; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; McCrohan, Catherine R.; White, Keith N.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is essential for some plants, diatoms, and sponges but, in higher animals, its endogenous regulation has not been demonstrated. Silicate ions may be natural ligands for aluminum and here we show that, in the freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis), intracellular silicon seems specifically up-regulated in response to sublethal aluminum exposure. X-ray microanalysis showed that exposure of snails to low levels of aluminum led to its accumulation in lysosomal granules, accompanied by marked up-regulation of silicon. Increased lysosomal levels of silicon were a specific response to aluminum because cadmium and zinc had no such effect. Furthermore, intra-lysosomal sulfur from metallothionein and other sulfur-containing ligands was increased after exposure to cadmium and zinc but not aluminum. To ensure that these findings indicated a specific in vivo response, and not ex vivo formation of hydroxy-aluminosilicates (HAS) from added aluminum (555 μg/liter) and water-borne silicon (43 μg/liter), two further studies were undertaken. In a ligand competition assay the lability of aluminum (527 μg/liter) was completely unaffected by the presence of silicon (46 μg/liter), suggesting the absence of HAS. In addition, exogenous silicon (6.5 mg/liter), added to the water column to promote formation of HAS, caused a decrease in lysosomal aluminum accumulation, showing that uptake of HAS would not explain the loading of aluminum into lysosomal granules. These findings, and arguments on the stability, lability, and kinetics of aluminum–silicate interactions, suggest that a silicon-specific mechanism exists for the in vivo detoxification of aluminum, which provides regulatory evidence of silicon in a multicellular organism. PMID:11891333

  14. Dynamic modulation of intracellular glucose imaged in single cells using a FRET-based glucose nanosensor

    OpenAIRE

    John, Scott A.; Ottolia, Michela; James N Weiss; Ribalet, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To study intracellular glucose homeostasis, the glucose nanosensor FLIPglu-600µM, which undergoes changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) upon interaction with glucose, was expressed in four mammalian cell lines: COS-7, CHO, HEK293, and C2C12. Upon addition of extracellular glucose, the intracellular FRET ratio decreased rapidly as intracellular glucose increased. The kinetics were fast (τ =5 to 15 s) in COS and C2C12 cells and slow (τ =20 to 40 s) in HEK and CHO cells. Upon ...

  15. Fluorescent probes and nanoparticles for intracellular sensing of pH values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular pH regulates a number of cell metabolism processes and its sensing is thus of great importance for cell studies. Among various methods, fluorescent probes have been widely used for sensing intracellular pH values because of their high sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution capability. In this article, the development of fluorescent probes with good practicability in sensing intracellular pH values and pH variation during 2009 − 2014 is reviewed. These fluorescence probes are divided into two kinds: small molecules and nanoparticles. Photophysical properties, advantages/disadvantages and applications of the two kinds of probes are discussed in detail. (topical review)

  16. Function of chloride intracellular channel 1 in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Fei Ma; Jun-Qiang Chen; Zhen Wang; Jin-Lu Liu; Bo-Pei Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1) on the cell proliferation,apoptosis,migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells.METHODS:CLIC1 expression was evaluated in human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MGC-803 by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Four segments of small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting CLIC1 mRNA and a no-sense control segment were designed by bioinformatics technology.CLIC1 siRNA was selected using Lipofectamine 2000 and transfected transiently into human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells.The transfected efficiency was observed under fluorescence microscope.After transfection,mRNA expression of CLIC1 was detected with RT-PCR and Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression.Proliferation was examined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry.Polycarbonate membrane transwell chamber and Matrigel were used for the detection of the changes of invasion and migration of the two cell lines.RESULTS:In gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MGC-803,CLIC1 was obviously expressed and CLIC1 siRNA could effectively suppress the expression of CLIC1 protein and mRNA.Proliferation of cells transfected with CLIC1 siRNA3 was enhanced notably,and the highest proliferation rate was 23.3% (P =0.002) in SGC-7901 and 35.55% (P =0.001) in MGC-803 cells at 48 h.The G2/M phase proportion increased,while G0/G1 and S phase proportions decreased.The apoptotic rate of the CLIC1 siRNA3 group obviously decreased in both SGC-7901 cells (62.24%,P =0.000) and MGC-803 cells (52.67%,P =0.004).Down-regulation of CLIC1 led to the inhibition of invasion and migration by 54.31% (P =0.000) and 33.62% (P =0.001) in SGC-7901 and 40.74% (P =0.000) and 29.26% (P =0.002) in MGC-803.However,there was no significant difference between the mock group cells and the negative control group cells.CONCLUSION:High CLIC1 expression can efficiently inhibit proliferation and

  17. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

  18. Real-time detection of viable microorganisms by intracellular phototautomerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, the detection of live microorganisms present in the environment or involved in infections is carried out by enumeration of colony forming units on agar plates, which is time consuming, laborious and limited to readily cultivable microorganisms. Although cultivation-independent methods are available, they involve multiple incubation steps and do mostly not discriminate between dead or live microorganisms. We present a novel generic method that is able to specifically monitor living microorganisms in a real-time manner. Results The developed method includes exposure of cells to a weak acid probe at low pH. The neutral probe rapidly permeates the membrane and enters the cytosol. In dead cells no signal is obtained, as the cytosolic pH reflects that of the acidic extracellular environment. In live cells with a neutral internal pH, the probe dissociates into a fluorescent phototautomeric anion. After reaching peak fluorescence, the population of live cells decays. This decay can be followed real-time as cell death coincides with intracellular acidification and return of the probe to its uncharged non-fluorescent state. The rise and decay of the fluorescence signal depends on the probe structure and appears discriminative for bacteria, fungi, and spores. We identified 13 unique probes, which can be applied in the real-time viability method described here. Under the experimental conditions used in a microplate reader, the reported method shows a detection limit of 106 bacteria ml-1, while the frequently used LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ Syto9 and propidium iodide stains show detection down to 106 and 107 bacteria ml-1, respectively. Conclusions We present a novel fluorescence-based method for viability assessment, which is applicable to all bacteria and eukaryotic cell types tested so far. The RTV method will have a significant impact in many areas of applied microbiology including research on biocidal activity, improvement of

  19. Nucleation temperature-controlled synthesis and in vitro toxicity evaluation of L-cysteine-capped Mn:ZnS quantum dots for intracellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Pandey, Gajanan; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Yadav, Sapna; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy

    2016-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), one of the fastest developing and most exciting fluorescent materials, have attracted increasing interest in bioimaging and biomedical applications. The long-term stability and emission in the visible region of QDs have proved their applicability as a significant fluorophore in cell labelling. In this study, an attempt has been made to explore the efficacy of L-cysteine as a capping agent for Mn-doped ZnS QD for intracellular imaging. A room temperature nucleation strategy was adopted to prepare non-toxic, water-dispersible and biocompatible Mn:ZnS QDs. Aqueous and room temperature QDs with L-cysteine as a capping agent were found to be non-toxic even at a concentration of 1500 µg/mL and have wide applications in intracellular imaging. PMID:26179189

  20. Distribution of Water in Synthetic Calcium Silicate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosz, C; Gaboreau, S; Grangeon, S; Prêt, D; Montouillout, V; Maubec, N; Ory, S; Blanc, P; Vieillard, P; Henocq, P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) is of paramount importance for understanding the behavior of cement materials because they control most of the properties of these man-made materials. The atomic scale water content and structure have a major influence on their properties, as is analogous with clay minerals, and we should assess these. Here, we used a multiple analytical approach to quantify water distribution in CSH samples and to determine the relative proportions of water sorbed on external and internal (interlayer) surfaces. Water vapor isotherms were used to explain the water distribution in the CSH microstructure. As with many layered compounds, CSHs have external and internal (interlayer) surfaces displaying multilayer adsorption of water molecules on external surfaces owing to the hydrophilic surfaces. Interlayer water was also quantified from water vapor isotherm, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA) data, displaying nonreversible swelling/shrinkage behavior in response to drying/rewetting cycles. From this quantification and balance of water distribution, we were able to explain most of the widely dispersed data already published according to the various relative humidity (RH) conditions and measurement techniques. Stoichiometric formulas were proposed for the different CSH samples analyzed (0.6 < Ca/Si < 1.6), considering the interlayer water contribution. PMID:27281114

  1. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 1698221...1 Title Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Author

  2. The universality and biological significance of signal molecules with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Generally,cell signal molecules are classified into the extracellular signal molecules (the first messengers) and the intracellular signal ones (the second messengers).Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP),calcium ions and calmodulin (CaM) are the traditional intracellular messengers,but they are also present in extracellular matrix (ECM).Some of them have been discovered to act as the first messengers through cell surface receptors.Other second messengers,such as cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP),cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and annexin,are also found existing outside animal and plant cells.The existence of these messengers with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions in cells may be a regular biological phenomenon.These compatible messengers might be the communication factors between intracellular and extracellular regions or among the cell populations,and are also important in regulating cell development procedure.

  3. Recent progress in the study of intracellular toxicity of amyloid β peptide in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; YU Longchuan

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition is one of the major pathological markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Extracellular Aβ toxicity has been studied for a long time in AD research field. However, controversial data show that extracellular Aβ load does not correlate with the dementia levels of AD patients and extracellular Aβ only induces significant cell death at non-physiological high concentrations.With the evolvement of Aβ hypothesis, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of intracellular Aβ toxicity recently. Intracellular Aβ induces dramatic cell loss in AD transgenic models and in human primary neurons (at pM concentrations) through p53, Bax and caspase-6 pathways. Here, we review the generation, toxicity and possible pathways of intracellular Aβ toxicity, and discuss the implication and current knowledge of intracellular Aβ in neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Intracellular Ca 2+ nonlinear wave behaviours in a three dimensional ventricular cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Holden, Arun V.

    2009-06-01

    Intracellular Ca 2+ activity regulates a wide range of cellular biochemical processes; in muscle cells, it links membrane excitation to contraction. Ca 2+ dynamics includes both synchronous oscillations, and nonlinear wave phenomena, both arising from the superposition of spatially localised stochastic events, such as Ca 2+ sparks. We incorporated individualised cell geometry reconstructed from confocal microscopy with realistic spatial distribution of RyR clusters into the three dimensional ventricular cell model, and reproduced complex spatio-temporal intracellular wave patterns from Ca 2+ sparks. We also introduced a detailed nuclear Ca 2+ handing model to simulate prolonged nuclear Ca 2+ transient, and study the effects of cytosolic-nuclear coupling on intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics. The model provides a computational platform to study intracellular Ca 2+ with the ability to interact with experimental measurements of subcellular structures, and can be modified for other cell types.

  5. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  6. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  7. Intra-ChIP: studying gene regulation in an intracellular pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Brett R; Tan, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular bacteria that reside within a host cell use a variety of strategies to exploit this unique niche. While these organisms are technically challenging to study in the context of an infected host cell, recent advances have led to an improved understanding of how the intracellular environment impacts bacterial gene expression. We recently demonstrated that chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) can be used to quantify transcription factor binding in the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis within infected cells. Furthermore, we showed it was possible to experimentally modulate transcription factor binding while simultaneously measuring changes in transcription. Here we discuss these findings as well as other recent work that has used ChIP to study intracellular pathogens within infected cells. We also discuss technical considerations associated with this approach and its possible future applications. PMID:26886234

  8. Complementary roles of intracellular and pericellular collagen degradation pathways in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Miller, Rebecca A; Engelholm, Lars H; Gavard, Julie;

    2007-01-01

    Collagen degradation is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Two key turnover pathways have been described for collagen: intracellular cathepsin-mediated degradation and pericellular collagenase-mediated degradation. However, the functional relationship between these ...

  9. Intra-ChIP: studying gene regulation in an intracellular pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Brett R; Tan, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular bacteria that reside within a host cell use a variety of strategies to exploit this unique niche. While these organisms are technically challenging to study in the context of an infected host cell, recent advances have led to an improved understanding of how the intracellular environment impacts bacterial gene expression. We recently demonstrated that chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) can be used to quantify transcription factor binding in the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis within infected cells. Furthermore, we showed it was possible to experimentally modulate transcription factor binding while simultaneously measuring changes in transcription. Here we discuss these findings as well as other recent work that has used ChIP to study intracellular pathogens within infected cells. We also discuss technical considerations associated with this approach and its possible future applications.

  10. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. An indirect intracellular staining (ICS method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels.

  11. Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Bjerrum, Poul J; Jessen, Torben E;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human spermatozoa, and VDR-knockout mice and vitamin D (VD) deficiency in rodents results in impaired fertility, low sperm counts and a low number of motile spermatozoa. We investigated the role of activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) in human...... spermatozoa and whether VD serum levels are associated with semen quality. METHODS Cross-sectional association study of semen quality and VD serum level in 300 men from the general population, and in vitro studies on spermatozoa from 40 men to investigate the effects of VD on intracellular calcium, sperm......M). 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium concentration in human spermatozoa through VDR-mediated calcium release from an intracellular calcium storage, increased sperm motility and induced the acrosome reaction in vitro. CONCLUSIONS 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium...

  12. DNA topology and adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to an intracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D G; Bowe, F; Hale, C; Dougan, G; Dorman, C J

    2000-01-01

    The expression of genes coding for determinants of DNA topology in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was studied during adaptation by the bacteria to the intracellular environment of J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. A reporter plasmid was used to monitor changes in DNA supercoiling during intracellular growth. Induction of the dps and spv genes, previously shown to be induced in the macrophage, was detected, as was expression of genes coding for DNA gyrase, integration host factor and the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. The topA gene, coding for the DNA relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, was not induced. Reporter plasmid data showed that bacterial DNA became relaxed following uptake of S. typhimurium cells by the macrophage. These data indicate that DNA topology in S. typhimurium undergoes significant changes during adaptation to the intracellular environment. A model describing how this process may operate is discussed. PMID:10874730

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of polyphosphate kinase 2 from the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Batten, Laura E.; Parnell, Alice E.; Wells, Neil J.; Amber L Murch; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Roach, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of polyphosphate is important for the virulence of a wide range of pathogenic bacteria and the enzymes of polyphosphate metabolism have been proposed as an anti-bacterial target. In the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis, the product of the gene FTT1564 has been identified as a polyphosphate kinase from the polyphosphate kinase 2 (PPK2) family. The isogenic deletion mutant was defective for intracellular growth in macrophages and was attenuated in mice, indicating an...

  14. Polarized exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion directs intracellular lumenogenesis within the C. elegans excretory cell

    OpenAIRE

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Lumenogenesis of small seamless tubes occurs through intracellular membrane growth and directed vesicle fusion events. Within the C. elegans excretory cell, which forms seamless intracellular tubes (canals) that mediate osmoregulation, lumens grow in length and diameter when vesicles fuse with the expanding lumenal surface. Here, we show that lumenal vesicle fusion depends on the small GTPase RAL-1, which localizes to vesicles and acts through the exocyst vesicle-tethering complex. Loss of ei...

  15. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-05-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients (2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-(/sup 125/I) insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin, (/sup 125/I)iodide, or (/sup 125/I)tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients.

  16. HLA-B27 Expression Does Not Modulate Intracellular Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J. L.; Smith, L; Matyszak, M. K.; Gaston, J S H

    2001-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen. Infection of susceptible individuals with this bacterium can trigger the development of reactive arthritis, an acute inflammation that is associated with the expression of the class I major histocompatibility antigen, HLA-B27. Other facultative intracellular pathogens, such as Yersinia and Salmonella spp., are also known triggers of reactive arthritis. Previous studies report conflicting results concerning whether the presence of HL...

  17. Intracellular ATP Levels are a Pivotal Determinant of Chemoresistance in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yunfei; Tozzi, Federico; Chen, Jinyu; Fan, Fan; Xia, Ling; Wang, JinRong; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Brasher, Heather; Widger, William; Ellis, Lee M.; Weihua, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Altered metabolism in cancer cells is suspected to contribute to chemoresistance but the precise mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that intracellular ATP levels are a core determinant in the development of acquired cross-drug resistance of human colon cancer cells that harbor different genetic backgrounds. Drug-resistant cells were characterized by defective mitochondrial ATP production, elevated aerobic glycolysis, higher absolute levels of intracellular ATP and enhanced HIF-1α-mediated s...

  18. Activation of NADPH Oxidase 1 Increases Intracellular Calcium and Migration of Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Takapoo, Maysam; Jagadeesha, Dammanahalli K.; Stanic, Bojana; Banfi, Botond; Bhalla, Ramesh C; Miller, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    Redox-dependent migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are central events in the development of vascular proliferative diseases; however, the underlying intracellular signaling mechanisms are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that activation of Nox1 NADPH oxidase modulates intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i). Using cultured SMCs from wild type (WT) and Nox1 null (Nox1−/y) mice, we confirmed that thrombin-dependent generation of ROS requires Nox1. Th...

  19. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  20. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Genes Contributing to Intracellular Replication by Expression Profiling and Mutant Screening†

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Biju; Przybilla, Karin; Stühler, Claudia; Schauer, Kristina; Slaghuis, Jörg; Thilo M Fuchs; Goebel, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A successful transition of Listeria monocytogenes from the extracellular to the intracellular environment requires a precise adaptation response to conditions encountered in the host milieu. Although many key steps in the intracellular lifestyle of this gram-positive pathogen are well characterized, our knowledge about the factors required for cytosolic proliferation is still rather limited. We used DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses to investigate the transcripti...

  1. Isolation of carbon nanohorn assemblies and their potential for intracellular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Tan, Juan; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2007-05-01

    Attributed to its distinctive dahlia-flowerlike structure and already desirable size (usually <100 nm), carbon nanohorn assemblies (CNHs), a new member of the fullerene family, are a potential vehicle for intracellular delivery. This paper shows that isolated CNHs and nanoscale CNH agglomerates can be successfully isolated by a copolymer (Gum Arabic) through steric stabilization. In vitro study shows that the modified CNHs are nontoxic and may be used as a promising vehicle for intracellular delivery.

  2. Isolation of carbon nanohorn assemblies and their potential for intracellular delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Xiaobin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Tan Juan [College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Zhang Guoliang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang Fengbao [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2007-05-16

    Attributed to its distinctive dahlia-flowerlike structure and already desirable size (usually <100 nm), carbon nanohorn assemblies (CNHs), a new member of the fullerene family, are a potential vehicle for intracellular delivery. This paper shows that isolated CNHs and nanoscale CNH agglomerates can be successfully isolated by a copolymer (Gum Arabic) through steric stabilization. In vitro study shows that the modified CNHs are nontoxic and may be used as a promising vehicle for intracellular delivery.

  3. Association of Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphisms with Stavudine Triphosphate Intracellular Levels and Lipodystrophy▿

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, Pere (Domingo Pedrol); Cabeza, M. Carmen; Pruvost, Alain; Torres, Ferran; Salazar, Juliana; del Mar Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, M. Gracia; Fontanet, Angels; Fernandez, Irene; Domingo, Joan C.; Villarroya, Francesc; Vidal, Francesc; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    The antiviral activity and toxicity of stavudine (d4T) depend on its triphosphate metabolite, stavudine triphosphate (d4T-TP). Therefore, modifications in intracellular levels of d4T-TP may change the toxicity profile of stavudine. d4T-TP intracellular levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined with a prominence liquid chromatograph connected to a triple-quadruple mass spectrometer. Polymorphisms in the thymidylate synthase (TS), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), ...

  4. Action Potential Morphology Influences Intracellular Calcium Handling Stability and the Occurrence of Alternans

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Peter N; Christini, David J

    2005-01-01

    Instability in the intracellular Ca2+ handling system leading to Ca2+ alternans is hypothesized to be an underlying cause of electrical alternans. The highly coupled nature of membrane voltage and Ca2+ regulation suggests that there should be reciprocal effects of membrane voltage on the stability of the Ca2+ handling system. We investigated such effects using a mathematical model of the cardiac intracellular Ca2+ handling system. We found that the morphology of the action potential has a sig...

  5. An efficient system for intracellular delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics to overcome bacterial resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Abed; Fatouma Saïd-Hassane; Fatima Zouhiri; Julie Mougin; Valérie Nicolas; Didier Desmaële; Ruxandra Gref; Patrick Couvreur

    2015-01-01

    The “Golden era” of antibiotics is definitely an old story and this is especially true for intracellular bacterial infections. The poor intracellular bioavailability of antibiotics reduces the efficency of many treatments and thereby promotes resistances. Therefore, the development of nanodevices coupled with antibiotics that are capable of targeting and releasing the drug into the infected-cells appears to be a promising solution to circumvent these complications. Here, we took advantage of ...

  6. Preparation and characterization of vinculin-targeted polymer–lipid nanoparticle as intracellular delivery vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junping; Örnek-Ballanco, Ceren; Xu, Jiahua; Yang, Weiguo; Yu, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular delivery vehicles have been extensively investigated as these can serve as an effective tool in studying the cellular mechanism, by delivering functional protein to specific locations of the cells. In the current study, a polymer–lipid nanoparticle (PLN) system was developed as an intracellular delivery vehicle specifically targeting vinculin, a focal adhesion protein associated with cellular adhesive structures, such as focal adhesions and adherens junctions. The PLNs possessed...

  7. Urothelial cultures support intracellular bacterial community formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth E; Klumpp, David J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2009-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) causes most community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTI). In a mouse model of UTI, UPEC invades superficial bladder cells and proliferates rapidly, forming biofilm-like structures called intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). Using a gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy, we developed an in vitro model for studying UPEC proliferation within immortalized human urothelial cells. By pharmacologic manipulation of urothelial cells with the cholesterol-sequestering drug filipin, numbers of intracellular UPEC CFU increased 8 h and 24 h postinfection relative to untreated cultures. Enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation required that the urothelial cells, but not the bacteria, be filipin treated prior to infection. However, neither UPEC frequency of invasion nor early intracellular trafficking events to a Lamp1-positive compartment were modulated by filipin. Upon inspection by fluorescence microscopy, cultures with enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation exhibited large, dense bacterial aggregates within cells that resembled IBCs but were contained with Lamp1-positive vacuoles. While an isogenic fimH mutant was capable of forming these IBC-like structures, the mutant formed significantly fewer than wild-type UPEC. Similar to IBCs, expression of E. coli iron acquisition systems was upregulated by intracellular UPEC. Expression of other putative virulence factors, including hlyA, cnf1, fliC, kpsD, and the biofilm adhesin yfaL also increased, while expression of fimA decreased and that of flu did not change. These results indicate that UPEC differentially regulates virulence factors in the intracellular environment. Thus, immortalized urothelial cultures that recapitulate IBC formation in vitro represent a novel system for the molecular and biochemical characterization of the UPEC intracellular life cycle.

  8. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular and lysates (intracellular blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway.

  9. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  10. Formation, Manipulation, and Elasticity Measurement of a Nanometric Column of Water Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Choe, H; Seo, Y; Lee, K; Kim, G; Cho, Y; Ihm, J; Jhe Won Ho; Jhe, and W.

    2005-01-01

    Nanometer-sized columns of condensed water molecules are created by an atomic-resolution force microscope operated in ambient conditions. Unusual stepwise decrease of the force gradient associated with the thin water bridge in the tip-substrate gap is observed during its stretch, exhibiting regularity in step heights (~0.5 N/m) and plateau lengths (~1 nm). Such "quantized" elasticity is indicative of the atomic-scale stick-slip at the tip-water interface. A thermodynamic-instability-induced rupture of the water meniscus (5-nm long and 2.6-nm wide) is also found. This work opens a high-resolution study of the structure and the interface dynamics of a nanometric aqueous column.

  11. Intracellular autocrine VEGF signaling promotes EBDC cell proliferation, which can be inhibited by Apatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sui; Zhang, Yanyan; Peng, Hong; Ke, Zunfu; Xu, Lixia; Su, Tianhong; Tsung, Allan; Tohme, Samer; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Qiuyang; Lencioni, Riccardo; Zeng, Zhirong; Peng, Baogang; Chen, Minhu; Kuang, Ming

    2016-04-10

    Tumor cells produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which can interact with membrane or cytoplasmic VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) to promote cell growth. We aimed to investigate the role of extracellular/intracellular autocrine VEGF signaling and Apatinib, a highly selective VEGFR2 inhibitor, in extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EBDC). We found conditioned medium or recombinant human VEGF treatment promoted EBDC cell proliferation through a phospholipase C-γ1-dependent pathway. This pro-proliferative effect was diminished by VEGF, VEGFR1 or VEGFR2 neutralizing antibodies, but more significantly suppressed by intracellular VEGFR inhibitor. The rhVEGF induced intracellular VEGF signaling by promoting nuclear accumulation of pVEGFR1/2 and enhancing VEGF promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression. Internal VEGFR2 inhibitor Apatinib significantly inhibited intracellular VEGF signaling, suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and delayed xenograft tumor growth in vivo, while anti-VEGF antibody Bevacizumab showed no effect. Clinically, overexpression of pVEGFR1 and pVEGFR2 was significantly correlated with poorer overall survival (P = .007 and P = .020, respectively). In conclusion, the intracellular autocrine VEGF loop plays a predominant role in VEGF-induced cell proliferation. Apatinib is an effective intracellular VEGF pathway blocker that presents a great therapeutic potential in EBDC. PMID:26805764

  12. Ciprofloxacin nano-niosomes for targeting intracellular infections: an in vitro evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to propose non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) for the treatment of intracellular infections, a remote loading method (active drug encapsulation) followed by sonication was used to prepare nano-niosome formulations containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Size analysis, size distribution and zeta potentials of niosomes were evaluated and then their antimicrobial activity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular distribution, and antibacterial activity against intracellular Staphylococcus aureus infection of murine macrophage-like, J774, cells were investigated in comparison to free drug. Our findings reveal that size and composition of the niosome formula can influence their in vitro biological properties. Vesicles in the 300–600 nm size range were phagocytosed to a greater degree by macrophages in comparison to other size vesicles. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPFX-loaded niosomes were two to eightfold lower than MICs of free CPFX. In addition, niosome encapsulation of CPFX provided high intracellular antimicrobial activities while free CPFX is ineffective for eradicating intracellular forms of S. aureus. Encapsulation of CPFX in niosomes generally decreased its in vitro cytotoxicity. Our results show that niosomes are suitable drug delivery systems with good efficacy and safety properties to be proposed for drug targeting against intracellular infections.

  13. Ciprofloxacin nano-niosomes for targeting intracellular infections: an in vitro evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Vajihe; Abedi, Daryoush [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pardakhty, Abbas [Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Pharmaceutics Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat, E-mail: sadeghi@pharm.mui.ac.ir [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In order to propose non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) for the treatment of intracellular infections, a remote loading method (active drug encapsulation) followed by sonication was used to prepare nano-niosome formulations containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Size analysis, size distribution and zeta potentials of niosomes were evaluated and then their antimicrobial activity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular distribution, and antibacterial activity against intracellular Staphylococcus aureus infection of murine macrophage-like, J774, cells were investigated in comparison to free drug. Our findings reveal that size and composition of the niosome formula can influence their in vitro biological properties. Vesicles in the 300-600 nm size range were phagocytosed to a greater degree by macrophages in comparison to other size vesicles. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPFX-loaded niosomes were two to eightfold lower than MICs of free CPFX. In addition, niosome encapsulation of CPFX provided high intracellular antimicrobial activities while free CPFX is ineffective for eradicating intracellular forms of S. aureus. Encapsulation of CPFX in niosomes generally decreased its in vitro cytotoxicity. Our results show that niosomes are suitable drug delivery systems with good efficacy and safety properties to be proposed for drug targeting against intracellular infections.

  14. An efficient system for intracellular delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics to overcome bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Nadia; Saïd-Hassane, Fatouma; Zouhiri, Fatima; Mougin, Julie; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Gref, Ruxandra; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The "Golden era" of antibiotics is definitely an old story and this is especially true for intracellular bacterial infections. The poor intracellular bioavailability of antibiotics reduces the efficency of many treatments and thereby promotes resistances. Therefore, the development of nanodevices coupled with antibiotics that are capable of targeting and releasing the drug into the infected-cells appears to be a promising solution to circumvent these complications. Here, we took advantage of two natural terpenes (farnesyl and geranyl) to design nanodevices for an efficient intracellular delivery of penicillin G. The covalent linkage between the terpene moieties and the antibiotic leads to formation of prodrugs that self-assemble to form nanoparticles with a high drug payload between 55-63%. Futhermore, the addition of an environmentally-sensitive bond between the antibiotic and the terpene led to an efficient antibacterial activity against the intracellular pathogen Staphylococcus aureus with reduced intracellular replication of about 99.9% compared to untreated infected cells. Using HPLC analysis, we demonstrated and quantified the intracellular release of PenG when this sensitive-bond (SB) was present on the prodrug, showing the success of this technology to deliver antibiotics directly into cells.

  15. Intracellular release of rapamycin from poly (lactic acid) nanospheres modifies autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Junpei; Matsui, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the autophagy activity of cells by the intracellular release of rapamycin (Rapa) of an autophagy inducer. Rapa was incorporated into nanospheres of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) for the controlled release of Rapa. Rapa was released from the PLGA nanospheres incorporating rapamycin (Rapa-PLGA-NS) with time while the Rapa-PLGA-NS were hydrolytically degraded. When human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were incubated with the Rapa-PLGA-NS, the Rapa-PLGA-NS were internalized, and the intracellular concentration was maintained over four days, indicating the intracellular Rapa release. The microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC3) of an autophagy marker was significantly high for the Rapa-PLGA-NS group compared with the free Rapa group even after four days incubation. In addition, intracellular harmful ubiquitinated proteins were degraded by the intracellular release of Rapa even after four days incubation in contrast to free Rapa. It is concluded that the intracellular Rapa release is effective in modulating the autophagy activity over a longer time period. PMID:27320771

  16. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all

  17. Surface bioengineering of diatomite based nanovectors for efficient intracellular uptake and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Monica; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Correia, Alexandra; Rea, Ilaria; Lamberti, Annalisa; de Stefano, Luca; Santos, Hélder A.

    2015-11-01

    Diatomite is a natural porous silica material of sedimentary origin. Due to its peculiar properties, it can be considered as a valid surrogate of synthetic porous silica for nano-based drug delivery. In this work, we exploit the potential of diatomite nanoparticles (DNPs) for drug delivery with the aim of developing a successful dual-biofunctionalization method by polyethylene glycol (PEG) coverage and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) bioconjugation, to improve the physicochemical and biological properties of the particles, to enhance the intracellular uptake in cancer cells, and to increase the biocompatibility of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT) modified-DNPs. DNPs-APT-PEG-CPP showed hemocompatibility for up to 200 μg mL-1 after 48 h of incubation with erythrocytes, with a hemolysis value of only 1.3%. The cytotoxicity of the modified-DNPs with a concentration up to 200 μg mL-1 and incubation with MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells for 24 h, demonstrated that PEGylation and CPP-bioconjugation can strongly reduce the cytotoxicity of DNPs-APT. The cellular uptake of the modified-DNPs was also evaluated using the above mentioned cancer cell lines, showing that the CPP-bioconjugation can considerably increase the DNP cellular uptake. Moreover, the dual surface modification of DNPs improved both the loading of a poorly water-soluble anticancer drug, sorafenib, with a loading degree up to 22 wt%, and also enhanced the drug release profiles in aqueous solutions. Overall, this work demonstrates that the biofunctionalization of DNPs is a promising platform for drug delivery applications in cancer therapy as a result of its enhanced stability, biocompatibility, cellular uptake, and drug release profiles.Diatomite is a natural porous silica material of sedimentary origin. Due to its peculiar properties, it can be considered as a valid surrogate of synthetic porous silica for nano-based drug delivery. In this work, we exploit the potential of diatomite nanoparticles

  18. Laser selective microablation of sensitized intracellular components within auditory receptor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Evans, Burt N.; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1995-05-01

    A laser system can be coupled to a light microscope for laser microbeam ablation and trapping of single cells in vitro. We have extended this technology by sensitization of target structures with vital dyes to provide selective ablation of specific subcellular components. Isolated auditory receptor cells (outer hair cells, OHCs) are known to elongate and contract in response to electrical, chemical and mechanical stimulation. Various intracellular structures are candidate components mediating motility of OHCs, but the exact mechanism(s) is currently unknown. In ongoing studies of OHC motility, we have used the microbeam for selective ablation of lateral wall components and of an axial cytoskeletal core that extends from the nucleus to the cell apex. Both the area beneath the subsurface cistemae of the lateral wall and the core are rich in mitochondria. OHCs isolated from guinea pig cochlea are suspended in L- 15 medium containing 2.0 (mu) M Rhodamine 123, a porphyrin with an affinity for mitochondria. A spark-pumped nitrogen laser pumping a dye cell (Coumarin 500) was aligned on the optical axis of a Nikon Optiphot-2 to produce a 3 ns, 0.5 - 10 micrometers spot (diameter above ablation threshold w/50X water immersion, N.A. 0.8), and energy at the target approximately equals 10 (mu) J/pulse. At short incubation times in Rh123 irradiation caused local blebbing or bulging of cytoplastic membrane and thus loss of the OHC's cylindrical shape. At longer Rh123 incubation times when the central axis of the cell was targeted we observed cytoplasmic clearing, immediate cell elongation (approximately equals 5%) and clumping of core material at nuclear and apical attachments. Experiments are underway to examine the significance of these preliminary observations.

  19. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  20. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that AP