WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic vapor laser

  1. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisner, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique applicable to many elements. A major present application to the enrichement of uranium for lightwater power reactor fuel has been under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1973. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet future U.S. needs for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. Major features of the AVLIS process will be discussed with consideration of the process figures of merit.

  2. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude. PMID:17902946

  3. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  4. [Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program from January through July, 1992. Each of the tasks assigned during this period is described, and results are presented. Section I details work on sensitivity matrices for the UDS relay telescope. These matrices show which combination of mirror motions may be performed in order to effect certain changes in beam parameters. In Section II, an analysis is given of transmission through a clipping aperture on the launch telescope deformable mirror. Observed large transmission losses could not be simulated in the analysis. An EXCEL spreadsheet program designed for in situ analysis of UDS optical systems is described in Section III. This spreadsheet permits analysis of changes in beam first-order characteristics due to changes in any optical system parameter, simple optimization to predict mirror motions needed to effect a combination of changes in beam parameters, and plotting of a variety of first-order data. Optical systems may be assembled directly from OSSD data. A CODE V nonsequential model of the UDS optical system is described in Section IV. This uses OSSD data to build the UDS model; mirror coordinates may thus be verified. Section V summarizes observations of relay telescope performance. Possible procedures which allow more accurate assessment of relay telescope performance are given

  5. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of atomic vapor laser isotope separation [AVLIS] as the technology to meet the United States' future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. The authors discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques employed. The methodology adopted is illustrated with examples of other elements that are under study in the program. (author)

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program: laser technology and demonstration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a large-scale process for photophysically enriching isotopes of several elements. The program now deploys plant prototypical hardware to demonstrate this enrichment process at full scale. The Laser Demonstration Facility, a fully integrated laser system has been constructed and when complete will produce more than 5000 W of tunable average power at a pulse repetition frequency >10 kHz. In AVLIS, an atomic vapor of mixed isotopes is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to photoionize only desired isotopes. The resulting electrically charged photoions are deflected in an electric field to collector (or extractor) plates where they condense as enriched products. The AVLIS laser system consists of a series of high-average-power dye lasers optically pumped by an array of copper lasers. The dye lasers are used to do the three-step photoionization process. These lasers are well suited for the AVLIS process for both technical and economic reasons. They provide the precise narrowband (<100-MHz), short-pulse (<100-nsec), high-average-power, high-repetition-frequency laser light required by the atomic spectroscopy and vapor flow properties. Equally important, the capital and operating costs of this laser system in its present state of development are consistent with a commercially viable process deployment

  7. Dichroic atomic vapor laser lock with multi-gigahertz stabilization range

    CERN Document Server

    Pustelny, S; Sholtes, T; Budker, D

    2015-01-01

    A dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) system exploiting buffer-gas-filled millimeter-scale vapor cells is presented. This system offers similar stability as achievable with bulk vapor cells, but has several important advantages. In addition to its compactness, it may provide continuous stabilization in a multi-gigahertz range around the optical transition. This range may be controlled either by changing the temperature of the vapor or by application of a buffer gas under an appropriate pressure. In particular, we show that the DAVLL system with a buffer-gas cell enables locking the laser frequency between two hyperfine components of the $^{85}$Rb ground state or as far as 16 GHz away from the closest optical transition.

  8. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  9. Atom Interferometry in a Warm Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Biedermann, G W; Rakholia, A V; Jau, Y -Y; Wheeler, D R; Sterk, J D; Burns, G R

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate matterwave interference in a warm vapor of rubidium atoms. Established approaches to light pulse atom interferometry rely on laser cooling to concentrate a large ensemble of atoms into a velocity class resonant with the atom optical light pulse. In our experiment, we show that clear interference signals may be obtained without laser cooling. This effect relies on the Doppler selectivity of the atom interferometer resonance. This interferometer may be configured to measure accelerations, and we demonstrate that multiple interferometers may be operated simultaneously by addressing multiple velocity classes.

  10. Self-generating magnetometer with laser pumping employment in “end resonance” wall coated vapor cell atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of two double resonance signals correlation investigation. These signals were observed synchronously in optically oriented Rb87 vapors with laser pumping in a dual scheme: low frequency Mx-magnetometer and microwave frequency discriminator. Analytical studies of the scalar and vector light shift components contribution to the frequency instability of the end resonance microwave transitions are presented. An experimental demonstration of the light shift components mutual compensation in optically pumped Rb87 atoms was provided. The results were processed in terms of Allan variance, which demonstrated an effect of decreasing frequency variation at averaging times more than 100 s for a joint scheme of the end resonance microwave transition and selfgenerating (Mx) magnetometer.

  11. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of laser induced chemistry began in earnest early in the 1970's with the initiation of major efforts in laser isotope separation (LIS) of uranium. Though many specialized, small-scale photochemical and diagnostic applications have been identified and evaluated experimentally, and continue to show promise, currently the only high payoff, large-scale applications remain LIS of special elements. Aspects of the physical scaling, technology status and economic basis of uranium LIS are examined with special emphasis on the effort at LLNL

  12. Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Petko; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atoms in a thermal gas is usually described through a Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of energy, and assumes isotropy. As a consequence, the probability for an atom to leave the surface under an azimuth angle {\\theta} should evolve as cos {\\theta}, in spite of the fact that there is no microscopic basis to justify such a law. The contribution of atoms moving at a grazing incidence towards or from the surface, i.e. atoms with a small normal velocity, here called "slow" atoms, reveals essential in the development of spectroscopic methods probing a dilute atomic vapor in the vicinity of a surface, enabling a sub-Doppler resolution under a normal incidence irradiation. The probability for such "slow" atoms may be reduced by surface roughness and atom-surface interaction. Here, we describe a method to observe and to count these slow atoms relying on a mechanical discrimination, through spatially separated pump and probe beams. We also report on our experimental progresses toward such a g...

  13. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  14. Iron bromide vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  15. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs

  16. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  17. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    McCarron, Daniel J; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  18. A heated vapor cell unit for DAVLL in atomic rubidium

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm-long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field...

  19. Wide range and highly sensitive atomic magnetometry with Rb vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Iftiquar, S M

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a technique in which Rb atomic response to weak magnetic field is high and an efficient rotation of linearly polarized laser beam results in efficient magnetometry. 85Rb isotope has been used for the magnetometry in an ordinary vapor cell without any paraffin coating to its inner wall. A linear regime of Faraday rotation of about 25 microT has been observed with atomic number density within the vapor cell of about 10^9 cm-3.

  20. Atom laser divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Le Coq, Yann; Thywissen, Joseph H.; Rangwala, Sadiq A.; Gerbier, Fabrice; Richard, Simon; Delannoy, Guillaume; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We measure the angular divergence of a quasi-continuous, rf-outcoupled, free-falling atom laser as a function of the outcoupling frequency. The data is compared to a Gaussian-beam model of laser propagation that generalizes the standard formalism of photonic lasers. Our treatment includes diffraction, magnetic lensing, and interaction between the atom laser and the condensate. We find that the dominant source of divergence is the condensate-laser interaction.

  1. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs

  2. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkowski, Joseph J.; Hagans, Karla G.

    1994-03-01

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multilaser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of 238U ground and metastable states, 235U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL's LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode- lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  4. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  5. Metal atom oxidation laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  6. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor

  7. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  8. Analysis of laser beam propagation effects in atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the atomic laser isotope separation process, the laser beams propagate through the atomic vapor over a long distance. It has been shown that the laser-atom interactions significantly modify the laser pulse shape and propagation velocity, resulting in degradation of the isotope separation efficiency. These propagation effects have been analyzed quantitatively, and a simple scaling formula has been derived to estimate the necessary laser energy for such optically thick atomic vapor. The optimum conditions of incident laser pulse have also been discussed. (author)

  9. Guided Quasicontinuous Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Guerin, William; Riou, Jean-Félix; Gaebler, John,; Josse, Vincent; Bouyer, Philippe; Aspect, Alain

    2006-01-01

    version published in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 200402 (2006) International audience We report the first realization of a guided quasicontinuous atom laser by rf outcoupling a Bose-Einstein condensate from a hybrid optomagnetic trap into a horizontal atomic waveguide. This configuration allows us to cancel the acceleration due to gravity and keep the de Broglie wavelength constant at 0.5 µm during 0.1 s of propagation. We also show that our configuration, equivalent to pigtailing an optical f...

  10. Controlling atomic vapor density in paraffin-coated cells using light-induced atomic desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Karaulanov, T; English, D; Rochester, S M; Rosen, Y; Tsigutkin, K; Budker, D; Alexandrov, E B; Balabas, M V; Kimball, D F Jackson; Narducci, F A; Pustelny, S; Yashchuk, V V

    2008-01-01

    Atomic-vapor density change due to light induced atomic desorption (LIAD) is studied in paraffin-coated rubidium, cesium, sodium and potassium cells. In the present experiment, low-intensity probe light is used to obtain an absorption spectrum and measure the vapor density, while light from an argon-ion laser or discharge lamp is used for desorption. Potassium is found to exhibit significantly weaker LIAD from paraffin compared to Rb and Cs, and we were unable to observe LIAD with sodium. A simple LIAD model is applied to describe the observed vapor-density dynamics, and the role of the cell's stem is explored through the use of cells with lockable stems. The results of this work could be used to assess the use of LIAD for vapor-density control in magnetometers, clocks, and gyroscopes utilizing coated cells.

  11. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3

  12. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  13. Dispersive radio frequency electrometry using Rydberg atoms in a prism-shaped atomic vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. Q.; Kumar, S.; Kübler, H.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a method to measure radio frequency (RF) electric fields (E-fields) using atoms contained in a prism-shaped vapor cell. The method utilizes the concept of electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms. The RF E-field induces changes in the index of refraction of the vapor resulting in deflection of the probe laser beam as it passes through the prism-shaped vapor cell. We measured a minimum RF E-field of 8.25 μ {{Vcm}}-1 with a sensitivity of ∼ 46.5 μ {{Vcm}}-1 {{Hz}}-1/2. The experimental results agree with a numerical model that includes dephasing effects. We discuss possible improvements to obtain higher sensitivity for RF E-field measurements.

  14. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-01

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  15. Investigations on atomic-vapor-filter high-spectral-resolution lidar for temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, E.; Weitkamp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature measurement by the analysis of Rayleigh scattered laser radiation with atomic vapor filters is investigated in both theory and laboratory experiments. Synthetic air is irradiated with a cw dye laser at 283 nano-meters, and the backscattered spectrum is analyzed with two lead vapor cells in one oven. Temperature measurements are carried out, and the effect of different parameters on the accuracy is investigated. Important aspects for the realization of a lidar are given.

  16. Metal vapor lasers with increased reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Sabotinov, N. V.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Results of investigation and development of an excitation pulse generator with magnetic pulse compression by saturation chokes for pumping of active media of CuBr, Sr, and Ca vapor lasers are presented. A high-power IGBT transistor is used as a commutator. The generator can operate at excitation pulse repetition frequencies up to 20 kHz. The total average power for all laser lines of the CuBr laser pumped by this generator is ~6.0 W; it is ~1.3-1.7 W for the Sr and Ca lasers.

  17. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  18. Copper vapor laser place in the laser isotope separation program

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaire, P.; Maury, J.

    1994-01-01

    The French uranium enrichment program, SILVA (Séparation Isotopique par Laser de la Vapeur Atomique d'uranium), has chosen yet the Copper Vapor Laser (CVL) for dye laser pumping. CVL is the most efficient laser in the visible, for pulsed operation, and with a high repetition rate. Over 400W of average optical power is achived from one unit ; work is done under CEA/CILAS contract. A 120W laser, the ICL 100 is available on the market from CEA/CILAS. MTBF over 1000 h is specified. In MOPA (Maste...

  19. Modulation transfer spectroscopy in a lithium atomic vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-16

    We have investigated modulation transfer spectroscopy of D2 transitions of 7Li atoms in a vapor cell. The role of the intensity of the probe beam in the spectrum is important, we have seen unique characteristics of the signal in the crossover peak. In order to find the best signal for laser locking, the slope and frequency offset of the zero-crossing signal are determined. The dependence of the modulation transfer spectra on polarizations of pump and probe beam is demonstrated. The residual amplitude modulation in the system is also considered, and the distortion of the spectra due to the modulation is analyzed. It was found that the crossover peak is more suitable for frequency stabilization due to its better residual amplitude modulation compensation. PMID:27409886

  20. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  1. Copper vapor laser prospects in glaucoma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Arcady P.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Egorov, Alexey E.; Shaban, Naim; Ponomarev, Igor V.

    1996-05-01

    New advances of copper vapor laser (CVL-laser) have been studied. Two wavelength radiation of the laser (511 nm and 578 nm) gives deeper permeability into organic tissues. Besides, the short pulse prevents the warm relaxation of small vessels. The technical data of CVL-laser: operating regime -- pulse, pulse duration -- 20 ns, pulse frequency 15000 pulse/sec. The shutter works in intervals from 0.05 to 2.0 sec. The power varies in accordance with wavelength: 511 nm (green) -- 1.5 W, 578 nm (yellow) -- 1, 2 W. The diameter of coagulate may be different: 100, 150, 400, 1000 mkm. We chose CVL-laser 'Femta,' created by P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, for ophthalmological use. Thirty eight eyes of 37 patients with different types and stages of glaucoma were studied and treated with CVL-laser. The operations of photomydriasis, gonioplasty and trabeculoplasty have been performed. CVL- laser demonstrated efficient application in treatment of interior eye segment of glaucoma patients. The advantages and disadvantages of the CVL-laser application in glaucoma surgery were discussed.

  2. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  3. Investigation of odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yaqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Teaching and Research Section of Maths and Physics, Guangzhou Commanding Academy of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Guangzhou, 510440 (China); Wu, Zhenkun; Si, Jinhai; Yan, Lihe; Zhang, Yiqi; Yuan, Chenzhi; Sun, Jia [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Yanpeng, E-mail: ypzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We theoretically deduce the macroscopic symmetry constraints for arbitrary odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities in homogeneous media including atomic vapors for the first time. After theoretically calculating the expressions using a semiclassical method, we demonstrate that the expressions for third- and fifth-order nonlinear susceptibilities for undressed and dressed four- and six-wave mixing (FWM and SWM) in atomic vapors satisfy the macroscopic symmetry constraints. We experimentally demonstrate consistence between the macroscopic symmetry constraints and the semiclassical expressions for atomic vapors by observing polarization control of FWM and SWM processes. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations. -- Highlights: •The macroscopic symmetry constraints are deduced for homogeneous media including atomic vapors. •We demonstrate that odd-order nonlinear susceptibilities satisfy the constraints. •We experimentally demonstrate the deduction in part.

  4. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. High resolution field imaging with atomic vapor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the development of imaging techniques in atomic vapor cells. This is a relatively unexplored area, despite the ubiquitous use of imaging in experiments with ultracold atoms. Our main focus is in high resolution imaging of microwave near fields, for which there is currently no satisfactory established technique. We detect microwave fields through Rabi oscillations driven by the microwave on atomic hyperfine transitions. The technique can be easily modified to also i...

  7. Femtosecond laser fluorescence and propagation in very dense potassium vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, Y; Kokaj, J; Afrousheh, K; Nair, R; Mathew, J; Pichler, G

    2013-12-16

    Femtosecond (fs) laser propagation and fluorescence of dense potassium vapor was studied, and the spectral region around the first and the second doublets of the principal series lines of potassium atoms was investigated. In our search we did not observe the conical emission in the far field, although it was previously observed in the case of rubidium. We discuss the possible reason of this unexpected result. The fluorescence spectrum revealed Rb impurity resonance lines in emission due to the collisional redistribution from the K(4p) levels into the Rb(5p) levels. In the forward propagation of 400 nm femtosecond light we observed the molecular band red shifted from potassium second doublet. However, no molecular spectrum was observed when the mode-locked fs laser light was discretely tuned within the wings of the first resonance lines, at 770 nm. PMID:24514609

  8. Radio-frequency Electrometry Using Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells: Towards the Shot Noise Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Jahangiri, Akbar; Kuebler, Harald; Shaffer, James P.; 5. Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Stuttgart, Germany Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are a promising candidate for radio frequency (RF) electric field sensing. Our method uses electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in vapor cells to read out the effect that the RF electric field has on the Rydberg atoms. The method has the potential for high sensitivity (pV cm-1 Hz- 1 / 2) and can be self-calibrated. Some of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of RF electric field sensing from reaching the shot noise limit are the residual Doppler effect and the sensitivity of the optical read-out using the probe laser. We present progress on overcoming the residual Doppler effect by using a new multi-photon scheme and reaching the shot noise detection limit using frequency modulated spectroscopy. Our experiments also show promise for studying quantum optical effects such as superradiance in vapor cells using Rydberg atoms. This work is supported by DARPA, ARO, and NRO.

  9. Focusing Light Beams To Improve Atomic-Vapor Optical Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2010-01-01

    Specially designed focusing of light beams has been proposed as a means of improving the performances of optical buffers based on cells containing hot atomic vapors (e.g., rubidium vapor). There is also a companion proposal to improve performance by use of incoherent optical pumping under suitable conditions. Regarding the proposal to use focusing: The utility of atomic-vapor optical buffers as optical storage and processing devices has been severely limited by nonuniform spatial distributions of intensity in optical beams, arising from absorption of the beams as they propagate in atomic-vapor cells. Such nonuniformity makes it impossible to optimize the physical conditions throughout a cell, thereby making it impossible to optimize the performance of the cell as an optical buffer. In practical terms simplified for the sake of brevity, "to optimize" as used here means to design the cell so as to maximize the group delay of an optical pulse while keeping the absorption and distortion of the pulse reasonably small. Regarding the proposal to use incoherent optical pumping: For reasons too complex to describe here, residual absorption of light is one of the main impediments to achievement of desirably long group delays in hot atomic vapors. The present proposal is directed toward suppressing residual absorption of light. The idea of improving the performance of slow-light optical buffers by use of incoherent pumping overlaps somewhat with the basic idea of Raman-based slow-light systems. However, prior studies of those systems did not quantitatively answer the question of whether the performance of an atomic vapor or other medium that exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Raman gain is superior to that of a medium that exhibits EIT without Raman gain.

  10. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  11. Optical molasses, laser traps, and ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is dramatic progress in the demonstration of the mechanical effects of light on atoms. The laser cooling and stopping of atoms in an atomic beam were followed by the 3-D cooling and confinement of atoms with laser light. The authors survey the recent major experimental advances and try to point out some interesting physics that can be done in this newly accessible domain of gaseous atoms at low temperatures and possibly high densities

  12. Diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin - coated resonant vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, S N; Plekhanov, A I; Sorokin, V A; Yakovlev, A V

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the diffusion of Rb atoms in paraffin - coated resonant vapor cells. We have modeled the Rb diffusion both in the cell and in the coating, assuming that the main loss of Rb atoms is due to the physical absorption of the atoms by the glass substrate. It is demonstrated that the equilibrium atomic density in the cell is a monotonic function of the thickness of the paraffin coating: the density increases with an increase in the thickness of the coating. The diffusion coefficient for rubidium in paraffin thin films has been determined to be equal to 4,7*10^-7 cm^2/s. The results of the experiment might be useful for a better understanding of the details involved in the processes of the interaction of alkali atoms with a paraffin coating.

  13. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Lal, Amit

    2014-09-18

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  14. Laser manipulation of atoms and nanofabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurdík, Erich

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental interaction processes between atoms and photons are exploited to control external degrees of freedom of the atoms. Laser light, when properly tuned near an atomic resonance, exerts such forces that the atoms are repelled from or attracted to the regions with low light intensities. We use

  15. Trace direction of plutonium by three-step photoionization with a laser system pumped by a copper vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser photoionization has been used to detect trace amounts of plutonium. A high sensitivity and selectivity has been achieved by applying three-step excitation and ionization of the plutonium atoms with high pulse-repetition rates and additional mass determination by time-of-flight measurements. A laser system was developed which consists of a copper vapor laser pumping three dye lasers simultaneously. Samples containing between 1010 and 1012 atoms of 239Pu on Re filaments were measured yielding strong resonance signals with maximum ion count rates of several kHz at a vanishingly low background. A detection efficiency of 10-7 was determined allowing the detection of about 108 plutonium atoms in a sample. (orig.)

  16. Computer simulated rate processes in copper vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A computer model for metal vapor lasers has been developed which places emphasis on the change of excited state populations of the lasant through inelastic collisions and radiative interaction. Also included are an energy equation for the pumping electrons and rate equations for laser photon densities. Presented are results of calculations for copper vapor with a neon buffer over a range of conditions. General agreement with experiments was obtained.

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main effort in the field of Isotopic Separation Research and Development in France is devoted since 1985 to the 'SILVA' process. A structured organization has been set up, including the following elements: Specific Research and Development for all the functions and components of the process: this work is supported by numerous benches located in Saclay and Pierrelatte. Each bench is mainly devoted to one process function; regarding process and operating performances are optimized. Integrated Experiences in a Pilot facility. Qualified components are integrated in a pilot facility located in Saclay, the capacity of which is steadily increased. At each stage, complete separative experiments demonstrate the improvements attained. Focused Basic Research for each field, often linked with various and relatively original phenomenas. Models have been built up, supported by specific experiments and values attained for intrinsical parameters. An aggregated process performance computing code integrates all the models, possibly under simplified form. Technical, operating and economical data are gradually added. A general assessment will take place in the middle of the nineties with several technical demonstrations and a complete evaluation of the French AVLIS process

  18. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarcat, Noel; Lafon, Alain; Perves, Jean-Pierre; Rosengard, Alex; Sauzay, Guy

    1993-05-01

    France has developed a very complete nuclear industry, from mining to reprocessing and radwastes management, and now has a major electro-nuclear park, with 55 power reactors, supplying 75% of the nation's electricity and representing 32% of its energy requirements. The modern multinational EURODIF enrichment plant in Pierrelatte in the south of the country supplies these reactors with enriched uranium as well as foreign utilities (30% exports). It works smoothly and has continuously been improved to reduce operating costs and to gain flexibility and longevity. Investment costs will be recovered at the turn of the century. The plant will be competitive well ahead of an aging production park, with large overcapacity, in other countries. Meanwhile, world needs will increase only slightly during the next 15 years, apart from the Asian Pacific area, but many world governments are becoming well aware of the necessity to progressively resume nuclear energy development worldwide from the year 2000 on.

  19. Contact laser vaporization of the prostate for benign prostatic hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomella, Leonard G.; Lotfi, M. A.; Milam, Douglas F.; Albala, David; Reagan, Gary

    1994-05-01

    The contact laser applications for the removal of the enlarged prostate are distinctly different than the majority of non-contact Nd:YAG lasers that rely on coagulation necrosis and delayed sloughing. Contact Nd:YAG laser allows cutting, coagulation and vaporization of tissue with minimal penetration beyond the contact surface. Using the contact laser prostatectomy technique, the contact laser probe directly touches and immediately vaporizes the prostatic tissue under the probe. The net result is the immediate removal of the obstructing tissue, in a manner similar to the standard electrosurgical TURP. This immediate removal of tissue offers the patient treated with the contact laser the potential for decreased catheter time and a more rapid resolution of symptoms. Our initial experience suggests that the contact technique may be better suited for the smaller prostate gland (i.e. less than 30 gm). The contact laser may also be used for a procedure termed the `laser assisted TURP': a standard electrosurgical TURP is performed and the contact laser is used for hemostasis. Several investigators have reported non-randomized results of the contact technique with good outcomes. A prospective randomized trial of the contact laser prostatectomy vrs the electrosurgical TURP is underway. The contact laser vaporization of the prostate holds great promise for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hypertrophy: it is virtually bloodless and allows immediate visualization of the TUR defect.

  20. Coupling a thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Strongly interacting atom-cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom-cavity systems.

  1. Molybdenum atoms yield in pulse ultraviolet laser photolysis of Mo(CO)6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Musikhin, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the yield of molybdenum atoms in the process of ultraviolet laser pulse photo-dissociation of Mo(CO)6 vapor. Molybdenum atoms in a ground state were formed by the quenching of the electronically excited Mo atoms generated during photolysis and were detected using the resonance absorption at a wavelength of 386.41 nm. The effective quenching rates were measured in the presence of various bath gases.

  2. Laser pulse design for coherent laser control of potassium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xian-Zhou; Jia Guang-Rui; He Hai-Fang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the dynamics of coherent laser control of potassium atoms is studied by using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA).The calculation results of population transfer are presented with different laser fields. The results show that the population can be transferred to target state completely by a specially designed laser field.

  3. Modeling atomization processes in high-pressure vaporizing sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf D.

    The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of KIVA, a multidimensional computer code for the simulation of atomization and vaporization processes in the injection of a liquid through a round hole into a compressed gas, are described. KIVA is based on the blob-injection model of Reitz and Diwakar (1987), taking into account the effects of liquid inertia, surface tension, and the aerodynamic forces on the jet, as well as drop collision and coalescence and the effect of drops on turbulence in the gas. The predictions of KIVA for different injection regimes are compared with published experimental data in extensive graphs, and good agreement is demonstrated.

  4. Laser plasma channel formation in barium vapor based on superelastic heating of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational study of plasma channel formation kinetics in optically dense barium vapor irradiated by pulsed laser light tuned to the Ba I resonance transition at λ = 553.5 nm has been performed. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of atoms associative ionization, which then gain energy in superelastic collisions and initiate the avalanche ionization of atoms by electron impact. We have studied the influence of radiative transfer effects in cylindrically symmetric gas volume on the excitation kinetics of multilevel barium atoms, dynamics of absorption of laser radiation, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo in condition of competition between the ionizing and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms. (paper)

  5. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm

  6. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  7. Observation of nonlinear laser spectra of cold atoms in diffuse light

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wen-zhuo; Liu, Liang; Wang, Yu-zhu

    2009-01-01

    The recoil-induced resonances (RIR) and electromagnetic-induced absorption (EIA) are observed in an experiment of diffuse cooling of $^{87}$Rb atomic vapor in an integrating sphere. We measured the nonlinear spectra varying with detuning of the diffuse laser light, and study their mechanism in the diffuse-light pumped and laser-beam probed configuration. Their differences from nonlinear spectra of cold atoms in one-dimensional optical molasses and magneto-optical trap (MOT) are also discussed.

  8. Physical Simulation for Large-Bore Copper Vapor Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU De-Li; WANG Run-Wen; TAO Yong-Xiang

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the electric circuit differential equations and the nonlinear partial differential equations of kinetics,a kinetic model for a series of large-bore copper-vapor lasers is carried out. Through the consistent computational results the radial kinetic parameters such as the stimulating electric field and the plasma electron temperature are presented. The factors, which evidently influence the output power and the beam quality of the large-bore copper-vapor laser, are the buffer gas pressure and the charging voltage.

  9. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  10. Demonstration of a Tunable-Bandwidth White Light Interferometer using Anomalous Dispersion in Atomic Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, G S; Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the 'white-light cavity' has recently generated considerable research interest in the context of gravitational wave detection. Cavity designs are proposed using negative (or anomalous) dispersion in an intracavity medium to make the cavity resonate over a large range of frequencies and still maintain a high cavity build-up. This paper presents the first experimental attempt and demonstration of white-light effect in a meter long ring cavity using an intracavity atomic medium. The medium's negative dispersion is caused by bi-frequency Raman gain in an atomic vapor cell. Although the white light condition was not perfectly achieved and improvements in experimental control are still desirable, significantly broad cavity response over bandwidth greater than 20 MHz has been observed. These devices will have potential applications in new generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors.

  11. Diode Pumped Alkali Vapor Lasers - A New Pathway to High Beam Quality at High Average Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R H; Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Beach, R J

    2005-05-06

    Resonance-transition alkali-vapor lasers have only recently been demonstrated [1] but are already attracting considerable attention. Alkali-atom-vapor gain media are among the simplest possible systems known, so there is much laboratory data upon which to base performance predictions. Therefore, accurate modeling is possible, as shown by the zero- free-parameter fits [2] to experimental data on alkali-vapor lasers pumped with Ti:sapphire lasers. The practical advantages of two of the alkali systems--Rb and Cs--are enormous, since they are amenable to diode-pumping [3,4]. Even without circulating the gas mixture, these lasers can have adequate cooling built-in owing to the presence of He in their vapor cells. The high predicted (up to 70%) optical-to-optical efficiency of the alkali laser, the superb (potentially 70% or better) wall-plug efficiency of the diode pumps, and the ability to exhaust heat at high temperature (100 C) combine to give a power-scalable architecture that is lightweight. A recent design exercise [5] at LLNL estimated that the system ''weight-to-power ratio'' figure of merit could be on the order of 7 kg/kW, an unprecedented value for a laser of the 100 kW class. Beam quality is expected to be excellent, owing to the small dn/dT value of the gain medium. There is obviously a long way to go, to get from a small laser pumped with a Ti:sapphire or injection-seeded diode system (of near-perfect beam quality, and narrow linewidth) [1, 4] to a large system pumped with broadband, multimode diode- laser arrays. We have a vision for this technology-development program, and have already built diode-array-pumped Rb lasers at the 1 Watt level. A setup for demonstrating Diode-array-Pumped Alkali vapor Lasers (DPALs) is shown in Figure 1. In general, use of a highly-multimode, broadband pump source renders diode-array-based experiments much more difficult than the previous ones done with Ti:sapphire pumping. High-NA optics, short focal

  12. Hydrogen atom in a Laser-Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Liman, Muhammed S; Oyewumi, K J; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of hydrogen atom's eigenvalues in a quantum plasma as it interacts with electric field directed along $\\theta=\\pi$ and exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series and using Ehlotzky's approximation, we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to $\\mathcal{O}(r^4,\\alpha_0^9)$, we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by electric field, wit...

  13. Bose-Einstein condensation in a vapor of sodium atoms in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Pei-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at normal temperature (T=343K) has been observed because an electric field was first applied. There are two ways to achieve phase transition: lower the temperature of Bose gas or increase its density. This article provides more appropriate method: increase the voltage. In theory, 3s and 3p states of sodium are not degenerate, but Na may be polar atom doesnot conflict with quantum mechanics because it is hydrogen-like atom. Our innovation lies in we applied an electric field used for the orientation polarization. Na vapor was filled in a cylindrical capacitor. In order to determine the polarity of sodium, we measured the capacitance at different temperatures. If Na is non-polar atom, its capacitance should be independent of temperature because the nucleus of atom is located at the center of the electron cloud. But our experiment shows that its capacitance is related to temperature, so Na is polar atom. In order to achieve Na vapor phase transition, we measured the capacitance at different voltages. From the entropy of Na vapor S=0, the critical voltage Vc=68volts. When V0; when V>Vc, the atoms become aligned with the field Svapor entered quasi-vacuum state. We create a BEC with 2.506×1017 atoms, condensate fraction reached 98.9%. This is BEC in momentum space. Our experiment shows that if a Bose gas enters quasi-vacuum state, this also means that it underwent phase transition and generates BEC. Therefore, quasi-vacuum state of alkali gas is essentially large-scale BEC. This is an unexpected discovery. BEC and vacuum theory are two unrelated research areas, but now they are closely linked together. The maximum induced dipole moment dind≤7.8×10-15 e cm can be neglected. Ultra-low temperature is in order to make Bose gas phase transition, we achieve the phase transition by the critical voltage, so the ultra-low temperature is not necessary. According to the standard proposed by Ketterle, although we didn't use laser cooling atoms

  14. A slow gravity compensated atom laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine Büning, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.;

    2010-01-01

    We report on a slow guided atom laser beam outcoupled from a Bose–Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms in a hybrid trap. The acceleration of the atom laser beam can be controlled by compensating the gravitational acceleration and we reach residual accelerations as low as 0.0027 g. The outcoupling...... mechanism allows for the production of a constant flux of 4.5×106 atoms per second and due to transverse guiding we obtain an upper limit for the mean beam width of 4.6 μm. The transverse velocity spread is only 0.2 mm/s and thus an upper limit for the beam quality parameter is M 2=2.5. We demonstrate...... the potential of the long interrogation times available with this atom laser beam by measuring the trap frequency in a single measurement. The small beam width together with the long evolution and interrogation time makes this atom laser beam a promising tool for continuous interferometric measurements....

  15. Energy characteristics of a transverse-discharge copper vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artem' ev, A.Y.; Babeiko, Y.A.; Bakhtin, O.M.; Borovich, B.L.; Vasil' ev, L.A.; Gerts, V.E.; Nalegach, E.P.; Ratnikov, G.E.; Tatarintsev, L.V.; Ul' yanov, A.N.

    1980-09-01

    A study was made of the basic energy characteristics of a transverse-discharge copper vapor laser. The average laser output power in the yellow and green lasing components was determined as a function of the amplitude and repetition frequency of the excitation pulses, temperature of the discharge tube walls, and buffer gas pressure. The current-voltage characteristics of the discharge were investigated. An average laser output power of 75 W was obtained, at a pulse repetition frequency of 3 kHz.

  16. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  17. Laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ye XU; Wen-li WANG; Qing-hong ZHOU; Guo-hui LI; Hai-ling JIANG; Lin-fang CHEN; Jie YE; Zhi-hong ZHOU; Yin CAI; Hai-yao TANG; Min ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    The experiments on the laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms are reported, including the two-dimensional transversal cooling, longitudinal velocity Zeeman deceleration, and a magneto-optical trap with a broadband transition at a wavelength of 399 nm. The magnetic field distributions along the axis of a Zeeman slower were measured and in a good agreement with the calculated results. Cold ytterbium atoms were produced with a number of about 107 and a temperature of a few milli-Kelvin.In addition, using a 556-nm laser, the excitations of cold tterbium atoms at 1S0-3p1 transition were observed. The ytterbium atoms will be further cooled in a 556-nm magneto-optical trap and loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice to make an ytterbium optical clock.

  18. Laser beam propagation effects in atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of two different-color laser pulses in the resonant three-level medium is studied. The three-level Bloch-Maxwell equations are solved numerically to analyze the change of the pulse shapes and the time-varying atomic populations. The pulse delay and the pulse shape break-up are observed especially for the first excitation laser pulse. Complete separation of the two laser pulses occur from a certain critical distance. It is shown that the rapid decrease of the ionization efficiency is caused by the separation of the two laser pulses. (author)

  19. Phase dynamics in a binary-collisions atom laser scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Zobay, O.; Meystre, P.

    1997-01-01

    Various aspects of the phase dynamics of an atom laser scheme based on binary collisions are investigated. Analytical estimates of the influence of elastic atom-atom collisions on the laser linewidth are given, and linewidths achievable in a recently proposed atom laser scheme [Phys. Rev. A 56, 2989 (1997)] are evaluated explicitly. The extent to which a relative phase can be established between two interfering atom lasers, as well as the properties of that phase, are also investigated.

  20. Towards a random laser with cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, William; Michaud, Franck; Brivio, Davide; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S; Carminati, Rémi; Eremeev, Vitalie; Goetschy, Arthur; Skipetrov, Sergey S; Kaiser, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Atoms can scatter light and they can also amplify it by stimulated emission. From this simple starting point, we examine the possibility of realizing a random laser in a cloud of laser-cooled atoms. The answer is not obvious as both processes (elastic scattering and stimulated emission) seem to exclude one another: pumping atoms to make them behave as amplifier reduces drastically their scattering cross-section. However, we show that even the simplest atom model allows the efficient combination of gain and scattering. Moreover, supplementary degrees of freedom that atoms offer allow the use of several gain mechanisms, depending on the pumping scheme. We thus first study these different gain mechanisms and show experimentally that they can induce (standard) lasing. We then present how the constraint of combining scattering and gain can be quantified, which leads to an evaluation of the random laser threshold. The results are promising and we draw some prospects for a practical realization of a random laser wit...

  1. Narrow linewidth single laser source system for onboard atom interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Theron, Fabien; Carraz, Olivier; Renon, Geoffrey; Bidel, Yannick; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust laser system for atom interferometry based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser is presented. Thanks to an original stabilization architecture on a saturated absorption setup, we obtain a frequency-agile laser system allowing fast tuning of the laser frequency over 1 GHz in few ms using a single laser source. The different laser frequencies used for atom interferometry are generated by changing dynamically the frequency of the laser and by creating sidebands using a phase...

  2. Physico-technical background of metal vapor laser systems and their application in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armichev, A. V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Kazaryan, Mishik A.

    1996-01-01

    Some results of the copper and gold vapor lasers and of helium-cadmium lasers used in medical practice are presented. The most in medical use copper vapor laser is commonly applied for low-intensity laser therapy and endoscopic surgery. A universal capability of dye lasers oscillating in 600 - 670 red region for excitation of the preparates used in photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The copper vapor lasers are shown also to effectively coagulate pre- tumor neoplasms. A new method of laser beams shaping fitted to tumor configuration basing on quantum optical systems including image brightness amplifiers is described. Variability of the irradiating beam contrast is displayed, including the contrast inversion. Possibilities of the copper vapor lasers use for tumors drugless phototherapy and the two-step and two-stage methods of the photodynamic therapy are discussed. Some Russian medical systems based on the copper vapor lasers and dye lasers pumped by them are specified in parameters.

  3. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  4. Investigation on orientation, epitaxial growth and microstructure of a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ films prepared on (001), (110) and (111) SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Ying; Huang, Zhi liang; Mao, Yangwu; Xu, Yuan Lai

    2015-04-01

    a-axis-, c-axis-, (103)/(110)- and (113)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were pareared by spray atomizing and coprecipitating laser chemical vapor deposition. The surface of the a-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of rectangular needle-like grains whose in-plane epitaxial growth relationship was YBCO [100] // STO [001] (YBCO [001] // STO [100]), and that of the c-axis-oriented YBCO film consisted of dense flat surface with epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [001] // STO [001] (YBCO [100] //STO [100]). For the (103)/(110)-oriented and (113)-oriented YBCO film, they showed wedge-shaped and triangle-shaped grains, with corresponding in-plane epitaxial growth relationship of YBCO [110] // STO [110] (YBCO [010] // STO [010]) and YBCO [100] // STO [100] (YBCO [113] // STO [111], respectively.

  5. Enthalpy model for heating, melting, and vaporization in laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Alexiades

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser ablation is used in a growing number of applications in various areas including medicine, archaeology, chemistry, environmental and materials sciences. In this work the heat transfer and phase change phenomena during nanosecond laser ablation of a copper (Cu target in a helium (He background gas at atmospheric pressure are presented. An enthalpy model is outlined, which accounts for heating, melting, and vaporization of the target. As far as we know, this is the first model that connects the thermodynamics and underlying kinetics of this challenging phase change problem in a self-consistent way.

  6. Magnetically tuned, robust and efficient filtering system for spatially multimode quantum memory in warm atomic vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Dąbrowski, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Warm atomic vapor quantum memories are simple and robust, yet suffer from a number of parasitic processes which produce excess noise. For operating in a single-photon regime precise filtering of the output light is essential. Here we report a combination of magnetically tuned absorption and Faraday filters, both light-direction-insensitive, which stop the driving lasers and attenuate spurious fluorescence and four-wave mixing while transmitting narrowband Stokes and anti-Stokes photons generated in write-in and readout processes. We characterize both filters with respect to adjustable working parameters. We demonstrate a significant increase in the signal to noise ratio upon applying the filters seen qualitatively in measurements of correlation between the Raman-scattered photons.

  7. High Field Seeking State Atom Laser and Properties of Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lin; XIONG Wei; YANG Fan; YI Lin; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2008-01-01

    We present an experimental study on the continuous atom laser. The experiments show that a high field seeking state atom laser with stable flux can be formed by increasing the strength of outcoupling before large density fluctuations appear. It is easy to obtain a long length or high speed output with this kind of atom laser.

  8. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  9. Semiclassical treatment of laser excitation of the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billing, Gert D.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Leforestier, C.

    1992-01-01

    We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms.......We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms....

  10. Atom laser dynamics in a tight waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, A del; Lizuain, I; Muga, J G [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, UPV-EHU, Apartado. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Pons, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.I.T. de Minas y Obras Publicas, UPV-EHU, 48901 Barakaldo (Spain); Moshinsky, M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: adolfo.delcampo@ehu.es

    2008-02-15

    We study the transient dynamics that arise during the formation of an atom laser beam in a tight waveguide. The time dependent density profile develops a series of wiggles which are related to the diffraction in time phenomenon. The apodization of matter waves, which relies on the use of smooth aperture functions, allows to suppress such oscillations in a time interval, after which there is a revival of the diffraction in time. The revival time scale is directly related to the inverse of the harmonic trap frequency for the atom reservoir.

  11. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 1013 W cm-2 desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  12. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu., E-mail: kseniakhabarova@gmail.com; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise “All-Russia Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements” (VNIIFTRI) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  13. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  14. Simple and Compact Nozzle Design for Laser Vaporization Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kokish, M G; Odom, B C

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a compact transparent nozzle for use in laser vaporization sources. This nozzle eliminates the need for an ablation aperture, allowing for a more intense molecular beam. We use this nozzle to prepare a molecular beam of aluminum monohydride (AlH) suitable for ion trap loading of AlH$^+$ via photoionization in ultra-high vacuum. We demonstrate stable AlH production over hour time scales using a liquid ablation target. The long-term stability, low heat load and fast ion production rate of this source are well-suited to molecular ion experiments employing destructive state readout schemes requiring frequent trap reloading.

  15. Coherent manipulation of atoms using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal structure of a particle an atom or other quantum system in which the excitation energies are discrete undergoes change when exposed to pulses of near-resonant laser light. This tutorial review presents basic concepts of quantum states, of laser radiation and of the Hilbert-space state vector that provides the theoretical portrait of probability amplitudes the tools for quantifying quantum properties not only of individual atoms and molecules but also of artificial atoms and other quantum systems. It discusses the equations of motion that describe the laser-induced changes (coherent excitation), and gives examples of laser=pulse effects, with particular emphasis on two-state and three-state adiabatic time evolution within the rotating-wave approximation. It provides pictorial descriptions of excitation based on the Bloch equations that allow visualization of two-state excitation as motion of a three-dimensional vector (the Bloch vector). Other visualization techniques allow portrayal of more elaborate systems, particularly the Hilbert-space motion of adiabatic states subject to various pulse sequences. Various more general multilevel systems receive treatment that includes degeneracies, chains and loop linkages. The concluding sections discuss techniques for creating arbitrary pre-assigned quantum states, for manipulating them into alternative coherent superpositions and for analyzing an unknown superposition. Appendices review some basic mathematical concepts and provide further details of the theoretical formalism, including photons, pulse propagation, statistical averages, analytic solutions to the equations of motion, exact solutions of periodic Hamiltonians, and population-trapping 'dark' states. (author)

  16. Development of a single-mode dye laser pumped by a copper vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasushi; Niki, Hideaki; Adachi, Satoru; Takeda, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1986-10-01

    An efficient high power single mode dye laser was developed for a study of uranium enrichment. The oscillation and amplification properties were studied experimentally and theoretically. The obtained band width was narrower than 100 MHz. When rhodamine 6 G chloride was used, the average output power and efficiency of the oscillator-amplifier system were 300 mW and 5%, respectively, at 575 nm for the total copper vapor laser pumping power of 4 W.

  17. Formation of nanooctahedra in molybdenum disulfide and molybdenum diselenide using pulsed laser vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parilla, Philip A; Dillon, Anne C; Parkinson, Bruce A; Jones, Kim M; Alleman, Jeff; Riker, Gerald; Ginley, David S; Heben, Michael J

    2004-05-20

    Pulsed laser vaporization has been used to produce nanooctahedra of MoS2 and MoSe2. The nanooctahedra primarily form in two- or three-layer nested octahedra, although nesting up to five layers has been observed. Tilting the TEM sample stage and mapping how the images of single particles transformed provided the evidence to verify their octahedral geometry. Analysis of 30 two- and three-layered octahedra showed that their outer edge lengths clustered at approximately 3.8 nm and approximately 5.1 nm, respectively. This discreet sizing and the high symmetry of these closed nanooctahedra represent the closest inorganic analogy yet to the carbon fullerenes. The geometrical implications for forming octahedra from these layered compounds are investigated by considering different atomic arrangements assuming either trigonal prismatic or octahedral coordination around the Mo atom and yields two possible configurations for the actual structure of the nanooctahedra. A preliminary survey of pulsed laser vaporization of other layered metal chalcogenides shows that these dichalcogenides differ in their tendency to form small closed layered fullerene-like structures. These materials can be ranked from highest tendency to lowest as follows: NbSe2, WS2, WSe2, SnS2, TaS2, GaS, ReS2, and MoTe2. PMID:18950101

  18. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  19. Investigation of the lasing characteristics of a barium vapor laser with pulse repetition frequencies up to 320 kHz for navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2015-11-01

    Results of experimental investigations into the characteristics of a laser on self-terminating transitions of the barium atom with λ = 1499 nm are presented for high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF). The frequency-energy characteristics are investigated in the self-heating mode of laser operation. Record values of PRF for the barium vapor laser, equal to ~320 kHz, have been attained.

  20. Atom interferometric gravitational wave detection using heterodyne laser links

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme based on a heterodyne laser link that allows for long baseline gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry. While the baseline length in previous atom-based proposals is constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated as it propagates between two satellites, here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

  1. Dressed Gain from the Parametrically Amplified Four-Wave Mixing Process in an Atomic Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wen, Feng; Che, Junling; Zhang, Dan; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-10-01

    With a forward cone emitting from the strong pump laser in a thermal rubidium atomic vapor, we investigate the non-degenerate parametrically amplified four-wave mixing (PA-FWM) process with dressing effects in a three-level “double-Λ” configuration both theoretically and experimentally. By seeding a weak probe field into the Stokes or anti-Stokes channel of the FWM, the gain processes are generated in the bright twin beams which are called conjugate and probe beams, respectively. However, the strong dressing effect of the pump beam will dramatically affect the gain factors both in the probe and conjugate channels, and can inevitably impose an influence on the quantum effects such as entangled degree and the quantum noise reduction between the two channels. We systematically investigate the intensity evolution of the dressed gain processes by manipulating the atomic density, the Rabi frequency and the frequency detuning. Such dressing effects are also visually evidenced by the observation of Autler-Townes splitting of the gain peaks. The investigation can contribute to the development of quantum information processing and quantum communications.

  2. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author)

  3. Prediction of enthalpy and standard Gibbs energy of vaporization of haloaromatics from atomic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, M J S; Almeida, A R R P; Liebman, J F

    2015-11-01

    Halogenated benzenes form a class of pollutants with a huge number of members - 1504 distinct benzene compounds, where one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by halogens, may exist theoretically. This study presents a user friendly method for accurate prediction of vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization, at 298.15 K, of any mono or poly halobenzene compound. The derived equations for the prediction of those vaporization properties depend just on the number of each constituent halogen atom. This is a consequence of the absence of intramolecular interactions between the halogen atoms, revealed after examining vaporization results of ca. 40 halogenated benzenes. In order to rationalize the estimation equations, the contribution of the halogen atoms for the referred to above properties of vaporization was decomposed into two atomic properties - the volume and electron affinity. Extension of the applicability of the estimation method to substituted benzenes containing other substituent groups beyond halogen atoms as well as to some polycyclic aromatic species was tested with success.

  4. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  5. An 80-W Laser Diode Array with 0.1 nm Linewidth for Rubidium Vapor Laser Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zi-Ning; WANG Hong-Yan; LU Qi-Sheng; HUA Wei-Hong; XU Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity.At a maximal driven current of 90 A,the device produces a cw output of 80 W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm.The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case.The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature.The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383K is demonstrated.Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) have attracted much attention and have developed quickly in recent years due to their great potential in the high power laser field.[1-4] The efficient operation of DPALs requires pump sources with a linewidth that matches the pressure-broadened absorption band of alkali atoms.In moderate (~5 atm buffer gas) and low (~1 atm buffer gas) pressure operating regimes,the required pump linewidths should be 0.4 nm and less than 0.1 nm,respectively,[5] while the typical linewidth of commercial laser diode arrays (LDAs) is 2-4 nm.%The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity. At a maximal driven current of 90 A, the device produces a cw output of80W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm. The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case. The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature. The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150 Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383 K is demonstrated.

  6. Industrial aspects of precision machining with copper vapor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Koch, Juergen; Lang, Adolf; Schutte, Karsten; Bergmann, Hans W.

    1997-08-01

    The applications of conventional infrared lasers running cw or quasi-sw for drilling, cutting and shaping are limited in the precision achievable due to the long interaction time which leads to heat affected zones. The necessity to use a gas jet to blow the molten material out of the cut kerf will damage fragile workpieces like thin foils. Short laser pulses of sufficient intensity remove the material directly by evaporation and minimize the amount of heat transferred into the solid. Classical infrared laser sources generate a shielding air plasma within some ns at power densities above some 107W/cm2. The optical breakdown threshold value in air can be shifted to higher intensities by using visible light as well as reducing the focal diameter. An alternative way is to shorten the pulse duration to less than 10 ps that a plasma is generated only after the pulse. Thus, the material removal process begins after the deposition of the pulse energy into the material. But such short pulses will generate a pressure wave due to the sudden thermal expansion and can damage or destroy microscopic components. For industrial production the productivity is a further aspect. Hence, a certain mean power is required in order to obtain the desired production rate. Considering the above aspects, copper vapor lasers (CVLs) with ns pulse duration are well suited for precision machining of metals and ceramics. Processing with CVLs is an advantage in that its wavelength is highly absorbed by metallic targets and the probability for the optical breakdown in air is low. CVLs in an oscillator-amplifier-setup incorporate diffraction limited beam quality and high average power. The present paper outlines the potential of the CVL for the industrial use regarding high processing speed and precision. Under these aspects the limiting mechanisms on the material removal process and the necessary processing strategies for scaling up the productivity are shown. The relevant laser parameters for

  7. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Balabanski, Dimiter L.; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ sta...

  8. Measuring the quantum statistics of an atom laser beam

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, A. S.; Olsen, M. K.; Haine, S. A.; Hope, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We propose and analyse a scheme for measuring the quadrature statistics of an atom laser beam using extant optical homodyning and Raman atom laser techniques. Reversal of the normal Raman atom laser outcoupling scheme is used to map the quantum statistics of an incoupled beam to an optical probe beam. A multimode model of the spatial propagation dynamics shows that the Raman incoupler gives a clear signal of de Broglie wave quadrature squeezing for both pulsed and continuous inputs. Finally, ...

  9. Research and development prospects for the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Research report 442

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities are being conducted on many aspects of the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Extensive laser spectroscopy studies have been made in order to identify attractive multi-step selective ionization schemes. Using low density (1010 atoms/cm3) apparatus, the excited state spectra of atomic uranium have been investigated via multiple step laser excitation and photoionization studies using two, three and four pulsed lasers. Observation of the spectra was accomplished by observing the yield of 235U and 238U ions as a function of the wavelength, intensities and delays of the various lasers. These data yielded information on the photoexcitation and photoionizatin cross sections, and on the location, J values, lifetimes, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the various atomic levels of uranium. Experiments on selective ionization of uranium vapor by multiple step laser excitation followed by ion extraction at 1013 atoms/cm3 density have produced 6% enriched 235U. These indicate that this process is well adapted to produce light water reactor fuel but less suitable for highly enriched material. Application has been made for license for a 1979 experimental facility to provide data for a mid-1980 commercial plant

  10. Quasi-dynamical analysis and real-time tissue temperature monitoring during laser vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ray, Aditi; Jebens, Dave; Chia, Ray; Hasenberg, Tom

    2014-03-01

    Vaporization and coagulation are two fundamental processes that can be performed during laser-tissue ablation. We demonstrated a method allowing quasi-dynamically observing of the cross-sectional images of tissue response during ablation. The results showed that coagulation depth is relatively constant during vaporization, which supports the excellent hemostasis of green laser benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. We also verified a new technology for real-time, in situ tissue temperature monitoring, which may be promising for in vivo tissue vaporization degree feedback during laser ablation to improve the vaporization efficiency and avoid complications.

  11. Gas and metal vapor lasers and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 22, 23, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    Various papers on gas and metal vapor lasers and applications are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-power copper vapor laser development, modified off-axis unstable resonator for copper vapor laser, industrial applications of metal vapor lasers, newly developed excitation circuit for kHz pulsed lasers, copper vapor laser precision processing, development of solid state pulse power supply for copper vapor laser, multiple spectral structure of the 578.2-nm line for copper vapor laser, adsorption of bromine in CuBr laser, processing of polytetrafluoroethylene with high-power VUV laser radiation, characterization of a subpicosecond XeF(C - A) excimer laser, X-ray preionization for high-repetition-rate discharge excimer lasers. Also discussed are: investigation of microwave-pumped excimer and rare-gas laser transitions, influence of gas composition of XeCl laser performance, output power stabilization of a XeCl excimer laser by HCl gas injection, excimer laser machining of optical fiber taps, diagnostics of a compact UV-preionized XeCl laser with BCl3 halogen donor, blackbody-pumped CO32 lasers using Gaussian and waveguide cavities, chemical problems of high-power sealed-off CO lasers, laser action of Xe and Ne pumped by electron beam, process monitoring during CO2 laser cutting, double-pulsed TEA CO2 laser, superhigh-gain gas laser, high-power ns-pulse iodine laser provided with SBS mirror. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  12. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  13. Soliton Atom Laser with Quantum State Transfer Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiong-Jun; JING Hui; GE Mo-Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the nonlinear effects in the quantum states transfer technique from photons to matter waves in the three-level case, which may provide the formation of a soliton atom laser with nonclassical atoms. The validity of quantum transfer mechanism is confirmed in the presence of the intrinsic nonlinear atomic interactions. The accompanied frequency chirp effect is shown to have no influence on the grey solitons formed by the output atom laser and the possible quantum depletion effect is also briefly discussed.

  14. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Wook; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2009-01-01

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light...

  15. Experimental system for the storage of light in atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, A.; Fleischhauer, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Phillips, D. F.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a recently reported experiment (D. F. Phillips, A. Fleischhauer, A. Mair, R. L. Walsworth, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 4783 (2001)., we reversibly stored a light pulse in a Zeeman (spin) coherence of Rb vapor for times ~ 0.5 ms. In this experiment, the Rb is warmed slightly above room temperature ( ~ 80^circC) and constrained by a buffer gas of a few torr of He. Experimental details of this light storage system will be presented.

  16. Atomic mercury vapor inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vogl, Ulrich; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high atomic mercury vapor pressure in a kagom\\'e-style hollow-core photonic crystal fiber at room temperature. After a few days of exposure to mercury vapor the fiber is homogeneously filled and the optical depth achieved remains constant. With incoherent optical pumping from the ground state we achieve an optical depth of 114 at the $6^3P_2 - 6^3D_3$ transition, corresponding to an atomic mercury number density of $6 \\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. The use of mercury vapor in quasi one-dimensional confinement may be advantageous compared to chemically more active alkali vapor, while offering strong optical nonlinearities in the ultraviolet region of the optical spectrum.

  17. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  18. Size control of vapor bubbles on a silver film by a tuned CW laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A vapor bubble is created by a weakly focused continuous-wave (CW laser beam on the surface of a silver film. The temporal dynamics of the bubble is experimentally investigated with a tuned incident laser. The expansion and contraction rates of the vapor bubble are determined by the laser power. The diameter of the vapor bubble can be well controlled through tuning the laser power. A theory model is given to explain the underlying physics in the process. The method reported will have some interesting applications in micro-fluidics and bio-techniques.

  19. [The physics of laser polarized muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This past research period we carried out a successful experiment at LAMPF in collaboration with Syracuse University in which we used lasers to produce polarized muonic 3He. Samples of nuclear polarized 3He were produced by spin-exchange with optically pumped rubidium vapor. Unpolarized muons were stopped in the gas, and became polarized due to their hyperfine interaction with the 3He nucleus. We determined that a muon polarization of ∼8% results with a 3He target polarization of 100%. The high statistical accuracy of our result gives us a firm handle on a theoretical question of great importance to future work involving muons and polarized 3He. Currently, we are working toward a new experiment at LAMPF, for which we have just submitted a proposal requesting running time this coming summer. The experiment utilizes a new technique for producing polarized muonic 3He, a technique we believe has the potential for producing practical polarizations that in principle could be as high as 75%, and in practice may exceed 25--50%. We call this new technique direct spin-exchange (DSE) because it is based on spin-exchange collisions between neutral muonic helium and an optically pumped vapor of Rb. It is direct because, in contrast to the technique we used last summer, the 3He nucleus is not involved in the spin-exchange process. We have proposed the use of DSE to study the induced pseudoscalar form factor of 3He. Finally, we describe an experiment to measure the spin dependent structure function of the neutron at SLAC. Princeton played an important role in the design and proposal of this experiment, including hosting a meeting to explore the technical feasibility of the polarized 3He target

  20. Ion generation by laser and its application to metal vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomena of ion generation from laser-heated metallic targets are studied. The interest of this experiment is to know quantitatively the number of ions from targets with various elements and at the various stages of laser power. The pressure change in vacuum in the instance of plasma production is another important phenomenon. An application of laser plasma to the metal vapor ion-laser is considered. The experimental set-up is shown. The amount of ions and the energy were measured with a time-of-flight ion collector. The energy spectra of ions were analyzed with an electrostatic deflector. The pressure change in vacuum was measured with a vacuum gauge and a quadrupole mass filter. For ion generation, three different lasers were used. A flash-lamp pumped dye laser with rhodamine-6G emitted the energy up to 1 joule at wavelength of about 0.6 μm. Two TEA type CO2 lasers emitted the energy up to 1 joule and 15 joule at 10.6 μm with the pulse width of 80 ns and 0.3 μs. The time integrated ion current from Cd and Cu targets heated by the rhodamine-6G dye laser was measured as a function of laser energy. The Cd ion-laser oscillation by laser-produced plasma was observed. The intensity of radiation at the wavelength of 5378 A was measured as a function of the pumping CO2 laser power. The gain coefficient was about one order of magnitude as high as compared with electrical discharge-pumped He-Cd laser. (Kato, T.)

  1. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  2. Narrow linewidth single laser source system for onboard atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Theron, Fabien; Renon, Geoffrey; Bidel, Yannick; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    We present an original compact and robust laser system for atom interferometry based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser. Thanks to an original stabilization architecture on a saturated absorption, we obtain a frequency agile laser system allowing fast tuning of the laser frequency over 1 GHz in few ms using only a single laser source. The different laser frequencies used for atom interferometry are created by changing dynamically the frequency of the laser and by creating sidebands using a phase modulator. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup compact, much less sensitive to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. This source provides spectral linewidth below 2.5 kHz required for precision atom interferometry, and particularly for an high performance atomic inertial sensor.

  3. Loading a vapor cell magneto-optic trap using light-induced atom desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, B P

    2000-01-01

    Low intensity white light was used to increase the loading rate of $^{87}$Rb atoms into a vapor cell magneto-optic trap by inducing non-thermal desorption of Rb atoms from the stainless steel walls of the vapor cell. An increased Rb partial pressure reached a new equilibrium value in less than 10 seconds after switching on the broadband light source. After the source was turned off, the partial pressure returned to its previous value in $1/e$ times as short as 10 seconds.

  4. Laser vaporization of extravasation type of mucocele of the lower lip with 940-nm diode laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old male presented with an asymptomatic swelling of the lower labial mucosa. Examination revealed that the tip of maxillary canine was causing trauma on the affected side. A diagnosis of extravasation type of mucocele was established clinically. Vaporization of the mucocele was done with a 940-nm diode laser in contact mode. The lesion healed uneventfully and there has been no recurrence for 3 months.

  5. Laser vaporization of extravasation type of mucocele of the lower lip with 940-nm diode laser

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, G; Mehra, A.; A Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with an asymptomatic swelling of the lower labial mucosa. Examination revealed that the tip of maxillary canine was causing trauma on the affected side. A diagnosis of extravasation type of mucocele was established clinically. Vaporization of the mucocele was done with a 940-nm diode laser in contact mode. The lesion healed uneventfully and there has been no recurrence for 3 months.

  6. Laser vaporization of extravasation type of mucocele of the lower lip with 940-nm diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G; Mehra, A; Agarwal, A

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with an asymptomatic swelling of the lower labial mucosa. Examination revealed that the tip of maxillary canine was causing trauma on the affected side. A diagnosis of extravasation type of mucocele was established clinically. Vaporization of the mucocele was done with a 940-nm diode laser in contact mode. The lesion healed uneventfully and there has been no recurrence for 3 months. PMID:23965466

  7. Cold atom dynamics in crossed laser beam waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Torrontegui, E; Ruschhaupt, A; Guéry-Odelin, D; Muga, J G

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics of neutral cold atoms in an $L$-shaped crossed-beam optical waveguide formed by two perpendicular red-detuned lasers of different intensities and a blue-detuned laser at the corner. Complemented with a vibrational cooling process this setting works as a one-way device or "atom diode".

  8. Laser-Focused Atomic Deposition for Nanascale Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yan; LI Tong-Bao; WU Wen; XIAO Yi-Li; ZHANG Ping-Ping; GONG Wei-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Laser-focused atomic deposition is a technique with which nearly resonant light is used to pattern an atom beam.To solve the problem that the result of laser-cooled atoms cannot be monitored during the 30-rmin depositing time,we present a three-hole mechanically precollimated aperture apparatus.A 425 nm laser light standing wave is used to focus a beam of chromium atoms to fabricate the nanoscale grating. The period of the grating is 213(+-)0.1 nm,the height is 4nm and the full width at half miximum is 64(+-)6nm.

  9. Study of Rb - vapor coated cell; atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    CERN Document Server

    Atutov, S N; Plekhanov, A I; Sorokin, V A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the study of an optical resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating, using geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. Anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  10. On the transverse mode of an atom laser

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, Th.; Köhl, M.; Esslinger, T.; Molmer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The transverse mode of an atom laser beam that is outcoupled from a Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated and is found to be strongly determined by the mean--field interaction of the laser beam with the condensate. Since for repulsive interactions the geometry of the coupling scheme resembles an interferometer in momentum space, the beam is found show filamentation. Observation of this effect would prove the transverse coherence of an atom laser beam.

  11. Multiphoton resonance ionization for hydrogen atom in laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Schroedinger equation of hydrogen atom in laser field is expanded by Floquet wave and can be solved by the iterative method. The atomic ionization by laser field is a complex eigenvalue problem, which is formed from differential equation and boundary condition. Then the formula of the multiphoton resonance ionization in a linear polarization laser field was obtained and it is compared with the experiment

  12. The linewidth of a non-Markovian atom laser

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, J. J.; Moy, G. M.; Collett, M. J.; Savage, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    We present a fully quantum mechanical treatment of a single mode atom laser including pumping and output coupling. By ignoring atom-atom interactions, we have solved this model without making the Born-Markov approximation. We find substantially less gain narrowing than is predicted under that approximation.

  13. Introduction to the theory of laser-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mittleman, Marvin H

    1993-01-01

    In response to the explosion of theories and experiments since the appearance of the first edition, the author has revised and expanded his basic text New sections include up-to-date discussions of multiphoton ionization, and electron-atom and atom-atom scattering in laser fields, reaffirming the work's position as the standard introduction to the field

  14. Vapor generation – atomic spectrometric techniques. Expanding frontiers through specific-species preconcentration. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Raúl A.; Pacheco, Pablo H.; Cerutti, Soledad [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Martinez, Luis D., E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina)

    2015-05-22

    This article reviews 120 articles found in SCOPUS and specific Journal cites corresponding to the terms ‘preconcentration’; ‘speciation’; ‘vapor generation techniques’ and ‘atomic spectrometry techniques’ in the last 5 years. - Highlights: • Recent advances in vapor generation and atomic spectrometry were reviewed. • Species-specific preconcentration strategies after and before VG were discussed. • New preconcentration and speciation analysis were evaluated within this framework. - Abstract: We review recent progress in preconcentration strategies associated to vapor generation techniques coupled to atomic spectrometric (VGT-AS) for specific chemical species detection. This discussion focuses on the central role of different preconcentration approaches, both before and after VG process. The former was based on the classical solid phase and liquid–liquid extraction procedures which, aided by automation and miniaturization strategies, have strengthened the role of VGT-AS in several research fields including environmental, clinical, and others. We then examine some of the new vapor trapping strategies (atom-trapping, hydride trapping, cryotrapping) that entail improvements in selectivity through interference elimination, but also they allow reaching ultra-low detection limits for a large number of chemical species generated in conventional VG systems, including complete separation of several species of the same element. This review covers more than 100 bibliographic references from 2009 up to date, found in SCOPUS database and in individual searches in specific journals. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this field.

  15. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  16. [The Measuring Method of Atomic Polarization of Alkali Metal Vapor Based on Optical Rotation and the Analysis of the Influence Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hui-ning; Quan, Wei; Chen, Yao; Li, Yang; Li, Hong

    2016-02-01

    High sensitivity measurements of inertia and magnetic field could be achieved by utilizing a category of devices, which manipulate the atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. The alkali cell which contains the alkali metal vapor is used to sense magnetic field and inertia. The atomic number density of alkali vapor and the polarization of alkali metal vapor are two of the most important parameters of the cell. They play an important role in the research on atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. Besides, optical polarization plays an important role in quantum computing and atomic physics. We propose a measurement of alkali vapor polarization and alkali number density by detecting the optical rotation in one system. This method simplifies existing experimental equipment and processes. A constant bias magnetic field is applied and the Faraday rotation angle is detected by a bunch of the probe beam to deduce alkali-metal density. Then the magnetic field is closed and a bunch of the pump laser is utilized to polarize alkali-metal. Again, the probe beam is utilized to obtain the polarization of alkali metal. The alkali density obtained at first is used to deduce the polarization. This paper applies a numerical method to analyze the Faraday rotation and the polarization rotation. According to the numerical method, the optimal wavelength for the experiment is given. Finally, the fluctuation of magnetic field and wavelength on signal analysis are analyzed. PMID:27209720

  17. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Chenli Gan

    2005-01-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atomfield interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L <λ/4) in experiments.

  18. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  19. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  20. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms with tunable laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of experiments on optical pumping of vapors of a mixture of rubidium isotopes is performed using diode lasers tunable in the vicinity of the D1-line. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of vapors changes drastically under laser irradiation tuned to certain components of the hyperfine structure of the D1-line. The absorption spectrum exhibits narrow peaks and holes related to the velocity-selective optical pumping and cross resonances. By using pulsed pumping across the magnetic field, Larmor oscillations of absorption are induced for a probe beam directed across the magnetic field

  1. Cooling of rubidium atoms in pulsed diffuse laser light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua-Dong; Wang Xu-Cheng; Xiao Ling; Zhang Wen-Zhuo; Liu Liang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment on laser cooling of 87Rb atoms in pulsed diffuse light, which is the key step towards a compact cold atom clock. It deduces an empirical formula to simulate the pulse cooling process based on the loading of cold atoms in cooling time and the loss in the dead time, which is in agreement with the experimental data. The formula gives a reference to select the parameters for the cold atom clock.

  2. Measuring the quantum statistics of an atom laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, A S; Hope, J J; Olsen, M K

    2006-01-01

    We propose and analyse a scheme for measuring the quadrature statistics of an atom laser beam using extant optical homodyning and Raman atom laser techniques. Reversal of the normal Raman atom laser outcoupling scheme is used to map the quantum statistics of an incoupled beam to an optical probe beam. A multimode model of the spatial propagation dynamics shows that the Raman incoupler gives a clear signal of de Broglie wave quadrature squeezing for both pulsed and continuous inputs. Finally, we show that experimental realisations of the scheme may be tested with existing methods via measurements of Glauber's intensity correlation function.

  3. Light scattering studies of solids and atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, T.C.

    1978-09-01

    The general technique of light scattering and luminescence was used to study the properties of a number of material systems. First, multi-phonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one- and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ crystals with x < or = 0.23 were investigated. Second, the observation of one-phonon resonant Raman scattering in HfS/sub 2/ is reported. The result is used to determine the position of the direct gap of HfS/sub 2/. Third, the first observation of the ..pi..-polarized one-magnon luminescence sideband of the /sup 4/T/sub lg/ (/sup 4/G) ..-->.. /sup 6/A/sub lg/(/sup 6/S) excitonic transition in antiferromagnetic MnF/sub 2/ is presented. An effective temperature of the crystal is deduced from the simultaneously observed anti-Stokes sideband emission. Multi-magnon (< or = 7) excitonic luminescence sidebands were also observed in MnF/sub 2/, KMnF/sub 2/, and RbMnF/sub 3/ using pulsed excitation and detection. A simple model based on two-ion local exchange is proposed to explain the results qualitatively. Fourth, the first observation of two-magnon resonant Raman scattering in MnF/sub 2/ around the magnon sidebands is reported. A simple theoretical description explains the experimental observations. Fifth, a detailed theory of exciton-exciton interaction in MnF/sub 2/ is developed to explain and to predict the experimental results on two-exciton absorption, high level excitation, and exciton--exciton scattering. Sixth, Brillouin scattering was used to obtain the five independent elastic constants of the layered compound GaSe. The results show clear elastic anisotropy of the crystal. Resonant Brillouin scattering near the absorption edge was also studied, but no resonant enhancement was found. Seventh, two-photon parametric scattering in sodium vapor was studied. Phase matching angles and scattering cross sections are calculated for a given set of experimental conditions.

  4. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  5. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  6. Note: A novel and robust circuit for jitter reduction in copper vapor laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R. K.; Raju, D. V. S.; Nakhe, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel circuit scheme is presented to improve timing jitter performance of high voltage pulse power supply utilizing semiconductor switches and magnetic pulse compressors, for pumping pulsed copper vapor lasers. The circuit effectively handles reflected energy from the laser load and achieves better jitter performance. The proposed circuit scheme had typical jitter value of ±2 ns whereas the standard circuit used earlier had jitter of more than ±10 ns under similar conditions. Performance of the circuit scheme is studied on a copper vapor laser operating at average laser power of 40 W.

  7. Electron-atom scattering in a circularly polarized laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Cionga, Aurelia; Zloh, Gabriela; 10.1103/PhysRevA.61.063417

    2013-01-01

    We consider electron-atom scattering in a circularly polarized laser field at sufficiently high electron energies, permitting to describe the scattering process by the first order Born approximation. Assuming the radiation field has sufficiently moderate intensities, the laser-dressing of the hydrogen target atom in its ground state will be treated in second order perturbation theory. Within this approximation scheme, it is shown that the nonlinear differential cross sections of free-free transitions do neither depend on the {\\it dynamical phase} $\\phi$ of the radiative process nor on the {\\it helicity} of the circularly polarized laser light. Relations to the corresponding results for linear laser polarization are established.

  8. Ionization characteristics of three-level atoms by nonmonochromatic lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization characteristics of two-step excitation by two intense nonmonochromatic (finite bandwidth) lasers are investigated. By approximating the laser fields by a stochastic model of a chaotic field, the stochastic atomic-density-matrix equations for three-level atoms are first obtained. Comparing with the analytical solution, the accuracy of our model is confirmed. By using this model, the ionization characteristics are studied in detail as a function of laser bandwidth. The dependence of laser bandwidth on the Doppler averaged ionization probability is also investigated. (author)

  9. Experiments with a laser cooled cloud of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Vasant; Banerjee, Ayan; Rapol, Umakant

    1999-01-01

    We discuss two experiments that can be performed using a cloud of laser-cooled and trapped atoms, namely Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and search for a permanent Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). BEC can be observed in Rb atoms in a magnetic trap by using forced evaporative cooling to continuously lower the temperature below the condensation limit. The cloud is cooled by preferentially ejecting the hottest atoms from a magnetic trap. The magnetic trap is loaded with laser-cooled atoms from a m...

  10. Saturation of atomic transitions using sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers in rubidium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D E; Pittman, T B

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate ultralow-power saturation of the rubidium D2 transitions using a tapered optical fiber (TOF) suspended in a warm Rb vapor. A direct comparison of nonlinear absorption measurements for the TOF system with those obtained in a standard free-space vapor cell system highlights the differences in saturation behavior for the two systems. The effects of hyperfine pumping in the TOF system are found to be minimized due to the short atomic transit times through the highly confined evanescent optical mode guided by the TOF. The TOF system data is well-fit by a relatively simple empirical absorption model that indicates nanoWatt-level saturation powers.

  11. Comparison of the treatment of vascular lesions with the copper-vapor laser and flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Waner, Milton; McGrew, Ben; Colvin, G. B.; Montague, Donna

    1992-08-01

    Vascular lesions such as port-wine stains and telangiectases are sometimes treated with carbon-dioxide lasers, argon lasers or argon-pumped dye lasers; however these lasers are non- specific in their thermal effect on tissues and as a result often cause significant scarring. Recently, evidence has accumulated that the flashlamp-pumped dye (585 nm) and copper- vapor (578 nm) lasers, which produce pulsed light that is efficiently absorbed by hemoglobin, are more selective in coagulating abnormal vascular tissue and as a result give a superior clinical result. It is not yet clear what the most important physical and biological mechanisms are during the light-tissue interaction mediated by these two lasers. The post-treatment sequence of events is different for tissue irradiated by each laser; most significantly, the flashlamp-pumped dye laser causes significant transient purpura, whereas the copper vapor laser causes blanching and eschar formation. The clinical outcome, that is regression of the lesion, is equally successful with either laser although some evidence has accumulated showing that the flashlamp-pumped dye laser is best suited to the treatment of small vessel disease while the copper-vapor laser is better for the treatment of large vessel disease. In this paper, we will discuss our observations of the treatment of vascular lesions on humans with the copper-vapor and flashlamp-pumped dye lasers using empirically derived efficacious treatment parameters. Mathematical models of light and heat propagation and in vivo experiments involving mice ears and rat skin flaps will be used to elucidate what we feel are the important underlying mechanisms of this vascular lesion laser therapy.

  12. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  13. Laser-enhanced ionization of mercury atoms in an inert atmosphere with avalanche amplification of the signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, W L; Matveev, O I; Cabredo, S; Omenetto, N; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1997-07-01

    A new method for laser-enhanced ionization detection of mercury atoms in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method, which is based on the avalanche amplification of the signal resulting from the ionization from a selected Rydberg level reached by a three-step laser excitation of mercury vapor in a simple quartz cell, can be applied to the determination of this element in various matrices by the use of conventional cold atomization techniques. The overall (collisional + photo) ionization efficiency is investigated at different temperatures, and the avalanche amplification effect is reported for Ar and P-10 gases at atmospheric pressure. It is shown that the amplified signal is related to the number of charges produced in the laser-irradiated volume. Under amplifier noise-limited conditions, a detection limit of ∼15 Hg atoms/laser pulse in the interaction region is estimated. PMID:21639354

  14. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  15. Magnetic coupling of laser-cooled atoms to a micro-resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Andrew; Wang, Ying-Ju; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Kitching, John

    2009-05-01

    The direct coupling of the spin-degrees of freedom of an atomic vapor to the vibrational motion of a magnetic cantilever tip has recently been demonstrated [1], and prospects for coupling a BEC on an atom-chip to a nano- mechanical resonator have been recently discussed [2]. Possible applications include chip-scale atomic devices, in which localized interactions with magnetic cantilever tips selectively influence or probe atomic spins. As a next step towards the realization of a strongly coupled ultra-cold atom- resonator system, we have constructed an apparatus to study the direct coupling between the spins of trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and a magnetic tip on a micro-cantilever. The atoms will be loaded into a magnetic trap formed by the cantilever tip and external magnetic fields. The cantilever will be driven capacitively at its resonance frequency, resulting in a coherent precession of the trapped atomic spins with a matching Larmor frequency. Prospects for measuring the back-action of the ensemble of atomic spins on a cantilever beam will also be discussed. [1] Y.-J. Wang,M. Eardley, S. Knappe, J. Moreland, L. Hollberg, and J. Kitching, PRL 97, 227602 (2006). [2] P. Treutlein,D. Hunger, S. Camerer, T. W. Hansch, and J. Reichel, PRL 99, 140403 (2007).

  16. Beam quality of a non-ideal atom laser

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix; Guerin, William; Le Coq, Yann; Fauquembergue, Marie; Bouyer, Philippe; Josse, Vincent; Aspect, Alain

    2006-01-01

    International audience We study the propagation of a non-interacting atom laser distorted by the strong lensing effect of the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) from which it is outcoupled. We observe a transverse structure containing caustics that vary with the density within the residing BEC. Using WKB approximation, Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formalism and ABCD matrices, we are able to describe analytically the atom laser propagation. This allows us to characterize the quality of the non-id...

  17. Theoretical tools for atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix; Le Coq, Yann; Impens, François; Guerin, William; Bordé, Christian,; Aspect, Alain; Bouyer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the propagation of non self-interacting atom laser beams. We start from a general propagation integral equation, and we use the same approximations as in photon optics to derive tools to calculate the atom laser beam propagation. We discuss the approximations that allow to reduce the general equation whether to a Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral calculated by using the stationary phase method, or to the eikonal. Within the paraxial approximation, we also introduce...

  18. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  19. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Iracema Takase; Hugo Borges Pereira; Aderval S. Luna; Patrícia Grinberg; Reinaldo Calixto de Campos

    2002-01-01

    The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES) are considered. Hydride generation...

  20. New niobium and rhenium halides synthesis routes by atomic vaporization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New synthetic route as the so called 'chimie douce' or MVS (Metal Vapor Synthesis) has been an increasing field lately to synthesize new kind of solid state structures. Our interest is the assembly of small molecular building blocks of early transition metal halides. We illustrate the use of vaporized rare earth metals to condense NbCls units. We probed the local order around the Nb atom with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, far Infra-Red and XPS in order to better understand the mechanisms involved. A first EXAFS, IR and XPS study on solid state products has shown the evolution of the NbCl5 dimer towards a chain like structure. However, the condensation patterns depends on the rare earth atoms vaporized. These results have been confirmed by X-ray Absorption ab initio calculations. Because our compounds are extremely air sensitive we have developed in situ MVS reactor to take 'snapshots' of the structural intermediates by EXAFS. This study showed the condensation of the initial NbCl5 building blocks by reduction of the Nb oxidation state by rare earth vaporization. This method is a new way of looking at condensation mechanisms via structural evolution observed by EXAFS. (author)

  1. Relaxation of atomic polarization in paraffin-coated cesium vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, M T; Rochester, S M; Kerner, K; Wong, C; Budker, D; Alexandrov, E B; Balabas, M V

    2005-01-01

    The relaxation of atomic polarization in buffer-gas-free, paraffin-coated cesium vapor cells is studied using a variation on Franzen's technique of ``relaxation in the dark'' [Franzen, Phys. Rev. {\\bf 115}, 850 (1959)]. In the present experiment, narrow-band, circularly polarized pump light, resonant with the Cs D2 transition, orients atoms along a longitudinal magnetic field, and time-dependent optical rotation of linearly polarized probe light is measured to determine the relaxation rates of the atomic orientation of a particular hyperfine level. The change in relaxation rates during light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) is studied. No significant change in the spin relaxation rate during LIAD is found beyond that expected from the faster rate of spin-exchange collisions due to the increase in Cs density.

  2. Atomic characterization of Au clusters in vapor-liquid-solid grown silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM), UMR 7647, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pareige, Philippe; Castro, Celia [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux (GPM), Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6634, CNRS, Av. de l' Université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Xu, Tao; Grandidier, Bruno; Stiévenard, Didier [Institut d' Electronique et de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies (IEMN), UMR 8520, CNRS, Département ISEN, 41 bd Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France)

    2015-09-14

    By correlating atom probe tomography with other conventional microscope techniques (scanning electron microscope, scanning transmission electron microscope, and scanning tunneling microscopy), the distribution and composition of Au clusters in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Si nanowires is investigated. Taking advantage of the characteristics of atom probe tomography, we have developed a sample preparation method by inclining the sample at certain angle to characterize the nanowire sidewall without using focused ion beam. With three-dimensional atomic scale reconstruction, we provide direct evidence of Au clusters tending to remain on the nanowire sidewall rather than being incorporated into the Si nanowires. Based on the composition measurement of Au clusters (28% ± 1%), we have demonstrated the supersaturation of Si atoms in Au clusters, which supports the hypothesis that Au clusters are formed simultaneously during nanowire growth rather than during the cooling process.

  3. Ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency using nanofiber-guided light in a warm atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D E; Pittman, T B

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofiber suspended in a warm rubidium vapor. The signal and control fields are both guided along the nanofiber, which enables strong nonlinear interactions with the surrounding atoms at relatively low powers. Transit-time broadening is found to be a significant EIT decoherence mechanism in this tightly-confined waveguiding geometry. Nonetheless, we observe significant EIT and controlled polarization rotation using control-field powers of only a few microWatts in this relatively robust warm-atom nanofiber system.

  4. Laser vaporization of cirrus-like ice particles with secondary ice multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Mary; Pomel, François; Wender, Christiane; Kiselev, Alexei; Duft, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of ultrashort laser filaments with individual 90-μm ice particles, representative of cirrus particles. The ice particles fragment under laser illumination. By monitoring the evolution of the corresponding ice/vapor system at up to 140,000 frames per second over 30 ms, we conclude that a shockwave vaporization supersaturates the neighboring region relative to ice, allowing the nucleation and growth of new ice particles, supported by laser-induced plasma photochemistry. This process constitutes the first direct observation of filament-induced secondary ice multiplication, a process that strongly modifies the particle size distribution and, thus, the albedo of typical cirrus clouds. PMID:27386537

  5. Laserlike and atomlike regimes in a one-atom laser

    OpenAIRE

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a three-level model of a one-atom laser, and show that there are two limiting regimes of parameter space, one in which the system behaves like a conventional laser and one in which the system exhibits novel quantum properties. We show that in the first limiting regime, the model can be approximated by semiclassical laser theory, and in the second limiting regime the model can be approximated as an effective two-level atom. We also perform numerical simulations that confirm the lim...

  6. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers

  7. Laser cooling atoms to indistinguishability: Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and entanglement through spin exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Motional control of neutral atoms has a rich history and increasingly interest has turned to single-atom control. In my thesis work, we created a platform to individually prepare single bosonic atoms in highly pure quantum states, by developing methods to laser cool single atoms to the vibrational ground state of optical tweezer traps. Applying this toolset, we observe the atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel effect when we arrange for atom tunneling to play the role of a balanced beam splitter between two optical tweezers. In another experiment, we utilize spin exchange to create entanglement, which we then verify after spatially separating the atoms to observe their non-local correlations. Merging these results with our recent demonstration of deterministic loading of atomic arrays, our results establish the concept of quantum gas assembly, which could be applied to a variety of systems ranging from the production of single dipolar molecules to the assembly of low-entropy arrays of atoms.

  8. Laser-excitation technique for the measurement of absolute transition probabilities of weak atomic lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, H. S.; Smith, P. L.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique is presented for the measurement of transition probabilities for weak allowed, intersystem, and forbidden lines. The method exploits the fact that oscillator strength is proportional to the number of stimulated absorptions and emissions produced by a narrow-band laser pulse of known energy which is in resonance with an atomic transition. The method is tested for a particular transition of Mg I with a known oscillator strength value and of appropriate magnitude. The number densities are measured using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the hook method for the lower level population and by measuring an absorption-equivalent width for the other. The apparatus consisted of a high-power tunable laser and a magnesium oven to produce excited Mg vapor, and a laser-plasma background continuum. The results are in good agreement with theoretical and other experimental data.

  9. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π− beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π− occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN

  10. Probing a Bose-Einstein Condensate with an Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, D.; Robins, N. P.; Figl, C.; Close, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    A pulsed atom laser derived from a Bose-Einstein condensate is used to probe a second target condensate. The target condensate scatters the incident atom laser pulse. From the spatial distribution of scattered atoms, one can infer important properties of the target condensate and its interaction with the probe pulse. As an example, we measure the s-wave scattering length that, in low energy collisions, describes the interaction between the |F=1,m_F=-1> and |F=2,m_F=0> hyperfine ground states ...

  11. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  12. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  13. Solar-simulator-pumped atomic iodine laser kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H. W.; Raju, S.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1983-01-01

    The literature contains broad ranges of disagreement in kinetic data for the atomic iodine laser. A kinetic model of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is used to select those kinetic data consistent with recent laser experiments at the Langley Research Center. Analysis of the solar-simulator-pumped laser experiments resulted in the following estimates of rate coefficients: for alkyl radical (n-C3F7) and atomic iodine (I) recombination, 4.3 x 10 to the 11th power (1.9) + or - cu cm/s; for n-C3F7I stabilized atomic iodine recombination (I + I) 3.7 x 10 to the -32nd power (2.3) + or -1 cm to the 6th power/s; and for molecular iodine (I2) quenching, 3.1 x 10 to the -11th power (1.6) + or - 1 cu cm/s. These rates are consistent with the recent measurements.

  14. Enhanced light-vapor interactions and all optical switching in a chip scale micro-ring resonator coupled with atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of atomic and photonic resonances serves as an important tool for enhancing light-matter interactions and enables the observation of multitude of fascinating and fundamental phenomena. Here, by exploiting the platform of atomic-cladding wave guides, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of rubidium vapor and an atomic cladding micro ring resonator. Specifically, we observed cavity-atom coupling in the form of Fano resonances having a distinct dependency on the relative frequency detuning between the photonic and the atomic resonances. Moreover, we were able to significantly enhance the efficiency of all optical switching in the V-type pump-probe scheme. The coupled system of micro-ring resonator and atomic vapor is a promising building block for a variety of light vapor experiments, as it offers a very small footprint, high degree of integration and extremely strong confinement of light and vapor. As such it may be used for important applications, such as all optical switching, disp...

  15. Nucleation and ultrafast vaporization dynamics of laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoinie, Guilaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Chlon, Ceciel; Boehmer, Marcel; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Jong, Nico; Manohar, Srirang; Versluis, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Precision control of vaporization, both in space and time, has many potential applications; however, the physical mechanisms underlying controlled boiling are not well understood. The reason is the combined microscopic length scales and ultra-short timescales associated with the initiation and subsequent dynamical behavior of the vapor bubbles formed. Here we study the nanoseconds vapor bubble dynamics of laser-heated single oil-filled microcapsules using coupled optical and acoustic detection. Pulsed laser excitation leads to vapor formation and collapse, and a simple physical model captures the observed radial dynamics and resulting acoustic pressures. Continuous wave laser excitation leads to a sequence of vaporization and condensation cycles, the result of absorbing microcapsule fragments moving in and out of the laser beam. A model incorporating thermal diffusion from the capsule shell into the oil core and surrounding water reveals the mechanisms behind the onset of vaporization. Excellent agreement is observed between the modeled dynamics and experiment. This work is supported by NanoNextNL, a micro and nanotechnology consortium of the Government of the Netherlands and 130 partners.

  16. Interaction of nanofiber-guided light with a warm atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel E.

    Systems allowing controllable photon-atom interactions are becoming increasingly important for quantum communication applications. One promising platform involves the interaction of the tightly-confined evanescent mode of an optical nanofiber with surrounding atoms. This dissertation will overview our work on the interaction of nanofiber-guided light with a warm rubidium vapor. In comparison to related work with cold atom clouds or trapped atoms, the "warm atom-nanofiber" system is fairly robust but operates in a regime where motional effects of the atoms are significant. We will first discuss a detailed study of saturated absorption in this system, with an emphasis on the role of motional effects in hyperfine pumping rates and various line broadening mechanisms. The power needed to saturate the system is essentially a measure of the system's capability to enable nonlinear optical interactions of the kind that are needed for quantum communication applications, and we observe remarkably ultralow saturation powers of 10's of nW (corresponding to only ˜ 10 photons passing through the nanofiber at a given time). We then utilize this strong nonlinearity to demonstrate 3-level ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and all-optical modulation with ultralow control-field powers on the order of only a few muW. Finally, we discuss a novel nanofiber-segment nonlinear ring resonator comprised of a large loop of conventional single-mode fiber with a short nanofiber segment surrounded by a warm rubidium vapor. In this device, the cavity enhanced evanescent field of the nanofiber enables even stronger photon-atom interactions.

  17. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  18. Feshbach-resonance-induced atomic filamentation and quantum pair correlation in atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Weiping; Search, Chris P.; Pu, Han; Meystre, Pierre; Wright, Ewan M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of an atom laser beam through a spatial region with a magnetic field tuned to a Feshbach resonance. Tuning the magnetic field below the resonance produces an effective focusing Kerr medium that causes a modulational instability of the atomic beam. Under appropriate circumstances, this results in beam breakup and filamentation seeded by quasi-particle fluctuations, and in the generation of correlated atomic pairs.

  19. Dynamics of Finite Energy Airy Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum in Multilevel Atomic Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenkun; Wang, Shun; Hu, Weifei; Gu, Yuzong

    2016-10-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of inward circular finite-energy Airy beams carrying different orbital angular momentum (OAM) numbers in a close-Λ three-level atomic vapor with the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window. We report that due to the EIT induced by the microwave field, the transverse intensity distribution properties of Airy beam can be feasibly manipulated and modulated through adjusting OAM numbers l and the frequency detuning, as well as the propagation distance, in the multi-level atomic systems. What's more, the rotation of the beam also can be observed with different positions in atomic ensembles. The investigation may provide a useful tool for studying particle manipulation, signal processing and propagation in graded-index (GRIN) fibers.

  20. Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93mW; the FWHM is 0.Snm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  1. Proposed search for an electric-dipole moment using laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, V

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experiment to search for a permanent atomic electric-dipole moment (EDM) using laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb atoms launched in an atomic fountain. A uniform B field sets the quantization axis, and the Ramsey separated-oscillatory-fields method is used to measure the Zeeman precession frequency of the atoms. Laser beams of appropriate polarization are used for preparation and detection in a given magnetic sublevel. The signature of an EDM is a shift in the Ramsey resonance correlated with application of a large E field. The precision is expected to be at least 20 times better than current limits because the use of a cold atomic beam allows application of E field 10 times larger than in a vapor cell, and the interaction time with the E field is 200 times larger compared to a thermal beam. The leading source of systematic error in beam experiments, the (E x v/c) motional magnetic field, is reduced considerably because of the near-perfect reversal of velocity between up and down trajectories through the E...

  2. Proposed search for an electric-dipole moment using laser-cooled 171Yb atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of a permanent electric-dipole moment (EDM) in a particle implies that both parity (P) and time-reversal symmetry (T) are violated. We propose an experiment to search for a permanent atomic EDM using laser-cooled 171Yb atoms launched in an atomic fountain. A uniform B field sets the quantization axis, and the Ramsey separated-oscillatory-fields method is used to measure the Zeeman precession frequency of the atoms. Laser beams of appropriate polarization are used for preparation and detection in a given magnetic sub-level. The signature of an EDM is a shift in the Ramsey resonance correlated with application of a large E field. The precision is expected to be at least 20 times better than current limits because the use of a cold atomic beam allows application of E field 10 times larger than in a vapor cell, and the interaction time with the E field is 200 times larger compared to a thermal beam. The leading source of systematic error in beam experiments, the motional magnetic field, is reduced considerably because of the near-perfect reversal of velocity between up and down trajectories through the E-field region. (authors)

  3. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  4. Recirculation of Laser Power in an Atomic Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzer, Daphna G.; Klipstein, WIlliam M.; Moore, James D.

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for laser-cooling atoms in a cesium atomic fountain frequency standard relies on recirculation of laser light through the atom-collection region of the fountain. The recirculation, accomplished by means of reflections from multiple fixed beam-splitter cubes, is such that each of two laser beams makes three passes. As described below, this recirculation scheme offers several advantages over prior designs, including simplification of the laser system, greater optical power throughput, fewer optical and electrical connections, and simplification of beam power balancing. A typical laser-cooled cesium fountain requires the use of six laser beams arranged as three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating beams to decelerate the atoms and hold them in a three-dimensional optical trap in vacuum. Typically, these trapping/cooling beams are linearly polarized and are positioned and oriented so that (1) counter-propagating beams in each pair have opposite linear polarizations and (2) three of the six orthogonal beams have the sum of their propagation directions pointing up, while the other three have the sum of their propagation directions pointing down. In a typical prior design, two lasers are used - one to generate the three "up" beams, the other to generate the three "down" beams. For this purpose, the output of each laser is split three ways, then the resulting six beams are delivered to the vacuum system, independently of each other, via optical fibers. The present recirculating design also requires two lasers, but the beams are not split before delivery. Instead, only one "up" beam and one oppositely polarized "down" beam are delivered to the vacuum system, and each of these beams is sent through the collection region three times. The polarization of each beam on each pass through the collection region is set up to yield the same combination of polarization and propagation directions as described above. In comparison with the prior design, the present

  5. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  6. Quantum Dynamical Theory for Squeezed Atom Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; HAN Yi-Ang; CHEN Jing-Ling; MIAO Yuan-Xiu

    2000-01-01

    A model for the squeezed output coupler of the trapped Bose-Einstein condensed atoms is established with a simple many-boson system of two states with linear coupling, by preparing an initially squeezed light field. In the Bogoliubov approximation, its solutions show that the quadrature squeezing effect mutually oscillates between the coupling light field and the output atomic field. This manifests that the initially squeezed light will transform into a coherent state after some period of coupling interaction while the output atomic field is in a squeezed state.

  7. Probing temperature during laser spot welding from vapor composition and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; DebRoy, T.; fürschbach, P. W.

    2003-11-01

    Measurement of weld pool temperature during laser spot welding is a difficult task because of the short pulse duration, often lasting only a few milliseconds, highly transient nature of the process, and the presence of a metal vapor plume near the weld pool. This article describes recent research to estimate weld pool temperatures experimentally and theoretically. Composition of the metal vapor from the weld pool was determined by condensing a portion of the vapor on the inner surface of an open ended quartz tube which was mounted perpendicular to the sample surface and coaxial with the laser beam. It was found that iron, chromium, and manganese were the main metallic species in the vapor phase. The concentrations of Fe and Cr in the vapor increased slightly while the concentration of Mn in the vapor decreased somewhat with the increase in power density. The vapor composition was used to determine an effective temperature of the weld pool. A transient, three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy was used to calculate the temperature and velocity fields in the weld pool as a function of time. The experimentally determined geometry of the spot welds agreed well with that determined from the computed temperature field. The effective temperature determined from the vapor composition was found to be close to the numerically computed peak temperature at the weld pool surface. Because of the short process duration and other serious problems in the direct measurement of temperature during laser spot welding, estimating approximate values of peak temperature from metal vapor composition is particularly valuable.

  8. Probing temperature during laser spot welding from vapor composition and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of weld pool temperature during laser spot welding is a difficult task because of the short pulse duration, often lasting only a few milliseconds, highly transient nature of the process, and the presence of a metal vapor plume near the weld pool. This article describes recent research to estimate weld pool temperatures experimentally and theoretically. Composition of the metal vapor from the weld pool was determined by condensing a portion of the vapor on the inner surface of an open ended quartz tube which was mounted perpendicular to the sample surface and coaxial with the laser beam. It was found that iron, chromium, and manganese were the main metallic species in the vapor phase. The concentrations of Fe and Cr in the vapor increased slightly while the concentration of Mn in the vapor decreased somewhat with the increase in power density. The vapor composition was used to determine an effective temperature of the weld pool. A transient, three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy was used to calculate the temperature and velocity fields in the weld pool as a function of time. The experimentally determined geometry of the spot welds agreed well with that determined from the computed temperature field. The effective temperature determined from the vapor composition was found to be close to the numerically computed peak temperature at the weld pool surface. Because of the short process duration and other serious problems in the direct measurement of temperature during laser spot welding, estimating approximate values of peak temperature from metal vapor composition is particularly valuable

  9. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend Christopher G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of a magneto-optical trap for caesium atoms is presented. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving high spatial number densities and low temperatures. Optimizing both of these together enables efficient evaporative cooling from a conservative trap, a procedure which has recently led to the first observations of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute atomic vapour. The behaviour of a magneto-optical trap is nomina...

  10. The Synthesized of Carbon Nano tubes from Palm Oil by Topas Atomizer Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on preparation of Carbon Nano tubes (CNTs) based on palm oil as a natural resource precursor. The Topas Atomizer was utilized to vapor up the carbon gas into the reaction chamber of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) to yield the CNTs in powder form at the inner wall of the Quartz tube. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of deposition temperature from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The samples characteristics were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results revealed that the increasing of the deposition temperature, the ID/IG ratio decreased from 650 - 850 degree Celsius. The results of Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) are also presented. (author)

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) vapors at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Z; Cullum, B M; Stokes, D L; Mobley, J; Miller, G H; Hajaligol, M R; Vo-Dinh, T

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we present the fluorescence spectra of anthracene and pyrene vapors at different elevated temperatures (from 150 to 650 degrees C) excited with the 337 nm line of a nitrogen laser. We describe the high temperature effects on the resulting spectral properties including spectral intensity, spectral bandwidth and spectral shift. We found that the PAH fluorescence spectral bandwidths become very broad as the temperature increases. The broadening is mainly due to thermal vibrational sequence congestion. We also have found that the fluorescence intensity of pyrene vapor increases with increasing temperature, which results from the increase of the pyrene vapor absorption cross section at 337 nm. PMID:11446693

  13. Development of Field-deployable Diode-laser-based Water Vapor Dial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Hoai Phong Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL has been developed for lower-tropospheric water vapor observation in Tokyo, Japan. A photoacoustic cell is used for spectroscopy experiment around absorption peaks of 829.022 nm and 829.054 nm. The water vapor density extracted from the observational data agrees with the referenced radiosonde data. Furthermore, we applied modulated pulse technique for DIAL transmitter. It enables DIAL to measure water vapor profile for both low and high altitude regions.

  14. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  15. Theoretical Femtosecond Physics Atoms and Molecules in Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical femtosecond physics is a new field of research. Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers of up to atomic field strengths are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. Laser-matter interaction is treated on a nonperturbative level in the book using approximate and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically. Physical phenomena, ranging from ionization of atoms to the ionization and dissociation of molecules and the control of chemical reactions are presented and discussed. Theoretical background for experiments with strong and short laser pulses is given. Several exercises are included in the main text. Some detailed calculations are performed in the appendices.

  16. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Chusseau, L; Philippe, F; Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-01-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intra-cavity Fano factor and the photo-current spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is considerably simpler than the one required by Quantum-Optics treatments. Whenever a comparison can be made, the expressions obtained coincide. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level atoms lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  17. Spatial transport of atomic coherence in electromagnetically induced absorption with a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2014-06-30

    We report the spatial transport of spontaneously transferred atomic coherence (STAC) in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), which resulted from moving atoms with the STAC of the 5S(1/2) (F = 2)-5P(3/2) (F' = 3) transition of (87)Rb in a paraffin-coated vapor cell. In our experiment, two channels were spatially separate; the writing channel (WC) generated STAC in the EIA configuration, and the reading channel (RC) retrieved the optical field from the spatially transported STAC. Transported between the spatially separated positions, the fast light pulse of EIA in the WC and the delayed light pulse in the RC were observed. When the laser direction of the RC was counter-propagated in the direction of the WC, we observed direction reversal of the transported light pulse in the EIA medium. Furthermore, the delay time, the magnitude, and the width of the spatially transported light pulse were investigated with respect to the distance between the two channels.

  18. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Moody, Joshua; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jérôme; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  19. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  20. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  1. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Tonneau, D.; Auvert, G.; Pauleau, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  2. A CPT-based Cs vapor cell atomic clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability of 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Liu, Xiaochi; Guérandel, Stéphane; De Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on the development and short-term fractional frequency stability of a continuous-regime (CW) Cs vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). The push-pull optical pumping technique is used to increase the number of atoms that participate to the clock transition, yielding a typical CPT resonance contrast of 25% for a CPT linewidth of about 450 Hz. The clock short-term fractional frequency stability is measured to be 3 x 10-13 τ-1/2 up to 100 seconds averaging time, in correct agreement with the signal-to-noise ratio limit. The mid-term frequency stability results are currently mainly limited by laser power effects. The detection of high-contrast narrow Raman-Ramsey fringes is demonstrated with this setup by making the atoms interact with a light pulse sequence.

  3. CW fountain of laser-cooled Yb atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rathod, K D; Natarajan, Vasant

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate launching of laser-cooled Yb atoms in a continuous atomic fountain. The continuous fountain has significant advantages over the more common pulsed fountain, which was also demonstrated by us recently. The fountain is formed in the following steps---(i) Atoms from a thermal beam are first Zeeman slowed to a small final velocity, (ii) the slowed atoms are captured in a two-dimensional magneto-optic trap (2D-MOT), and (iii) atoms are launched {\\em continuously} in the vertical direction using two sets of moving-molasses beams, inclined at $\\pm 15^\\circ$ to the vertical. The cooling transition used is the strongly-allowed ${^1S}_0 \\rightarrow {^1P}_1$ transition at 399 nm. We capture about $7 \\times 10^6$ atoms in the 2D-MOT, and then launch them with a vertical velocity of 13 m/s at a longitudinal temperature of 125(6) mK.

  4. Dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, V; Geiger, R; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Battelier, B; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-11-01

    We present a compact and stable dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry with two different atomic species. It is based on frequency-doubled telecom lasers locked on a femtosecond optical frequency comb. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup immune to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. The source provides the frequency agility and phase stability required for atom interferometry and can easily be adapted to other cold atom experiments. We have shown its robustness by achieving the first dual-species K-Rb magneto-optical trap in microgravity during parabolic flights.

  5. Entanglement generated between a single atom and a laser pulse

    OpenAIRE

    Silberfarb, Andrew; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2003-01-01

    We quantify the entanglement generated between an atom and a laser pulse in free space. We find that the entanglement calculated using a simple closed-system Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian is in remarkable agreement with a full open-system calculation, even though the free-space geometry is far from the strong coupling regime of cavity QED. We explain this result using a simple model in which the atom couples weakly to the laser while coupling strongly to the vacuum. Additionally we place an upp...

  6. Associative ionization of two laser excited Na atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation into the associative ionization of two sodium atoms excited by polarized laser beams is described. It was possible to excite the Na atoms in a velocity-selective way by exploiting the Doppler effect. The excitation of Na to the 32P3/2, F=3 level is discussed on the basis of so-called saturation curves. Experiments with seven different combinations of polarization of the two exciting laser beams are described and the results discussed. 86 refs.; 53 figs.; 6 tabs

  7. Ionization of atoms by lasers and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ring dye laser was monitored 5890 A line by a sodium fluorescence cell. The laser was orthogonally directed to interact with a sodium effusive atomic beam. Light radiation from a lamp shifted the excited sodium to near continuum level. The highly excited states are more susceptible to an external field, thus shifting the highly external atoms to the continuum level. The interaction of the electric field causes an increase of two orders of magnitude as compared to two photonionization only. The high signal recorded was due to the probability of the ionization cross section approaching the excited cross section which is several orders of magnitude higher

  8. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  9. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Extracting Atoms on Demand with Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mohring, B; Haug, F; Morigi, G; Schleich, W P; Raizen, M G; Mohring, Bernd; Bienert, Marc; Haug, Florian; Morigi, Giovanna; Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a scheme that allows to coherently extract cold atoms from a reservoir in a deterministic way. The transfer is achieved by means of radiation pulses coupling two atomic states which are object to different trapping conditions. A particular realization is proposed, where one state has zero magnetic moment and is confined by a dipole trap, whereas the other state with non-vanishing magnetic moment is confined by a steep microtrap potential. We show that in this setup a predetermined number of atoms can be transferred from a reservoir, a Bose-Einstein condensate, into the collective quantum state of the steep trap with high efficiency in the parameter regime of present experiments.

  11. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  12. Iodine Determination by Microwave Plasma Torch Atomic Emission Spectrometer Coupled with Online Preconcentration Vapor Generation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Yan-qun; LUO Gui-min; FENG Guo-dong; CHEN Huan-wen; FEI Qiang; HUAN Yan-fu; JIN Qin-han

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on iodine determination by microwave plasma torch atomic emission spectrometry (MPT-AES) coupled with online preconcentration vapor generation method.A new desolvation device,multistrand Nation dryer,was used as the substitute for condenser desolvation system.Some experimental conditions,such as preconcentration time,acidity of sample solution,rinsing solution acidity and dynamic linear range were investigated and optimized.The new desolvation system eliminates the problem of decreasing emission intensity of I(I) 206.238 nm line with the increase of working time on a conventional condenser desolvation system,thus greatly improving the reproducibility.

  13. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.;

    2006-01-01

    show results of the characterization of PSR in isotopically enhanced rubidium-87 cells, performed in two independent laboratories. We observed that, contrary to earlier work, the presence of atomic noise in the thermal vapor overwhelms the observation of squeezing. We present a theory that contains...... atomic noise terms and show that a null result in squeezing is consistent with this theory.......The traversal of an elliptically polarized optical field through a thermal vapor cell can give rise to a rotation of its polarization axis. This process, known as polarization self-rotation (PSR), has been suggested as a mechanism for producing squeezed light at atomic transition wavelengths. We...

  14. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  15. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Landini, M; Carcagni', L; Trypogeorgos, D; Fattori, M; Inguscio, M; Modugno, G

    2011-01-01

    We investigate sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of systems and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25(3)microK and 47(5)microK in high-density samples of the two isotopes 39K and 41K, respectively. Our findings will find application to other atomic systems.

  16. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landini, M. [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38123 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Roy, S.; Carcagni, L.; Trypogeorgos, D. [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G. [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25{+-}3 {mu}K and 47{+-}5 {mu}K in high-density samples of the two isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  17. Suppressing decoherence of spin waves in a warm atomic vapor by applying a guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation to extend lifetimes of light storages by applying guiding magnetic fields in a room-temperature atomic vapor. The storages are based on dynamic electromagnetically induced transparency. Retrieval efficiencies versus storage time are experimentally measured for different strengths of the guiding magnetic fields. The measured results show that the 1/e storage times are ∼6 μs and ∼59 μs for the guiding field B0z = 0 and B0z = 93 mG, respectively. Physical processes causing decoherence in an atomic ensemble have been discussed and analyzed. A theory model which is used to evaluate the decoherence caused by fluctuations of transverse magnetic fields is developed. Based on this evaluation, the fact that storage lifetimes can be increased by applying guiding magnetic fields is well explained. (paper)

  18. Frequency-Tunable Microwave Field Detection in an Atomic Vapor Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the sigma+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high resolution microwave imaging system, this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  19. A laser extinction based sensor for simultaneous droplet size and vapor measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqiang Sun; David J. Ewing; Lin Ma

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows involving liquid droplets in association with gas flow occur in many industrial and scientific applications.Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using optical techniques based on laser extinction to simultaneously measure vapor concentration and temperature and droplet size and loading.This work introduces the theoretical background for the optimal design of such laser extinction techniques,termed WMLE (wavelength-multiplexed laser extinction).This paper focuses on the development of WMLE and presents a systematic methodology to guide the selection of suitable wavelengths and optimize the performance of WMLE for specific applications.WMLE utilizing wavelengths from 0.5to 10 μm is illustrated for droplet size and vapor concentration measurements in an example of water spray,and is found to enable unique and sensitive Sauter mean diameter measurement in the range of ~1-15μm along with accurate vapor detection.A vapor detection strategy based on differential absorption is developed to extend accurate measurement to a significantly wider range of droplet loading and vapor concentration as compared to strategies based on direct fixed-wavelength absorption.Expected performance of the sensor is modeled for an evaporating spray.This work is expected to lay the groundwork for implementing optical sensors based on WMLE in a variety of research and industrial applications involving multi-phase flows.

  20. Search for a permanent EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    To explore the mechanism for the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the study on fundamental symmetry violation using the trapped radioactive atoms with laser cooling techniques is being promoted. An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A finite value of EDM means the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and the CP violation under the CPT invariance. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895 in atomic system. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e cm. To overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM, it is necessary to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~ 10 6 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The extracted Fr ion beam is transported to the neutralizer, which is located 10 m downstream, and the produced neutral Fr atoms are introduced into the MOT to load the next trapping system such as the optical dipole force trap and optical lattice. The coherence time will be increased in the laser trapping system, and the present status of the experiment will be reported.

  1. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  2. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 – 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 – 150 ns, and pulse energy of ∼ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage

  3. Ablation of biological tissues by radiation of strontium vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Vasilieva, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on sources of self- contained transitions in pairs SrI and SrII has been developed. The radiation spectrum contains 8 laser lines generating in the range of 1 - 6.45 μm, with a generation pulse length of 50 - 150 ns, and pulse energy of ˜ 2.5 mJ. The divergence of the output beam was close to the diffraction and did not exceed 0.5 mrad. The control range of the laser pulse repetition rate varied from 10 to 15 000 Hz. The given laser system has allowed to perform ablation of bone tissue samples without visible thermal damage.

  4. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  5. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG WenTao; ZHU BaoHua; ZHANG BaoWu; LI TongBao

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size, fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The influence of laser power on depo-sition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW, the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW, but with laser power increase, equal to 50 mW, the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  6. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size,fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm.The influence of laser power on deposition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW,the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW,but with laser power increase,equal to 50 mW,the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  7. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  8. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  9. Multi-wavelength metal vapor laser systems for solving applied problems of atmospheric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Mirza, S. Y.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    Results of a cycle of experimental investigations of a multi-wavelength metal vapor laser system based on original configuration of a multi-medium metal vapor laser source are presented. Novelty of our approach consists in that two gas-discharge active elements (on copper bromide and strontium vapors) are arranged in a common cavity, and each of them is pumped by an independent power supply unit, which allows them to be optimized independently for excitation conditions and thereby the output set of lasing wavelengths and their relative power distribution to be regulated. This makes the above-described system promising for a number of scientific and technological applications. The total output power of 11 spectral components lying in the range 0.43-6.45 μm reached ~17 W.

  10. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...

  11. X-ray refractive index of laser-dressed atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the complex index of refraction in the x-ray regime of atoms in laser light. The laser (intensity up to 10^13 W/cm^2, 800nm) modifies the atomic states but, by assumption, does not excite or ionize the atoms in their electronic ground state. Using quantum electrodynamics, we devise an ab initio theory to calculate the dynamic dipole polarizability and the photoabsorption cross section, which are subsequently used to determine the real and imaginary part, respectively, of the refractive index. The interaction with the laser is treated nonperturbatively; the x-ray interaction is described in terms of a one-photon process. We numerically solve the resolvents involved using a single-vector Lanczos algorithm. Finally, we formulate rate equations to copropagate a laser and an x-ray pulse through a gas cell. Our theory is applied to argon. We study the x-ray polarizability and absorption near the argon K edge over a large range of dressing-laser intensities. We find electromagnetically induced transp...

  12. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  13. Atomic excitation and acceleration in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, H.; Eichmann, U.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic excitation in the tunneling regime of a strong-field laser-matter interaction has been recently observed. It is conveniently explained by the concept of frustrated tunneling ionization (FTI), which naturally evolves from the well-established tunneling picture followed by classical dynamics of the electron in the combined laser field and Coulomb field of the ionic core. Important predictions of the FTI model such as the n distribution of Rydberg states after strong-field excitation and the dependence on the laser polarization have been confirmed in experiments. The model also establishes a sound basis to understand strong-field acceleration of neutral atoms in strong laser fields. The experimental observation has become possible recently and initiated a variety of experiments such as atomic acceleration in an intense standing wave and the survival of Rydberg states in strong laser fields. Furthermore, the experimental investigations on strong-field dissociation of molecules, where neutral excited fragments after the Coulomb explosion of simple molecules have been observed, can be explained. In this review, we introduce the subject and give an overview over relevant experiments supplemented by new results.

  14. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-07-01

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  15. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines two complimentary methods for the laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra-cold atom beam. If combined, these methods could serve as a starting point for high-through put and possibly even continuous production of Bose-Einstein condensates. First, a mechanism is outlined to harvest ultra cold atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into an optical dipole trap. A continuous loading scheme is described that dissipates the directed kinetic energy of a captured atom via deceleration by a magnetic potential barrier followed by optical pumping to the energetically lowest Zeeman sublevel. The application of this scheme to the transfer of ultra cold chromium atoms from a magnetically guided atom beam into a deep optical dipole trap is investigated via numerical simulations of the loading process. Based on the results of the theoretical studies the feasibility and the efficiency of our loading scheme, including the realisation of a suitable magnetic field configuration, are analysed. Second, experiments were conducted on the transverse laser cooling of a magnetically guided beam of ultra cold chromium atoms. Radial compression by a tapering of the guide is employed to adiabatically heat the beam. Inside the tapered section heat is extracted from the atom beam by a two-dimensional optical molasses perpendicular to it, resulting in a significant increase of atomic phase space density. A magnetic offset field is applied to prevent optical pumping to untrapped states. Our results demonstrate that by a suitable choice of the magnetic offset field, the cooling beam intensity and detuning, atom losses and longitudinal heating can be avoided. Final temperatures below 65 μK have been achieved, corresponding to an increase of phase space density in the guided beam by more than a factor of 30.

  16. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  17. Hot hydrogen atoms in a water-vapor microwave plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarova, E.; Dias, F.M.; Ferreira, C.M. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-12-15

    A study of the hydrogen Balmer line shape in a water-vapor, microwave slot-antenna excited plasma source operated at 2.45 GHz is reported. The emission profiles of the H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}} lines are well fitted by Gaussian profiles. Excited hydrogen atoms are detected in the remote plasma zone of the source up to 30 cm distance from the exciting antennas. The measured Doppler temperature corresponding to the H{sub {beta}} line broadening is about three times higher than the rotational temperature of the hydrogen molecular Fulcher-{alpha} band. It has been found clear evidence for the existence of a local source of excited ''hot'' hydrogen atoms in the ''microwave field free'' remote plasma zone. The measured Doppler broadening of the O(777.4 nm) triplet line indicates that ''hot'' oxygen atoms, with an energy around 0.3 eV, are also created in this source. Exothermic electron-ion and ion-ion recombination processes as well as DC distributed potentials existing in inhomogeneous remote plasma are possible local sources of ''hot'' atoms in the far remote plasma zone. (author)

  18. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier

  19. Searching for Dark Matter with Atomic Clocks and Laser Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny; Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    We propose new schemes for the direct detection of low-mass bosonic dark matter, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and resides in the observed galactic dark matter haloes, using atomic clock, atomic spectroscopy and laser interferometry measurements in the laboratory. We have recently shown that such dark matter can produce both a `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations in the fundamental constants. Using recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements in, we have derived limits on the quadratic interactions of scalar dark matter with ordinary matter that improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We have also proposed the use of laser and maser interferometry as novel high-precision platforms to search for dark matter, with effects due to the variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on alterations in the accumulated phase enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude. Other possibilities include the use of highly-charged ions, molecules and nuclear clocks.

  20. Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

    2003-09-16

    Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

  1. STIRAP in sodium vapor with picosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Jim L; Allen, Susan D; Tilley, Matt; Hoke, Steven; Johnson, J Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experimental measurements and calculations of STIRAP transfer efficiencies were made on a sodium gas starting from the $3^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ electronic ground state, passing through the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ and/or the $3^2{\\rm P}_{3/2}$ to the $5^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ state. The lasers used in the experiments had a pulse width of several picoseconds and were close to the Fourier transform limit. Although the linewidth of the laser was much smaller than the spin orbit splitting between the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ and $3^2{\\rm P}_{3/2}$ states, Experiments and calculations reveal that both 3p states play a role in the transfer efficiency when the lasers are tuned to resonance through the $3^2{\\rm P}_{1/2}$ state, revealing evidence for quantum interference between the competing pathways.

  2. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  3. Multi-V-type and Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency experiments in rubidium atoms with low-power low-cost free running single mode diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín Varela, S.; León Suazo, J. A.; Gutierrez González, J.; Vargas Roco, J.; Buberl, T.; Aguirre Gómez, J. G.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in A-type and multi-V-type configurations in a sample of rubidium atoms inside a vapor cell at room temperature. Typical EIT windows are clearly visible in the Doppler- broadened absorption signal of the weak probe beam. The coherent optical pump and probe fields are produced by two tunable low-cost, low-power, continuous-wave (cw), free-running and single mode operated diode laser systems, temperature stabilized and current controlled, tuned to the D2 line of rubidium atoms at 780.2 nm wavelength. The continuum wave and single mode operation of our laser systems are confirmed by direct and saturated absorption spectroscopy techniques. Among other applications, these simple experiments can be used as a low-cost undergraduate laboratory in atomic physics, laser physics, coherent light-atom interaction, and high resolution atomic spectroscopy.

  4. CARBON-DIOXIDE LASER VAPORIZATION IN EARLY GLOTTIC CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; PATEL, P; ANNYAS, AA

    1994-01-01

    Objective: Presently, widely employed treatment modalities for early glottic carcinoma include radiation therapy, surgical excision, and carbon dioxide laser excision. All these treatments have good oncological results, but poor or questionable functional-results in terms of quality of voice and muc

  5. Nonadiabatic tunneling ionization of atoms in elliptically polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the nonadiabatic effects in strong field tunneling ionization of atoms in elliptically polarized laser fields by solving the 3D time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). Comparing our TDSE results with those of two semi-classical methods, i.e., the quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo simulation (QTMC) and the Coulomb-corrected strong field approximation (CCSFA), we confirm the existence of the nonadiabatic effects with its fingerprint in the nonzero initial lateral velocity at the tunneling exit in the laser polarization plane. Our study shows that these nonadiabatic initial lateral momentum effects become significant in high ellipticity or circularly polarized laser field. These results indicate that the calibration of the experimental laser intensity in this situation should be performed nonadiabatically, which may strongly affect the results of the real tunneling time delay measurements. (paper)

  6. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  7. Fabrication of micro carbon pillar by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 罗迎社; 李立君; 钟琦文; 李新华; 殷水平

    2008-01-01

    Argon ion laser was used as the induced light source and ethane(C2H4) was selected as the precursor gas,in the variety ranges of laser power from 0.5 W to 4.5 W and the pressure of the precursor gas from 225×133.3 Pa to 680×133.3 Pa,the experiments of laser induced chemical vapor deposition were proceeded for fabrication of micro carbon pillar.In the experiments,the influences of power of laser and pressure of work gas on the diameter and length of micro carbon pillar were investigated,the variety on averaged growth rate of carbon pillar with the laser irradiation time and moving speed of focus was discussed.Based on experiment data,the micro carbon pillar with an aspect ratio of over 500 was built through the method of moving the focus.

  8. High-resolution Resonance Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition from a population difference grating in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Wang*, Hai; Li, Shujing; Zhang, Chunhong; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2009-01-01

    The laser spectroscopy with a narrow linewidth and high signal to noise ratio (S/N) is very important in the precise measurement of optical frequencies. Here, we present a novel high-resolution backward resonance Bragg-scattering (RBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG). The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field in thermal 87Rb vapor, which periodically modulates the space population distribution of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. A probe beam, having the identical frequency and the orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. Such Bragg-scattered light becomes stronger at an atomic resonance transition, which forms the RBS spectrum with a high S/N and sub-natural linewidth. Using the scheme of the coherent superposition of the individual Rayleigh-scattered light emitted from the atomic dipole oscillators on the PDG, the experimentally observed RBS spectroscopy is theoretically explained.

  9. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser vapor sensor using swelling polymer reflection modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Dohn, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    Vapor detection using a low-refractive index polymer for reflection modulation of the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated. The VCSEL sensor concept presents a simple method to detect the response of a sensor polymer in the presence of volatile organic co...... compounds. We model the physics as a change in the top mirror loss caused by swelling of the polymer upon absorbing the target volatile organic compound. Further we show how acetone vapors at 82 000 ppm concentration can change the polymer coated VCSEL output power by 20 mu W....

  10. Laser photoacoustic detection of the essential oil vapors of thyme, mint, and anise

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kahlout, A. M.; Al-Jourani, M. M.; Abu-Taha, M. I.; Laine, Derek C.

    1998-07-01

    Photoacoustic studies of the vapors of the essential oils of thyme, mint and anise have been made using a line-tunable waveguide CO2 laser in conjunction with a heat-pipe type of photoacoustic vapor sample cell operated over the temperature range 20 - 180 degree(s)C. Identifying spectral fingerprint features are found in the 9 - 10 micrometers spectral region for each of the three essential oils investigated. The principal features of the photoacoustic spectrum of each essential oil are associated with the dominant chemicals present i.e. thymol in thyme oil, menthol in mint and anethole in anise.

  11. Influence of the virtual photon field on the squeezing properties of an atom laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jian-Gang; Sun Chang-Yong; Wen Ling-Hua; Liang Bao-Long

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the squeezing properties of an atom laser without rotating-wave approximation in the system of a binomial states field interacting with a two-level atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. It discusses the influences of atomic eigenfrequency, the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms, parameter of the binomial states field and virtual photon field on the squeezing properties. The results show that two quadrature components of an atom laser can be squeezed periodically. The duration and the degree of squeezing an atom laser have something to do with the atomic eigenfrequency and the parameter of the binomial states field, respectively. The collapse and revival frequency of atom laser fluctuation depends on the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms. The effect of the virtual photon field deepens the depth of squeezing an atom laser.

  12. Unitary model for atomic ionization by intense XUV laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M G

    2016-01-01

    A unitary model describing the electronic transitions in an atom subject to a strong high frequency laser pulse is proposed. The model fully accounts for the initial state coupling with the continuum spectrum. Continuum-continuum as well as discrete-discrete transitions are neglected. The model leads to a single integro-differential equation for the initial state amplitude. Exact numerical and approximate closed semi-analytical solutions of this equation are obtained. A comparison of present results with full time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation solution for Hydrogen atoms subject to a laser pulse is presented. The initial state time dependent population is rather well described by the model and two approximate solutions. The electron energy spectrum is also well reproduced by the model and by a new improved Weiskopf-Wigner related approximation.

  13. Effect of Laser Power on Atom Probe Tomography of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Diercks, D.

    2011-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is an emerging analytical method that has the potential to produce nm-scale spatial resolution of atom positions with ppm-level detection limits. Until recently, APT has been limited to analysis of conducting samples due to the high pulsed electrical fields previously required. The recent development of laser-assisted APT now allows much lower laser powers to be used, opening the door to analysis of geologic minerals. The potential applications are many, ranging from diffusion profiles to the distribution of nano-phases to grain boundary chemical properties. We reported the first analysis of natural olivine using APT last year (Parman et al, 2010). While the spatial resolution was good (nm-scale), the accuracy of the compositional analysis was not. Two of the primary barriers to accurate ion identification in APT are: 1) Specimen overheating - This is caused by the interaction of the laser with the low thermal conductivity insulating specimens. Ions are assumed to have left the surface of the sample at the time the laser is pulsed during the analysis (laser pulse width = 12 ps). If the laser power is too high, the surface remains heated for an appreciable time (greater than 5 ns in some cases) after the laser pulse, causing atoms to field evaporate from the surface well after the laser pulse. Since they hit the detector later than the atoms that were released during the pulse, they are interpreted to be higher mass. Thus overheating appears in the analysis as a smearing of mass/charge peaks to higher mass/charge ratios (thermal tails). For well separated peaks, this is not a substantial problem, but for closely spaced peaks, overheating causes artificial mass interferences. 2) Molecular evaporation or clustering - This is also caused by overheating by the laser. Ideally, atoms are field evaporated individually from the surface of the cylindrical specimen. However, if the absorbed energy is high enough, clusters of atoms will be formed

  14. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  15. Recombination pumped atomic nitrogen and carbon afterglow lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that lasing of atomic nitrogen and carbon can be obtained during the afterglow of an electrical discharge in gas mixtures of either neon or helium containing low partial pressures of N/sub 2/ or CO. In addition, the neon-nitrogen laser has recently been pumped directly by nuclear radiation. Microwave quenching experiments have shown conclusively that the afterglow lasers are being pumped directly by the recombination of electron-ion pairs. This result differs from the mechanisms previously proposed for these systems. Measurements comparing the relative sensitivity to the electron temperature of the neon to atomic nitrogen and carbon afterglow light infer that the recombination process pumping these lasers is collisional-radiative, allowing the recombining ions to be identified as N/sup +/ and C/sup +/. Since this process is highly compatible with nuclear-radiation generated plasmas, it is not unreasonable to infer that this process is also the pumping mechanism in the nuclear-excited, neon-nitrogen laser.

  16. Kinetics of laser-pulse vaporization of uranium carbide by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of uranium carbide vaporization in the temperature range 3000 K to 5200 K was studied using a Nd-glass laser with peak power densities from 1.6 x 105 to 4.0 x 105 watts/cm2. The vapor species U, UC2, C1 and C3 were detected and analyzed by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. From the mass spectrometer signals number densities of the various species in the ionizer were obtained as functions of time. The surface of the irradiated uranium carbide was examined by scanning electron microscope and the depth profile of the crater was obtained. In order to aid analysis of the data, the heat conduction and species diffusion equations for the solid (or liquid) were solved numerically by a computer code to obtain the temperature and composition transients during laser heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to study the effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the computed surface temperatures

  17. Isotopically selective collinear laser photoionization of accelerated helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collinear two-step laser photoionization of 3He and 4He isotopes, accelerated to energies of up to 3.9 keV, is described. It is shown that the ionization selectivity in the case of the rare isotope 3He is 106 for a residual-gas pressure of 10-7 Torr in the vacuum system. The sensitivity is limited by collisions that result in the excitation of fast metastable atoms to Rydberg states in the field-free region, and by impact ionization of fast atoms in the region of the ionizer. It is shown that the ionization of helium atoms excited to n3D states occurs along the adiabatic and diabatic channels

  18. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  19. Energy characteristics of a transverse-discharge copper-vapor laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemev, A.Yu.; Babeiko, Yu.A.; Bakhtin, O.M.; Borovich, B.L.; Vasilev, L.A.; Gerts, V.E.; Nalegach, E.P.; Ratnikov, G.E.; Tatarintsev, L.V.; Ulianov, A.N.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental results on the characteristics of a transverse-discharge copper-vapor laser are presented. The average power of stimulated emission in the yellow and green lines is studied as a function of excitation pulse amplitude and repetition rate, temperature of discharge chamber walls, and buffer gas pressure. The volt-ampere characteristics of the discharge were determined. An average radiation power of 75 W was achieved for a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz.

  20. Transurethral holmium laser vaporization to the urethral tumour through a ureteroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zuo, Xiaoming; Feng ZHANG; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2014-01-01

    We present 2 cases of urethral cancers: one is recurrent bladder transitional cell carcinoma accompanied by urethral metastatic carcinoma located on the right side of verumontanum, and the other is primary bladder and metastatic urethral adenocarcinoma. The urethral tumour was treated by transurethral holmium laser vaporization to the urethral tumour through a ureteroscope and the bladder tumour was treated with transurethral resection and degeneration of the bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). After t...

  1. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Haniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4 fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures.

  2. 80-W green KTP laser used in photoselective laser vaporization of the prostrate by frequency doubling of Yb 3+ -doped large-mode area fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongxing; Li, Zhengjia

    2007-05-01

    Photoselective laser vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is the most promising method for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but KTP lasers used in PVP with lamp-pumped are low efficient .To increase the efficiency , we develop a 80-W, 400kHz, linearly polarized green laser based on a frequency-doubled fiber laser. A polarization-maintaining large-mode area (LMA) fiber amplifier generate polarized 1064nm fundamental wave by amplifying the seed signal from a composite Cr 4+:YAG-Nd 3+:YAG crystal fiber laser. The fundamental wave is injected into a KTP crystal with confined temperature management to achieve second harmonic generation (SHG). The overall electrical efficiency to the green portion of the spectrum is 10%.80-W maintenance-free long-lifetime KTP laser obtained can well satisfy the need of PVP.

  3. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A non-zero EDM shows the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and under the CPT invariance it means the CP violation. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ∼ 895. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to perform the search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e · cm. The important points to overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM are to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ∼106 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The developments of the laser system and optical equipments are in progress, and the present status and future plan of the experimental project is reported.

  4. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakemi, Y.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Liu, S.; Nataraj, H. S.; Oikawa, A.; Saito, M.; Sato, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Aoki, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Murakami, T.; Imai, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Wakasa, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2011-07-01

    An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A non-zero EDM shows the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and under the CPT invariance it means the CP violation. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to perform the search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e · cm. The important points to overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM are to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~106 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The developments of the laser system and optical equipments are in progress, and the present status and future plan of the experimental project is reported.

  5. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with 10B and 3He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C3F7I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation

  6. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  7. Imaging Atoms and Molecules with Strong Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Christopher

    We study multi-photon ionization of rare gas atoms and small molecules by infrared femtosecond laser pulses. We demonstrate that ionization is accurately described by a tunnelling model when many infrared photons are absorbed. By measuring photo-electron and photo-ion spectra, we show how the sub-Angstrom spatial resolution of tunnelling gives information about electron densities in the valence shell of atoms and molecules. The photo-electron and photo-ion momentum distributions are recorded with a velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer. We describe a tomographic method for imaging a 3-D momentum distribution of arbitrary symmetry using a 2-D VMI detector. We apply the method to measure the 3-D photo-electron distribution in elliptically polarized light. Using circularly polarized light, we show how the photo-electron momentum distribution can be used to measure the focused laser intensity with high precision. We demonstrate that the gradient of intensities present in a focused femtosecond pulse can be replaced by a single average intensity for a highly nonlinear process like multi-photon ionization. By studying photo-electron angular distributions over a range of laser parameters, we determine experimentally how the photon linear momentum is shared between the photo-electron, photo-ion and light field. We find the photo-electron carries only a portion of the total linear momentum absorbed. In addition we consider how angular momentum is shared in multi-photon ionization, and find the photo-electron receives all of the angular momentum absorbed. Our results demonstrate how optical and material properties influence the photo-electron spectrum in multi-photon ionization. These will have implications for molecular imaging using femtosecond laser pulses, and controlling the initial conditions of laser generated plasmas.

  8. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this program was to make quantitative measurements of the effects of higher-order phase/frequency correlations in a laser beam on nonlinear optical absorption processes in atoms. The success of this program was due in large part to a unique experimental capability for modulating the extracavity beam of a stabilized (approx-lt 200 kHz) continuous-wave laser with statistically-well-characterized stochastic phase (or frequency) fluctuations, in order to synthesize laser bandwidths to ∼20 MHz (depending on noise amplitude), with profiles variable between Gaussian and Lorentzian (depending on noise bandwidth). Laser driven processes investigated included the following: (1) the optical Autler-Towns effect in the 3S1/2 (F = 2, MF = 2) → 3P3/2 (F = 3, MF = 3) two- level Na resonance, using a weak probe to the 4D5/2 level; (2) the variance and spectra of fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the two-level Na resonance; (3) the Hanle effect in the 1S0 - 3P1, transition at λ = 555.6 nm in 174 Yb; (4) absorption (and gain) of a weak probe, when the probe is a time-delayed replica of the resonant (with the two-level Na transition) pump laser; and (5) four-wave-mixing in a phase-conjugate geometry, in a sodium cell, and, finally, in a diffuse atomic sodium beam. The experimental results from these several studies have provided important confirmation of advanced theoretical methods

  9. Interaction between laser-induced plasma/vapor and arc plasma during fiber laser-MIG hybrid welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid plasma is an important physical phenomenon in fiber laser-MIG hybrid welding. It greatly affects the stability of the process, the quality of the weld, and the efficiency of energy coupling. In this paper, clear and direct proofs of these characteristics are presented through high-speed video images. Spectroscopic analysis is used to describe the characterization of hybrid plasma. The hybrid plasma forms a curved channel between the welding wire and the keyhole during the fiber laser-MIG hybrid welding process. The curved channel is composed of two parts. The laser-induced plasma/vapor expands due to the combined effect of the laser and the MIG arc, forming an ionization duct, which is one part of the curved channel. The resistance of the duct is smaller than that of other locations because of the rise in electrical conductivity. Consequently, the electrical arc is guided through the duct to the surface of the material, which is the other part of the curved channel. The spectral intensities of metal elements in laser-MIG hybrid welding are much stronger than those in MIGonly welding, whereas the spectral intensities of shielding gas element in laser-MIG hybrid welding are much weaker

  10. Coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from Raman output coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyong He; Chunjia Huang

    2009-01-01

    The coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from a Raman output coupler,in which the sodium atoms in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) intcract with two light beams consisting of a weaker squeezed coherent probe light and a stronger classical coupling light,is investigated.The results show that in the case of a large mean number of BEC atoms and a weaker probe light field,the atom laser is antibunching,and this atom laser is second-order coherent if the number of BEC atoms in traps is large enough.

  11. High-speed microjet generation using laser-induced vapor bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudalov, Nikolai; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Peters, Ivo; Visser, Claas-Willem; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    The generation and evolution of microjets are studied both experimentally and numerically. The jets are generated by focusing a laser pulse into a microscopic capillary tube (~50 μm) filled with water-based red dye. A vapor bubble is created instantly after shooting the laser (microjet forms. The process of jet formation is captured using high-speed recordings at 1.0 × 106 fps. The velocity of the microjets can reach speeds of ~850 m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The high-speed recordings enable us to study the effect of several parameters on the jet velocity, e.g. the absorbed energy and the distance between the laser spot and the free surface.The results show a clear dependence on these variables, even for supersonic speeds. Comparisons with numerical simulations confirm the nature of these dependencies.

  12. Relationship between 578-nm (copper vapor) laser beam geometry and heat distribution within biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyasov, Ildar K.; Prikhodko, Constantin V.; Nevorotin, Alexey J.

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model and the thermoindicative tissue phantom were applied for evaluation of a depth of tissue necrosis (DTN) as a result of quasi-cw copper vapor laser (578 nm) irradiation. It has been shown that incident light focusing angle is essential for DTN. In particular, there was a significant rise in DTN parallel to elevation of this angle up to +20 degree(s)C and +5 degree(s)C for both the MC simulation and tissue phantom models, respectively, with no further increase in the necrosis depth above these angles. It is to be noted that the relationship between focusing angles and DTN values was apparently stronger for the real target compared to the MC-derived hypothetical one. To what extent these date are applicable for medical practice can be evaluated in animal models which would simulate laser-assisted therapy for PWS or related dermatologic lesions with converged 578 nm laser beams.

  13. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  14. Enabling Nanotechnology with Focused Ion Beams from Laser Cooled Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Orloff, J.; Maazouz, M.; McClelland, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Magneto-Optical Trap Ion Source (MOTIS) being developed at NIST has the potential to enable numerous advances in nanoscale science. In a MOTIS, atoms are captured into a MOT, photoionized, and accelerated to an energy of a few hundred eV to a few tens of kV. A beam formed in this way can be brought to a tight focus, competitive with the commercial focused ion beam machines deployed widely today. Additionally, the unique characteristics of this source, coupled with the user's choice of ion from the long and growing list of laser-coolable atomic species suggest that the MOTIS has the potential to advance the state of the art in applications such as imaging, nanofabrication, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and others. I will present high-resolution images from our lithium and chromium MOTIS-based focused ion beams and discuss applications which we will pursue with these new tools.

  15. Designing frustrated quantum magnets with laser-dressed Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaetzle, Alexander W; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1/2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1/2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments. PMID:25978228

  16. Adiabatic theory of ionization of atoms by intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a first step towards the adiabatic theory of ionization of atoms by intense laser pulses, here we consider the simplest one-dimensional zero-range potential model. The asymptotic solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the adiabatic regime is obtained and the photoelectron spectrum is calculated. The factorization formula for the photoelectron spectrum in the back-rescattering region, first suggested by Morishita et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013903 (2008)] on the basis of ab initio calculations, is derived analytically.

  17. Elucidating the Structure of Sugars: MW Spectroscopy Combined with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Cimas, Alvaro

    2013-06-01

    Carbohydrates are one of the most versatile biochemicalbuilding blocks, widely acting in energetic, structural or recognition processes. Even the small monosaccharides display unique structural and conformational freedom and may coexist in many open-chain or cyclic forms. We recently initiated the investigation of a series of monosaccharides using a combination of ultrafast laser vaporization and microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jet expansions. We present several structural studies on carbohydrates of aldoses and ketoses of five and six carbon sugars vaporized by UV ultrafast laser vaporization and stabilized in a jet expansion. The experimental evidence confirms that sugars exhibits a α-/β-pyranose conformation (6-membered ring), sharply contrasting with the furanose form (5-membered ring) found in the nature (as component of RNA, sucrose). In addition, thanks to the use of enriched samples, we have experimentally determined the substitution and effective structures. Finally, the structure of several monosaccharides was compared and common structural patterns of their conformational landscape will be showed. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, Á. Cimas, B. G. Davis, F. J. Basterretxea, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2845-2852, 2013.

  18. Thermal dynamics-based mechanism for intense laser-induced material surface vaporization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2008-09-01

    Laser material processing involving welding, ablation and cutting involves interaction of intense laser pulses of nanosecond duration with a condensed phase. Such interaction involving high brightness radiative flux causes multitude of non-linear events involving thermal phase transition at soild–liquid–gas interfaces. A theoretical perspective involving thermal dynamics of the vaporization process and consequent non-linear multiple thermal phase transitions under the action of laser plasma is the subject matter of the present work. The computational calculations were carried out where titanium (Ti) was treated as a condensed medium. The solution to the partial differential equations governing the thermal dynamics and the underlying phase transition event in the multiphase system is based on non-stationary Eulerian variables. The Mach number depicts significant fluctuations due to thermal instabilities associated with the laser beam flux and intensity. A conclusive amalgamation has been established which relates material surface temperature profile to laser intensity, laser flux and the pressure in the plasma cloud.

  19. Physics of zinc vaporization and plasma absorption during CO2 laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of mathematical models have been developed earlier for single-material laser welding processes considering one-, two-, and three-dimensional heat and mass transfers. However, modeling of laser welding of materials with multiple compositions has been a difficult problem. This paper addresses a specific case of this problem where CO2 laser welding of zinc-coated steel, commonly used in automobile body manufacturing, is mathematically modeled. The physics of a low boiling point material, zinc, is combined with a single-material (steel) welding model, considering multiple physical phenomena such as keyhole formation, capillary and thermocapillary forces, recoil and vapor pressures, etc. The physics of laser beam-plasma interaction is modeled to understand the effect on the quality of laser processing. Also, an adaptive meshing scheme is incorporated in the model for improving the overall computational efficiency. The model, whose results are found to be in close agreement with the experimental observations, can be easily extended for studying zinc-coated steel welding using other high power, continuous wave lasers such as Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG

  20. Delta-doping of boron atoms by photoexcited chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron delta-doped structures in Si crystals were fabricated by means of photoexcited chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Core electronic excitation with high-energy photons ranging from vacuum ultraviolet to soft x rays decomposes B2H6 molecules into fragments. Combined with in situ monitoring by spectroscopic ellipsometry, limited number of boron hydrides can be delivered onto a Si(100) surface by using the incubation period before the formation of a solid boron film. The boron-covered surface is subsequently embedded in a Si cap layer by Si2H6 photo-excited CVD. The crystallinity of the Si cap layer depended on its thickness and the substrate temperature. The evaluation of the boron depth profile by secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that boron atoms were confined within the delta-doped layer at a concentration of 2.5 x 1020 cm-3 with a full width at half maximum of less than 9 nm, while the epitaxial growth of a 130-nm-thick Si cap layer was sustained at 420 deg. C.

  1. Conversion of bright magneto-optical resonances into dark at fixed laser frequency for D2 excitation of atomic rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalvans, Linards; Mozers, Arturs; Opalevs, Dmitrijs

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances on the hyperfine transitions belonging to the D2 line of rubidium were changed from bright to dark resonances by changing the laser power density of the single exciting laser field or by changing the vapor temperature in the cell. In one set of experiments atoms were excited by linearly polarized light from an extended cavity diode laser with polarization vector perpendicular to the light's propagation direction and magnetic field, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was observed along the direction of the magnetic field, which was scanned. A low-contrast bright resonance was observed at low laser power densities when the laser was tuned to the Fg=2 --> Fe=3 transition of Rb-87 and near to the Fg=3 --> Fe=4 transition of Rb-85. The bright resonance became dark as the laser power density was increased above 0.6mW/cm2 or 0.8 mW/cm2, respectively. When the Fg=2 --> Fe=3 transition of Rb-87 was excited with circularly polarized light in a second set of experiments, a bright r...

  2. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO2, H2 and H2O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L-1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L-1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  3. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  4. Titanium atom detection by resonance fluorescence excited with a nitrogen laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coincidence of wave lengths of nitrogen laser basing lines and resonance transitions in titanium atom is investigated. It is shown that resonance fluorescence excited by nitrogen laser can be used for absolute titanium atom density measurements. Experiments on titanium atom detection in a vapour cloud formed under irradiation of a titanium target in vacuum by dye laser pulse, are conducted. Fluorescence extinguishing is observed under high evaporation power

  5. QUANTUM STATISTICS OF AN ATOM LASER IN THEPRESENCE OF A STRONG INPUT LIGHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING HUI; MIAO YUAN-XIU; HAN YI-ANG

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of quantum dynamical theory, we present a new method to control the quantum statistics of an atom laser by applying a powerful input light. Differing from the case in the rotating wave approximation, the non-classical properties can appear in the output atom laser beam with the evolution of time. By choosing a suitable phase of the input light, it is capable of realizing a steady and brighter output of coherent atom laser.

  6. Controlling quantum coherence of atom laser by light with strong strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING; Hui(景辉); GE; Molin(葛墨林); GE; Molin(葛墨林)

    2002-01-01

    A new method for controlling the quantum coherence of atom laser by applying input light with strong strength is presented within the framework of quantum dynamical theory. Unlike the case of rotating wave approximation(RWA), we show that the non-classical properties, such as sub-Poisson distribution and quadrature squeezed effect, can appear in the output atom laser beam with time. By choosing suitable initial RF phase, a steady and brighter output of squeezed coherent atom laser is also available.

  7. Ionization of hydrogen atom by electron impact in the presence of elliptically polarized laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of ionization in electron hydrogen atom collision in the presence of elliptically polarized laser field, is investigated. The use of the higher order modification of the atomic bound state wave function shows that there is a strong enhancement in the cross section when the laser frequency is half the atomic transition frequency. The dependence of the cross section on the polarization of the laser field is also discussed. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs

  8. A study on laser power balance in a multi-step ionization process of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on rate equation a theoretical study on laser power balance in a resonance multi-step ionization process of atoms has been presented in this paper. The calculation results made for a typical three-level atom show that there is an optimization laser power assignment when the total pumping laser power is limited, and under the optimization laser power assignment the ionization probability of a three-level atom can reach its maximum value. This conclusion is very different from that obtained under saturation excitation conditions. The method used here can be applied to more complicated multi-step ionization process of atoms. (authors)

  9. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone towards space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21...

  10. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-28

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of electrothermal atomization diode laser Zeeman- and wavelength-modulated atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry by using a near-infrared diode laser with and without Zeeman and wavelength modulation were carried out with graphite furnace electrothermal atomization. Analytical curves and limits of detection were compared. The magnetic field was modulated with 50 Hz, and the wavelength of the diode laser with 10 kHz. Coherent forward scattering was measured with crossed and slightly uncrossed polarizers. The results show that the detection limits of atomic absorption spectrometry are roughly the same as those of coherent forward scattering spectrometry with crossed polarizers. According to the theory with bright flicker noise limited laser sources the detection limits and linear ranges obtained with coherent forward scattering spectrometry with slightly uncrossed polarizers are significantly better than those obtained with crossed polarizers and with atomic absorption spectrometry. This is due to the fact that employing approaches of polarization spectroscopy reduce laser intensity fluctuations to their signal carried fractions

  12. A Scheme of Generating and Spatially Separating Two-Component Entangled Atom Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Jing, Hui; Liu, Xin; Zhan, Ming-sheng; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Entanglement of remote atom lasers is obtained via quantum state transfer technique from lights to matter waves in a five-level $M$-type system. The considered atom-atom collisions can yield an effective Kerr susceptibility for this system and lead to the self- and cross- phase modulation between the two output atom lasers. This effect results in generation of entangled states of output fields. Particularly, under different conditions of space-dependent control fields, the entanglement of ato...

  13. In-situ vaporization and matrix removal for the determination of rare earth impurities in zirconium dioxide by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method for the determination of trace rare earth impurities in ZrO2 powder has been developed based on electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A polytetrafluoroethylene slurry was used as a fluorinating reagent to convert both the matrix (Zr) and the analytes (rare earth elements) into fluorides with different volatilities at a high temperature in a graphite furnace. The more volatile ZrF4 was removed in-situ by selective vaporization prior to the determination of the analytes, removing matrix spectral interferences. Under optimum operating conditions, the absolute detection limits of the analytes varied from 0.04 ng (Yb) to 0.50 ng (Pr) with relative standard deviations less than 5%. The recommended approach has been successfully applied to the determination of trace rare earth impurities (La, Pr, Eu, Gd, Ho and Yb) in ZrO2 powder and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by pneumatic nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after the separation of the matrix using a solvent extraction procedure

  14. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229 nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J. M.; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the 4th harmonic using two successive second harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier as a...

  15. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  16. CO2 - LASER RADIATION ABSORPTION IN 1000 CM-1 WATER VAPOR CONTINUUM

    OpenAIRE

    Aref'Ev, V.; Sizov, N.; Dianov-Klokov, V.; V. Ivanov

    1980-01-01

    Water vapor absorption of CO2-laser radiation at R 40, R 10, P 20, P 32 lines of the 10.4µ band and R 10, R 18, R 44 lines of the 9.4µ band has been investigated in the laboratory. The results obtained are compared with the measurements of 10-13µ solar radiation attenuation. The experimental facts strongly support the assumption that water dimers play an important role in the 8-13µ region. The analysis of field and laboratory experiments allow the following conclusion : under most meteorologi...

  17. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  18. Preliminary results on diode-laser assisted vaporization of prostate tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Seitz, Michael; Reich, Oliver; Bachmann, Alexander; Steinbrecher, Verena; Ackermann, Alexander; Stief, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Introduction and objectives: The aim was to identify the capability and the laser parameter of under water tissue vaporisation by means of a diode laser (1470 nm). Afterwards the feasibility and postoperative clinical outcome of vaporization of the prostate was investigated. Method: After acquiring suitable laser parameters in in-vitro experiments using a perfused tissue model patients (n=10) suffering from bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated by diode laser. Their clinical outcome, in terms of acceptance and post-operatively voiding were evaluated. The diode laser emitted light of the wavelength of 1470 nm at 50 W (Biolitec GmbH) and delivered to the tissue by means of a side-fire fibre introduced through a 24F continuous-flow cystoscope. Normal saline was used for irrigation with an additive of 1% ethanol. The prostatic lobes (volume range 35-80ml) were vaporized within the prostatic capsular using sweeping and push and pull technique. The mean time of laser application was 2400 sec (1220-4000 sec) resulting in applied energies of 121 kJ in the mean (range: 61-200kJ). Results: During laser treatment none of the 10 patients showed any significant blood loss or any fluid absorption (no ethanol uptake). Foley catheters were removed between 18 and 168 hours postoperatively (mean: 49.8h+/-46h). After removal of the catheter the mean peak urine flow rate increased from 8.9ml/s +/- 2.9ml/s pre-operatively in comparison to 15.7ml/s +/- 5 ml/s (p=0.049) post-operatively. 8/10 patients were satisfied with their voiding outcome. None of the patients showed appearance of urgency, dysuria, hematuria, or incontinence but two patients required re-catheterization. After a follow-up of 1month, 8/10 patients showed evidence of good results and are satisfied with the outcome. Two patients required consecutive TUR-P. After a follow-up of 6-month the 8 patients are still satisfied. Conclusions: This very early and limited experience using

  19. Study of the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three aspects of the interactions of atoms with high intensity laser fields were treated. All three were motivated by experiment. The first investigation was prompted by a recent experiment (Kruit et al. 1983) involving multiphoton ionization of Xe. In this experiment it was found that the photoelectron energy spectrum contained peaks that corresponded to the absorption of more than the minimum number of photons required to ionize the atom. A model approximation here showed good qualitative agreement with experiment. An experiment (Grove et al. 1977) designed to test a theoretical calculation of the dynamical Stark effect stimulated the second part of this thesis, namely: a study of how an adiabatically and near-adiabatically changing field intensity affects the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a two-level atom. It was found that there is an asymmetry in the spectrum for off-resonance excitation produced because the field turn-on repopulates the dressed state that is depopulated by spontaneous emission. The third part of this thesis was based on an experiment (Granneman and Van der Wiel 1976) that attempted to verify a perturbation calculation of the two-photon ionization cross section of Cs. A discrepancy of four orders of magnitude near a minimum in the cross section was found between theory and experiment. To explain this discrepancy it was suggested (Armstrong and Beers 1977) that the effective order of nonlinearity (k) for this process varied significantly around the minimum. This study involves a perturbation calculation of k. It was found that k varies rapidly around the minimum, and that this variation should be experimentally observable for laser intensities of the order of tens of GW cm-2

  20. Some new trends in laser isotope separation in atomic vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New approaches to the methods of laser isotope separation are considered and realised which substantially extend the possibilities of the methods. To narrow down an absorption line and decrease parasitic absorption at transitions in isotope atoms that do not belong to an isotope being separated, two-photon excitation of atoms was used both in collinear and counterpropagating light beams. By using two-photon excitation in counterpropagating light beams, the weight amounts of Zn isotopes were separated under the conditions when the isotopic structure of a resonance transition was completely masked by the Doppler broadening. Two-photon excitation in collinear beams was used for efficient purification of lead from a rare 210Pb isotope to obtain a low-radioactive lead. A detailed computer simulation of separation of isotopes of Zn, B, Pb, and Si using two-photon excitation was performed. An efficient method of isotope separation involving chemical reactions with selectively excited long-lived atoms was proposed and realised. The method offers some advantages over the conventional photoionisation method. (invited paper)

  1. Confinement of ultracold atoms in a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam created with diffractive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Sharon A; Farrar, J Tom; Akin, T G; Krzyzewski, S; Abraham, E R I

    2013-01-01

    We report 2D confinement of Rb 87 atoms in a Laguerre-Gaussian laser beam. Changing of the sign of the detuning from the atomic resonance dramatically alters the geometry of the confinement. With the laser detuned to the blue, the atoms are confined to the dark, central node of the Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. This trapping method leads to low ac Stark shifts to the atomic levels. Alternatively, by detuning the laser to the red of the resonance, we confine atoms to the high intensity outer ring in a multiply-connected, toroidal configuration. We model the confined atoms to determine azimuthal intensity variations of the trapping laser, caused by slight misalignments of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode generating optics.

  2. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood. PMID:27432235

  3. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood.

  4. Multiphoton ionization of the hydrogen atom exposed to circularly or linearly polarized laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the multiphoton ionization of the hydrogen atom exposed to the linearly or circularly polarized laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It finds that the ratio of the ionization probabilities by linearly and circularly polarized laser pulses varies with the numbers of absorbing photons. With the same laser intensity, the circularly polarized laser pulse favors to ionize the atom with more ease than the linearly polarized laser pulse if only two or three photons are necessary to be absorbed. For the higher order multiphoton ionization, the linearly polarized laser pulse has the advantage over circularly polarized laser pulse to ionize the atom. (atomic and molecular physics)

  5. Fabrication of CdTe solar cells by laser-driven physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Liu, S.; Nguyen, M.; Aydinli, A.; Tsien, L.H.; Bohn, R.G. (Toledo Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-05-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells were fabricated for the first time using a laser-driven physical vapor deposition method. An XeCl excimer laser was used to deposit both of the II-VI semiconductor layers in a single vacuum chamber from pressed powder targets. Results are presented from optical absorption. Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and electrical characterization of the films. Solar cells were fabricated by deposition onto SnO{sub 2}-coated glass with top contacts produced by gold evaporation. Device performance was evaluated from the spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements in the dark and with air mass 1.5 solar illumination. (orig.).

  6. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  7. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom

  8. High-temperature quadrupole mass spectrometer for studying vaporization from materials heated by a CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mass spectrometry techniques in studying vaporization from selected materials, we designed a mass spectrometer than can be used either with a continuous wave or pulsed laser heating system or with a conventional furnace heating system. Our experimental apparatus, the components of which are described in detail, consisted of a quadrupole mass spectrometer positioned in a crossed-beam configuration, controlling electronics, a data acquisition system, a vacuum system, a cryogenic collimation system, and a laser heating system. Results of mass spectral scans taken during laser pyrolysis of polymeric materials and laser vaporization of graphite were compatible with data reported in other studies. Results of mass spectral studies of laser-induced combustion in the Ti + C system are also presented

  9. Relativistic theory of atom-laser interactions at very high laser intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-frequency approximation of Kristic and Mittleman is considered in detail as a basis for the relativistic theory of the atom-laser interactions. The properties of the 3D potentials are discussed. Within a one-dimensional model, similar to that employed by Kylstra, Ermolaev, and Joachain in ab initio calculations on the time-dependent Dirac equation, the electron mass-shift due to dressing by a superstrong laser field is investigated. In the full domain of the laser parameters, frequency ω and the peak field strength Ε0, the 1D bound states exhibit remarkable features. The numerical calculations show the existence of a very wide intermediate range of the field strengths where, in the zeroth-order of the high-frequency approximation, the binding is stabilized by the field

  10. Laser scattering diagnostics of an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.; Seong, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The radial profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in contact with vaporized water, which is driven by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency by means of the Thomson and Raman laser scattering methods. There is a distinct difference in the radial profiles of the plasma parameters between plasmas in contact with water and those without water contact. In the case of plasmas without vaporized water contact, all the parameters have a single-peak distribution with maximum values at the center of the discharge. In the case of plasmas in contact with vaporized water, all parameters have double-peak distributions; a neighboring peak appears beside the main peak. The new peak may have originated from the ripple of the water surface, which works as a cathode, and the peak of the ripple offers a sharp curvature point, playing the role of a pin. Our experimental results and the underlying physics are described in detail.

  11. Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

  12. Two Types of Mass Abundance Distributions for Anionic Carbon Clusters Investigated by Laser Vaporization and Pulsed Molecular Beam Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; NI Guo-Quan; XUZhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Two types of mass spectra for anionic carbon clusters Cn- have been revealed using laser vaporization and pulsed molecular beam techniques. The less structured mass spectrum characteristic of the magic-numbers at n = 5, 8,11, 15, and 17 is established at the early stage of the cluster formation process, namely, in the laser vaporization process. The more structured one is featured for a regular odd-even alternation and the magic numbers at n =10, 12, 16, 18, 22, and 28, and has been developed only after extensive clustering and qnenching processes, where low-energy electron attachment plays a vital role. Transition between these two types of mass spectra can be realized by controlling either the strength of the pulsed gas flow or the synchronism between the gas flow and the laser vaporization.

  13. Behavior of vapor/plasma within the keyhole and above the workpiece during CO2 laser penetration welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a high-speed camera and an optical emission monitor were used to study the behavior of vapor/plasma during CO2 laser welding of SUS304 stainless steel. Results of optical emission from vapor/plasma show that two characteristic frequency bands exist, 100-500 Hz and 1 500-3 500 Hz. At the same time, the changing images of vapor/plasma and bottom pool also confirm that there are two different fluctuation frequency bands. One of the frequency bands represents the characteristic of vapor/plasma within the keyhole, and it is within 167-500 Hz. Another frequency band is within 1 500-3 500 Hz, and it obviously derives from the shielding gas. Some factors may cause these frequency differences between the keyhole plasma and the shielding gas plasma. One of them is that the vapor/plasma pressure within the keyhole will increase slowly.

  14. Creation of an Ultracold Plasma by Photoionizing Laser-Cooled Cesium Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Qun; FENG Zhi-Gang; ZHANG Lin-Jie; LI Chang-Yong; ZHAO Jian-Ming; JIA Suo-Tang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The signals of ultracold plasma are observed by two-photon ionization of laser-cooled atom in a caesium magneto-optical trap.A simple model has been introduced to explain the creation of plasma, and the mechanism is further investigated by changing the energy of a pulsed dye laser and the number of initial cooled atoms.

  15. Stationary entanglement between two spatially separated atoms driven by a coherent laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Xiang-Ping; Fang Mao-Fa; Zheng Xiao-Juan; Cai Jian-Wu

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies quantum entanglement between two spatially separated atoms driven by a coherent laser field in the dissipative process of spontaneous emission. It is shown that the entanglement strongly depends on the detuning of the laser frequency from atomic transition frequency, the interatomic separation and the Rabi frequency of the coherent laser field. A considerable amount of steady state entanglement can be obtained near △ = -α(i.e., the dipole-dipole interaction and the detuning cancel out mutually) for small atomic separation and large Rabi frequency of the coherent laser field.

  16. Role of fluorine atoms in the oxidation-hydrolysis process of plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, O.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Palacio, C. (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain))

    The oxidation and/or hydrolysis of a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition fluorinated silicon nitride film in a moisture atmosphere has been studied. The film presents fluorine atoms incorporated as -SiF, -SiF[sub 2], -SiF[sub 3], and [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n] groups. The open structure of the film, due to the high fluorine content as [-SiF[sub 2]-][sub n], favors the penetration of oxygen and water molecules in the network. The evolution of the film has been explained by the different reactivity of the silicon atoms depending on their chemical environment. The role of fluorine atoms incorporated into the film has been established. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  18. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  19. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  20. Ionization of hydrogen atom by X-ray absorption in the presence of optical laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of X-rays in hydrogen atom considering the irradiation of the target by an intense optical laser of frequency ω is studied. It is found that the terms of the modified scattering amplitude has different dependence on polarization vectors of X-ray fields and laser fields. There is resonance in the differential cross section for absorption at different frequencies when ω (the laser frequency) becomes nearly equal to atomic transition frequency. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs

  1. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  2. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  3. Efficient multiple time scale method for modeling compressible vapor plume dynamics inside transient keyhole during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Li, Wen; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili

    2016-03-01

    Efficient coupling modeling of multiple time scale interactions between keyhole, weld pool and compressible vapor plume during laser welding has long been limited. To address this problem, we present a highly efficient multiple time scale method combining a novel dual-time stepping and Ghost Fluid interpolation strategy with incompressible and compressible fluid solvers, which allows us predicting the compressible plume dynamics inside transient keyhole in fiber laser welding for the first time. In our method, the compressible dynamic vapor inside the transient keyhole is solved with a Roe scheme based algorithm and the incompressible molten liquid of weld pool is calculated by a Projection method. A novel temperature dependent boundary condition of vapor plume is also proposed for the consideration of the dynamic evaporation phenomena on the transient keyhole wall. It is found that the time dependent distributions of vapor plume characteristics, including temperature, pressure, velocity, density and Mach number distributions inside the transient keyhole induced by laser welding can be reasonably predicted by comparing to experimental and literature data. It is also shown that the proposed multiple time scale method is around 60 times faster than the vapor plume modeling method using a single nanosecond scale time step. For the vapor plume in a typical fiber laser welding process, the results indicate that the peak pressure can be greater than 2.0 atmospheric pressures; the average density is around 0.15-0.3 kg/m3 which is much smaller than the air density; and the local Mach number can be greater than 0.8 or even 1.0 Mach which demonstrates the necessity to treat the vapor plume as a compressible fluid.

  4. Dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during deep penetration fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Li, Wen; Chen, Xin; Gong, Shuili

    2016-07-01

    The compressible metallic vapor plume or plasma plume behaviors in the keyhole during deep penetration laser welding have significant effects on the joint quality. However, these behaviors and their responses to process parameter variations have not been well understood. In this paper, we first systematically study the dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during fiber laser welding of 304 stainless steels based on a multiple timescale multiphase model. The time-dependent temperature, pressure, velocity and Mach number distributions of vapor plume under different process parameters are theoretically predicted. It is found that the distributions of the main physical characteristics of vapor plume such as pressure, velocity as well as Mach number in keyhole are usually highly uneven and highly time dependent. The peak difference of the velocity, pressure, temperature and Mach number of the vapor plume in a keyhole could be greater than 200 m/s, 20 kPa, 1000 K and 0.6 Mach, respectively. The vapor plume characteristics in a transient keyhole can experience significant changes within several hundreds of nanoseconds. The formation mechanisms of these dynamic characteristics are mainly due to the mesoscale keyhole hump (sized in several tens of microns) dynamics. It is also demonstrated that it is possible to suppress the oscillations of compressible vapor plume in the keyhole by improving the keyhole stability through decreasing the heat input. However, stabilizing the keyhole could only weaken, but not eliminate, the observed highly uneven and transient characteristics. This finding may pose new challenges for accurate experimental measurements of vapor plume induced by laser welding.

  5. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Shcheglov, P. Yu.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Gumenyuk, A. V.; Rethmeier, M.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted spectroscopic studies of the welding plasma formed in the process of welding with an ytterbium fiber laser delivering output power of up to 20 kW. The influence of shielding gases (Ar, He) on different parts of the welding plume is investigated. The absorption coefficient of the laser radiation by the welding-plume plasma is estimated. Scattering of 532-nm probe radiation from particles of the condensed metal vapor within the caustic of a high-power fiber laser beam is measured. Based on the obtained results, conclusions are made on the influence of the plasma formation and metal vapor condensation on the radiation of the high-power fiber laser and the stability of the welding process.

  6. Analysis of Nanometer Structure for Chromium Atoms in Gauss Standing Laser Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua; XIONG Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The equation of motion of two-level chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is discussed and the distribution of chromium atoms is given under different transverse velocity conditions.The results show that the focusing position of atoms will be affected by the transverse velocity of atoms.Based on the four-order Runge-Kutta method,the locus of chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is simulated.The three-dimensional characteristics of nanometer structures are stimulated under perfect and emanative conditions.

  7. Quantum Statistical Behaviors of Interaction of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate with Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated quantum statistical behaviors of photons and atoms in interaction of an atomic Bose Einstein condensate with quantized laser field. When the quantized laser field is initially prepared in a superposition state which exhibits holes in its photon-number distribution, while the atomic field is initially in a Fock state, it is found that there is energy exchange between photons and atoms. For the input and output states, the photons and atoms may exhibit the sub-Poissonian distribution. The input and output laser fields may exhibit quadrature squeezing, but for the atomic field, only the output state exhibits quadrature squeezing. It is shown that there exists the violation of the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality, which means that the correlation between photons and atoms is nonclassical.``

  8. Explosive vaporization induced by high-power CO2-laser target interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions of high-power laser pulses with targets such as metals or dielectric materials causes a series of optical, thermal, and mechanical processes. Thereby, heating, melting, and vaporization can take place in a short time. At power densities of about 107 to several 108 W/cm2 this can even be produced explosively. As compared to continuous ablation, this type of interaction can remove greater masses from the bulk of material. The investigations are performed by using an electron-beam preionized CO2-laser acting on different target materials. The energy of the laser pulses is about 30 J, the pulse-half-widths of the long-tail pulses 4 to 6 μs. Optical measurements yield some information on threshold values for these processes, for the formation and expansion of plasmas, and for the ejection of material in form of greater particles. High speed photographic techniques include a rotating mirror- and an image converter camera. Starting from shock-wave theory, gas dynamic equations (in unidimensional approximation) allow for a quantitative determination of the specific internal energies and pressures in the case of optical detonation. (orig.)

  9. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K2Cr2O7/H2SO4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L-1 of Hg2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L-1 (0.14 μg kg-1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L-1

  10. Determination of mercury in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with direct reduction in microemulsion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Luna, Aderval Severino

    2005-06-01

    The determination of Hg in gasoline by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, after direct aqueous NaBH 4 reduction in a three-component (microemulsion) medium, was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing gasoline with propan-1-ol and 50% v / v HNO 3 at a 20 : 15 : 1 volume ratio. A long-term homogeneous system was immediately formed this way. After reduction, the Hg vapor generated in a reaction flask was transported to an intermediate K 2Cr 2O 7/H 2SO 4 trap solution in order to avoid poisoning of the Au-Pt trap by the gasoline vapors. A second reduction step was then conducted and the generated Hg vapor transported to the Au-Pt trap, followed by thermal release of Hg 0 and atomic absorption measurement. Purified N 2 was used as purge and transport gas. After multivariate optimization by central composite design calibration graphs showed coefficients of correlation of 0.9999 and a characteristic mass of 2 ng was obtained. Typical coefficients of variation of 5% and 6% were found for ten consecutive measurements at concentration levels of 1 and 8 μg L -1 of Hg 2+, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.10 μg L -1 (0.14 μg kg -1) in the original sample. A total measurement cycle took 11 min, permitting duplicate analysis of 3 samples per hour. The results obtained with the proposed procedure in the analysis of commercial gasoline samples were in agreement with those obtained by a comparative procedure. Gasoline samples of the Rio de Janeiro city have shown Hg concentrations below 0.27 μg L -1.

  11. THE M-M TRANSITION LASERS IN STRONTIUM VAPOR%锶蒸气M-M跃迁激光

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚志欣; 潘佰良; 陈钢; 方本民; 陈星; 陈坤

    2001-01-01

    通过在锶蒸气和氦混合气体中的高重复率脉冲放电,同时获得了锶原子4条谱线的激光振荡,它们对应于复三能级4d*3D3,2,1与5p*3P02,1,0之间的多谱线跃迁,其波长分别为2.92μm,3.01μm,2.69μm和2.60μm.除了3.01μm激光外,均为首次报道.激光平均功率合计约10mW,相互之间的强度比为5∶4∶4∶1.在分析了相关能级特征和实验现象的基础上,对其作用机理进行了初步的探讨,建议将其分类命名为M-M跃迁激光.%A set of laser oscillations of four strontium atom spectral lines simultaneity have been obtained, through high|repetition|frequency pulsed discharge in mixed gases of strontium vapor and helium buffer gas. The corresponding wavelengths with the transitions from compound three|energy levels 4d*3D3,2,1 to 5p*3P02,1,0 are 2.92μm, 3.01μm, 2.69μm and 2.60μm respectively,their ratios of intensities are 5∶4∶4∶1 and the total average laser power is 10mW.As far as we know,the laser spectral lines have never been reported except 3.01μm.On the basis of analyzing characteristics of corresponding energy levels and experimental phenomena,the action mechanism is discussed primarily.We suggest the classification of the spectral lines to be named as M|M transition laser.

  12. Development of long life pulse power supply for copper vapor laser. Do joki laser yo chojumyo reiki dengen no kaihatsu. ; Saidai shutsuryoku unten oyobi laser hasshin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, T.; Goto, N.; Nemoto, K. (Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-04-01

    Long life pulse power supply for Cu vapor laser was developed. This is composed of the pulse generation circuit and the pulse compression circuit. Current pulse of 10 mu second pulse width is generated in the pulse generating circuit by switching electric charge on the condensor charged through GTO (gate turn off) thyristors. The pulse compression circuit makes the current pulse fast to 300ms utilizing the difference of inductance at the saturation and the unsaturation on the circuit which uses a reactor having saturable property using a ferromagnetic substance for the core as the magnetic switch. The operation was carried out at the GTO generasting full power. Co base amorphous alloy of low loss was used for the core of saturable inductor and the circuit efficiency of 77% could be obtained by suppressing the heat generation in core even at 4,000Hz operation. The full output power of 8.2kW was possible which corresponds to 100W class laser oscillation. Repeated Cu vapor laser oscillation of 30W succeeded at the condition of 4,000Hz and power supply output of 5.9kW. 7 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers: Conception and characterization of a single mode source for Cesium atoms manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers currently used in atomic clocks or inertial sensors are suffering from a lack of power, narrow linewidth or compactness for future spatial missions. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers, which combine the approach of classical solid state lasers and the engineering of semiconductor laser, are considered here as a candidate to a metrological laser source dedicated to the manipulation of Cesium atoms in these instruments. These lasers have demonstrated high power laser emission in a circular single transverse mode, as well as single longitudinal mode emission, favoured by the semiconductor structure and the external cavity design. We study the definition and the characterization of a proper semiconductor structure for the cooling and the detection of Cesium atoms at 852 nm. A compact and robust prototype tunable on the Cesium D2 hyperfine structure is built. The laser frequency is locked to an atomic transition thanks to a saturated absorption setup. The emission spectral properties are investigated, with a particular attention to the laser frequency noise and the laser linewidth. Finally, we describe and model the thermal properties of the semiconductor structure, which enables the simulation of the laser power characteristic. The experimental parameters are optimised to obtain the maximum output power with our structure. Thanks to our analysis, we propose several ways to overcome these limitations, by reducing the structure heating. (authors)

  14. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229 nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, Yushi; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the 4th harmonic using two successive second harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes $^{111}$Cd and $^{113}$Cd, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  15. Frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to realize a frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top. To reach that goal, the author first presents the calculation of atomic vapour density by means of laser absorption ratio measure and studies the dye laser working. It is then necessary to find a device giving the required precision on the frequency of the absorption line choosen. It is obtained thanks to the atomic line reconstitution by optogalvanic effect which gives the reference. Besides, the author presents the necessity of a laser emission power regulation which is obtained thanks to a device including an acoustic and optic modulator. A reliable and accurate captor is choosen and adjusted testing various hollow cathode lamps. The method to obtain the frequency lock of laser emission on iron atomic line top is described. (TEC). 18 refs., 64 figs

  16. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  17. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Schkolnik, V; Wenzlawski, A; Grosse, J; Kohfeldt, A; Döringshoff, K; Wicht, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Braxmaier, C; Krutzik, M; Peters, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone towards space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 liters and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technol...

  18. Frequency doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Theron, Fabien; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Zahzam, Nassim; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A compact and robust laser system, based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser, providing all the lasers needed for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices is presented. Thanks to an optical switch at 1.5 \\mu m and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is needed for all the laser system. Our system delivers at 780 nm a power of 900 mW with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a power of 650 mW with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  19. Time-resolved ionization of the hydrogen atom in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the strong field approximation to study the single-photon ionization of the hydrogen atom in the time domain. During the interaction of the laser pulse and the atom, the electron is pumped to the Volkov state and has a widely energy distribution at the beginning of the laser pulse. With the time evolution, only the photon-electron with the energy hra - Ip is survived, where to is the laser angular frequency, and Ip is the ionization potential of the atom. Therefore we observed how the energy spectrum of the ionized electron builds in the time domain.

  20. DPAL: a new class of CW near-infrared high-power diode-pumped alkali (vapor) lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, William F.; Beach, Raymond J.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2004-05-01

    DPAL, a new class of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers, offers the prospect for high efficiency cw laser radiation at near-infrared wavelengths: cesium 895 nm, rubidium 795 nm, and potassium 770 nm. The physics of DPAL lasers are outlined, and the results of laboratory demonstrations using a titanium sapphire surrogate pump are summarized, along with benchmarked device models. DPAL electrical efficiencies of 25-30% are projected and near-diffraction-limited DPAL device power scaling into the multi-kilowatt regime from a single aperture is also projected.

  1. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  2. Multiphoton resonant ionization of hydrogen atom exposed to two-colour laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the multiphoton resonant ionization by two-colour laser pulses in the hydrogen atom by solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. By fixing the parameters of fundamental laser field and scanning the frequency of second laser field, it finds that the ionization probability shows several resonance peaks and is also much larger than the linear superposition of probabilities by applying two lasers separately. The enhancement of the ionization happens when the system is resonantly pumped to the excited states by absorbing two or more colour photons non-sequentially. (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. Coherent population transfer in Rydberg potassium atom by a single frequency-chirped laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xian-Zhou; Ma Qiao-Zhi; Li Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    By using the time-dependent multilevel approach, we have calculated the coherent population transfer among the quantum states of potassium atom by a single frequency-chirped laser pulse. The results show that the population can be efficiently transferred to a target state and be trapped there by using an ‘intuitive’ or a ‘counter-intuitive’ frequency sweep laser pulse in the case of ‘narrowband’ frequency-chirped laser pulse. It is also found that a pair of sequential ‘broadband’ frequency-chirped laser pulses can efficiently transfer population from one ground state of the A atom to the other one.

  4. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  5. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-04-24

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included.

  6. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Power, E. P.; George, L; Vanderelzen, B.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S. M.; Raithel, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integr...

  7. Laser agitates probability flow in atoms to form alternating current and its peak-dip phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Huai-Yang

    2016-01-01

    By using trajectory-based approaches to quantum transition, it is found that laser can agitate the probability flow in atoms to form alternating current with the frequency of the laser. The detailed physical process of quantum transition is investigated, during which the alternating current in atomic probability flow becomes a key role connecting the external electromagnetic wave with the evolution of the quantum states in atoms. Computer was employed to simulate the physical process. The atomic alternating current may have the peak-dip phenomenon.

  8. Charge states of high Z atoms in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a numerical solution of the Thomas-Fermi atom in the presence of a static electric field as a model of the adiabatic response of a heavy atom in the presence of a strong laser field. In this semiclassical approach, we calculate the resulting charge state of the atom and its induced dipole moment after the field is turned on. Due to the scaling properties of the Thomas-Fermi approach, the resulting total atomic charge and dipole moment can be expressed as a universal function of the field. We compare our results with recent ionization experiments performed on noble gases using laser fields. 7 refs., 5 figs

  9. Proposed search for an electric-dipole moment using laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experiment to search for a permanent atomic electric-dipole moment (EDM) using laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb atoms launched in an atomic fountain. A uniform B field sets the quantization axis, and the Ramsey separated-oscillatory-fields method is used to measure the Zeeman precession frequency of the atoms. Laser beams of appropriate polarization are used for preparation and detection in a given magnetic sublevel. The signature of an EDM is a shift in the Ramsey resonance correlated w...

  10. Novel laser atomic fluorescence spectrometer for environmental and biomedical analyses of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Parmer, Keith D.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the development of a novel experimental set-up using laser atomic fluorescence for detection and concentration measurements of heavy metal atoms for environmental and biomedical analyses. This spectrometer is based on the application of tunable LiF:F2+** and LiF:F2- color center and alexandrite lasers with nonlinear converters for narrowband excitation of atomic fluorescence and the use of gated multichannel CCD detectors for fluorescence measurements. A standard graphite furnace module was used for sample atomization. The laser sources used provide narrowband selective laser excitation continuously tunable in the 200 - 400 nm range and are therefore suitable for resonant excitation of atomic transitions in practically all known heavy metal atoms. In the first experiments, water samples containing Cu, Pb and Fe impurities were studied and detection levels of less than 1 ppb were observed. Comparison of the results of atomic laser fluorescence analysis and traditional atomic absorption spectrometry showed good qualitative agreement between these two methods. It is projected that full optimization of our experimental set up will allow for improved detection levels of several orders of magnitude. Possible optimization and simplification of the spectrometer are discussed in the context of developing a portable instrument for field use.

  11. Inversion symmetry breaking of atomic bound states in strong and short laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stooß, Veit; Ott, Christian; Blättermann, Alexander; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In any atomic species, the spherically symmetric potential originating from the charged nucleus results in fundamental symmetry properties governing the structure of atomic states and transition rules between them. If atoms are exposed to external electric fields, these properties are modified giving rise to energy shifts such as the AC Stark-effect in varying fields and, contrary to this in a constant (DC) electric field for high enough field strengths, the breaking of the atomic symmetry which causes fundamental changes in the atom's properties. This has already been observed for atomic Rydberg states with high principal quantum numbers. Here, we report on the observation of symmetry breaking effects in Helium atoms for states with principal quantum number n=2 utilizing strong visible laser fields. These findings were enabled by temporally resolving the dynamics better than the sub-optical cycle of the applied laser field, utilizing the method of attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS). We ident...

  12. High-order harmonic generation from Rydberg atoms driven by plasmonic-enhanced laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tikman, Y; Ciappina, M F; Chacon, A; Altun, Z; Lewenstein, M

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should to exceed certain threshold in order to generate HHG, when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructures engineering. In this work we propose to use Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmonic-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behaviour and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. To this aim we numerically solve the time...

  13. Laser cooling of single trapped atoms to the ground state: a dark state in position space

    OpenAIRE

    Morigi, Giovanna; Cirac Sasturáin, Juan Ignacio,; Ellinger, K; Zoller, P.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a scheme that allows us to laser cool trapped atoms to the ground state of a one-dimensional confining potential. The scheme is based on the creation of a dark state by designing the laser profile, so that the hottest atoms are coherently pumped to another internal level, and then repumped back. The scheme works beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit. We present results of a full quantum treatment for a one-dimensional model.

  14. Making custom fiber lasers for use in an atomic physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Ali; Cameron, Garnet; Nault, Kyla; Shiner, David

    2016-05-01

    Fiber lasers can be a reasonable choice for a laser source in atomic physics. Our particular applications involve the optical pumping and in some applications cooling of various transitions in atomic helium. Doped fiber with emission at the required wavelengths is necessary. Readily available fiber and approximate wavelength emission ranges include Yb (990 - 1150 nm), Er/Yb (1530 - 1625 nm) and Th (1900 -2100 nm). High efficiency conversion of pump photons into stable single frequency laser emission at the required wavelength is the function of the fiber laser. A simple fiber laser cavity uses a short (~ few mm) fiber grating high reflector mirror, a doped fiber section for the laser cavity, and a long (~ few cm) fiber grating output coupler. To ensure reliable single frequency operation, the laser cavity length should be within 2-3 times the output grating length. However the cavity length must be long enough for round trip gains to compensate for the output mirror transmission loss. Efficiency can be maximized by avoiding fiber splices in the fiber laser cavity. This requires that the gratings be written into the doped fiber directly. In our previous designs, back coupling of the fiber laser into the pump laser contributes to instability and sometimes caused catastrophic pump failure. Current designs use a fiber based wavelength splitter (WDM) to study and circumvent this problem. Data will be presented on the fiber lasers at 1083 nm. Work on a Thulium 2057 nm fiber laser will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF Grant # 1404498.

  15. Chemical vapor generation of silver for atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer: Radiotracer efficiency study and characterization of silver species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile Ag species were generated in flow injection arrangement from nitric acid environment in the presence of surfactants (Triton X-100 and Antifoam B) and permanent Pd deposits as the reaction modifiers. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer heated to 900 deg. C was used for atomization; evidence was found for thermal mechanism of atomization. Relative and absolute limits of detection (3σ, 250 μl sample loop) measured under optimized conditions were: 1.4 μg l-1 and 0.35 ng, respectively. The efficiency of chemical vapor generation (CVG) as well as spatial distribution of residual analyte in the apparatus was studied by 111Ag radioactive indicator (half-life 7.45 days) of high specific activity. It was found out that 23% of analyte was released into the gaseous phase. However, only 8% was found on filters placed at the entrance to the atomizer due to transport losses. About 40% of analyte remained in waste liquid, whereas the rest was found deposited over the CVG system. Presented study follows the hypothesis that the 'volatile' Ag species are actually metallic nanoparticles formed upon reduction in liquid phase and then released with good efficiency to the gaseous phase. Number/charge size distributions of dry aerosol were determined by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. Ag was detected in 40-45 nm particles holding 10 times more charge if compared to Boltzmann equilibrium. At the same time, Ag was also present on 150 nm particles, the main size mode of the CVG generator. The increase of Ag in standards was reflected by proportional increase in particle number/charge for 40-45 nm size particles only. Transmission electron microscopy revealed particles of 8 ± 2 nm sampled from the gaseous phase, which were associated in isolated clusters of few to few tens of nanometres. Ag presence in those particles was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  16. Quasistatic limit of the strong-field approximation describing atoms in intense laser fields: Circular polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, J H

    2010-01-01

    In the recent work of Vanne and Saenz [Phys. Rev. A 75, 063403 (2007)] the quasistatic limit of the velocity gauge strong-field approximation describing the ionization rate of atomic or molecular systems exposed to linearly polarized laser fields was derived. It was shown that in the low-frequency limit the ionization rate is proportional to the laser frequency (for a constant intensity of the laser field). In the present work I show that for circularly polarized laser fields the ionization rate is proportional to higher powers of the laser frequency for hydrogenic atoms. The new analytical expressions for asymptotic ionization rates (which become accurate in the quasistatic limit) contain no summations over multiphoton contributions. For very low laser frequencies (optical or infrared), these expressions usually remain with an order-of-magnitude agreement with the velocity gauge strong-field approximation.

  17. Role of atomic hydrogen density and energy in low power chemical vapor deposition synthesis of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates without diamond seeding by a very low power (∼40-80 W) microwave plasma continuous vapor deposition reaction of a mixture of helium-hydrogen-methane (48.2/48.2/3.6%) or argon-hydrogen-methane (17.5/80/2.5%). However, predominantly graphitic carbon films or no films formed when neon, krypton, or xenon was substituted for helium or argon. The films were characterized by time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It is proposed that each of He+ and Ar+ served as a catalyst with atomic hydrogen to form an energetic plasma since only plasmas having these ions in the presence of atomic hydrogen showed significantly broadened H α lines corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of >100 eV as reported previously. It was found that not only the energy, but also the H density uniquely increases in He-H2 and Ar-H2 plasmas. Bombardment of the carbon surface by highly energetic hydrogen formed by the catalysis reaction may play a role in the formation of diamond. Then, by this novel pathway, the relevance of the CO tie line is eliminated along with other stringent conditions and complicated and inefficient techniques which limit broad application of the versatility and superiority of diamond thin film technology

  18. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  19. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l' Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); Calosso, C. E. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Danet, J. M. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-09-15

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz and −129 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10{sup −14} at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  20. A scheme for the generation of two-mode atomic laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunjia Huang(黄春佳); Ming Zhou(周明); Kewei Mo(莫克威)

    2003-01-01

    The quantum dynamic behavior of the system composed of V-type three-level atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) interacting with two-mode coherent light field has been studied. The results show that the atoms of V-type three-level atomic BEC, which are excited to higher-level states under the action of light field, still keep their properties of coherent states. It demonstrates theoretically that two-mode atomic laser may be prepared by V-type three-level atomic BEC.

  1. Productions of hollow atoms from solids irradiated by high intensity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, K.; Sasaki, A.; Zhidkov, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The production of hollow atoms through the collisions of fast electrons with a solid is studied. These electrons are produced by high-intensity short-pulse laser irradiation on a solid. The inner-shell ionization and excitation processes by the fast electron impact are investigated. It is found that ionization processes give more significant contribution to the production of hollow atoms. (orig.)

  2. Mapping of laser diode radiation intensity by atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskii, M. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Podoskin, A. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of the intensity of laser diode radiation has been studied using an original method based on atomic-force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the laser radiation intensity in both the near field and transition zone of a high-power semiconductor laser under room-temperature conditions can be mapped by AFM at a subwavelength resolution. The obtained patterns of radiation intensity distribution agree with the data of modeling and the results of near-field optical microscopy measurements.

  3. Enhancement of Efficiency of XUV Generation in Atomic Gases Irradiated by Intense Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Y.; Shoutova, O. A.

    We present the results of the theoretical study of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atomic gases. It is shown that the photoemission spectra exhibit unusual behavior when the laser field strength approaches near-atomic values. In subatomic field strength the cut-off frequency increases linearly with laser pulse intensity. However, when the field strength approaches near-atomic region firstly cut-off frequency slows down and then saturates. To interpret such kind of photoemission spectrum behavior we have proposed the light-atom interaction theory based on the use of eigenfunctions of boundary value problem for "an atom in the external field" instead of the traditional basis of the "free atom" eigenfunctions.

  4. Laser-Induced Particle Adsorption on Atomically Thin MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Choi, Seung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; DelRio, Frank W; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-02-10

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for use in nanodevices because of its remarkable electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. These material properties are often dependent on the thickness or the number of layers, and hence Raman spectroscopy is widely used to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 due to the sensitivity of the vibrational spectrum to thickness. However, the lasers used in Raman spectroscopy can increase the local surface temperature and eventually damage the upper layers of the MoS2, thereby changing the aforementioned material properties. In this work, the effects of lasers on the topography and material properties of atomically thin MoS2 were systematically investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In detail, friction force microscopy was used to study the friction characteristics of atomically thin MoS2 as a function of laser powers from 0.5 to 20 mW and number of layers from 1 to 3. It was found that particles formed on the top surface of the atomically thin MoS2 due to laser-induced thermal effects. The degree of particle formation increased as the laser power increased, prior to the thinning of the atomically thin MoS2. In addition, the degree of particle formation increased as the number of MoS2 layers increased, which suggests that the thermal behavior of the supported MoS2 may differ depending on the number of layers. The particles likely originated from the atmosphere due to laser-induced heating, but could be eliminated via appropriate laser powers and exposure times, which were determined experimentally. The outcomes of this work indicate that thermal management is crucial in the design of reliable nanoscale devices based on atomically thin MoS2.

  5. Coherent Population Trapping Resonances in Cs Atomic Vapor Layers of Micrometric Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krasteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel behavior of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA resonance observed on the D2 line of Cs for atoms confined in cells with micrometric thickness. With the enhancement of light intensity, the EIA resonance amplitude suffers from fast reduction, and even at very low intensity (W < 1 mW/cm2, resonance sign reversal takes place and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT resonance is observed. Similar EIA resonance transformation to EIT one is not observed in conventional cm-size cells. A theoretical model is proposed to analyze the physical processes behind the EIA resonance sign reversal with light intensity. The model involves elastic interactions between Cs atoms as well as elastic interaction of atom micrometric-cell windows, both resulting in depolarization of excited state which can lead to the new observations. The effect of excited state depolarization is confirmed also by the fluorescence (absorption spectra measurement in micrometric cells with different thicknesses.

  6. Intra-operative power measurement of laser fibers during photoselective vaporization of the prostate using the 80W-KTP-Greenlight laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Thomas; Sulser, Tullio; Baumgartner, Martin K.; Fatzer, Markus; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.; Seifert, Hans-Helge

    2008-02-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the Prostate (PVP) using the 80W-Greenlight-PV (R) Laser System (Laserscope (R), San Jose, USA) has been established as a treatment option for patients suffering from obstructive symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, longer operation time compared to standard trans-urethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the high costs of the laser fibers are specific problems of this technique. In addition, many clinicians performing PVP complain about a reduced effectiveness of vaporization during treatment. Therefore, power measurement was performed during PVP using the 80W-Greenlight-PV (R) Laser System. Power output was measured at the beginning and also regularly throughout the operation. A total of 40 fibers were investigated in 35 patients. Damage to the tip of the fibers was regularly visible and increased as more energy was supplied. Additionally, in 90% of all fibers a decrease of power output was detectable during the operation. This became pronounced after the application of 200kJ, resulting in an end of lifespan (i.e. 275kJ) median power output of only 20% of the starting value. Corresponding to the clinical observations the impressive damage to the emission window was associated with a substantial decrease of power output during PVP. These observations might explain the impaired vaporization during PVP and a longer operation time compared to conventional TURP. Hence, improvements in the quality of the laser fibers are necessary to advance the efficiency of this promising technology.

  7. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  8. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O., E-mail: o.dmitrieva@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Choi, P., E-mail: p.choi@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Gerstl, S.S.A. [Imago Scientific Instruments, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Ponge, D.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. -- Research highlights: {yields} Changing the laser pulse energy in pulsed-laser atom probe could induce some changes in the analysis results of complex steels. {yields} Decreases in the evaporation fields and the ++/+ charge state ratios were detected with raising laser energy. {yields} Chemical composition of the intermetallic precipitates and the interface sharpness were not influenced by changing the laser energy.

  9. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  10. Laser cooling of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Stephen Anthony

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and experimental work concerning radiation forces on atoms, with particular reference to rubidium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. After a short history of the field of laser cooling, a review of the semiclassical theory of mechanical interactions between two-level atoms and electromagnetic radiation is given. Different formulations of the semiclassical theory are discussed, including a new formulation in terms of momentum transfer amongst the pl...

  11. Single-atom detection of ytterbium by selective laser excitation field ionization from Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of single atoms Yb has been achieved using the method of electric-field ionization from the high-lying Rydberg states. Atoms of Yb in a beam were excited in three steps to a 17-p state by radiation of three pulsed dye lasers. The statistics of an atom's appearance in the interaction volume have been studied in the single-ion counting regime at low beam density

  12. Atomic force microscopy studies of homoepitaxial GaN layers grown on GaN template by laser MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, B. S.; Singh, A.; Tanwar, S.; Tyagi, P. K.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Kushvaha, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    We have grown homoepitaxial GaN films on metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown 3.5 µm thick GaN on sapphire (0001) substrate (GaN template) using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser assisted molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) system. The GaN films were grown by laser ablating a polycrystalline solid GaN target in the presence of active r.f. nitrogen plasma. The influence of laser repetition rates (10-30 Hz) on the surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN layers have been studied using atomic force microscopy. It was found that GaN layer grown at 10 Hz shows a smooth surface with uniform grain size compared to the rough surface with irregular shape grains obtained at 30 Hz. The variation of surface roughness of the homoepitaxial GaN layer with and without wet chemical etching has been also studied and it was observed that the roughness of the film decreased after wet etching due to the curved structure/rough surface.

  13. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A. H.; Zheng, R. R.; Tang, H. Q.; Qi, X. Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  14. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  15. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程太旺; 李晓峰; 傅盘铭; 陈式刚

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω - 2ω and lω - 3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  16. Kinetic theory of (2+4)-level atom in σ+ -σ- laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chuang; Yu De-Shui; Chen Jing-Biao

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic theory of (2+4)-level atoms in σ+ -σ- laser fields is presented.We systemically discuss friction coefficient,momentum diffusion tensor and atomic temperature based on the Fokker-Planck equation.This cooling system is much like that of a (1+3)-level atom,and the temperature is still limited to the Doppler temperature.Since this cooling system has not been investigated before,this work may be regarded as a necessary complement to the laser cooling theory.

  17. Laser diagnostics of the energy spectrum of Rydberg states of the lithium-7 atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelener, B. B., E-mail: bobozel@mail.ru; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The spectra of excited lithium-7 atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap are studied using a UV laser. The laser diagnostics of the energy of Rydberg atoms is developed based on measurements of the change in resonance fluorescence intensity of ultracold atoms as the exciting UV radiation frequency passes through the Rydberg transition frequency. The energies of various nS configurations are obtained in a broad range of the principal quantum number n from 38 to 165. The values of the quantum defect and ionization energy obtained in experiments and predicted theoretically are discussed.

  18. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at λω = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5±3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 ± 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, Λ-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two-color spectroscopy experiment

  19. Efficient sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an indium atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Ihn

    2009-07-23

    Laser cooled atomic gases and atomic beams are widely studied samples in experimental research in atomic and optical physics. For the application of ultra cold gases as model systems for e.g. quantum many particle systems, the atomic species is not very important. Thus this field is dominated by alkaline, earthalkaline elements which are easily accessible with conventional laser sources and have convenient closed cooling transition. On the other hand, laser cooled atoms may also be interesting for technological applications, for instance for the creation of novel materials by atomic nanofabrication (ANF). There it will be important to use technologically relevant materials. As an example, using group III atoms of the periodical table in ANF may open a route to generate fully 3D structured composite materials. The minimal requirement in such an ANF experiment is the collimation of an atomic beam which is accessible by one dimensional laser cooling. In this dissertation, I describe transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam. For efficient laser cooling on a cycling transition, I have built a tunable, continuous-wave coherent ultraviolet source at 326 nm based on frequency tripling. For this purpose, two independent high power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for the generation of the fundamental radiation at {lambda}{sub {omega}} = 977 nm have been constructed. I have observed sub-Doppler transverse laser cooling of an Indium atomic beam on a cycling transition of In by introducing a polarization gradient in the linear-perpendicular-linear configuration. The transverse velocity spread of a laser-cooled In atomic beam at full width at half maximum was achieved to be 13.5{+-}3.8 cm/s yielding a full divergence of only 0.48 {+-} 0.13 mrad. In addition, nonlinear spectroscopy of a 3-level, {lambda}-type level system driven by a pump and a probe beam has been investigated in order to understand the absorption line shapes used as a frequency reference in a previous two

  20. Progress towards atomic vapor photonic microcells: Coherence and polarization relaxation measurements in coated and uncoated HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; McFerran, J. J.; Jouin, J.; Ilinova, E.; Thomas, P.; Benabid, F.

    2013-03-01

    We report a comparative study on dephasing mechanisms between inner core coated and uncoated sections of the same Kagome hypocycloid-shaped core hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) filled with rubidium vapor. The comparison is performed by measuring the atomic polarization relaxation and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) linewidth in Rb loaded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) inner wall coated and bare silica core Kagome HC-PCF. The measurements show a polarization relaxation time of 32μs in a PDMS coated Kagome HC-PCF and 24μs in uncoated Kagome HC-PCF. A minimum EIT linewidth of 6.2±0.8MHz is achieved in PDMS coated Kagome HC-PCF, and 8.3±0.9 MHz for the uncoated Kagome HC-PCF.

  1. Evaluation of vapor generation for the determination of nickel by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Julieta [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650-San Martin, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad Proyectos Especiales de Suministros Nucleares, Av. Libertador 8250, 1429-Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-09-01

    Volatile species of Ni were generated by merging acidified aqueous samples and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the inlet tube of the plasma torch. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used for detection. The operating conditions (chemical and physical parameters) and the concentrations of different acids were evaluated for the efficient generation of Ni vapor. The detection limit (3 {sigma}{sub blank}) was 1.8 ng mL{sup -1}. The precision (RSD) of the determination was 4.2% at a level of 500 ng mL{sup -1} and 7.3% for 20 ng mL{sup -1} (n=10). The efficiency of the generation process was estimated to be 51%. The possible interfering effect of transition metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Zn), hydride forming elements (As, Ge, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te), and Hg on Ni signal was examined. This study has demonstrated that Ni vapor generation is markedly free of interferences. (orig.)

  2. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  3. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: flores@quimica.ufsm.br

    2009-06-15

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L{sup - 1} KBr in 6 mol L{sup - 1} HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L{sup - 1} HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH{sub 4} solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g{sup - 1} for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  4. Lasers as a Bridge between Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Matinyan, Sergei G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of optical and UV laser radiation to several topics in low-energy nuclear physics. We consider the laser-induced nuclear anti-Stokes transitions, the laser-assisted and the laser-induced internal conversion, and the Electron Bridge and Inverse Electron Bridge mechanisms as tools for deexciting and exciting of low-lying nuclear isomeric states. A study of the anomalous, by low-lying, nuclear isomeric states (on an example of the $^{229}$Th nucleus) is present...

  5. Ambient Molecular Analysis of Biological Tissue Using Low-Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Postionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Flanigan, Paul M.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct analysis of plant and animal tissue samples by laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) was investigated using low-energy, femtosecond duration laser vaporization at wavelengths of 800 and 1042 nm followed by nanospray postionization. Low-energy (profile for the petal and leaf samples. Phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine, were identified from a fresh mouse brain section sample using Ti:Sapphire-LEMS without the application of matrix. These lipid features were suppressed in both the fiber-based and Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS measurements when the brain sample was prepared using the optimal cutting temperature compounds that are commonly used in animal tissue cryosections.

  6. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min−1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m0) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m0 of 18 analytes were calculated for stopped & mini furnace gas flows. • Experimental

  7. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  8. Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem

  9. Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem.

  10. MW Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: Succinic Acid in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Estibaliz; Ecija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Godfrey, Peter D.; McNaughton, Don; Jahn, Michaela K.; Nair, K. P. Rajappan; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2013-06-01

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. In order to understand the nucleation process, here we report an experimental and theoretical investigation of chemical structure of succinic acid. We have used the technique of Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy (FTMW). Succinic acid was vaporized by UV ultrafast laser ablation to suppress thermal decomposition processes^a and seeded into an expanding stream of Ne forming a supersonic jet. The rotational spectrum detected the presence of a single most stable conformation in the cm- mm- wave regions for which accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters have been determined. The study was extended to all monosubstituted isotopic species (^{13}C, ^{18}O, D(O)), which were positively identified, leading to an accurate determination of the effective and substitution structures of the molecule. The experimental study was supplemented by ab initio (MP2) and DFT (M06-2X and B3LYP) calculations. ^{a} E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 51, 3119-3124, 2012.

  11. Atmospheric remote sensing of water vapor, HCl and CH4 using a continuously tunable Co:MgF2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyuk, Norman; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1987-01-01

    A differential-absorption lidar system has been developed which uses a continuously tunable (1.5-2.3 micron) cobalt-doped magnesium fluoride laser as the radiation source. Preliminary atmospheric measurements of water vapor, HCl, and CH4 have been made with this system, including both path-averaged and ranged-resolved DIAL measurements at ranges up to 6 and 3 km, respectively.

  12. Non-additivity in laser-illuminated many-atom systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Kurizki, Gershon

    2013-01-01

    We show that atoms subject to laser radiation may form a non-additive many-body system on account of their long-range interactions, when the atoms are trapped in the vicinity of a fiber with Bragg grating. When the laser frequency is inside the grating's bandgap but very close to its edge, we find that the range and strength of the laser-induced interaction becomes substantially enhanced, due to the large density of states near the edge, while the competing process of scattering to the fiber is inhibited. The dynamics of this system conforms to a prominent model of statistical physics which exhibits slow relaxation. This suggests the possibility of using laser-illuminated atoms to study the characteristics of non-additive systems.

  13. Determination of cadmium in rice and water by tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaodong [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Wu Peng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Chen Li [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hou Xiandeng, E-mail: houxd@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2009-09-14

    In this work, the microsampling nature of tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization Ar/H{sub 2} flame atomic fluorescence spectrometry (W-coil ETV-AFS) as well as tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (W-coil ET-AAS) was used with cloud point extraction (CPE) for the ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in rice and water samples. When the temperature of the extraction system is higher than the cloud point temperature of the selected surfactant Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium with dithizone can be quantitatively extracted into the surfactant-rich phase and subsequently separated from the bulk aqueous phase by centrifugation. The main factors affecting the CPE, such as concentration of Triton X-114 and dithizone, pH, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were optimized for the best extract efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection for cadmium by W-coil ETV-AFS and W-coil ET-AAS were 0.01 and 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with sensitivity enhancement factors of 152 and 93, respectively. The proposed methods were applied to the determination of cadmium in certified reference rice and water samples with analytical results in good agreement with certified values.

  14. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states

  15. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  16. Characterization of atomic-layer MoS2 synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying-Zi, Peng; Yang, Song; Xiao-Qiang, Xie; Yuan, Li; Zheng-Hong, Qian; Ru, Bai

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-layer MoS2 ultrathin films are synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transition electron microscopy (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization methods is applied to investigate the crystal structures, valence states, and compositions of the ultrathin film areas. The nucleation particles show irregular morphology, while for a larger size somewhere, the films are granular and the grains have a triangle shape. The films grow in a preferred orientation (002). The HRTEM images present the graphene-like structure of stacked layers with low density of stacking fault, and the interlayer distance of plane is measured to be about 0.63 nm. It shows a clear quasi-honeycomb-like structure and 6-fold coordination symmetry. Room-temperature PL spectra for the atomic layer MoS2 under the condition of right and left circular light show that for both cases, the A1 and B1 direct excitonic transitions can be observed. In the meantime, valley polarization resolved PL spectra are obtained. XPS measurements provide high-purity samples aside from some contaminations from the air, and confirm the presence of pure MoS2. The stoichiometric mole ratio of S/Mo is about 2.0–2.1, suggesting that sulfur is abundant rather than deficient in the atomic layer MoS2 under our experimental conditions. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LY16F040003 and LY16A040007) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51401069 and 11574067).

  17. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and

  18. Testing the distance-dependence of the van der Waals interaction between an atom and a surface through spectroscopy in a vapor nanocell

    CERN Document Server

    Laliotis, A; Todorov, P; Hamdi, I; Dutier, G; Yarovitski, A; Saltiel, S; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Ducloy, M; Bloch, D; Laliotis, Athanasdios; Maurin, Isabelle; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Dutier, Gabriel; Yarovitski, Alexander; Saltiel, Solomon; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Ducloy, Martial; Bloch, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents our current measurements in a vapor nanocell aiming at a test of the distance-dependence of the atom-surface interaction, when simple asymptotic descriptions may turn to be not valid. A state-of-the-art of atom-surface interaction measurements is provided as an introduction, along with the comparison with the theory of the van der Waals (or Casimir-Polder) interaction; it is followed by a presentation of the most salient features of nanocell spectroscopy

  19. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected.

  20. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.;

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  1. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Interactions with Atoms, Solids,and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to bring together scientists and students working in the field of laser matter interactions in order to review and stimulate developmentoffundamental science with ultra-short pulse lasers. New techniques of pulse compression and colliding-pulse mode-locking have made possible the construction of lasers with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such lasers are now in operation at several research laboratories in Europe and the United States. These laser facilities present a new and exciting research direction with both pure and applied science components. In this ASI the emphasis is on fundamental processes occurring in the interaction of short laser pulses with atoms, molecules, solids, and plasmas. In the case of laser-atom (molecule) interactions, high power lasers provide the first access to extreme high-intensity conditions above 10'8 Watts/em', a new frontier for nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and molecules. New phenomena observed include ...

  2. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  3. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  4. Multiphoton resonant ionization of hydrogen atom exposed to two-colour laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Pei-Jie; Fang Yan

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the multiphoton resonant ionization by two-colour laser pulses in the hydrogen atom by solving the time-dependent Schr(o)dinger equation.By fixing the parameters of fundamental laser field and scanning the frequency of second laser field,it finds that the ionization probability shows several resonance peaks and is also much larger than the linear superposition of probabilities by applying two lasers separately.The enhancement of the ionization happens when the system is resonantly pumped to the excited states by absorbing two or more colour photons non-sequentially.

  5. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Wenchuan; Wang, Zhenghao

    2016-03-01

    A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL(-1) methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH3(+) solutions were in the range of 0.2-5 ng mL(-1)(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88×10(-3)ng mL(-1) and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL(-1) standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7-45.8 ng g(-1). The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6-103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n=6) were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis. PMID:26615576

  6. Study of helium and beryllium atoms with strong and short laser field; Etude des atomes d'helium et de beryllium en champ laser intense et bref

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulan, St

    2004-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of the interaction between a two-active electron atom and an intense (10{sup 14} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and ultrashort (from a few 10{sup -15} to a few 10{sup -18} s) laser field. In the first part, we describe the current experimental techniques able to produce a coherent radiation of high power in the UV-XUV regime and with femtosecond time duration. A theoretical model of a laser pulse is defined with such characteristics. Then, we develop a numerical approach based on B-spline functions to describe the atomic structure of the two-active electron system. A spectral non perturbative method is proposed to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation. We focalize our attention on the description of the atomic double continuum states. Finally, we expose results on the double ionization of helium and beryllium atoms with intense and short laser field. In particular, we present total cross section calculations and ejected electron energy distributions in the double continuum after one- and two-photon absorption. (author)

  7. Mathematical model of isotope-selective laser excitation of long-lived levels of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method of laser isotope separation base on monophoton selective excitation of long-lived states of atoms could be classified as a new one. Taking zinc and rubidium as an example it is shown that long-lived excited states of atoms could effectively chemically react with a number of molecules, whereas basic states of atoms react weakly. In contrast to AVLIS the method is based on the use of one wavelength. This method does not require collimation of flow of atoms and electric extraction. The method uses Doppler contour property. This property resides in that frequency tuning increasing simultaneously from all the isotopes excitation selectivity rises

  8. Laser-Assisted Field Evaporation and Three-Dimensional Atom-by-Atom Mapping of Diamond Isotopic Homojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Samik; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-02-10

    It addition to its high evaporation field, diamond is also known for its limited photoabsorption, strong covalent bonding, and wide bandgap. These characteristics have been thought for long to also complicate the field evaporation of diamond and make its control hardly achievable on the atomistic-level. Herein, we demonstrate that the unique behavior of nanoscale diamond and its interaction with pulsed laser lead to a controlled field evaporation thus enabling three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping of diamond (12)C/(13)C homojunctions. We also show that one key element in this process is to operate the pulsed laser at high energy without letting the dc bias increase out of bounds for diamond nanotip to withstand. Herein, the role of the dc bias in evaporation of diamond is essentially to generate free charge carriers within the nanotip via impact ionization. The mobile free charges screen the internal electric field, eventually creating a hole rich surface where the pulsed laser is effectively absorbed leading to an increase in the nanotip surface temperature. The effect of this temperature on the uncertainty in the time-of-flight of an ion, the diffusion of atoms on the surface of the nanotip, is also discussed. In addition to paving the way toward a precise manipulation of isotopes in diamond-based nanoscale and quantum structures, this result also elucidates some of the basic properties of dielectric nanostructures under high electric field.

  9. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields. Semiclassical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealing with timely and interesting issues in strong laser physics. Illustrates complex strong field atomic ionization with the simple semiclassical model of classical trajectory perspective for the first time. Provides a theoretical model that can be used to account for recent experiments. The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers in the field of laser physics, atom molecule physics and theoretical physics. Dr. Jie Liu is a professor of Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China and Peking University.

  10. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  11. ÉTUDE DES PROPRIÉTÉS DE PROPAGATION
    D'UN LASER À ATOMES

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript presents various experimental and theoretical aspects concerning a specificsystem of atom optics : the atom laser. In our experiment, this one results from aBose-Einstein condensate of rubidium 87 and we thus initially detail the various coolingtechniques used to obtain this coherent atomic source in a hybrid ferromagnetic trap.The atom lasers we produce are extracted from the condensed cloud by radiofrequency,and propagate vertically under the effect of gravity. One specifici...

  12. Study on energy density of gold-vapor laser and necrosis depth of mouse malignant tumor (S180)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Wang, Ze-shi; Yang, Yonghua; Wang, Yongjiang

    1993-03-01

    Gold-vapor laser glass type is a new laser for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Its chief characteristics are pulse type, 6000 - 7000 Hz of frequency, 627.8 nm in wavelength, 3 - 4 watts output, etc. By changing laser energy density, we noticed changes of necrosis depth and surface temperature. The results show that the depth of groups of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Jol/cm2 were 0.62 +/- 0.21, 0.72 +/- 0.05, 0.97 +/- 0.10, and 1.56 +/- 0.13 cm (p effect may be improved in the clinic. The surface tumor temperature was changed during the treatment, reaching as high as 39.13 degree(s)C, 43.78 degree(s)C, 44.16 degree(s)C, and 43.5 degree(s)C in different groups. This paper also discusses the coordinated effects of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy.

  13. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, R. V.; Zellweger, C.; Knohl, A.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  14. Soft-Bake Purification of SWCNTs Produced by Pulsed Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yowell, Leonard; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga; Allada, Rama Kumar; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2013-01-01

    The "soft-bake" method is a simple and reliable initial purification step first proposed by researchers at Rice University for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) produced by high-pressure carbon mon oxide disproportionation (HiPco). Soft-baking consists of annealing as-produced (raw) SWCNT, at low temperatures in humid air, in order to degrade the heavy graphitic shells that surround metal particle impurities. Once these shells are cracked open by the expansion and slow oxidation of the metal particles, the metal impurities can be digested through treatment with hydrochloric acid. The soft-baking of SWCNT produced by pulsed-laser vaporization (PLV) is not straightforward, because the larger average SWCNT diameters (.1.4 nm) and heavier graphitic shells surrounding metal particles call for increased temperatures during soft-bake. A part of the technology development focused on optimizing the temperature so that effective cracking of the graphitic shells is balanced with maintaining a reasonable yield, which was a critical aspect of this study. Once the ideal temperature was determined, a number of samples of raw SWCNT were purified using the soft-bake method. An important benefit to this process is the reduced time and effort required for soft-bake versus the standard purification route for SWCNT. The total time spent purifying samples by soft-bake is one week per batch, which equates to a factor of three reduction in the time required for purification as compared to the standard acid purification method. Reduction of the number of steps also appears to be an important factor in improving reproducibility of yield and purity of SWCNT, as small deviations are likely to get amplified over the course of a complicated multi-step purification process.

  15. Trapping atoms in the evanescent field of laser written wave guides

    CERN Document Server

    Jukic, Dario; Walther, P; Szameit, A; Pohl, T; Götte, J B

    2016-01-01

    We analyze evanescent fields of laser written waveguides and show that they can be used to trap atoms close to the surface of an integrated optical atom chip. In contrast to subwavelength nanofibres it is generally not possible to create a stable trapping potential using only the fundamental modes. This is why we create a stable trapping potential by using two different laser colors, such that the waveguide supports two modes for the blue detuned laser, while for the red detuned light the waveguide has only a single mode. In particular, we study such a two-color trap for Cesium atoms, and calculate both the potential and losses for the set of parameters that are within experimental reach. We also optimize system parameters in order to minimize trap losses due to photon scattering and tunneling to the surface.

  16. Some properties of atomic beam produced by laser induced ablation of Li target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed atomic beams produced in vacuum by laser induced ablation from a lithium target are analyzed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The 1-mixing processes induced in the n = 9, 10 Li Rydberg states by collisions with CO2 molecules illustrate the application of the method. Resolution is limited by the 1 mm diameter of the probe laser beam. Combining LIF and absorption measurements gives nLi as a function of time at various distances from the target surface. The investigation of the Li-C02 1-mixing process in a heat pipe oven proved impossible due to the high reactivity of Li with C02. This problem was solved by renewing the Li atoms at each laser shot. Values obtained for n = 9, n = 10 are k = 17 x 10-8 and 15 x 10-8 cc/sec, respectively

  17. Dynamics simulation on the interaction of intense laser pulses with atomic clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Hong-Chuan; Zhu Peng-Jia; Sun Shao-Hua; Liu Zuo-Ye; Li Lu; Ma Ling-Ling; Hu Bi-Tao

    2009-01-01

    Under classical particle dynamics, the interaction process between intense femtosecond laser pulses and icosahedral noble-gas atomic clusters was studied. Our calculated results show that ionization proceeds mainly through tunnel ionization in the combined field from ions, electrons and laser, rather than the electron-impact ionization. With increasing cluster size, the average and maximum kinetic energy of the product ion increases. According to our calculation, the expansion process of the clusters after laser irradiation is dominated by Coulomb explosion and the expansion scale increases with increasing cluster size. The dependence of average kinetic energy and average charge state of the product ions on laser wavelength is also presented and discussed. The dependence of average kinetic energy on the number of atoms inside the cluster was studied and compared with the experimental data. Our results agree with the experimental results reasonably well.

  18. Non-sequential double ionization of Mg atoms in elliptically polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-sequential double ionization of the Mg atom in elliptically polarized laser fields is investigated. The numerical results indicate that the ‘knee’ structure is more obvious with increasing ellipticity in the laser intensity range (1013–1015 W cm−2) we considered, and recollision excitation with subsequent tunnelling ionization occurs much more easily at higher ellipticity, which can be well explained by the corresponding momentum distribution of electrons. Moreover, the ionized electron energy of Mg atoms at the end of the pulse also indicates that rescattering of electrons still occurs in elliptically polarized laser fields. In addition, the angular distribution of ionized electrons is also calculated and the result shows that angular distribution of electrons is no longer along the x-axis in elliptically polarized laser fields. (paper)

  19. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  20. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  1. Magneto-optical trapping of ytterbium atoms with a 398.9 nm laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0-1P1 transition at 398.9 nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower. Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock. (authors)

  2. A tunable low-drift laser stabilized to an atomic reference

    CERN Document Server

    Leopold, Tobias; Feuchtenbeiner, Stefanie; Grebing, Christian; Micke, Peter; Scharnhorst, Nils; Leroux, Ian D; López-Urrutia, José R Crespo; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-01-01

    We present a laser system with a linewidth and long-term frequency stability at the 50 kHz level. It is based on a Ti:Sapphire laser emitting radiation at 882 nm which is referenced to an atomic transition. For this, the length of an evacuated transfer cavity is stabilized to a reference laser at 780 nm locked to the $^{85}$Rb D$_2$-line via modulation transfer spectroscopy. Full tunability of the spectroscopy laser is realized using the sideband locking technique to the transfer cavity. In this configuration, the linewidth of the spectroscopy laser is derived from the transfer cavity, while the long-term stability is derived from the atomic resonance. The frequency stability and linewidth of both lasers are characterized by comparison against an active hydrogen maser frequency standard and an ultra-narrow linewidth laser, respectively. The spectral gaps are bridged with an optical frequency comb. The laser system presented here will be used for spectroscopy of the $1s^{2}2s^{2}2p\\ ^{2}P_{1/2} -\\ ^{2}P_{3/2}$...

  3. Peeking and poking at atoms with laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Feynman, in his famous Lectures on Physics, toyed with the idea of all scientific knowledge being wiped out and facing the choice of passing one single idea down to future generations. He believed it should be the hypothesis that all things are made of atoms. The idea that matter is built up from discrete fundamental units can be traced back to several ancient cultures (the word atom deriving from the Greek word atomos 'cannot be divided'). It is only within the last century or so, however, that theories for atomic structure were developed to explain a series of phenomena observed throughout the 18th-19th Centuries. Many of these phenomena were optical, such as Melvill's observation in 1752 that a mixture of sea salt and alcohol would burn with a yellow flame or Wollaston's observation in 1802 that sunlight contains black lines in its spectrum. Further refinement and characterisation from people like Fraunhofer, Kirchoff, Bunsen, Balmer, and Zeeman followed, but it was not until 1913, with the introduction of the Rutherford-Bohr atomic model, that a cornerstone was laid for what would become a quantum mechanical description of the atom. (author).

  4. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation transition studies for atoms confined in Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes

    CERN Document Server

    Akin, T G; Dribus, Ben; Marzuola, Jeremy; Johnson, Lise; Alexander, Jason; Abraham, E R I

    2011-01-01

    Multiply-connected traps for cold, neutral atoms fix vortex cores of quantum gases. Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes are ideal for such traps due to their phase stability. We report theoretical calculations of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition properties and thermal characteristics of neutral atoms trapped in multiply connected geometries formed by Laguerre-Gaussian LG{p}{l} beams. Specifically, we consider atoms confined to the anti-node of a LG{0}{1} laser mode detuned to the red of an atomic resonance frequency, and those confined in the node of a blue-detuned LG{1}{1} beam. We compare the results of using the full potential to those approximating the potential minimum with a simple harmonic oscillator potential. We find that deviations between calculations of the full potential and the simple harmonic oscillator can be up to 3%-8% for trap parameters consistent with typical experiments.

  6. Influence of atomic modeling on integrated simulations of laser-produced Au plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Yechiel; Raicher, Erez; Ehrlich, Yosi; Hurvitz, Gilad; Shpilman, Zeev; Fraenkel, Moshe; Zigler, Arie; Henis, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Time-integrated x-ray emission spectra of laser-irradiated Au disks were recorded using transmission grating spectrometry, at laser intensities of 10(13) to 10(14) W/cm(2). Radiation-hydrodynamics and atomic physics calculations were used to simulate the emitted spectra. Three major plasma regions can be recognized: the heat wave, the corona, and an intermediate region connecting them. An analysis of the spectral contribution of these three plasma regions to the integrated recorded spectrum is presented. The importance of accurate atomic modeling of the intermediate plasma region, between the corona and the heat wave, is highlighted. The influence of several aspects of the atomic modeling is demonstrated, in particular multiply-excited atomic configurations and departure from local thermal equilibrium. PMID:26651806

  7. Investigation on 447.3 nm blue-violet laser by extra-cavity frequency doubling of a diode-pumped cesium vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin; Shao, Mingzhen; Xie, Jijiang

    2016-09-01

    447.3 nm blue-violet lasers are investigated by extra-cavity single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) of diode-pumped cesium vapor lasers (Cs-DPALs) using a LBO crystal. Two types of 894.6 nm Cs-DPAL are constructed, and the beam quality factors are Mx2=1.02, My2=1.13 and Mx2=2.13, Mx2=2.66, respectively. The maximum output powers for the two types of Cs-DPAL operating in pulsed mode are 0.692 W and 2.6 W, and the corresponding maximum second harmonics (SH) powers are 9.5 μW and 11.2 μW at optimal focusing parameter of 1.68, respectively. The relative insensitivity of SH power to the LBO crystal temperature and the influence of Cs laser beam quality on the SHG efficiency are analyzed qualitatively.

  8. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  9. Selective photoionization scheme for atomic gadolinium laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selective photoionization scheme for separating 157Gd from natural gadolinium and the laser irradiation conditions in order to enrich 157Gd to 60-80% are discussed in the case of two- and three-step photoionization. The dependence of excitation pathways on J-values is also discussed. From the view point of ionization rate it is preferable to select the four-colour three-step photoionization scheme by using both the ground and the lowest metastable levels. Optimum laser irradiation conditions for gadolinium isotope separation are presented. (author)

  10. Relativistic semi-classical theory of atom ionization in ultra-intense laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A relativistic semi-classical theory (RSCT) of H-atom ionizationin ultra-intense laser (UIL) is proposed. A relativistic analytical expression for ionization probability of H-atom in its ground state is given. This expression, compared with non-relativistic expression, clearly shows the effects of the magnet vector in the laser, the non-dipole approximation and the relativistic mass-energy relation on the ionization processes. At the same time, we show that under some conditions the relativistic expression reduces to the non-relativistic expression of non-dipole approximation. At last, some possible applications of the relativistic theory are briefly stated.

  11. 6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research

    CERN Document Server

    Błaszczak, Z; Marinova, K; LASER 2004

    2006-01-01

    6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research, LASER 2004, held in Poznan, Poland, 24-27 May, 2004 Researchers and graduate students interested in the Mössbauer Effect and its applications will find this volume indispensable. The volume presents the most recent developments in the methodology of Mössbauer spectroscopy. Reprinted from Hyperfine Interactions (HYPE) Volume 162, 1-4

  12. Laser-assisted multiphoton ionization of a hydrogen atom by electron impact

    OpenAIRE

    Deb, S. Ghosh; S Roy; Sinha, C.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of the electron impact multiphoton ionization of a hydrogen atom in the presence of an intense laser field has been studied theoretically, with a view to comparing (qualitatively) the results with the recent kinematically complete experiments of Horr et al [ Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 94, 153201, (2005) ] for the He target. Significant laser modifications are noted in the present doubly (DDCS) and the fully differential cross sections (TDCS). For most of the explored kinematics (chos...

  13. Multiphoton atom ionization in a field of an ultrashort laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closed analytical expressions for the probability of the multiphoton atoms and ions ionization under effect of the alternating current filed applicable for any value of Keldysh parameter are obtained through imaginary time method. Dependence of the ionization probability and photoelectron pulse spectrum on the ultrashort laser pulse form is considered. The formulae obtained may be used in the theory of the semiconductor multiphoton ionization by the laser pulse field

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of ionization stabilization of atoms in intense laser fields

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Michael; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.; Wang, Peijie

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the stabilization of ionization of atoms subjected to a superintense laser pulse using nonlinear dynamics. We provide an explanation for the lack of complete ionization at high intensity and for the decrease of the ionization probability as intensity is increased. We investigate the role of each part of the laser pulse (ramp-up, plateau, ramp-down) in this process. We emphasize the role of the choice for the ionization criterion, energy versus distance criterion.

  15. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, T., E-mail: inoue-t@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute of Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan); Aoki, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Hatanaka, K. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Murakami, T. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nataraj, H. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee (India); and others

    2015-04-15

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  16. Quantum treatment of two-stage sub-Doppler laser cooling of magnesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Il'enkov, R. Ya.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Deep laser cooling of 24Mg atoms has been theoretically studied. We propose a two-stage sub-Doppler cooling strategy using electrodipole transition 3 3P2→3 3D3 (λ =383.8 nm). The first stage implies exploiting magneto-optical trap with σ+ and σ- light beams, while at the second stage lin ⊥ lin molasses is used. We focus on achieving a large number of ultracold atoms (Tefftreatment, taking into full account the recoil effect and beyond many widely used approximations. Steady-state values of average kinetic energy and linear momentum distributions of cold atoms have been analyzed for various light-field intensities and frequency detunings. The results of conducted quantum analysis have been significantly different from the results achieved under a semiclassical approximation based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The second cooling stage allows achieving sufficiently lower kinetic energies of the atomic cloud as well as increased fraction of ultracold atoms at certain conditions compared to the first one. We hope that the obtained results can help in overcoming current experimental problems in deep cooling of 24Mg atoms by means of laser field. Cold magnesium atoms cooled in a large amount to several μ K are of huge interest to, for example, quantum metrology and to other many-body cold-atoms physics.

  17. Selective photochemical burning out of an isotope under interaction of resonant laser radiation with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for laser separation of the zinc and rubidium isotopes, based on the selective burning out of excited atoms in flux with the buffer gas and gas-reagent, is experimentally realized. The selective isotope excitation is carried out through the single-photon method with application of weak absorption lines and on the edge of the Doppler contour of absorbing the atoms with low isotope shift value

  18. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.;

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states...... of chemisorbed hydrogen in the desorption process. Very slow velocities of 700 and 400  ms-1 for H and D atoms are associated with the desorption out of the highest vibrational state of a barrierless potential....

  19. Anomalous Effects of Driving Field Linewidth on a One-Atom Dressed-State Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-Jin; Hu Xiang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We examine the effects of driving Geld linewidth on a one-atom dressed state laser. Unexpectedly, the linewidth leads to anomalous effects on the cavity Geld. The mean photon number of the cavity Geld is raised or the normalized variance is reduced to a certain degree as the linewidth increases for an appropriate range of parameters. The responsible mechanism is attributed to the fluctuation-induced modification of the electromagnetic reservoir where the atom stays.

  20. Laser-induced reaction of Yb atoms with hydrogen chloride in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of an investigation of the reaction of ytterbium atoms with hydrogen chloride initiated by laser radiation resonant with the 1S/sub O/-3P1 intercombination transition. The rate constant of extinction of the excited state of the ytterbium atom by a molecular reagent was measured: k/sub d/ = (6.4 +- 1.5) x 10-10 cm3sec

  1. Atom laser based on four-wave mixing with Bose-Einstein condensates in nonlinear lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasak, T.; Konotop, V. V.; Trippenbach, M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical lattices are typically used to modify the dispersion relation of the matter wave, in particular, to ensure resonant conditions for multiwave interactions. Here we propose an alternative mechanism of wave interactions. It can be implemented using a nonlinear lattice and modifies the momentum conservation law of the interacting atoms, leaving the energy conservation unchanged. We propose to apply this phenomenon to construct an atom laser via a resonant four-wave mixing process.

  2. Vapor-Phase Atomic Layer Deposition of Co9S8 and Its Application for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Gao, Yuanhong; Shao, Youdong; Su, Yantao; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-10-14

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of cobalt sulfide (Co9S8) is reported. The deposition process uses bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)cobalt(II) and H2S as the reactants and is able to produce high-quality Co9S8 films with an ideal layer-by-layer ALD growth behavior. The Co9S8 films can also be conformally deposited into deep narrow trenches with aspect ratio of 10:1, which demonstrates the high promise of this ALD process for conformally coating Co9S8 on high-aspect-ratio 3D nanostructures. As Co9S8 is a highly promising electrochemical active material for energy devices, we further explore its electrochemical performance by depositing Co9S8 on porous nickel foams for supercapacitor electrodes. Benefited from the merits of ALD for making high-quality uniform thin films, the ALD-prepared electrodes exhibit remarkable electrochemical performance, with high specific capacitance, great rate performance, and long-term cyclibility, which highlights the broad and promising applications of this ALD process for energy-related electrochemical devices, as well as for fabricating complex 3D nanodevices in general.

  3. Study of the ionization of sodium vapor in the presence of resonant laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization of a diffuse sodium jet, excited by laser radiation (D2 resonance), either continuous or pulsed, is studied by electron spectroscopy. Results show: associative ionization (AI) in the collision of two Na(3p) excited atoms; occupancy of highly excited nl states in energy association collisions of two Na(3p) followed by Penning collisional ionization (CI) in the system Na(nl) + Na(3p); heating of electrons by 1, 2, or 3 superelastic collisions with Na(3p). For both the excitation cases (continuous or pulsed source) analysis of experiment results leads to a description of the whole of the ionized medium, characterized as being low density and the site of the ambipolar diffusion of charged particles. A highly simplified model describes the kinetic and electrokinetic equilibrium (continuous case) in which the different populations of distinct nonthermalized energy (low energy primary electrons, hot electrons) play specific roles. The cross sections associated with AI and CI are estimated from experiment results using the model

  4. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  5. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, J. S.; Sacha, K.; Eckhardt, B.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-10-01

    It is now possible to produce laser pulses with reproducible pulse shape and controlled carrier envelope phase. It is discussed how that can be explored in double ionisation studies. To this end we solve numerically the Schrödinger equation for a limited dimensionality model which nevertheless treats electron repulsion qualitatively correctly and allows to study correlation effects due to the Coulomb repulsion.

  6. CO2 laser vaporization in the treatment of cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with abnormal Papanicolaou smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruge, S; Felding, C; Skouby, S O;

    1992-01-01

    In a randomized study, we have evaluated the treatment of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions by CO2 laser vaporization. Fifty patients with abnormal Papanicolaou smears and histological evidence of cervical HPV infection associated or not with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) gra...... in their cervical smears at 12 months' follow-up was identical in the two groups, supporting the hypothesis that HPV is a persistent infection during which the virus is widespread in the vaginal epithelium.......In a randomized study, we have evaluated the treatment of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions by CO2 laser vaporization. Fifty patients with abnormal Papanicolaou smears and histological evidence of cervical HPV infection associated or not with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade...... I were randomized to either a treatment or a control group. The cervical swabs were obtained every 3 months in both groups and examined for HPV type 16 DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. After a follow-up period of 12 months no significant differences were found between the laser treatment...

  7. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  8. The effect of atoms excited by electron beam on metal evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Guo Feng; Ying Chun Tong

    2002-01-01

    In atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), the metal is heated to melt by electron beams. The vapor atoms may be excited by electrons when flying through the electron beam. The excited atoms may be deexcited by inelastic collision during expansion. The electronic energy transfers translational energy. In order to analyse the effect of reaction between atoms and electron beams on vapor physical parameters, such as density, velocity and temperature, direct-simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is used to simulate the 2-D gadolinium evaporation from long and narrow crucible. The simulation results show that the velocity and temperature of vapor increase, and the density decreases

  9. Laser frequency offset locking scheme for high-field imaging of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, Graciana

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and flexible frequency offset locking scheme developed for high-field imaging of ultra-cold atoms which relies on commercially available RF electronics only. The main new ingredient is the use of the sharp amplitude response of a home-made RF filter to provide an error signal for locking the lasers. We were able to offset lock two independent diode lasers within a capture range of 200 MHz, and with a tuning range of up to 1.4GHz. The beat-note residual fluctuations for offset locked lasers are bellow 2MHz for integration times of several hundreds of seconds.

  10. ENERGETIC ABOVE-THRESHOLD IONIZATION SPECTRA OF H-ATOM IN INTENSE LASER FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN BAO-ZHEN

    2000-01-01

    The above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra of H-atom in intense laser fields (laser intensity I is up to 1018W/cm2)are calculated. It is found that the kinetic energy of the ejected electron at the location of the peak of the ATI spectra is about equal to the corresponding ponderomotive potential of the applied laser fields. This result is consistent with that obtained by Wilks et al. and fits the experimental results of the super thermal electron. A possible new mechanism of the super thermal electron generation is proposed.

  11. Manipulating Photoelectron Distributions for Rare Gas Atoms Ionized with Polarized Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小刚

    2012-01-01

    Above-threshold ionizations of rare gas atoms excited by polarized femtosecond laser pulses are investigated. The photoelectron momentum spectra are obtained applying the strong-field approximation (SFA) theory. It is found that, distribution of the emitted photoelectrons varies with different polarizations of laser pulses. We have interpreted the relationship between the observed distribution and the laser polarization taking advantage of tunneling ionization theory and simple-man model. The polarization sensitivity indicates that one can easily manipulate the photoelectron distribution by controlling the polarization of the exciting pulse.

  12. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  13. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Mehrnoush [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 {mu}L, a sampling temperature of 27 {sup o}C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n = 7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 {mu}g L{sup -1} were also studied.

  14. Determination of methyl mercury by aqueous phase Eehylation, followed by gas chromatographic separation with cold vapor atomic fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wild, John F.; Olsen, Mark L.; Olund, Shane D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent national sampling of streams in the United States revealed low methyl mercury concentrations in surface waters. The resulting median and mean concentrations, calculated from 104 samples, were 0.06 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.15 ng/L, respectively. This level of methyl mercury in surface water in the United States has created a need for analytical techniques capable of detecting sub-nanogram per liter concentrations. In an attempt to create a U.S. Geological Survey approved method, the Wisconsin District Mercury Laboratory has adapted a distillation/ethylation/ gas-phase separation method with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy detection for the determination of methyl mercury in filtered and unfiltered waters. This method is described in this report. Based on multiple analyses of surface water and ground-water samples, a method detection limit of 0.04 ng/L was established. Precision and accuracy were evaluated for the method using both spiked and unspiked ground-water and surface-water samples. The percent relative standard deviations ranged from 10.2 to 15.6 for all analyses at all concentrations. Average recoveries obtained for the spiked matrices ranged from 88.8 to 117 percent. The precision and accuracy ranges are within the acceptable method-performance limits. Considering the demonstrated detection limit, precision, and accuracy, the method is an effective means to quantify methyl mercury in waters at or below environmentally relevant concentrations

  15. Ex vivo evaluation of safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Junya; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Laser vaporization of the prostate is one of the promising technique for less-invasive treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, shorter operative duration and higher hemostatic ability are expected. The wavelength of 980 nm offers a high simultaneous absorption by water and hemoglobin, so that it combines the efficient vaporization with good hemostasis. Therefore, we have evaluated the safety and efficacy of vaporization of the prostate using a recently developed 300 W high-power laser diode with the wavelength of 980 nm. First, validity of bovine prostate tissue as the sample was confirmed by measuring the optical properties of bovine and human prostate tissue using a double integrating sphere optical system. Next, contact and non-contact ex vivo irradiations were performed for various irradiation powers and times, and vaporized and coagulated depths were measured. In the contact irradiation, the vaporized depth at the power of 300 W was significantly deeper than that at the power of 100 W, while the difference was relatively smaller for the coagulated depths at 300 and 100 W. In the non-contact irradiation, coagulation as thick as that in the contact irradiation was observed almost without vaporization. Therefore, it is suggested that the treatment in the contact irradiation using the high-power laser diode can vaporize the prostate more efficiently without increasing the risk of perforation. Hemostasis with the coagulation would be possible in both irradiation methods. To prevent the postoperative perforation, operators need to understand the relationship between the coagulated depth and the irradiation conditions.

  16. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a5D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful

  17. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by protons in the presence of a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization of atomic hydrogen by protons in the presence of a laser background is studied. We describe the initial and final states of the proton by plane waves, the state of the target by a dressed wavefunction obtained by time-dependent theory in the soft-photon approximation, and the state of the ejected electron by a two-centre Coulomb function modulated in time by the laser field in the same way as a plane wave. The laser-modified double differential cross sections for a geometry of laser polarization parallel to the incident cross section of the proton are calculated and compared with the laser-free results. For each small electron ejection angle, a critical point is found in the electron energy spectrum, behind which the cross section is notably enhanced. (author)

  18. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and abs...

  19. Low-Energy Ions from Laser-Cooled Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeganrad, G.; Fioretti, A.; Guerri, I.; Tantussi, F.; Ciampini, D.; Allegrini, M.; Viteau, M.; Fuso, F.

    2016-05-01

    We report the features of an ion source based on two-color photoionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam outsourced from a pyramidal magneto-optical trap. The ion source operates in continuous or pulsed mode. At acceleration voltages below 300 V, it delivers some ten ions per bunch with a relative energy spread Δ Urms/U ≃0.032 , as measured through the retarding field-energy-analyzer approach. Space-charge effects are negligible thanks to the low ion density attained in the interaction volume. The performances of the ion beam in a configuration using focused laser beams are extrapolated on the basis of the experimental results. Calculations demonstrate that our low-energy and low-current ion beam can be attractive for the development of emerging technologies requiring the delivery of a small amount of charge, down to the single-ion level and its eventual focusing in the 10-nm range.

  20. Mw Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: {RIBOSE} Found in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2012-06-01

    Sugars are aldoses or ketoses with multiple hydroxy groups which have been elusive to spectroscopic studies. Here we report a rotational study of the aldopentose ribose. According to any standard textbook aldopentoses can exhibit either linear forms, cyclic five-membered (furanose) structures or six-membered (pyranose) rings, occurring either as α- or β- anomers depending on the orientation of the hydroxy group at C-1 (anomeric carbon). β-Furanose is predominant in ribonucleosides, RNA, ATP and other biochemically relevant derivatives, but is β-furanose the native form also of free ribose? Recent condensed-phase X-ray and older NMR studies delivered conflicting results. In order to solve this question we conducted a microwave study on D-ribose that, owing to ultrafast UV laser vaporization, has become the first C-5 sugar observed with rotational resolution. The spectrum revealed six conformations of free ribose, preferentially adopting β-pyranose chairs as well as higher-energy α-pyranose forms. The method also allowed for unambiguous distinction between different orientations of the hydroxy groups, which stabilize the structures by cooperative hydrogen-bond networks. No evidence was observed of the α-/β-furanoses or linear forms found in the biochemical derivatives. i) D. Šišak, L. B. McCusker, G. Zandomeneghi, B. H. Meier, D. Bläser, R. Boese, W. B. Schweizer, R. Gylmour and J. D. Dunitz Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 4503, 2010. ii) W. Saenger Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 6487, 2010. i) M. Rudrum, and D. F. Shaw, J. Chem. Soc. 52, 1965. ii) R. U. Lemieux and J. D. Stevens Can. J. Chem. 44, 249, 1966. iii) E. Breitmaier and U. Hollstein Org. Magn. Reson. 8, 573, 1976. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. in press: DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107973, 2012.

  1. Flux correction for closed-path laser spectrometers without internal water vapor measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Hiller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, instruments became available on the market that provide the possibility to perform eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and many other trace gases, including the traditional CO2 and H2O. Most of these instruments employ laser spectroscopy, where a cross-sensitivity to H2O is frequently observed leading to an increased dilution effect. Additionally, sorption processes at the intake tube walls modify and delay the observed H2O signal in closed-path systems more strongly than the signal of the sampled trace gas. Thereby, a phase shift between the trace gas and H2O fluctuations is introduced that dampens the H2O flux observed in the sampling cell. For instruments that do not provide direct H2O measurement in the sampling cell, transfer functions from externally measured H2O fluxes are needed to estimate the effect of H2O on trace gas flux measurements. The effects of cross-sensitivity and the damping are shown for an eddy covariance setup with the Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures CO2, CH4, and H2O fluxes. This instrument is technically identical with the Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Research Inc. that does not measure H2O concentrations. Hence, we used measurements from a FGGA to derive a modified correction for the FMA accounting for dilution as well as phase shift effects in our instrumental setup. With our specific setup for eddy covariance flux measurements, the cross-sensitivity counteracts the damping effects, which compensate each other. Hence, the new correction only deviates very slightly from the traditional Webb, Pearman, and Leuning density correction, which is calculated from separate measurements of the atmospheric water vapor flux.

  2. In Vitro Study on the Vaporization Ratio of 2-μm Laser in Human Prostatic Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勇; 孙东翀; 魏志涛; 徐锋; 洪宝发; 张旭

    2010-01-01

    In this study,the vaporization ratio of the 2-μm laser in the prostatic tissue with benign prostatic hyperplasia was examined in vitro,to explore a technique to estimate the clearance rate of prostatic tissue during the transurethral vaporesection of the prostate.A total of 9 fresh prostatic tissue specimens were obtained by open surgery and the wet weight of the prostatic tissue were measured immediately after the sample collection.Under the simulated conditions of transurethral vaporesection of the prosta...

  3. Control of atomic transition rates via laser light shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Jauregui, R

    2015-01-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, requires waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be natura...

  4. Sperimentazione in osservatorio di un nuovo magnetometro a vapore di potassio pompato da laser a diodo

    OpenAIRE

    Beverini, N.; UNIPI; Faggioni, O.; Istituto Geofisica Marina - CUNISPE; Alzetta, E.; UNIPI; Maccioni, E.; UNIPI; Carmisciano, C.; Istituto Geofisica Marina - CUNISPE

    1998-01-01

    Nel Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Università di Pisa e' stato sviluppato un nuovo tipo di magnetometro a vapore di alcalino, basato sulla misura della frequenza di risonanza Zeeman dell'atomo di potassio .....

  5. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms by strong, short pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical technique for investigating the behavior of many electron atoms in intense laser fields is presented. A description of the method is followed by results of an illustrative, application to helium for a number of wavelengths and intensities. A discussion of high order ionization dynamics for this system based on these calculations is provided. 10 refs

  6. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  7. Multiphoton and tunneling ionization of atoms in an intense laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yan-Zhuo; Zhao Song-Feng; Zhou Xiao-Xin

    2012-01-01

    We study the ionization probabilities of atoms by a short laser pulse with three different theoretical methods,i.e.,the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schr(o)dinger equation (TDSE),the Perelomov Popov-Terent'ev (PPT)theory,and the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory.Our results show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of several atoms (i.e.,H,He,and Ne) obtained from the PPT theory accord quite well with the TDSE results both in the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes,while the ADK results fit well to the TDSE data only in the tunneling ionization regime.Our calculations also show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of a H atom at three different laser wavelengths of 600 nm,800 nm,and 1200 nm obtained from the PPT theory are also in good agreement with those from the TDSE,while the ADK theory fails to give the wavelength dependence of ionization probability.Only when the laser wavelength is long enough,will the results of ADK be close to those of TDSE.

  8. Multiphoton and tunneling ionization of atoms in an intense laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the ionization probabilities of atoms by a short laser pulse with three different theoretical methods, i.e., the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the Perelomov—Popov—Terent'ev (PPT) theory, and the Ammosov—Delone—Krainov (ADK) theory. Our results show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of several atoms (i.e., H, He, and Ne) obtained from the PPT theory accord quite well with the TDSE results both in the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes, while the ADK results fit well to the TDSE data only in the tunneling ionization regime. Our calculations also show that laser intensity dependent ionization probabilities of a H atom at three different laser wavelengths of 600 nm, 800 nm, and 1200 nm obtained from the PPT theory are also in good agreement with those from the TDSE, while the ADK theory fails to give the wavelength dependence of ionization probability. Only when the laser wavelength is long enough, will the results of ADK be close to those of TDSE

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  10. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO4 laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 μm in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  11. Ambient Molecular Analysis of Biological Tissue Using Low-Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Postionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Flanigan, Paul M.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct analysis of plant and animal tissue samples by laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) was investigated using low-energy, femtosecond duration laser vaporization at wavelengths of 800 and 1042 nm followed by nanospray postionization. Low-energy (sugars, and other metabolites were successfully detected and revealed the anticipated metabolite profile for the petal and leaf samples. Phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine, were identified from a fresh mouse brain section sample using Ti:Sapphire-LEMS without the application of matrix. These lipid features were suppressed in both the fiber-based and Ti:Sapphire-based LEMS measurements when the brain sample was prepared using the optimal cutting temperature compounds that are commonly used in animal tissue cryosections.

  12. Acceleration of neutral atoms in strong short-pulse laser fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, U; Nubbemeyer, T; Rottke, H; Sandner, W

    2009-10-29

    A charged particle exposed to an oscillating electric field experiences a force proportional to the cycle-averaged intensity gradient. This so-called ponderomotive force plays a major part in a variety of physical situations such as Paul traps for charged particles, electron diffraction in strong (standing) laser fields (the Kapitza-Dirac effect) and laser-based particle acceleration. Comparably weak forces on neutral atoms in inhomogeneous light fields may arise from the dynamical polarization of an atom; these are physically similar to the cycle-averaged forces. Here we observe previously unconsidered extremely strong kinematic forces on neutral atoms in short-pulse laser fields. We identify the ponderomotive force on electrons as the driving mechanism, leading to ultrastrong acceleration of neutral atoms with a magnitude as high as approximately 10(14) times the Earth's gravitational acceleration, g. To our knowledge, this is by far the highest observed acceleration on neutral atoms in external fields and may lead to new applications in both fundamental and applied physics. PMID:19865167

  13. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  14. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  16. Generalized Two-State Theory for an Atom Laser with Nonlinear Couplings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; TIAN Li-Jun

    2002-01-01

    We present a generalized two-state theory to investigate the quantum dynamics and statistics of an atom laser with nonlinear couplings. The rotating wave approximate Hamiltonian of the system is proved to be analytically solvable. The fraction of output atoms is then showed to exhibit an interesting collapse and revival phenomenon with respect to the evolution time, a sign of nonlinear couplings. Several nonclassical effects, such as sub-Poissonian distribution, quadrature squeezing effects, second-order cross-correlation and accompanied violation of Cauchy-Schwartz inequality are also revealed for the output matter wave. The initial global phase of the trapped condensate, in weak nonlinear coupling limits, is found to exert an interesting impact on the quantum statistical properties of the propagating atom laser beam.

  17. Densification behavior of gas and water atomized 316L stainless steel powder during selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The densification during selective laser melting (SLM) process is an important factor determining the final application of SLM-part. In the present work, the densifications under different processing conditions were investigated and the densification mechanisms were elucidated. It was found that the higher laser power, lower scan speed, narrower hatch spacing and thinner layer thickness could enable a much smoother melting surface and consequently a higher densification. The gas atomized powder possessed better densification than water atomized powder, due to the lower oxygen content and higher packing density of gas atomized powder. A large number of regular-shaped pores can be generated at a wider hatch spacing, even if the scanning track is continuous and wetted very well. The densification mechanisms were addressed and the methods for building dense metal parts were also proposed as follows: inhibiting the balling phenomenon, increasing the overlap ratio of scanning tracks and reducing the micro-cracks.

  18. Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultra cold atom beam

    OpenAIRE

    Aghajani-Talesh, Anoush

    2014-01-01

    In dieser Dissertation werden zwei komplementäre Methoden für die Laserkühlung eines magnetisch geführten, ultrakalten Atomstrahls untersucht. Kombiniert könnten diese Methoden den Ausgangspunkt für eine, möglicherweise sogar kontinuierliche, Hochdurchsatzproduktion von Bose-Einstein-Kondensaten darstellen. Als erstes wird ein Mechanismus vorgestellt, mit dem sich ultrakalte Atome aus einem magnetisch geführten Atomstrahl in eine optische Dipolfalle umladen lassen. Es wird ein kontinuierli...

  19. Chlorine Analysis by Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim Koch; Aleksandr Zybin; Kay Niemax

    2000-01-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particulary with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine-and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the exspected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample.

  20. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  1. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  2. CO/sub 2/ laser sustained CW discharge atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high pressure, supersonic, laser sustained plasma nozzle beam source has been developed for the production of intense (>1019 particles s1-sr-1) beams of atomic and/or radical species having kinetic energies in the range of 1 to 10 eV. A high plasma temperature (10 to 30,000 K) is produced in the throat of a hydrodynamic expansion nozzle by sustaining a cw optical discharge in a gas using a high power cw CO2 laser. Gas mixtures are expanded through the nozzle/discharge region creating energetic atoms and molecules. An oxygen atom beam has been produced with a kinetic energy of 2 to 3 eV and an intensity of approx. 1018 O-atoms s-1sr-1. O-atom collisions (1 eV) from an uncharacterized nickel surface shows strong specular scattering with approximately 50% energy loss to the surface. Argon beams having kinetic energies between 5 to 10 eV with intensities of >1019 atoms s-1sr-1 have also been produced. 13 refs., 8 figs

  3. Integration of the AVLIS [atomic vapor laser isotopic separation] process into the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AVLIS RD and D efforts are currently proceeding toward full-scale integrated enrichment demonstrations in the late 1980's and potential plant deployment in the mid 1990's. Since AVLIS requires a uranium metal feed and produces an enriched uranium metal product, some change in current uranium processing practices are necessitated. AVLIS could operate with a UF6-in UF6-out interface with little effect to the remainder of the fuel cycle. This path, however, does not allow electric utility customers to realize the full potential of low cost AVLIS enrichment. Several alternative processing methods have been identified and evaluated which appear to provide opportunities to make substantial cost savings in the overall fuel cycle. These alternatives involve varying levels of RD and D resources, calendar time, and technical risk to implement and provide these cost reduction opportunities. Both feed conversion contracts and fuel fabricator contracts are long-term entities. Because of these factors, it is not too early to start planning and making decisions on the most advantageous options so that AVLIS can be integrated cost effectively into the fuel cycle. This should offer economic opportunity to all parties involved including DOE, utilities, feed converters, and fuel fabricators. 10 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Team resource management trainer's manual for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High reliability organizations do exist. They have been defined as those organizations that conduct thousands of high-consequence operations a year, essentially error-free. Naval air carriers, air traffic control, and commercial aviation are some of these kinds of organizations. How did they get that way? What kinds of people staff them? Can we become a high reliability organization? This workshop will look at these questions. When we are done, it will be up to you to determine whether we have the right stuff. There are six goals for this workshop: Describe Team Resource Management and its purpose; Describe Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) and their role in predicting and managing team performance and errors; Describe the principles for managing human error; Describe TRMs 12 rules-of-thumb (the Dirty Dozen) and use of safety nets; Conduct Operational Risk Management (ORM); Demonstrate ways to keep TRM working

  5. Team resource management participant's handbook for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of any operation is to complete tasks efficiently and effectively. Working safely is completely consistent with efficient, reliable operations. Working in an unsafe manner is not effective or ultimately efficient. If someone is hurt, work stops. Following the steps advocated by Team Resource Management (TRM) leads to more safe, efficient, effective work habits. TRM is a method used by teams (i.e., leaders and workers) to conduct technical business. It is used by the aviation industry to improve reliability and safety through formalizing the way it does business. High reliability organizations do exist. They conduct thousands of high-consequence operations a year, essentially error-free. Naval air carriers, air traffic control, and commercial aviation are some of these kinds of organizations. How did they get that way? What kinds of people staff them? Can we become a high reliability organization? This workshop will look at these questions. When we are done, it will be up to you to determine if we have the right stuff. The goals of this workshop are to: Describe Team Resource Management and its purpose; Describe Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) and their role in predicting and managing team performance and errors; Describe the principles for managing human error; Describe TRMs 12 rules-of-thumb (the Dirty Dozen) and use of safety nets; Conduct Operational Risk Management (ORM); Demonstrate ways to keep TRM working

  6. The application of atomic vapor laser isotope separation to the enrichment of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the results of recent work carried out at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop a process for enriching mercury. The discussion centers around the results of spectroscopic measurements of excited-state lifetimes, photoionization cross sections, and isotope shifts. (author)

  7. Team resource management trainer's manual for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-03-13

    High reliability organizations do exist. They have been defined as those organizations that conduct thousands of high-consequence operations a year, essentially error-free. Naval air carriers, air traffic control, and commercial aviation are some of these kinds of organizations. How did they get that way? What kinds of people staff them? Can we become a high reliability organization? This workshop will look at these questions. When we are done, it will be up to you to determine whether we have the right stuff. There are six goals for this workshop: Describe Team Resource Management and its purpose; Describe Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) and their role in predicting and managing team performance and errors; Describe the principles for managing human error; Describe TRM's 12 rules-of-thumb (the "Dirty Dozen") and use of safety nets; Conduct Operational Risk Management (ORM); Demonstrate ways to keep TRM working.

  8. Team resource management participant's handbook for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The goal of any operation is to complete tasks efficiently and effectively. Working safely is completely consistent with efficient, reliable operations. Working in an unsafe manner is not effective or ultimately efficient. If someone is hurt, work stops. Following the steps advocated by Team Resource Management (TRM) leads to more safe, efficient, effective work habits. TRM is a method used by teams (i.e., leaders and workers) to conduct technical business. It is used by the aviation industry to improve reliability and safety through formalizing the way it does business. High reliability organizations do exist. They conduct thousands of high-consequence operations a year, essentially error-free. Naval air carriers, air traffic control, and commercial aviation are some of these kinds of organizations. How did they get that way? What kinds of people staff them? Can we become a high reliability organization? This workshop will look at these questions. When we are done, it will be up to you to determine if we have the right stuff. The goals of this workshop are to: Describe Team Resource Management and its purpose; Describe Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) and their role in predicting and managing team performance and errors; Describe the principles for managing human error; Describe TRM's 12 rules-of-thumb (the "Dirty Dozen") and use of safety nets; Conduct Operational Risk Management (ORM); Demonstrate ways to keep TRM working.

  9. 3D transient multiphase model for keyhole, vapor plume, and weld pool dynamics in laser welding including the ambient pressure effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Jianxin; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming

    2015-11-01

    The physical process of deep penetration laser welding involves complex, self-consistent multiphase keyhole, metallic vapor plume, and weld pool dynamics. Currently, efforts are still needed to understand these multiphase dynamics. In this paper, a novel 3D transient multiphase model capable of describing a self-consistent keyhole, metallic vapor plume in the keyhole, and weld pool dynamics in deep penetration fiber laser welding is proposed. Major physical factors of the welding process, such as recoil pressure, surface tension, Marangoni shear stress, Fresnel absorptions mechanisms, heat transfer, and fluid flow in weld pool, keyhole free surface evolutions and solid-liquid-vapor three phase transformations are coupling considered. The effect of ambient pressure in laser welding is rigorously treated using an improved recoil pressure model. The predicated weld bead dimensions, transient keyhole instability, weld pool dynamics, and vapor plume dynamics are compared with experimental and literature results, and good agreements are obtained. The predicted results are investigated by not considering the effects of the ambient pressure. It is found that by not considering the effects of ambient pressure, the average keyhole wall temperature is underestimated about 500 K; besides, the average speed of metallic vapor will be significantly overestimated. The ambient pressure is an essential physical factor for a comprehensive understanding the dynamics of deep penetration laser welding.

  10. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons

  11. Ionization potential of neutral atomic plutonium determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization potential of the neutral plutonium atom, Pu i, has been determined by two- and three-step resonance photoionization observation of the threshold of ionization and of the Rydberg series. The Rydberg series were observed by field ionization as series that converge to the first ionization limit and as autoionizing series the converge to the second and to several higher convergence limits. The threshold and Rydberg series were obtained through a number of two- and three-step pathways. The photoionization threshold value for the 239Pu i ionization potential is 48 582(30) cm-1, and the more accurate value from the Rydberg series is 48 604(1) cm-1 or 6.0262(1) eV

  12. Diode laser operating on an atomic transition limited by an isotope ⁸⁷Rb Faraday filter at 780 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Hong, Yelong; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an extended cavity Faraday laser system using an antireflection-coated laser diode as the gain medium and the isotope (87)Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as the frequency selective device. Using this method, the laser wavelength works stably at the highest transmission peak of the isotope (87)Rb FADOF over the laser diode current from 55 to 140 mA and the temperature from 15°C to 35°C. Neither the current nor the temperature of the laser diode has significant influence on the output frequency. Compared with previous extended cavity laser systems operating at frequencies irrelevant to spectacular atomic transition lines, the laser system realized here provides a stable laser source with the frequency operating on atomic transitions for many practical applications. PMID:26371933

  13. Diode laser operating on an atomic transition limited by an isotope ⁸⁷Rb Faraday filter at 780 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiming; Hong, Yelong; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an extended cavity Faraday laser system using an antireflection-coated laser diode as the gain medium and the isotope (87)Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as the frequency selective device. Using this method, the laser wavelength works stably at the highest transmission peak of the isotope (87)Rb FADOF over the laser diode current from 55 to 140 mA and the temperature from 15°C to 35°C. Neither the current nor the temperature of the laser diode has significant influence on the output frequency. Compared with previous extended cavity laser systems operating at frequencies irrelevant to spectacular atomic transition lines, the laser system realized here provides a stable laser source with the frequency operating on atomic transitions for many practical applications.

  14. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  15. Investigation of isotopically-selective laser collinear photoionization of accelerated helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of investigations of collinear two-step laser photoionization of 3He and 4He isotopes accelerated to energies up to 3.9 keV. It is shown that selectivity of ionization of the rare isotope 3He is 106 for a residual vacuum in the system fo 10-7 mm Hg. It is limited by collision processes leading to the excitation of fast metastable atoms into Rydberg state in the field-free region and to impact ionization of the fast atoms in the region of the ionizer. The ionization of fast Rydberg atoms in a transverse electric field is investigated. It is shown that the ionization of helium atoms excited into the n3D states proceeds via adiabatic and diabatic channels

  16. Search for Electric dipole moment (EDM) in laser cooled and trapped 225Ra atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Mukut; Bailey, Kevin; Dietrich, Matthew; Green, John; Holt, Roy; Korsch, Wolfgang; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Lemke, Nathan; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Tom; Parker, Richard; Singh, Jaideep; Trimble, Will; Argonne National Laboratory Collaboration; University Of Chicago Collabration; University Of Kentucky Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We are searching for an EDM of the diamagnetic 225Ra atom. 225Ra has nuclear spin I =1/2. Experimental sensitivity to its EDM is enhanced due to its heavy mass and the increased Schiff moment of its octupole deformed nucleus. Our experiment involves collecting laser cooled Ra atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), transporting them 1 meter with a far off-resonant optical dipole trap (ODT) and then transferring the atoms to a second standing-wave ODT in our experimental chamber. We will report our recent experiences in polarizing and observing Larmor precession of 225Ra atoms in parallel electric and magnetic fields in a magnetically shielded region and progress towards a first measurement of the EDM of 225Ra. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and contract No. DE-FG02-99ER41101.

  17. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  18. Study of isotopic selectivity in laser resonance ionization of lutetium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using numerical simulation method in terms of rate equation approximation, laser-induced isotopic selectivity of the scheme of resonance ionization: 5d6s22D3/2(573.655 nm)→5d6s6p 4F3/2 (642.518 nm)→6s6p24P1/2(643.548 nm)→Autoionization state was studied. The function of isotopic selectivity on laser wavelength was calculated for the parameters matching real experimental conditions by this method. The results calculated were well met with the experimental. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic selectivity on the laser parameters, such as wavelength, bandwidth and intensity, were discussed in view of the interaction of linearly polarized light with lutetium atom. The approaches that isotopic ratio were accurately determined by laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry in the case of certain laser parameters were presented. This theoretical method may be also used to study the isotopic selectivity of other elements and select the scheme of resonance ionization of laser isotope separation

  19. Strong magnetism observed in carbon nanoparticles produced by the laser vaporization of a carbon pellet in hydrogen-containing Ar balance gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Hirohito; Muraki, Susumu; Endo, Hiroki; Bandow, Shunji; Iijima, Sumio

    2010-08-25

    Nanometer-scale carbon particles driven by the pulsed-laser vaporization of pelletized pure carbon powder at 1000 °C in a hydrogen-containing environment show anomalous magnetism like a superparamagnet, while the sample prepared in 100% of Ar does not show such magnetism. The observed magnetism was unchanged over months in the ambient. The structure of this nanomaterial resembles the foam of a laundry detergent and transmission electron microscopy indicates a clear corrugated line contrast. On the other hand, a sample without strong magnetism does not give such an image contrast. The x-ray diffraction pattern coincides with that of graphite and no other peak is detected. Thermogravimetry indicates that all samples completely burn out up to approx. 820 °C and no material remains after combustion, indicating that the sample does not contain impurity metals. Magnetization is easily saturated by ∼10,000 G at 280 K with no hysteresis, but the hysteresis appears at 4.2 K. This phenomenon is explained by introducing a crystalline anisotropy which restricts the motion of the magnetic moment and stabilizes the remnant magnetization at zero magnetic field. Magnitudes of the saturation magnetization are in the range of 1-5 emu G g(-1) at 4.2 K, which correspond to 0.002-0.01 Bohr magneton per carbon atom. This concentration may be increased by ten times or more, because only about 4-10% of particles have a magnetic domain in the present samples.

  20. Prospects for diode-pumped alkali-atom-based hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintov, Yoav; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-08-15

    By employing large hollow-core Kagome fiber in a double-clad configuration, the performance of a potentially rubidium vapor-based fiber laser is explored. The absorbed power and laser efficiency versus pump power are calculated utilizing a simple laser model. Our results show that a Kagome-based high-power fiber laser is feasible provided that the value of the collisional fine-structure mixing rate will be elevated by increasing the ambient temperature or by increasing the helium pressure.