WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic spectroscopy study

  1. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  2. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  3. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  5. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections

  6. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  8. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  9. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  10. Study of a Model Humic Acid-type Polymer by Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Antonio Piza; Nelson Consolin-Filho; Sérgio da Costa Saab; Daiana Kotra Deda; Fábio de Lima Leite; Marcilene Ferrari Barriquello; Ladislau Martin-Neto

    2012-01-01

    A model HA-type polymer of para-benzoquinone synthetic humic acid (SHA) and its complexes with copper, iron and manganese metal ions were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Natural humic acids (HA) and synthetic humic acids (SHA) were examined by fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated similarity of SHA and HA spectra. The AFM images of SHA and its complexes revealed variable morphologies, such as small spheres, aggregates and a sponge-like structure. The SHA complexes displayed ...

  11. Atomic and molecular photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were also measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the ejected electrons. The double-angle-TOF method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collection efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. An electron spectroscopy study of inner-shell photoexcitation and ionization of Xe, photoelectron angular distributions from H2 and D2, and photoionization cross sections and photoelectron asymmetries of the valence orbitals of NO are reported

  12. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

    1989-07-01

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28) and neonlike (34 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Study on some current aspects of plasma spectroscopic instrumentation using atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years we have developed different techniques for plasma instrumentation. Within the paper we briefly review the developments of spectroscopic equipment's for their current aspects under the plasma spectroscopy using the general formulations of atomic spectroscopy. Special emphasis will be place on the development simple technique for plasma spectroscopy with several its multidimensional aspects in present scenario of plasma science and nuclear materials. (author)

  16. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  17. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  18. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  19. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  20. Theoretical experimental study of the factors that govern the molybdenum absorption signal by means of electro thermic atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of molybdenum carbides in the atomizer, used in the electro thermic atomic absorption spectroscopy, is responsible for incomplete analyte removal in its analysis. This generates the apparition of the memory effect and little precision in the results. In this work, different variables that could affect the molybdenum absorption sign were investigated, as well as the influence of hydrochloric acid on the memory effect, by means of studies in the different stages: drying, calcination and atomization, and the samples deposition order in molybdenum solutions, either acidified or not acidified

  1. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  2. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  3. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert, E-mail: r.loew@physik.uni-stuttgart.de [5. Physikalisches Institut and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  4. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  5. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  6. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study of bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.M.; Jimenez, I.; Vazquez, L.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Albella, J.M.; Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco28049, Madrid (Spain); Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States); Himpsel, F.J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin53706 (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on Si(100) has been studied by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and atomic force microscopy, two techniques well suited to characterize nanometric crystallites. Diamond nuclei of {approximately}15nm are formed after 5 min of bias-enhanced treatment. The number of nuclei and its size increases with the time of application of the bias voltage. A nanocrystalline diamond film is attained after 20 min of bias-enhanced nucleation. At the initial nucleation stages, the Si substrate appears covered with diamond crystallites and graphite, without SiC being detected by XANES. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Scanning Josephson spectroscopy on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Josephson effect provides a direct method to probe the strength of the pairing interaction in superconductors. By measuring the phase fluctuating Josephson current between a superconducting tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a BCS superconductor with isolated magnetic adatoms on its surface, we demonstrate that the spatial variation of the pairing order parameter can be characterized on the atomic scale. This system provides an example where the local pairing potential suppression is not directly reflected in the spectra measured via quasiparticle tunneling. Spectroscopy with such superconducting tips also shows signatures of previously unexplored Andreev processes through individual impurity-bound Shiba states. The atomic resolution achieved here establishes scanning Josephson spectroscopy as a promising technique for the study of novel superconducting phases.

  9. One-atom detection and statistical studies with resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To learn how to take matter apart atom-by-atom and to count each atom according to its type, regardless of its initial chemical or physical state, is presumably a worthy goal in scientific research. The advent of the laser created real hope that these aspirations will be realized. The counting of atoms is not merely an intellectual exercise set apart from real-world applications. On the contrary, even though the capability is scarcely more than five years old, practical applications have been made in many fields of chemistry, physics, the environment, and industry. In this lecture we wish to review how the laser made possible the counting of atoms and how this capability has been put to use in situations where atoms are free to react chemically as they diffuse through a medium. Fluctuation phenomena and statistical mechanics can also be examined in these situations

  10. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  11. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  12. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  13. Nuclear delocalization of hydrogen atoms studied by PIMD simulations and NMR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.

    Debrecen: -, 2015. s. 71. [International Conference on Density Functional Theory and its Applications /16./. 31.08.2015-04.09.2015, Debrecen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : path integral molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Surface chemistry of plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 studied by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface groups created during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were studied by infrared spectroscopy. For temperatures in the range of 25-150 deg. C, -CH3 and -OH were unveiled as dominant surface groups after the Al(CH3)3 precursor and O2 plasma half-cycles, respectively. At lower temperatures more -OH and C-related impurities were found to be incorporated in the Al2O3 film, but the impurity level could be reduced by prolonging the plasma exposure. The results demonstrate that -OH surface groups rule the surface chemistry of the Al2O3 process and likely that of plasma-assisted ALD of metal oxides from organometallic precursors in general

  15. A Literature Study of Matrix Element Influenced to the Result of Analysis Using Absorption Atomic Spectroscopy Method (AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gold sample analysis can be deviated more than >10% to those thrue value caused by the matrix element. So that the matrix element character need to be study in order to reduce the deviation. In rock samples, the matrix elements can cause self quenching, self absorption and ionization process, so there is a result analysis error. In the rock geochemical process, the elements of the same group at the periodic system have the tendency to be together because of their same characteristic. In absorption Atomic Spectroscopy analysis, the elements associate can absorb primer energy with similar wave length so that it can cause deviation in the result interpretation. The aim of study is to predict matrix element influences from rock sample with application standard method for reducing deviation. In quantitative way, assessment of primer light intensity that will be absorbed is proportional to the concentration atom in the sample that relationship between photon intensity with concentration in part per million is linier (ppm). These methods for eliminating matrix elements influence consist of three methods : external standard method, internal standard method, and addition standard method. External standard method for all matrix element, internal standard method for elimination matrix element that have similar characteristics, addition standard methods for elimination matrix elements in Au, Pt samples. The third of standard posess here accuracy are about 95-97%. (author)

  16. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  17. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  18. Atomic physics for fusion plasma spectroscopy; a soft x-ray study of molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the radiative patterns of the ions of heavy atoms (Z approx-gt 18) is crucial to fusion experiments. The present thesis applies ab initio, relativistic calculations of atomic data to modeling the emission of molybdenum (Z = 42) ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The models are compared to observations made in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Experimental confirmation of these models allows confidence in calculations of the total molybdenum concentration and quantitative estimates of the total power lost from the plasmas due to molybdenum line radiation. Charge states in the plasma core (Mo33+ to Mo29+) emit strong x-ray and XUV spectra which allow benchmarking of models for the spatial distribution of highly stripped molybdenum ions; the models only achieve agreement with observations when the rates of indirect ionization and recombination processes are included in the calculation of the charge state distribution of the central molybdenum ions. The total concentration of molybdenum in the core of the plasma is found, and the total power radiated from the plasma core is computed. Observations of line emission from more highly charged molybdenum ions (Mo36+ to Mo34+) are presented. open-quotes Bulkclose quotes molybdenum charge states (Mo25+ to Mo23+) emit complicated XUV spectra from a position in the plasma near C-Mod's half radius; spatial profiles of these ions' emission are analyzed. Models for the line-emission spectra of adjacent ions (Mo28+ to Mo26+) are offered, and the accuracy and limits of ab initio energy level calculations are discussed. open-quotes Edgeclose quotes charge states (Mo22+ to Mo15) extend to the last closed magnetic flux surface of the C-Mod plasma. The strongest features from these charge states are emitted in a narrow band from ∼70 Angstrom

  19. A study of the effect of some nutritious solutions acidity on the traditional aluminium utensils using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the effect of the acidity of some nutritious solutions, like tomato juice and lemon juice, on the un-processed untreated, traditional cooking utensils, which are made of aluminum and others made of Tefal for comparing them. The comparison has been done by heating the utensils into different periods: 30, 45 and 60 minutes. The two minerals of aluminum and lead have been identified in the studied samples using the atomic absorption spectroscopy. Usage lead mineral in forming these utensils by any way during their manufacturing is the cause of taking this mineral into consideration in the study. The results of this study show that aluminum has recorded the higher concentration after a heating period of 30 minutes, where its amount in the samples of tomato juice is (24.48 μg/ml) and in the lemon juice is (34.43 μg ml). The lead has also recorded a steady concentration (0.01 μg/ml) in all studied samples, where it has been in the allowed limits (0.1 μg/ml). The concentration of aluminum mineral has exceeded those limits (2 - 5 μg/l), where it forms a great danger on the health of the human beings, who will have those foods. For this reason, we must make a reconsideration of using the traditional cooking utensils and replace them with what it is new and healthy. (author)

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Frine [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Benzo, Zully [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Quintal, Manuelita [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Garaboto, Angel [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Albornoz, Alberto [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Brito, Joaquin L. [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: joabrito@ivic.ve

    2006-10-15

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 2+}) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO{sub 3}. Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 5+}) and carbide (Mo{sup 2+}) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar{sup +} ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform.

  1. USEPA METHOD STUDY 38 - SW-846 METHOD 3010, ACID DIGESTION OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES AND EXTRACTS FOR TRACE METALS BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted on SW-846 Method 3010, "Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts for Total Metals for Analysis by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy", to determine the mean recovery and precision for analyses of 21 trace metals in surf...

  2. Mechanistic study of atomic layer deposition of AlxSiyO thin film via in-situ FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of surface reaction mechanism on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum silicate (AlxSiyO) was conducted with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as precursors and H2O as the oxidant. In-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to elucidate the underlying surface mechanism that enables the deposition of AlxSiyO by ALD. In-situ FTIR study revealed that ineffective hydroxylation of the surface ethoxy (–OCH2CH3) groups prohibits ALD of SiO2 by TEOS/H2O. In contrast, effective desorption of the surface ethoxy group was observed in TEOS/H2O/TMA/H2O chemistry. The presence of Al-OH* group in vicinity of partially hydroxylated ethoxy (–OCH2CH3) group was found to propagate disproportionation reaction, which results in ALD of AlxSiyO. The maximum thickness from incorporation of SiOx from alternating exposures of TEOS/H2O chemistry in AlxSiyO was found to be ∼2 Å, confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements

  3. Surface compositions of atomic layer deposited Zn1−xMgxO thin films studied using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors present Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) studies of Zn1−xMgxO (ZMO) films grown via interrupted atomic-layer deposition (ALD) techniques. The ZMO films were fabricated by alternating ALD deposition of ZnO and MgO layers up to 1000 cycles. Zn1−xMgxO films with progressively decreasing Mg/Zn ratios (Mg/Zn = 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/9, and 2/8, 3/12, 4/16, and 5/20) were fabricated for this study. The AES results exhibit an abrupt drop of Mg composition on the ZMO surface when the Mg/Zn < 1/3. Additionally, the surface composition ratios of O to Mg, O to Zn, and Mg to Zn were estimated with known Auger sensitivity factors. The results indicate that Mg ions diffuse into the bulk, forming Zn1−xMgxO alloys

  4. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  5. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  6. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy as a tool for studying, optimizing, and monitoring plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note it is demonstrated that optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is an easy-to-implement and valuable tool to study, optimize, and monitor thin film growth by plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD). The species in the plasma can be identified through the analysis of the light emitted by the plasma. OES provides therefore information on the reactant species delivered to the surface by the plasma but it also yields unique insight into the surface reaction products and, as a consequence, on the reaction mechanisms of the deposition process. Time-resolved measurements reveal information about the amount of precursor dosing and length of plasma exposure needed to saturate the self-limiting half reactions, which is useful for the optimization of the ALD process. Furthermore, time-resolved OES can also be used as an easy-to-implement process monitoring tool for plasma-assisted ALD processes on production equipment; for example, to monitor reactor wall conditions or to detect process faults in real time.

  8. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of sputtered uranium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy was used to study the sputtering of 99.8% 238U metal foil when bombarded by normally incident 500 to 3000 eV Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, and O2+. A three-level atom model of the LIF processes is developed to interpret the observed fluorescent emission from the sputtered species. The model shows that close attention must be paid to the conditions under which the experiment is carried out as well as to the details of the collision cascade theory of sputtering. Rigorous analysis shows that when properly applied, LIF can be used to investigate the predictions of sputtering theory as regards energy distributions of sputtered particles and for the determination of sputtering yields. The possibility that thermal emission may occur during sputtering can also be tested using the proposed model. It is shown that the velocity distribution (either the number density or flux density distribution, depending upon the experimental conditions) of the sputtered particles can be determined using the LIF technique and that this information can be used to obtain a description of the basic sputtering mechanisms. These matters are discussed using the U-atom fluorescence measurements as a basis. The relative sputtering yields for various incident ions on uranium were also measured for the first time using the LIF technique. A surprisingly high fraction of the sputtered uranium atoms were found to occupy the low lying metastable energy levels of U(I). The population of the sputtered metastable atoms were found approximately to obey a Boltzman distribution with an effective temperature of 920 +- 1000K. 41 references

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target

  10. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  11. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  12. Studies on mercury contamination in the Brazilian Amazonic region using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technique, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and it was concluded that most of the mercury was present in the hair as the dangerous methylmercury. It is known already that the most probable source of methylmercury for humans is fish ,due to the fact that they can concentrate methylmercury many times. Since the Indians consume fish on a daily basis, this could be the reason for the presence of very high amounts of mercury in their hair and also in their blood, as shown by other studies. (author)

  13. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  14. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.; Luiten, Andre N.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler-broadening of atomic transitions in $^{85}$Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine $k_B$ with a relative uncertainty of $4.1\\times 10^{-4}$, and with a deviation of $2.7\\times 10^{-4}$ from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapour, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques,...

  15. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  16. Determination of trace amounts of scandium by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Y K

    1968-05-01

    Optimum instrumental conditions were investigated for the determination of trace quantities of scandium by atomic-absorption spectroscopy. Enhancement effects by organic solvents and by complex extractions were also studied. (46)Sc was used to establish the optimum extraction conditions. A sensitivity of 0.06 ppm of Sc was observed when using extraction into oxine-butanol and atomic absorption was measured with an acetylene-nitrous oxide flame. PMID:18960315

  17. Modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (authors)

  18. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  19. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  20. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  1. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, {approximately}10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching.

  2. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  3. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES - A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) had been an essential tool to gather spectroscopic information about atomic energy level structure in the early decades of this century. The correct interpretation of the oscillatory structure in the x-ray absorption cross-section above the absorption edge has transformed XAS from a spectroscopic tool to a structural technique. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) yields information about the interatomic distances, near neighbor coordination numbers, and lattice dynamics. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure), on the other hand, gives information about the valence state, energy bandwidth and bond angles. Today, there are about 50 experimental stations in various synchrotrons around the world dedicated to collecting x-ray absorption data from the bulk and surfaces of solids and liquids. In this chapter, they will give the basic principles of XAS, explain the information content of essentially two different aspects of the absorption process leading to EXAFS and XANES, and discuss the source and sample limitations

  5. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dahia, F

    2015-01-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  6. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  7. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of K Atoms on Argon Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douady, J; Awali, S; Poisson, L; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J M; Gervais, B

    2015-06-11

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of the 4s → 4p photoexcitation of the K atom trapped at the surface of ArN clusters made of a few hundred Ar atoms. Our experimental method based on photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to firmly establish that one single K atom is trapped at the surface of the cluster. The absorption spectrum is characterized by the splitting of the atomic absorption line into two broad bands, a Π band associated with p orbitals parallel to the cluster surface and a Σ band associated with the perpendicular orientation. The spectrum is consistent with observations reported for K atoms trapped on lighter inert gas clusters, but the splitting between the Π and Σ bands is significantly larger. We show that a large amount of K atoms are transiently stuck and eventually lost by the Ar cluster, in contrast with previous observations reported for alkaline earth metal systems. The excitation in the Σ band leads systematically to the ejection of the K atom from the Ar cluster. On the contrary, excitation in the Π band leads to the formation of a bound state. In this case, the analysis of the experimental photoelectron spectrum by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation shows that the relaxation drives the system toward a basin where the coordination of the K atom is 2.2 Ar atoms on the average, in a poorly structured surface. PMID:25854161

  8. Mass and Auger electron spectroscopy studies of the interactions of atomic and molecular chlorine on a plasma reactor wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the interactions of Cl and Cl2 with an anodized Al surface in an inductively coupled chlorine plasma. The cylindrical substrate is rapidly rotated within a differentially pumped wall and is exposed to the plasma 35% of the time through a conical skimmer. On the opposite side of the substrate, a second skimmer and differential pumping allows the surface and desorbing products to be analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), line-of-sight mass spectrometry (MS), and through pressure rise measurements. In a 600 W Cl2 plasma at 5 mTorr, the surface becomes covered with a layer with the overall stoichiometry of about Al2Si2O10Cl3, with Si being the result of the slow erosion of the quartz discharge tube. The surface layer composition (specifically Cl coverage) does not change as a function of the delay time (1 ms-10 min) between plasma exposure and AES characterization. In contrast to AES measurements, the MS signals from Cl2 desorption, resulting from recombination of Cl atoms, decrease by about a factor of 10 over the 1-38 ms probed by varying the substrate rotation frequency. Substantial adsorption and desorption of Cl2 are also observed with the plasma off. Cl recombination coefficients (γCl) derived from an analysis of the time-dependent MS signals range from 0.01 to 0.1 and increase with increasing Cl-to-Cl2 number density ratio, suggesting a competition for adsorption sites between Cl2 and Cl

  9. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related question...

  10. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in 85Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine kB with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10-4 and with a deviation of 2.7x10-4 from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured kB value was less than 4x10-6. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  11. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    CERN Document Server

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler-broadening of atomic transitions in $^{85}$Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine $k_B$ with a relative uncertainty of $4.1\\times 10^{-4}$, and with a deviation of $2.7\\times 10^{-4}$ from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapour, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured $k_B$ value was less than $4\\times 10^{-6}$. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for im...

  12. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Talk: Soft X-Ray Studies of Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films: From Spectroscopy to Ultrafast Nanoscale Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    My talk will review the development of soft x-ray spectroscopy and microscopy and its impact on our understanding of chemical bonding, magnetism and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces. I will first outline important soft x-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques that have been developed over the last 30 years and their key strengths such as elemental and chemical specificity, sensitivity to small atomic concentrations, separation of charge and spin properties, spatial resolution down to the nanometer scale, and temporal resolution down to the intrinsic femtosecond timescale of atomic and electronic motions. I will then present scientific breakthroughs based on soft x-ray studies in three selected areas: the nature of molecular bonding and reactivity on metal surfaces, the molecular origin of liquid crystal alignment on surfaces, and the microscopic origin of interface-mediated spin alignments in modern magnetic devices. My talk will also cover the use of soft x-rays for revealing the temporal evolution of electronic structure, addressing the key problem of ``function,'' down to the intrinsic femtosecond time scale of charge and spin configuration changes. As examples I will present the formation and breaking of chemical bonds in surface complexes and the motion of the magnetization in magnetic devices. Work supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science of the US Department of Energy.

  13. Influences of the propyl group on the van der Waals structures of 4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms studied by electronic and cationic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms formed in the molecular beam were studied in the first excited electronic state, S1, using resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy and in the cation ground state, D0, using mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The combination of electronic and cationic spectra of the clusters allows two conformations to be identified in both aniline-Ar1 and aniline-Ar2, which are assigned to either the gauche configuration or anti-configuration of 4-propylaniline. The gauche isomer exhibits complex bands shifted 29 cm−1 and 89 cm−1 from the S1 origin bands and 83 cm−1 and 148 cm−1 from the ionization potential assigned to the Ar1 and Ar2 complexes, respectively. For the anti-rotamer, the corresponding shifts actually become nearly additive, 53 cm−1 and 109 cm−1 for the S1 origin bands, and 61 cm−1 and 125 cm−1 for the ionization potentials. Ab initio calculations provide insights into the influences of the propyl and amino groups on the positions of the argon atoms within the clusters. In addition, the binding energy of one argon with the gauche isomer of 4-propylaniline has been measured to be 550 ± 5 cm−1 in the D0 state, 496 ± 5 cm−1 in the S1 state, and 467 ± 5 cm−1 in the neutral ground state, S0

  14. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Action Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions and Studies of Cold Collsions in a Hybrid Atom-Ion Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Schowalter, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This Dissertation details the development of state-of-the-art hybrid atom-ion trapping architecture and technique towards increasing the quantum control of matter and the detection of chemical processes at cold temperatures. Experimental work discussed herein is performed primarily using the second-generation of the MOTion trap, a hybrid atom-ion trap consisting of a co-located magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear quadrupole trap (LQT), with which $^{40}$Ca and a variety of atomic and mol...

  16. Adsorption and deposition of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on alumina studied by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, Morihide [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)], E-mail: higo@apc.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Miake, Takeshi; Mitsushio, Masaru; Yoshidome, Toshifumi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Ozono, Yoshihisa [Center for Instrumental analysis, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2008-04-30

    The adsorption state of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) deposited from acetone solutions (0.01-1.00 mg/ml) on native oxide surfaces of Al films was characterized by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide was prepared on evaporated Al films at room temperature in an oxygen-dc glow discharge. The morphology of the deposited AQ-2-COOH on the oxide surfaces was observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. These surface analyses showed that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed predominantly as a uniform nanometer-scale film of carboxylate anions on the oxide surfaces deposited from solutions with concentrations lower than or equal to 0.02 mg/ml. It was found that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed as both a uniform film of anions and as micron-sized particles of neutral molecules with heights of a few tens of nanometers when AQ-2-COOH is deposited from solutions with concentrations higher than 0.02 mg/ml. A comparison of the results obtained by these surface analytical techniques clearly shows the features and advantages of these analytical techniques.

  17. Adsorption and deposition of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on alumina studied by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption state of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) deposited from acetone solutions (0.01-1.00 mg/ml) on native oxide surfaces of Al films was characterized by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide was prepared on evaporated Al films at room temperature in an oxygen-dc glow discharge. The morphology of the deposited AQ-2-COOH on the oxide surfaces was observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. These surface analyses showed that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed predominantly as a uniform nanometer-scale film of carboxylate anions on the oxide surfaces deposited from solutions with concentrations lower than or equal to 0.02 mg/ml. It was found that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed as both a uniform film of anions and as micron-sized particles of neutral molecules with heights of a few tens of nanometers when AQ-2-COOH is deposited from solutions with concentrations higher than 0.02 mg/ml. A comparison of the results obtained by these surface analytical techniques clearly shows the features and advantages of these analytical techniques

  18. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  19. Sensitive spectroscopy of an ytterbium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Guttridge, A; Kemp, S L; Boddy, D; Freytag, R; Tarbutt, M R; Hinds, E A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of ultracold ytterbium atoms generally involve the frequency stabilisation (locking) of lasers to two transitions at 399 and 556 nm in order to implement laser cooling. Here we present a simple and robust apparatus for generation of suitable, narrow fluorescence signals with a high signal to noise ratio at both wavelengths. The design utilises easily acquired vacuum parts, optics and electronics and requires very little laser power. We demonstrate the stability and precision of the frequency stabilisation at 556 nm by presenting sensitive measurements of the gravitational sag of an ytterbium MOT as a function of laser power.

  20. Influences of the propyl group on the van der Waals structures of 4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms studied by electronic and cationic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhijun [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Gu, Quanli [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Trindle, Carl O., E-mail: cot@virginia.edu [Chemistry Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Knee, J. L., E-mail: jknee@wesleyan.edu [Chemistry Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms formed in the molecular beam were studied in the first excited electronic state, S{sub 1}, using resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy and in the cation ground state, D{sub 0}, using mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The combination of electronic and cationic spectra of the clusters allows two conformations to be identified in both aniline-Ar{sub 1} and aniline-Ar{sub 2}, which are assigned to either the gauche configuration or anti-configuration of 4-propylaniline. The gauche isomer exhibits complex bands shifted 29 cm{sup −1} and 89 cm{sup −1} from the S{sub 1} origin bands and 83 cm{sup −1} and 148 cm{sup −1} from the ionization potential assigned to the Ar{sub 1} and Ar{sub 2} complexes, respectively. For the anti-rotamer, the corresponding shifts actually become nearly additive, 53 cm{sup −1} and 109 cm{sup −1} for the S{sub 1} origin bands, and 61 cm{sup −1} and 125 cm{sup −1} for the ionization potentials. Ab initio calculations provide insights into the influences of the propyl and amino groups on the positions of the argon atoms within the clusters. In addition, the binding energy of one argon with the gauche isomer of 4-propylaniline has been measured to be 550 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the D{sub 0} state, 496 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 1} state, and 467 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the neutral ground state, S{sub 0}.

  1. Impedance spectroscopy study of the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching states of atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaenen, Irina; Shkabko, Andrey; Aslam, Nabeel; Meuffels, Paul; Waser, Rainer; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne [Peter Gr, ue, nberg Institut and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt Strasse, 52425, Juelich (Germany); Heikkilae, Mikko; Vehkamaeki, Marko; Niinistoe, Jaakko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelae, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P. O. Box 55, Helsinki, 00014 (Finland)

    2015-04-01

    The polarity of the resistive switching (RS) characteristic of metal-oxide-metal devices from atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} films was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy. Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/Ti/Pt cells made with 10 nm Ti and 30 nm Pt capping top electrodes, served as unipolar switching (US) devices. Bipolar switching (BS) devices were represented by Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/30 nm TiN cells. Temperature measurements of the ON-state resistances clearly show metallic and semiconducting behavior for the US and BS cells, respectively. The pristine and the ON and OFF states of the devices were analyzed by means of impedance spectroscopy. All ZrO{sub 2} based RS devices exhibited similar impedance characteristics in the pristine states. In contrast, after electroforming clear differences in the Nyquist-plots of the US and BS devices were observed. The effect of the device structure on the RS polarity is discussed under consideration of the pillar-shaped grainy microstructure of the ZrO{sub 2} thin films. An empirical model based on redox reactions between ZrO{sub 2} and the non-noble metal electrode is proposed emphasizing defect formation prior at the ZrO{sub 2} grain boundaries. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Impedance spectroscopy study of the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching states of atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarity of the resistive switching (RS) characteristic of metal-oxide-metal devices from atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO2 films was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy. Pt/ZrO2/Ti/Pt cells made with 10 nm Ti and 30 nm Pt capping top electrodes, served as unipolar switching (US) devices. Bipolar switching (BS) devices were represented by Pt/ZrO2/30 nm TiN cells. Temperature measurements of the ON-state resistances clearly show metallic and semiconducting behavior for the US and BS cells, respectively. The pristine and the ON and OFF states of the devices were analyzed by means of impedance spectroscopy. All ZrO2 based RS devices exhibited similar impedance characteristics in the pristine states. In contrast, after electroforming clear differences in the Nyquist-plots of the US and BS devices were observed. The effect of the device structure on the RS polarity is discussed under consideration of the pillar-shaped grainy microstructure of the ZrO2 thin films. An empirical model based on redox reactions between ZrO2 and the non-noble metal electrode is proposed emphasizing defect formation prior at the ZrO2 grain boundaries. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li+-He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li+-He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He)+-quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  4. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  5. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  6. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  7. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design. PMID:27193551

  8. Design of a WWW database server for Atomic Spectroscopy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department of Atomic Spectroscopy at Lund Univ produces large amounts of experimental data on energy levels and emissions for atomic systems. In order to make this data easily available to users outside the institution, a database has been produced and made available on the Internet. This report describes the organization of the data and the Internet interface of the data base. 4 refs

  9. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  10. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  11. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Soter, A; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  12. Exploring the Single Atom Spin State by Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chang; Teng, Po-Yuan; Chiu, Po-Wen; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-11-13

    To control the spin state of an individual atom is an ultimate goal for spintronics. A single atom magnet, which may lead to a supercapacity memory device if realized, requires the high-spin state of an isolated individual atom. Here, we demonstrate the realization of well isolated transition metal (TM) atoms fixed at atomic defects sparsely dispersed in graphene. Core-level electron spectroscopy clearly reveals the high-spin state of the individual TM atoms at the divacancy or edge of the graphene layer. We also show for the first time that the spin state of single TM atoms systematically varies with the coordination of neighboring nitrogen or oxygen atoms. These structures can be thus regarded as the smallest components of spintronic devices with controlled magnetic behavior. PMID:26613462

  13. Mechanistic study of atomic layer deposition of Al{sub x}Si{sub y}O thin film via in-situ FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jea; Kim, Taeseung; Seegmiller, Trevor; Chang, Jane P., E-mail: jpchang@ucla.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A study of surface reaction mechanism on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum silicate (Al{sub x}Si{sub y}O) was conducted with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as precursors and H{sub 2}O as the oxidant. In-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to elucidate the underlying surface mechanism that enables the deposition of Al{sub x}Si{sub y}O by ALD. In-situ FTIR study revealed that ineffective hydroxylation of the surface ethoxy (–OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}) groups prohibits ALD of SiO{sub 2} by TEOS/H{sub 2}O. In contrast, effective desorption of the surface ethoxy group was observed in TEOS/H{sub 2}O/TMA/H{sub 2}O chemistry. The presence of Al-OH* group in vicinity of partially hydroxylated ethoxy (–OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}) group was found to propagate disproportionation reaction, which results in ALD of Al{sub x}Si{sub y}O. The maximum thickness from incorporation of SiO{sub x} from alternating exposures of TEOS/H{sub 2}O chemistry in Al{sub x}Si{sub y}O was found to be ∼2 Å, confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  14. Surface compositions of atomic layer deposited Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O thin films studied using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ting; Romero, Danilo; Gomez, Romel D., E-mail: rdgomez@umd.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the authors present Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) studies of Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O (ZMO) films grown via interrupted atomic-layer deposition (ALD) techniques. The ZMO films were fabricated by alternating ALD deposition of ZnO and MgO layers up to 1000 cycles. Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O films with progressively decreasing Mg/Zn ratios (Mg/Zn = 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/9, and 2/8, 3/12, 4/16, and 5/20) were fabricated for this study. The AES results exhibit an abrupt drop of Mg composition on the ZMO surface when the Mg/Zn < 1/3. Additionally, the surface composition ratios of O to Mg, O to Zn, and Mg to Zn were estimated with known Auger sensitivity factors. The results indicate that Mg ions diffuse into the bulk, forming Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O alloys.

  15. Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study on oxidative etching of diamond-like carbon films by hyperthermal atomic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface structural changes of a hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film exposed to a hyperthermal atomic oxygen beam were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). It was confirmed that the DLC surface was oxidized and etched by high-energy collisions of atomic oxygen. RBS and real-time mass-loss data showed a linear relationship between etching and atomic oxygen fluence. SR-PES data suggested that the oxide layer was restricted to the topmost surface of the DLC film. NEXAFS data were interpreted to mean that the sp2 structure at the DLC surface was selectively etched by collisions with hyperthermal atomic oxygen, and an sp3-rich region remained at the topmost DLC surface. The formation of an sp3-rich layer at the DLC surface led to surface roughening and a reduced erosion yield relative to the pristine DLC surface.

  16. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli

    2005-11-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atom-field interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L < ?/4) in experiments.

  17. Observables in neutrino mass spectroscopy using atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP

  18. Radioimmunoassay (RIA), radioreceptorassay (RRA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) applied to studies on animal nutrition and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, our group began working in the development of a sensitive method to measure the active principle (1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D3-glycoside) of Solanum glaucophyllum, a plant that grows wild in our country causing calcinosis of breeding cattle. RIA and RRA have been applied to determine this glycoside in the aqueous extracts of the plant leaves and the free vitamin D metabolite in animal plasma samples, respectively. AAS was also used to determine calcium, together with phosphorus determined by colorimetric methods, in blood and tissues of experimental animals in order to study the relationship between the active principle kinetics and its effects. More recently, this plant has been proposed as a source of vitamin D activity (VDA) that might contribute with environment care improving calcium and phosphorus utilization by animals. Our group is by now, as a first step, studying the effects of different diet levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) [covering the range between commercial recommendations and half of NRC requirements (1994)], as well as different sources of those minerals, upon productive, nutritional, skeletal and biochemical parameters, in a series of experiments covering either a part or the entire breeding cycle of broilers. We think that the high levels of vitamin D3 employed in commercial farms (4 times NRC recommendations) could enable birds fed on basal diets to enhance the synthesis of the active metabolite of the vitamin in order to overcome partially these minerals deficiency. These methods of analysis have been applied successfully in our research projects contributing to the improvement of animal health and production and our approach has been considered adequate for the study of this additive and therefore has been required by the private industry of foreign countries. (author)

  19. Optical Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Atomic Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemens Mark E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical single- and double-quantum three-dimensional Fourier-transform spectra are obtained for atomic vapors. We show that three-dimensional spectra can be used to identify the Hamiltonian of complex systems and to reveal the nature of many-body interactions.

  20. Atomic short-range order in mechanically synthesized iron based Fe-Zn alloys studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konieczny Robert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical alloying method was applied to prepare nanocrystalline iron-based Fe1−xZnx solid solutions with x in the range 0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.05. The structural properties of the materials were investigated with the Mössbauer spectroscopy by measuring the room temperature spectra of 57Fe for as-obtained and annealed samples. The spectra were analyzed in terms of parameters of their components related to unlike surroundings of the iron probes, determined by different numbers of zinc atoms existing in the neighborhood of iron atoms. The obtained results gave clear evidence that after annealing process, the distribution of impurity atoms in the first coordination spheres of 57Fe nuclei is not random and it cannot be described by binomial distribution. The estimated, positive values of the short-range order parameters suggest clustering tendencies of Zn atoms in the Fe-Zn alloys with low zinc concentration. The results were compared with corresponding data derived from Calphad calculation and resulting from the cellular atomic model of alloys by Miedema.

  1. 7th Czechoslovak spectroscopic conference and VIIIth CANAS (Conference on analytical atomic spectroscopy). Abstracts. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference on spectroscopy held in Ceske Budejovice on June 18-22, 1984, proceeded in three sessions: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy and special spectroscopic techniques. In the molecular spectroscopy session, 81 papers were read of which 12 were inputted in INIS. The subject of inputted papers was the use of NMR for the analysis of organic compounds and for the study of radiation defects in semiconductors, and the use of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of nuclear and irradiated materials. (J.P.)

  2. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  3. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  4. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  5. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  6. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)3]3[CoW12O40]·9H2O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)3]2[FeW12O40]·H3O·H2O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)3]2+ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm−1, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. - Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate

  7. Transformation of amyloid-like fibers, formed from an elastin-based biopolymer, into a hydrogel: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamia, R; Salvi, A M; D'Alessio, L; Castle, J E; Tamburro, A M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the propensity of elastin-based biopolymers to form amyloid-like fibers when dissolved in water. These are of interest when considered as "ancestral units" of elastin in which they represent the simplest sequences in the hydrophobic regions of the general type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu). We normally refer to these biopolymers based on elastin or related to elastin units as "elastin-like polypeptides". The requirement of water for the formation of amyloids seems quite interesting and deserves investigation, the water representing the natural transport medium in human cells. As a matter of fact, the "natural" supramolecular organization of elastin is in the form of beaded-string-like filaments and not in the form of amyloids whose "in vivo" deposition is associated with some important human diseases. Our work is directed, therefore, to understanding the mechanism by which such hydrophobic sequences form amyloids and any conditions by which they might regress to a non-amyloid filament. The elastin-like sequence here under investigation is the ValGlyGlyValGly pentapeptide that has been previously analyzed both in its monomer and polymer form. In particular, we have focused our investigation on the apparent stability of amyloids formed from poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), and we have observed these fibers evolving to a hydrogel after prolonged aging in water. We will show how atomic force microscopy can be combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to gain an insight into the spontaneous organization of an elastin-like polypeptide driven by interfacial interactions. The results are discussed also in light of fractal-like assembly and their implications from a biomedical point of view. PMID:17206798

  8. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  9. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π− beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π− occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN

  10. Transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy of hydrated halogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Elles, Christopher G; Crowell, Robert A; Arms, Dohn A; Landahl, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy monitors the transient species generated by one-photon detachment of an electron from aqueous bromide. Hydrated bromine atoms with a lifetime of ca. 17 ns were observed, nearly half of which react with excess Br- to form Br2-. The K-edge spectra of the Br atom and Br2- anion exhibit distinctive resonant transitions that are absent for the Br- precursor. The absorption spectra indicate that the solvent shell around a Br0 atom is defined primarily by hydrophobic interactions, in agreement with a Monte Carlo simulation of the solvent structure.

  11. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  12. Doppler-free spectroscopy on tantalum atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the usefulness of an atomic beam source for refractory metals in Doppler-free spectroscopy. The splittings between seven hyperfine components of the weak 578.01 nm transition in TaI are measured to +- 1 MHz. The hyperfine A and B coefficients for the upper and lower level are determined from the observed splittings. (orig.)

  13. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  14. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (atomic and molecular physics)

  15. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  16. Atomic spectroscopy introduction to the theory of hyperfine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Anatoli V

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Spectroscopy provides a comprehensive discussion on the general approach to the theory of atomic spectra, based on the use of the Lagrangian canonical formalism. This approach is developed and applied to explain the hydrogenic hyperfine structure associated with the nucleus motion, its finite mass, and spin. The non-relativistic or relativistic, spin or spin-free particle approximations can be used as a starting point of general approach. The special attention is paid to the theory of Lamb shift formation. The formulae for hydrogenic spectrum including the account of Lamb shift are written in simple analytical form. The book is of interest to specialists, graduate and postgraduate students, who are involved into the experimental and theoretical research in the field of modern atomic spectroscopy.

  17. Laser spectroscopy of multi-level doppler broadened atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler broadened atomic vapor system can be easily prepared for spectroscopy study than an atomic beam system can be. Vapor cell and hollow cathode discharge lamps are widely used in the experiment. The possibility for observing the trapped state in a Doppler broadened Λ system was examined and confirmed by our early experiment where counter-propagating laser beams are used. For the measurement of the hyperfine structure constants of high-lying levels of heavy elements, we compared the co-propagating and counter-propagating beams in a Doppler broadened ladder systems. It was shown that the counter-propagating beams give a stronger and narrower signal than that from the co-propagating beams. Our treatment also considers the power broadening of the transition. For some photo-ionization experiments, it is necessary to pump two thermally populated levels simultaneously to the higher level and then to the auto-ionizing levels. A technique is proposed to avoid the trapped state and to increase the ionization efficiency.

  18. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre ''Demokritos'' in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target

  19. One-atom detection using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measuring technique which can detect a single atom of a given kind, even in the presence of 1019 or more atoms of another kind, with good space and time resolution, was utilized to study the density fluctuation of less than 100 cesium atoms in a small volume of space filled with inert gases. Repeated measurements of the absolute number of atoms in a defined volume at an arbitrary time were recorded for the first time in order to obtain a statistical distribution giving the fluctuation of the number of atoms around the mean value. Numerous other physics applications of the one-atom detector are briefly described

  20. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C2. The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  1. In-situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 on Silicon Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youb Lee, Seung; Jeon, Cheolho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Yooseok; Jung, Woosung; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2012-03-01

    In-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the initial stages of TiO2 growth on a Si(001) substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The core level spectra of Si 2p, C 1s, O 1s, and Ti 2p were measured at every half reaction in the titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP)-H2O ALD process. The ligand exchange reactions were verified using the periodic oscillation of the C 1s concentration, as well as changes in the hydroxyl concentration. XPS analysis revealed that Ti2O3 and Si oxide were formed at the initial stages of TiO2 growth. A stoichiometric TiO2 layer was dominantly formed after two cycles and was chemically saturated after four cycles.

  2. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  3. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  4. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  5. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  6. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  7. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy

  8. Nuclear properties studied by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of atomic nuclei are determined by means of laser spectroscopy model-independently. Laser-rf techniques enable us to make precision measurement of these moments. The hfs anomaly, i.e., Bohr-Weisskopf effect will be studied systematically at CERN ISOLDE shortly. (author)

  9. Study of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ponciano-Ojeda, Francisco; López-Hernández, Oscar; Mojica-Casique, Cristian; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ramírez-Martínez, Fernando; Flores-Mijangos, Jesús; Sahagún, Daniel; Jáuregui, Rocío; Jiménez-Mier, José

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room temperature rubidium cell with continuous wave extended cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the non-dipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5p3/2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6p3/2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (~ 13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F - 1, F and F + 1 splitting of the 6p3/2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5s -> 5p3/2 preparation dynamics, the...

  10. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  11. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  12. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1  rad s-1. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3×10(-18)  eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks. PMID:26182090

  13. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin Cu2O and subsequent reduction to Cu studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of ultrathin (<5 nm) Ru-doped Cu2O films deposited on SiO2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and Cu films by subsequent reduction of the Cu2O using HCO2H or CO is reported. Ru-doped Cu2O has been deposited by a mixture of 16: 99 mol. % of [(nBu3P)2Cu(acac)] as Cu precursor and 17: 1 mol. % of [Ru(η5-C7H11)(η5-C5H4SiMe3)] as Ru precursor. The catalytic amount of Ru precursor was to support low temperature reduction of Cu2O to metallic Cu by formic acid (HCO2H) on arbitrary substrate. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the Cu2O ALD film indicated nearly 1 at. % of carbon contamination and a phosphorous contamination below the detection limit after sputter cleaning. Systematic investigations of the reduction of Ru-doped Cu2O to metallic Cu by HCO2H or CO as reducing agents are described. Following the ALD of 3.0 nm Cu2O, the ultrathin films are reduced between 100 and 160 °C. The use of HCO2H at 110 °C enabled the reduction of around 90% Cu2O. HCO2H is found to be very effective in the removal of oxygen from Ru-doped Cu2O films with 2.5–4.7 nm thickness. In contrast, CO was effective for the removal of oxygen from the Cu2O films only below 3.0 nm at 145 °C. Root mean square surface roughness of 0.4 ± 0.1 nm was observed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations after the ALD of Cu2O, followed by the subsequent reduction of 3.0 nm Cu2O using either HCO2H at 110 °C or CO at 145 °C on SiO2. Furthermore, ex situ low energy ion scattering and AFM investigations confirmed that the Cu2O film after ALD and Cu films after subsequent reduction was continuous on the SiO2 substrate

  14. Mercury pollution surveys in Riga by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical sessions of mercury pollution measurements in Riga (Latvia) have been performed in several districts using an RA-915+ Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer coupled with a global positioning system (GPS). The measurements were taken from a driving car and in different days at one particular location (the Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy) for monitoring the changes in atmospheric mercury concentration. GPS was used to relate the measurement results to particular places, which made it possible to create a digitalized database of pollution for different geographic coordinates in different time spans. The measurements have shown that the background level of mercury concentration in Riga does not exceed 5 ng/m3, although there are several areas of elevated mercury pollution that need particular attention. (Authors)

  15. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ν less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts

  16. Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan, E-mail: fanzhang@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pan, Jinshan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Claesson, Per Martin [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute for Surface Chemistry, P.O. Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Brinck, Tore [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, Teknikringen 36, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO{sub 4} induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mussel protein was tested as 'green' corrosion protection strategy for steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 9, the protein adsorbs on carbon steel and forms a multilayer-like film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaIO{sub 4} leads to structural changes and cross-linking of the protein film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking results in a dense and compact film with increased stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking of preformed film significantly enhances the corrosion protection.

  17. Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO4 oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO4 induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO4 oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%. - Highlights: ► Mussel protein was tested as “green” corrosion protection strategy for steel. ► At pH 9, the protein adsorbs on carbon steel and forms a multilayer-like film. ► NaIO4 leads to structural changes and cross-linking of the protein film. ► Cross-linking results in a dense and compact film with increased stability. ► Cross-linking of preformed film significantly enhances the corrosion protection.

  18. Atomic lifetime measurements by beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, H.; Volz, U.

    1993-01-01

    Beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy as a precise, cascade-free and collision-free method for measuring atomic lifetimes and individual oscillator strengths is described. Its recent application to fine-structure levels of the KrI 5p configuration is reported. The experimental uncertainty is reduced by one order of magnitude, with respect to previous work, down to 0.3% (1σ). The discussion of these results in comparison with experimental and theoretical ones from the literature underlines the precision of the method and its potential to guide future theoretical developments.

  19. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  20. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  1. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  2. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975. [Program, abstracts, and author index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics. (GHT)

  3. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  4. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin Cu{sub 2}O and subsequent reduction to Cu studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Dileep [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Assim, Khaybar; Lang, Heinrich [Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Bruener, Philipp; Grehl, Thomas [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstr. 15, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Georgi, Colin; Waechtler, Thomas; Ecke, Ramona; Schulz, Stefan E., E-mail: stefan.schulz@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de; Gessner, Thomas [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz, Germany and Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems—ENAS, Technologie-Campus 3, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The growth of ultrathin (<5 nm) Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films deposited on SiO{sub 2} by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and Cu films by subsequent reduction of the Cu{sub 2}O using HCO{sub 2}H or CO is reported. Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O has been deposited by a mixture of 16: 99 mol. % of [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] as Cu precursor and 17: 1 mol. % of [Ru(η{sup 5}-C{sub 7}H{sub 11})(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3})] as Ru precursor. The catalytic amount of Ru precursor was to support low temperature reduction of Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by formic acid (HCO{sub 2}H) on arbitrary substrate. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film indicated nearly 1 at. % of carbon contamination and a phosphorous contamination below the detection limit after sputter cleaning. Systematic investigations of the reduction of Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by HCO{sub 2}H or CO as reducing agents are described. Following the ALD of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O, the ultrathin films are reduced between 100 and 160 °C. The use of HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C enabled the reduction of around 90% Cu{sub 2}O. HCO{sub 2}H is found to be very effective in the removal of oxygen from Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films with 2.5–4.7 nm thickness. In contrast, CO was effective for the removal of oxygen from the Cu{sub 2}O films only below 3.0 nm at 145 °C. Root mean square surface roughness of 0.4 ± 0.1 nm was observed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations after the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O, followed by the subsequent reduction of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O using either HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C or CO at 145 °C on SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, ex situ low energy ion scattering and AFM investigations confirmed that the Cu{sub 2}O film after ALD and Cu films after subsequent reduction was continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  5. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  6. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  7. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  8. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of interfaces for spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submonolayer sensitivity and element-specificity of conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, combined with the use of 57Fe enriched tracer layers, enable to carefully investigate thin films and interfaces at the atomic-scale. This paper reports on the main achievements we obtained so far in the study of structural, chemical, and magnetic properties of a variety of interfaces between oxides and Fe-based films having potential interest in the field of spintronics.

  9. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Lechner, P.; Sandri, P. Levi; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.-X.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.; Tatsuno, H.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-10-01

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  10. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  11. Atomic relaxation processes in an intermetallic Ti–43Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B alloy studied by mechanical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced intermetallic γ-TiAl-based alloy containing Nb and Mo has been studied to understand the microscopic mechanisms taking place during thermal treatments carried out to adjust a fine, nearly lamellar microstructure. The evolution of the microstructure has been characterized by high-energy X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, while the atomistic mechanisms of defect mobility have been studied through internal friction and dynamic modulus measurements. An internal friction relaxation peak has been observed at about 1050 K (for 1 Hz) in the initial oversaturated α2-Ti3Al phase, whose intensity strongly decreases after precipitation of the γ-TiAl laths. The activation parameters of this relaxation have been measured, Hact = 3.1 ± 0.05 eV, τ0 = 8.3 × 10−17 s and β = 1.3, and the relaxation is attributed to a point defect mechanism taking place inside the supersaturated α2-Ti3Al phase. A new Zener-like atomistic model based on stress-induced reorientation of Al–VTi–Al dipoles has been developed to explain the observed relaxation, resolving the controversy concerning the relaxation peak at 1050 K present in many γ-TiAl-based alloys. Precipitation of the γ-lamellae has also been considered as being responsible for the dynamic modulus hardening and, additionally, for another contribution to the internal friction at higher temperature than the described relaxation. Finally, the theoretical Debye equations as a function of temperature, for both internal friction and dynamic modulus, have been applied, using the measured activation parameters, to perform a deconvolution of the relaxation and precipitation contributions. The obtained results agree well with the experimental ones at different frequencies, allowing a global interpretation of the involved atomic processes

  12. Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Niering, M

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the internal structure of the hydrogen atom is studied by means of optical spectroscopic methods. The main interest is thereby devoted to the transition of the 1S ground-state into the metastable 2S-state.

  13. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy : a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. H.; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, C; SEGALEN, L.; Roche, D; PERSON, A.; Fayon, F.; Morin, G.; F. Babonneau

    2014-01-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, C-13 and F-19 magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8 wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the nu(1) PO4 stretching band to h...

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of the Luminescence Spectroscopy of atomic Mercury and atomic Manganese isolated in Rare Gas Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily experimental but also contains an important theoretical extension to gain further insight into the optical spectroscopy of atomic ns2 metal atoms, mercury and manganese isolated in cryogenic thin films of rare gases argon, krypton and xenon. The luminescence spectroscopy of solid-state M/RG (M = Hg and Mn; RG = Ar, Kr and Xe) samples has been recorded employing both time-integrated (steady-state) and time-resolved methods. The impe...

  15. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atomic physics and foundations of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique, unified presentation of these partial fields and by this exclusive. With the highly reputed co-author Prof. Dr. Ingolf Volker Hertel. Eminent presentation makes it possible, together also over set connections. For bachelor/master and diploma curricula. The book applies primarily to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until promotion. It offers a detailed introduction to the most important theme complexes of atomic and molecular physics and the methods of modern optical physics connected with this. In many selected partial fields it leads until the actual status of research. Simultaneously it also appeals to the active scientist and wants to be a standard work of the field. By the clearly stuctured chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics - step-wise made familiar with the most important phenomena and models of atomic and molecular physics and led wherever it is offered, to their actual developments in modern research. In the first part here present the to a certain degree canonical knowledge with the main topic structure of atoms and molecules and the competent spectroscopy is summarized. In the second part still being in work deepening knowledge for this is mediated, and selected chapters of modern optics, lase physics, cluster research, and scattering physics is treated, as well a short excursus in the world of cold atoms and molecules is given. At the whole both volumes of this textbook want to show to the interested reader that atomic, molecular, and optical physics, are still as usual an alive field of modern physical research

  16. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear

  17. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  18. Combined atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilised onto self-assembled monolayer on the gold film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fabrication of biosensors, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) are an attractive method of immobilising enzymes at electrode surface since it allows precise control over the amount and spatial distribution of the immobilized enzyme. The covalent attachment of glucose oxidase (GOx) to a carboxylic terminated SAM chemisorbed onto gold films was achieved via carbodiimide activation of the carboxylic acids to a reactive intermediate susceptible to nucleophilic attack by amines on free lysine chains of the enzyme. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements were used for characterisation of GOx modified gold surfaces. Tapping mode AFM studies have revealed that GOx molecules form slightly disordered arrays of pentagonal or hexagonal clusters. Observed features of immobilised GOx are distributed as a submonolayer on the SAM surface which has allowed visualisation of native and unfolded enzyme structure. The presence of the SAM and enzyme on the gold surface was detected by XPS spectroscopy. Spectra show typical peaks for the C 1s, O 1s and N 1s regions. A kinetic study of the adsorption of GOx onto activated SAM using in-situ QCM allowed determination the amount of immobilised GOx on the layer and consequently the optimal immobilisation conditions. Performance parameters of the biosensor such as sensitivity to glucose concentration as a function of enzyme loading were evaluated amperometrically using the redox mediator p-benzoquinone

  19. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  1. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  2. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  3. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1998-01-01

    The basic research on the control of atoms using the coherent interaction, such as the development of the generator of the thermal atomic beam with high directionality, the photodeflection of atomic beam and the coherent excitation of atoms, has been performed. Yb atomic beam with small divergence was generated and the deflection mechanism of the atomic beam was studied by using a broad band dye laser and a narrow band laser. It has been proved that the single mode dye laser with narrow bandwidth was suitable for deflection of atoms but the frequency locking system was indispensable. And the apparatus for intermodulated optogalvanic (IMOG) experiment was developed and the high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy was studied for laser frequency stabilization. (author). 74 refs., 1 tab., 26 figs

  4. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  5. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84−87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  7. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; R Behera; A K Das

    2012-04-01

    The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as the external DC magnetic field is changed. The technical difficulty of tuning laser frequency under locked condition over a large frequency span is discussed along with possible solutions.

  8. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  9. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  10. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  11. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential. PMID:26628660

  12. Characterization of laser - induced plasmas by atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Pace, Diego M; Bertuccelli, Graciela; D' Angelo, Cristian A, E-mail: ddiaz@exa.unicen.edu.ar, E-mail: gbertucc@exa.unicen.edu.ar, E-mail: cdangelo@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Instituto de Fisica ' Arroyo Seco' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, U.N.C.P.B.A., Campus Universitario, Paraje Arroyo Seco, (B7000GHG) Tandil, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to characterization of plasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure from a calcium hydroxide sample with a known concentration of Mg by using an infrared Nd:YAG laser. The influence of laser irradiance on plasma morphology and emission intensity was studied. Spatially-integrated intensities of Mg I-II lines along the line-of-sight were measured for different laser energies and delay times. The plasma temperature and the electron density were determined in each case by using and algorithm that calculates the optical thickness of the spectral lines and reproduces their experimental profiles in a framework of an homogeneous plasma in LTE that takes into account the effects of self-absorption. The results obtained showed the usefulness of this approach to provide additional information retrieved from the optical thickness of spectral lines for plasma characterization in LIBS experiments.

  13. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Measurement of oxygen atom diffusion in Nb and Ta by anelastic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Henrique de Almeida

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Impurity interstitial atoms present in metals with BCC structure can diffuse in the metallic matrix by jumps to energetically equivalent crystallographic sites. Anelastic spectroscopy (internal friction is based on the measurement of mechanical loss or internal friction as a function of temperature. Due to its selective and nondestructive nature, anelastic spectroscopy is well suited for the study of diffusion of interstitial elements in metals. Internal friction measurements were made using the torsion pendulum technique with oscillation frequency of a few Hz, temperature interval from 300 to 700 K, heating rate of about 1 K/min, and vacuum better than 10-5 mbar. The polycrystalline Nb and Ta samples used were supplied by Aldrich Inc. The results obtained showed thermally activated relaxation structures due to stress-induced ordering of oxygen atoms around the Nb (or Ta atoms of the metallic matrix. The results were interpreted by three methods and led to activation enthalpy values for the diffusion of oxygen in Nb and Ta of 1.15 eV and 1.10 eV, respectively.

  15. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  16. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  17. USEPA METHOD STUDY 35 - SW-846 METHOD 3005, ACID DIGESTION OF WATERS FOR TOTAL RECOVERABLE OR DISSOLVED METALS FOR ANALYSES BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted to determine the precision and bias (recovery) of Solid Waste (SW) Method 3005 for the analysis of 21 elements in ground water. SW Method 3005 is entitled, "Acid Digestion of Waters for Total Recoverable Metals for Analyses by ...

  18. Atom-surface studies with Rb Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical progress studying atom-surface interactions using rubidium Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms can be strongly coupled to surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes of a dielectric material. The coherent interaction between Rydberg atoms and SPhPs has potential applications for quantum hybrid devices. Calculations of TM-mode SPhPs on engineered surfaces of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and lithium tantalate (PPLT) for different periodic domains and surface orientations, as well as natural materials such as quartz, are presented. Our SPhP calculations account for the semi-infinite anisotropic nature of the materials. In addition to theoretical calculations, we show experimental results of measurements of adsorbate fields and coupling of Rydberg atoms to SPhPs on quartz.

  19. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  20. Rotational spectra of N$_2^+$: An advanced undergraduate laboratory in atomic and molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B; Arndt, P T

    2015-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive instructional experiment that demonstrates the rotational energy levels of diatomic nitrogen, using the emission band spectrum of molecular nitrogen ionized by various processes in a commercial AC capillary discharge tube. The simple setup and analytical procedure is introduced as part of a sequence of educational experiments employed by a course of advanced atomic and molecular spectroscopy, where the study of rotational spectra is combined with the analysis of vibrational characteristics for a multifaceted picture of the quantum states of diatomic molecules.

  1. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  2. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  3. A study on the determination of major, minor and trace constituents in meteorites by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Bear, B. R.; Fassel, V. A.

    A study on the ICP-AES determination of 42 major and trace elements in meteorites was described. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of aqua regia and HF in a sealed Teflon bomb and boric acid is added after dissolution to complex the excess HF. The final solution is transformed into an aerosol via ultrasonic nebulization. The reference solutions employed for calibrating the spectrometers contained only the HF-aqua regia-HS3BO3 matrix. A polychromator and a programmable scanning monochromator interfaced to the same plasma excitation source provided the spectroscopic data. The accuracy of the determination was assessed by: (1) comparing our results with those obtained by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence; and (2) by analyzing several geological references samples (US Geological Survey and Canadian Certified Reference Materials). The analytical results showed good agreement. The relative standard deviation of the determination of the major elements ranged from 0.5 to 2%, and of the minor and trace elements from 0.5 to 8%.

  4. The study of materials at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atom probe is a projection microscope whose principle is based on the pin effect: the sample is shaped under the form of a very sharp pin and is submitted to a high electrical potential. Under the influence of the electrical field, the atoms are ejected and the sample surface can be peeled away atom by atom. The ejected atom carries 2 pieces of information: its trajectory and its speed. The knowledge of the trajectory allows the determination of the initial position site of the atom on the surface and the measurement of the time taken by the ion to reach the detector allows the identification of the atom through the use of a time-of-flight spectroscopy method. The development of new position detectors that can detect and record simultaneous impacts has led to the possibility of 3-dimensional imaging of the sample. The last generation of 3-dimensional atom probes has been used to study the position of the different species of atoms in an alloy and to study the formation of atom clusters around impurities in neutron irradiated ferritic steels. (A.C.)

  5. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yuechun; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (RF) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the RF field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed RF-induced phenomena progresses from AC level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous RF-modulation sidebands to complex state-mixing and level-crossings with high-l hydrogen-like states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the RF field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg-EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based and calibration-free technique to measure and map RF electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms – new results and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, J. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Dep. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O.Box 3055, Victoria B.C. Canada V8W3P6 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, P.O. box MG-6, R76900 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); D' Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sez. di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita I-00161, Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    The antikaon interaction on nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is neither simple nor well understood. Rather direct access to this field is provided by x-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium isotopes. A series of precision measurements on kaonic atoms was performed very successfully by the SIDDHARTA Collaboration at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy). Consequently, new precision data on the strong interaction observables (i.e. energy shift and broadening of low-lying atomic states) were delivered having an important impact on the theory of low-energy QCD with strangeness. Presently, the follow-up experiment, SIDDHARTA-2, is in preparation, aiming at a determination of the strong interaction observables in kaonic deuterium as the highest priority; other type of measurements (light and heavier kaonic atoms) are as well foreseen. With the kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-resolved scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the progress and present status of experimental studies and an outlook to future perspectives in this fascinating research field is given.

  7. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  8. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  9. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy of transition metals in condensed helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigated laser induced fluorescence spectra of copper and gold atoms and dimers thereof isolated in solid and liquid 4He. Among the atomic spectral lines the most interesting ones are forbidden transitions that involve electrons from inner d-shells which are screened from the surrounding He atoms by the outer s-shell and are therefore much less affected by the interaction with the He matrix. Indeed, the observed spectral lineshapes are much narrower than those of transitions involving outer shell electrons. Another important result is the observation of well resolved vibrational structures in five molecular bands of the Au2 and Cu2 dimers. We expect that the analysis of those spectra will significantly advance our understanding of impurity atoms and molecules in condensed He. (author)

  10. Updated Atomic Data and Calculations for X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, A R; Smith, R K; Brickhouse, N S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the latest release of AtomDB, version 2.0.2, a database of atomic data and a plasma modeling code with a focus on X-ray astronomy. This release includes several major updates to the fundamental atomic structure and process data held within AtomDB, incorporating new ionization balance data, state-selective recombination data, and updated collisional excitation data for many ions, including the iron L-shell ions from Fe$^{+16}$ to Fe$^{+23}$ and all of the hydrogen- and helium-like sequences. We also describe some of the effects that these changes have on calculated emission and diagnostic line ratios, such as changes in the temperature implied by the He-like G-ratios of up to a factor of 2.

  11. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σ+g state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σ+g state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the molecular interaction potential for this state depends on the 2P atomic radiative lifetime. By calculating the energy eigenvalues of a model potential for the 13Σ+g state and fitting them to the experimentally measured vibrational levels, we have extracted a value for the 2P lifetime of 26.99±0.16 ns. The precision is currently limited by the accuracy of a region of the model potential provided by ab initio calculations

  12. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. We show that a simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features of this conversion observed in the experimental intensity noise spectrum.

  13. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    OpenAIRE

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of e...

  14. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  15. Magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics modeling for line polarization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the mechanism of polarized X-ray line emission in plasmas, its connection to plasma anisotropy, and introduce an atomic kinetics model and code (POLAR) [1] based on the population kinetics of magnetic sublevels. POLAR represents a multi-level, multi-process approach to the problem of polarized spectra in plasmas, and hence it is well suited for plasma applications where cascade effects and alignment transfer can become important. Polarization degrees of X-ray spectral lines computed with POLAR were successfully benchmarked against calculations done with other formalisms, and experimental results obtained at the EBIT facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We also investigated the polarization of He-like Si X-ray satellite lines as spectral signatures of anisotropy in the electron distribution function. A comprehensive modeling study was performed taking into account hydrodynamics and electron kinetics. We find that two satellite lines connecting singlet states develop a noticeable polarization while the triplet lines remain unpolarized. These results suggest a scenario where triplet lines could be used as a reference while the singlets could be used as polarized markers of plasma anisotropy. (author)

  16. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  17. Use of laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of an argon inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (LEAFS) is investigated and employed as a diagnostic technique for study of the argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Computer simulations are used to describe the behavior of nonsteady-state laser excited fluorescence (LEF) for multi-level atomic systems under conditions expected to be encountered in the ICP and an atmospheric pressure flame. These simulations are then compared to experimental data collected under similar conditions in the ICP and a flame. These studies show that LEAFS should be a useful tool for characterization of an ICP, with certain limitations. Relatively small changes in saturated LEF signals under changing quenching and mixing conditions are both predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for several atomic systems. This independence from quenching and mixing effects allows one to relate saturated LEF signals directly to relative number densities of species when spatially scanning over an inhomogeneous medium, such as an ICP discharge, where significant changes in quenching can be encountered in a single scan. SSI values are also found to be useful as indicators of relative collisional quenching rates and relative degree of LTE establishment in the ICP, as well as ease of saturation for a given transition

  18. Surface spectroscopy using inelastic scattering of He atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy (∼0 meV) neutral helium atomic beam has been scattered from crystal surfaces. Energy gain and face phonons may be measured by time-of-flight analysis of single phonon scattering dominates, allowing the frequency and wave vector of individual surface phonons to be determined and their dispersion relations plotted. Resonant interaction with bound states of the helium in the surface potential well is found to greatly affect the inelastic scattering cross-sections. 23 references, 27 figures

  19. Precision Spectroscopy of Kaonic Atoms at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scordo A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The SIDDHARTA experiment aims at a precise measurement of K -series kaonic hydrogen x-rays and the first-ever measurement of the kaonic deuterium x-rays to determine the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the lowest lying atomic states. These measurements offer a unique possibility to precisely determine the isospin-dependent $ar{K}$-nucleon scattering lengths.

  20. Studies on the interaction of hydrogen atoms with diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration modes of hydrogen-atom adsorption on the diamond surface were studied with high resolution-electron energy loss spectroscopy. Two main losses were observed at 360 MeV and 160 MeV. They are assigned to the C-H stretch vibrations and the angle-changing deformation vibrations respectively. Replacing H-atom with D-atom, isotopic shifts were observed in the loss spectra. Heating the diamond surface to 900 deg C, all of the loss features disappear, but an inelastic continuous loss-structure was observed. Due to H-atom desorption, the dangling-bonds became horizontal bonds on the diamond surface, resulting in the graphitization of diamond surface. The appearance of the inelastic continuous loss-structure was the characteristic of graphite π-band. The graphitization of the diamond surface was affirmed further by UPS and AES studies

  1. A STUDY OF TIN IMPURITY ATOMS IN AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Rabchanova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Using the Mössbauer spectroscopy method for the 119 Sn isotope the state of tin impurity atoms in amorphous a-Si silicon is studied. The electrical and optical properties of tin doped films of thermally spray-coated amorphous silicon have been studied. It is shown that in contrast to the crystalline silicon where tin is an electrically inactive substitution impurity, in vacuum deposited amorphous silicon it produces an acceptor band near the valence band and a fraction of the tin atoms become...

  2. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  3. Experimental parameters of vanadium determination by atomic-absorption spectroscopy with graphite-furnace atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found that impregnation of a graphite cuvette (HGA-72) with salts of elements which form stable carbides (Ta, Si, Nb, Zr, W, La) decreases the absorbance signal for vanadium. The slope of the atomization curves indicates that formation of vanadium atoms is inhibited, probably by formation of a ternary compound between the impregnating element, vanadium and graphite. On the contrary bigger signals and better repeatability of results may be achieved when the cuvette is coated with pyrolytic graphite and methane is added to the sheath gas. The presence of methane increases the atomization efficiency and compensates for the disadvantageous influence of any air present in the sheath gas. (author)

  4. PETOS-BASIC programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PETOS-BASIC program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and, atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the least squares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Petos-Basic programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Petos-Basic program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the leastsquares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (author)

  6. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, T. M.; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J. E.; Ortega, D.; Diddams, S. A.; Oates, C. W.; Hollberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrat...

  7. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on ...

  8. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  9. Nuclear structure of light thallium isotopes as deduced from laser spectroscopy on a fast atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After optimizing the system by experiments on /sup 201,203,205/Tl, the neutron-deficient isotopes 189-193Tl have been studied using the collinear fast atom beam laser spectroscopy system at UNISOR on-line to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. A sensitive system for the measurements was developed since the light isotopes were available in mass-separated beams of only 7 x 104 to 4 x 105 atoms per second. By laser excitation of the 535 nm atomic transitions of atoms in the beam, the 6s27s 2S/sub 1/2/ and 6s26s 2P/sub 3/2/ hyperfine structures were measured, as were the isotope shifts of the 535 nm transitions. From these, the magnetic dipole moments, spectroscopic quadrupole moments and isotopic changes in mean-square charge radius were deduced. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous data. The /sup 190,192/Tl isotopes show a considerable difference in quadrupole deformations as well as an anomalous isotope shift with respect to 194Tl. A large isomer shift in 193Tl is observed implying a larger deformation in the 9/2- isomer than in the 1/2+ ground state. The /sup 189,191,193/Tl isomers show increasing deformation away from stability. A deformed shell model calculation indicates that this increase in deformation can account for the dropping of the 9/2- band in these isotopes while an increase in neutron pairing correlations, having opposite and compensating effects on the rotational moment of inertia, maintains the 9/2- strong-coupled band structure. 105 refs., 27 figs

  10. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  11. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp1P1-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He+ + He at 10 keV and He2+ + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Krq+ (q=7-9) and Xeq+ (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p2P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p3P1-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs

  12. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K−pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAΦNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K−p atom leading to a hadronic shift ϵ1s and a hadronic broadening Γ1s of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated constrained by the SIDDHARTA data on kaonic hydrogen. For the extraction of the isospin-dependent scattering lengths a measurement of the hadronic shift and width of kaonic deuterium is necessary. Therefore, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. Many improvements in the experimental setup will allow to measure kaonic deuterium which is challenging due to the anticipated low X-ray yield. Especially important are the data on the X-ray yields of kaonic deuterium extracted from a exploratory experiment within SIDDHARTA.

  13. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, J.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bosnar, D.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-03-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons (K-) with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K-pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAΦNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K-p atom leading to a hadronic shift ɛ1s and a hadronic broadening Γ1s of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated constrained by the SIDDHARTA data on kaonic hydrogen. For the extraction of the isospin-dependent scattering lengths a measurement of the hadronic shift and width of kaonic deuterium is necessary. Therefore, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2). Many improvements in the experimental setup will allow to measure kaonic deuterium which is challenging due to the anticipated low X-ray yield. Especially important are the data on the X-ray yields of kaonic deuterium extracted from a exploratory experiment within SIDDHARTA.

  14. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  15. Ionization potential of neutral atomic plutonium determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization potential of the neutral plutonium atom, Pu i, has been determined by two- and three-step resonance photoionization observation of the threshold of ionization and of the Rydberg series. The Rydberg series were observed by field ionization as series that converge to the first ionization limit and as autoionizing series the converge to the second and to several higher convergence limits. The threshold and Rydberg series were obtained through a number of two- and three-step pathways. The photoionization threshold value for the 239Pu i ionization potential is 48 582(30) cm-1, and the more accurate value from the Rydberg series is 48 604(1) cm-1 or 6.0262(1) eV

  16. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  17. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  18. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  19. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  20. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  1. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, U. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Electron and Optical Physics Div.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.; MacDonald, M.A. [E.P.S.R.C. Daresbury Lab., Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  3. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy with the single-atom sensitivity on metallofullerene molecules in peapods

    CERN Document Server

    Suenaga, K

    2002-01-01

    Electron microscopy and spectroscopy with the single-atom sensitivity enables us to obtain a direct image of the intra-molecular structure and chemical identification of individual metallofullerenes encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotubes, so-called peapods. By a comparison of high resolution images with a simulation to extract the relative atom positions for encaged metal atom in each molecule, distribution of molecular orientation and its interaction between adjacent molecules in metallofullerene-peapods have been statistically analyzed. Moreover the techniques described here demonstrates the possibilities to observe individual chemical reaction inside carbon nanotubes.

  4. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  5. New niobium and rhenium halides synthesis routes by atomic vaporization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New synthetic route as the so called 'chimie douce' or MVS (Metal Vapor Synthesis) has been an increasing field lately to synthesize new kind of solid state structures. Our interest is the assembly of small molecular building blocks of early transition metal halides. We illustrate the use of vaporized rare earth metals to condense NbCls units. We probed the local order around the Nb atom with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, far Infra-Red and XPS in order to better understand the mechanisms involved. A first EXAFS, IR and XPS study on solid state products has shown the evolution of the NbCl5 dimer towards a chain like structure. However, the condensation patterns depends on the rare earth atoms vaporized. These results have been confirmed by X-ray Absorption ab initio calculations. Because our compounds are extremely air sensitive we have developed in situ MVS reactor to take 'snapshots' of the structural intermediates by EXAFS. This study showed the condensation of the initial NbCl5 building blocks by reduction of the Nb oxidation state by rare earth vaporization. This method is a new way of looking at condensation mechanisms via structural evolution observed by EXAFS. (author)

  6. Spatially Resolved Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy in Microelectronics Processing Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebner, G.A.

    1998-10-14

    Plasma processing of microelectronic materials is strongly dependent on the generation and control of neutral radial and ion species generated in a plasma. For example, process uniformity across a #er is drken by a combination of plasma charged particle and neutral uniformity. Due to extensive rexarch and engineering the current generation of commercial plasma reactors can generate very radially uniform ion distributions, usually better than ~ 2 perwnt as determined by ion saturation measurements. Due in part to the difficulty associated with determining the neutral radial distributions, control of the neutral radical uniformity is less well developed. This abstract will review our recent measurements of the spatial distribution of severaI important atomic and molecukw species in inductively coupled plasmas through C12 / BCIJ / Ar containing gas mixtures. Measured species include the ground state Cl and BC1 densities as well as the metastable argon density. The fbeus of this review will be on the experimental techniques and results. In addition to assisting in the development of a fbndarnental understanding of the important pkunna physics, these measurements have been used to benchmark multi dimensional plasma discharge codes.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  8. Mineral distribution in rice: Measurement by Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES) is a new technology with comparable performance and sensitivity to Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Both instrument use plasma as the energy source that produces atomic and ionic emission lines. However, MP-AES uses nitrogen as the plasma gas instead of argon which is an additional expense for ICP-OES. Thus, MP-AES is more economical. This study quantified six essential minerals (Se, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and K) in rice using MP-AES. Hot plate digestion was used for sample extraction and the detection limit for each instrument was compared with respect to the requirement for routine analysis in rice. Black, red and non-pigmented rice samples were polished in various intervals to determine the concentration loss of minerals. The polishing time corresponds to the structure of the rice grains such as outer bran layer (0 to 15), inner bran layer (15 to 30), outer endosperm layer (30 to 45), and middle endosperm layer (45 to 60). Results of MP-AES analysis showed that black rice had all essential materials (except K) in high concentration at the outer bran layer. The red and non-pigmented rice samples on the other hand, contained high levels of Se, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the whole bran portion. After 25 seconds, the mineral concentrations remained constant. The concentration of Cu however, gave consistent value in all polishing intervals, hence Cu might be located in the inner endosperm layer. Results also showed that K was uniformly distributed in all samples where 5% loss was consistently observed for every polishing interval. Therefore, the concentration of K was also affected by polishing time. Thus, the new MP-AES technology with comparable performance to ICP-OES is a promising tool for routine analysis in rice. (author)

  9. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  10. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal

  11. Theoretical Studies of Atomic Transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic structure calculations were performed for properties such as energy levels, binding energies, transition probabilities, lifetimes, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts. Accurate computational procedures were devised so that properties could be predicted even when they could not be obtained from experiment, and to assist in the identification of observed data. The method used was the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, optionally corrected for relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Fully relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations also were performed using the GRASP code A database of energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities was designed and implemented and, at present, includes many results for Be-like to Ar-like

  12. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  13. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  14. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio

  15. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  16. Impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy applied to the determination of atomic surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Δ12 = -7.5% and Δ23 = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 ± 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)-√3 x √3-Au surface showed the He+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. A detailed examination of the Si(111)-√3 x √3-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML) small areas of √3 x √3 character were still present

  17. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  18. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy in atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine topics of current interest in which we feel the use of RIS can yield significant contributions. To this end we discuss several previous studies as examples of the methods involved and then suggest a variety of specific experiments, the performance of which, we endeavor to show, should be possible with present-day technology. The areas of consideration are: (1) laser excitation with relatively broad bandwidth lasers; (2) measurements of photoionization cross sections; and (3) studies of collision and transport processes. Particular attention is given to the inert gases and to diatomic molecules

  19. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; Denis, A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  20. Two-photon spectroscopy of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the target species was excited by a photon of fixed wavelength and a visible photon of tunable wavelength to a two-photon allowed transition state. The excited species was then completely ionized by an additional photon. The ion pair was detected. Not only was the two-photon rate constant measured but also the spectra were recorded by tuning the visible photon wavelength. Argon, krypton, and molecular hydrogen(H2) were studied in a high-pressure cell using parallel plate detection of the photoelectrons. Nitric oxide (NO) and the van der Waals molecule ArNO were studied using a molecular beam from a pulsed nozzle and detection of the parent ion with a quadrapole mass spectrometer. The fixed wavelength photon used with NO and ArNO was the third harmonic (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. In the experiments with Ar, Kr, and H2, the third harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser was tripled in xenon to yield a vacuum ultraviolet fixed wavelength photon (118 nm)

  1. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    87Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na+ projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  2. Quenching-independent fluorescence measurements of atomic hydrogen with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching-independent fluorescence by atomic hydrogen has been measured with photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS) in stoichiometric and fuel-rich premixed H2/O2/N2 flames at a pressure of 20 Torr. These measurements are compared with conventional fluorescence measurements in the same flames. When matched in the postflame zone, the two sets of measurements diverge in the preheat zone between the burner surface and the peak of the fluorescence profiles. This divergence, caused by changes in the local quenching rate coefficient, shows the utility of PICLS for determining the kinetics of atomic hydrogen in the preheat zone

  3. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  4. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    OpenAIRE

    Ciurylo, R.; Tiesinga, E.; Kotochigova, S.; P.S. Julienne

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and ...

  5. Bicircular High-Harmonic Spectroscopy Reveals Dynamical Symmetries of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Ahsan, Md Sabbir; Lin, Nan; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-03-01

    We introduce bicircular high-harmonic spectroscopy as a new method to probe dynamical symmetries of atoms and molecules and their evolution in time. Our approach is based on combining a circularly polarized femtosecond fundamental field of frequency ω with its counterrotating second harmonic 2 ω . We demonstrate the ability of bicircular high-harmonic spectroscopy to characterize the orbital angular momentum symmetry of atomic orbitals. We further show that breaking the threefold rotational symmetry of the generating medium—at the level of either the ensemble or that of a single molecule—results in the emission of the otherwise parity-forbidden frequencies 3 q ω (q ∈N ) , which provide a background-free probe of dynamical molecular symmetries.

  6. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and

  7. Stable-isotope ratio analysis based on atomic hyperfine structure and optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic hyperfine structures were measured for the Cu I transition at 5782 A by optogalvanic spectroscopy at high resolution, with a cw dye laser. Samples were electro-deposited on the demountable cathode of a home-made hollow-cathode lamp. By spectral deconvolution, the relative isotopic abundances of 63Cu and 65Cu could be determined with good accuracy and precision. The technique is applicable to copper concentrations as low as 1.6 ppm. (author)

  8. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Torun, H.; Finkler, O.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a ...

  9. New energy levels of atomic niobium by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied in order to find new energy levels of the niobium atom. A continuous wave tuneable titanium–sapphire laser in the wavelength range from 750 to 865 nm and a hollow-cathode lamp were used. We discovered four energy levels of even parity, three lying levels below 19 000 cm−1 and one at much higher energy. Additionally hyperfine structure data of six levels of odd parity were determined. (paper)

  10. Elemental analysis of hair samples using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of hair samples was performed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. The ion exchange preconcentration technique was employed. The capacity of the exchanger used-cellulose hyphan at different pH was investigated to determine the optimum pH for the resin. The capacity of the resin to take up elements of interest from mixed solutions was also analysed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  11. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Morzyński, Piotr; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S.; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J.; Killian, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered ...

  12. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  13. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  14. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups

  15. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beida Information Research (BIR), Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  16. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  17. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices

  18. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  19. A distributed atomic physics database and modeling system for plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are undertaking to develop a set of computational capabilities which will facilitate the access, manipulation, and understanding of atomic data in calculations of x-ray spectral modeling. In this present limited description we will emphasize the objectives for this work, the design philosophy, and aspects of the atomic database, as a more complete description of this work is available. The project is referred to as the Plasma Spectroscopy Initiative; the computing environment is called PSI, or the ''PSI shell'' since the primary interface resembles a UNIX shell window. The working group consists of researchers in the fields of x-ray plasma spectroscopy, atomic physics, plasma diagnostics, line shape theory, astrophysics, and computer science. To date, our focus has been to develop the software foundations, including the atomic physics database, and to apply the existing capabilities to a range of working problems. These problems have been chosen in part to exercise the overall design and implementation of the shell. For successful implementation the final design must have great flexibility since our goal is not simply to satisfy our interests but to vide a tool of general use to the community

  20. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly-ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser- and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large scale ab initio calculations. Large blocks of data are predictively systematized and parameterized along isoelectric, homologous, isoionic, Rydberg, and yrast series, to provide a comprehensive and reliable data base

  1. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  2. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bonert, A E [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser-and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large-scale ab initio calculations. Typical examples are the following: lifetime measurements in the neon isoelectronic sequence; multiplexed decay curve measurements of Li-like Si XII; and isoelectronic specification of intershell resonance and intercombination decay rates using measured transition probabilities and spectroscopically determined singlet-mixing amplitudes

  4. Moessbauer Spectroscopy study of Quimsachata Volcano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been studied volcanic lava from Quimsachata Volcano in Pem. Moessbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electronic and optical microscopy allowed the identification of different mineralogical phases. (A.C.AS.)

  5. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  6. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saß, Anne; Forge, Ralf; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature ch...

  7. Precision spectroscopy of exotic atoms as a tool to test chiral dynamics in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exotic atoms, or meson-nucleus bound states in more general, are excellent tools for studying chiral dynamics in nuclei, since both the nuclear density and the meson wavefunction are precisely known in these systems. We here discuss pionic hydrogen, deeply-bound pionic atoms, kaonic hydrogen and kaonic helium atoms, with emphasis on experimental details which affect the accuracy of quantitative determination of chiral dynamics in nuclei. (author)

  8. Spectroscopy and Stark-effect of Rydberg states in Ca and Sr in an atomic beam experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg states of Calcium and Strontium were excited by laser radiation in an atomic beam experiment. Such spectroscopy of the Rydberg series could be done in both elements and also the Stark effect was examined in Strontium. (BEF)

  9. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    2013-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Collision Physics II focuses on studies on the role of atomic collision processes in astrophysical plasmas, including ionic recombination, electron transport, and position scattering. The book first discusses three-body recombination of positive and negative ions, as well as introduction to ionic recombination, calculation of the recombination coefficient, ions recombining in their parent gas, and three-body recombination at moderate and high gas-densities. The manuscript also takes a look at precision measurements of electron transport coefficients and differential cr

  10. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, S.; Milan, J. B.; Buma, W. J.; de Lange, C. A.

    1997-05-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoelectron spectroscopic studies enable a detailed comparison of the autoionization and photoionization rates of these states.

  11. Helium clusters as cold, liquid matrix for the laser spectroscopy of silver atoms, silver clusters and C60 fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main obstacles in the study of gas phase metal clusters is their high temperature. Even cooling in a seeded beam is only of limited used, since the condensation continuously releases energy into the system. As a consequence, spectroscopic studies of free metal clusters typically yield broad structures, which are interpreted as plasma resonances of a free electron gas. An experiment on ionic sodium clusters has shown that low temperatures lead to a narrowing of the absorption bands and the appearance of additional structure, that can not be explained within the free electron model. Thus the need for cold clusters is evident. In principle the deposition of metal clusters into inert matrices eliminates the temperature problem but it can also inflict strong changes on the electronic spectra. Droplets of liquid helium serve as a much more gentle matrix that avoids many of the above problems. In this thesis the new technique of helium droplet spectroscopy is presented as a tool for the study of extremely cold metal clusters. Clusters of silver up to a mass greater than 7000 amu have been produced by pickup of single atoms by a beam of helium droplets. The droplets are formed in a supersonic expansion. The cluster's binding energy is removed by evaporative cooling and the system remains at 0.4 K. The doped droplets are probed by laser spectroscopy with a depletion technique or resonant two photon ionization. We were able to measure the first UV absorption spectrum of metal atoms (silver) inside helium droplets. Another experiment shows that a small fraction of the captured silver atoms resides on the surface of the droplet like alkali atoms. In a two photon process previously unobserved s- and d-Rydberg states of the free silver atom (20 left angle n left angle 80) were excited. The silver atoms, initially embedded in the helium droplets, are found to move to the surface and desorb when excited to the broadened 5p level. This is the first result showing laser

  12. Design and construction of a research atomic layer deposition system for in situ infrared and electron spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of an ultra-high vacuum surface-analysis chamber that incorporates an internal cell for performing atomic layer deposition at a pressure of up to ∼1 Torr. The apparatus permits the growth process to be interrupted in stages during which data can be obtained using infrared and x-ray photoemission spectroscopies together with other electron-based techniques. Demonstration results are given for the adsorption of H2O on Si (100) at a pressure of ∼0.3 Torr. The system described is generally applicable in the study of any surface reaction under non-high-vacuum conditions in which there is a need for both infrared and electron spectroscopies

  13. Processes in Geophysics Studied by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helgason, Orn [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland)

    2004-12-15

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been appreciated in geoscience as a powerful tool to study magnetic and structural properties of a wide range of minerals and rocks. In this presentation the application of Moessbauer spectroscopy in different geophysical processes such as tracing the development of magma during volcanic eruptions and phase transitions of magnetic minerals due to thermal impact of dikes in earlier lava formation or hydrothermal alteration will be discussed.

  14. Atoms, molecules, and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons, spectroscopy and scattering physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These textbooks apply first of all to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until the promotion. They want to a certain degree mediate the canonical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics and introduce to foundations of modern optica and quantum optics. In many selected partial fields they lead (together with a planned third volume) up to the actual status of research. So also the active scientist is addressed. By clearly structurated chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics, stepwise made familiar with the most important phenomena, models, and measuring methods. Thereby the focus lies on the experiment and its interpretation - the necessary theory is introduced from this point of view compactly and occasionally also something laxly. The first part is concentrated to the structure of the atoms and an introduction in modern methods of spectroscopy. In the present second part it deals with the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy as well as with scattering physics, which treats - complementarly to the bound molecular states - the continuum. Finally selected chapters of laser physics, modern optics, and quantum optics are treated. Thereby atomic, molecular, and optical physics is proved as a undiminishedly alive, highly productive branch of modern physics. It provides simultaneously for many further partial fields of physics and other natural-scientific disciplines indispensable foundations.

  15. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  16. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons (K-) with nucleons and nuclei in the low energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K-pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DA?NE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K-p atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering le...

  17. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAFNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound kaonic hydrogen atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated ...

  18. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  19. Kaonic atoms studies at DAFNE by the SIDDHARTA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargnelli, M. [Stefan Meyer Institut of the Austrian Academy od Sciences, Vienna, 1090, Boltzmanngasse 3 (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Dep. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria B.C. Canada V8W3P6 (Canada); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Via Ponzio, 34/5, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M.; Curceanu Petrascu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Via Ponzio, 34/5, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F.; Girolami, B. [INFN Sez. di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita I-00161, Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan Meyer Institut of the Austrian Academy od Sciences, Vienna, 1090, Boltzmanngasse 3 (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); Kienle, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Physik Departement, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Lechner, P. [PNSensors GmbH, Roennerstr. 28, D-80803 Muenchen (Germany); Levi Sandri, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Longoni, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Via Ponzio, 34/5, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Lucherini, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)] (and others)

    2010-04-01

    The K-barN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for chiral SU(3) symmetry in QCD, especially for the explicit symmetry breaking induced by the relatively large mass of the strange quark. At the DA{phi}NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from {phi}-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The low-energy antikaon-nucleon interaction in kaonic hydrogen and kaonic deuterium can be investigated under favorable conditions. The DEAR (DA{phi}NE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen is remeasured with improved precision. From the shift and width in K{sup -}p and K{sup -}d the isospin-dependent antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths can be determined, quantities essential as constraints for low-energy QCD.

  20. Perforated hollow-core optical waveguides for on-chip atomic spectroscopy and gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud-Carrier, M.; Hill, C.; Decker, T.; Black, J. A.; Schmidt, H.; Hawkins, A.

    2016-03-01

    A hollow-core waveguide structure for on-chip atomic spectroscopy is presented. The devices are based on Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides and may be used for a wide variety of applications which rely on the interaction of light with gases and vapors. The designs presented here feature short delivery paths of the atomic vapor into the hollow waveguide. They also have excellent environmental stability by incorporating buried solid-core waveguides to deliver light to the hollow cores. Completed chips were packaged with an Rb source and the F = 3 ≥ F' = 2, 3, 4 transitions of the D2 line in 85Rb were monitored for optical absorption. Maximum absorption peak depths of 9% were measured.

  1. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  2. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  3. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–Hen vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm−1). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Aln photoion with n larger than two

  4. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  5. In-situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Andreas; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present an in-situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly-polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence $\\Delta n$ at the level of $10^{-8}$ and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  6. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10(-8) and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses. PMID:24387479

  7. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  8. Communication: Atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ(3)) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ(2))

  9. High-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy with transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Irwin, K D; Ishimoto, S; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Ullom, J N; Yamada, S

    2014-01-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution x-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an x-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2 - 3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm^2. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  10. High-Resolution Kaonic-Atom X-ray Spectroscopy with Transition-Edge-Sensor Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishimoto, S.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Ullom, J. N.; Yamada, S.

    2014-09-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an X-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2-3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  11. NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of hybrid organic – inorganic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Špírková, Milena

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-164. ISSN 1022-1360. [Discussion Conference Spectroscopy of Partially Ordered Macromolecular Systems /22./. Prague, 21.07.2003-24.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0735; GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * coatings and films * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2005

  12. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  13. Applications of atomic absorption spectroscopy towards the analysis of scalp hair diagnosing epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years a considerable effort has been directed at the measurement of trace metal levels in various human tissues with the view of correlating these trace metals to human health and disease Scalp hair has been suggested as a potentially valuable tissue in recording changes in the levels of many trace, elements in the body over a long period of time. Levels of fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Mg and Ca are determined in scalp hair adult epileptic normal male and female subjects by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A total of 85 hair samples for normal male/female subjects and 78 of male/female epileptic subjects were analyzed within the respective age groups of 28 to 30 and 24 to 27 years. The study showed higher average concentration of Zn, Fe and Cu in normal male adults than those found in epileptic subjects. Epileptic females showed higher average concentrations of Zn, Ca and Cu. The correlation coefficient study indicated significant correlation (r>0.589 at p=0.001) between Fe and Cr, Mg. Ca and Cu for epileptic females only. For normal male subjects Ca showed a strong correlation for Zn and Fe and for Cr and Ca. The regression analysis showed the significant role of Zn, Ca, Mg and Cr in scalp hair of normal and epileptic subjects. Accordingly, the metal to metal ratio analysis revealed critical Mg/Zn ratios as indicators of healthy (1) subjects. The ratio date are used for evaluation of the status of epileptic patients based on their ailment history. (author)

  14. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  15. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  16. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  17. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and abs...

  18. Study of quarkonium spectroscopy through the approximated variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of the qq sup(-) bound states in a non-relativistic approximation using a approximate variational method is studied. Because of its similarity to positronium, a wave function of the hidrogen atom, is used. The 'coulomb-logaritmic-linear' was the potential used to described it. The fitting is done, and relevant coupling constant due to a logaritmic piece is found. All states described in this way furnishes v2 3P are reasonably explained and it no occurs with the mass diference between psi and eta sub(c). (Author)

  19. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  20. Atomic resolution studies of carbonic anhydrase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II has been solved with a sulfonamide inhibitor at 0.9 Å resolution. Structural variation and flexibility is seen on the surface of the protein and is consistent with the anisotropic ADPs obtained from refinement. Comparison with 13 other atomic resolution carbonic anhydrase structures shows that surface variation exists even in these highly ordered isomorphous crystals. Carbonic anhydrase has been well studied structurally and functionally owing to its importance in respiration. A large number of X-ray crystallographic structures of carbonic anhydrase and its inhibitor complexes have been determined, some at atomic resolution. Structure determination of a sulfonamide-containing inhibitor complex has been carried out and the structure was refined at 0.9 Å resolution with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters to an R value of 0.141. The structure is similar to those of other carbonic anhydrase complexes, with the inhibitor providing a fourth nonprotein ligand to the active-site zinc. Comparison of this structure with 13 other atomic resolution (higher than 1.25 Å) isomorphous carbonic anhydrase structures provides a view of the structural similarity and variability in a series of crystal structures. At the center of the protein the structures superpose very well. The metal complexes superpose (with only two exceptions) with standard deviations of 0.01 Å in some zinc–protein and zinc–ligand bond lengths. In contrast, regions of structural variability are found on the protein surface, possibly owing to flexibility and disorder in the individual structures, differences in the chemical and crystalline environments or the different approaches used by different investigators to model weak or complicated electron-density maps. These findings suggest that care must be taken in interpreting structural details on protein surfaces on the basis of individual X-ray structures, even if atomic resolution data are available

  1. The use of atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples from uranium mill tailings sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbach, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) was established to support the environmental measurement needs of the various DOE remedial action programs. A laboratory intercomparison study conducted by the TMC, using soil and water samples from sites contaminated by uranium mill tailings, indicated large discrepancies in analytical results reported by participating laboratories for arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium. The present study was undertaken to investigate the most commonly used analytical techniques for measuring these four elements, ascertain routine and reliable quantification, and assess problems and successes of analysts. Based on a survey of the technical literature, the analytical technique of atomic absorption spectroscopy was selected for detailed study. The application of flame atomic absorption, graphite furnace atomic absorption, and hydride generation atomic absorption to the analysis of tailings-contaminated samples is discussed. Additionally, laboratory sample preparation methods for atomic absorption spectroscopy are presented. The conclusion of this report is that atomic absorption can be used effectively for the determination of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples if the analyst understands the measurement process and is aware of potential problems. The problem of accurate quantification of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil contaminated by waste products from uranium milling operations affects all DOE remedial action programs (Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP)), since all include sites where uranium was processed. 96 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Experimental studies on kaonic atoms at DA{phi}NE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zmeskal, J. [Stefan Meyer Insitut fuer subatomare Physik, Vienna (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Beer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria B.C. (Canada); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Sez. Di Elettronica, Milan (Italy); Bragadirean, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy)]|[IFIN-HH, Bucharest (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan Meyer Insitut fuer subatomare Physik, Vienna (Austria); Catitti, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Curceanu Petrascu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy)]|[IFIN-HH, Bucharest (Romania); Fiorini, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Sez. Di Elettronica, Milan (Italy); Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Sez. Di Elettronica, Milan (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN, Sez. Di RomaI and Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Girolami, B. [INFN, Sez. Di RomaI and Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P. [Stefan Meyer Insitut fuer subatomare Physik, Vienna (Austria); Lechner, P. [PNSensor GmbH, Munich (Germany); Levi Sandri, P.; Lucherini, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Longoni, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Sez. Di Elettronica, Milan (Italy); Marton, J. [Stefan Meyer Insitut fuer subatomare Physik, Vienna (Austria); Pietreanu, D.; Sirghi, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Ponta, T. [IFIN-HH, Bucharest (Romania); Sirghi, D.L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Rome) (Italy)]|[IFIN-HH, Bucharest (Romania); Soltau, H. [PNSensor GmbH, Munich (Germany); Strueder, L. [MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany); Widmann, E. [Stefan Meyer Insitut fuer subatomare Physik, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-06-15

    With precise X-ray spectroscopy on kaonic hydrogen at the DA{phi}NE electron-positron collider at Laboratori Natzionali di Frascati the chiral symmetry breaking scenario in the strangeness sector will be investigated by studying the K{sup -}p and K{sup -}d s-wave interaction at threshold. The strong interaction induced shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s atomic state was measured with DEAR (DA{phi}NE Exotic Atom Research) and in future with SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research with Timing Application) the kaonic hydrogen system will be measured with utmost precision. In addition, data for the K{sup -}d system will become available for the first time. Kaonic hydrogen together with precision measurements of kaonic helium will allow the study of the sub-threshold {lambda}(1405) resonance, which might act as a doorway for the formation of antikaon-mediated deeply bound nuclear states in light nuclei. Therefore, these precision measurements are a powerful tool to test chiral symmetry breaking in systems with strangeness.

  3. Experimental studies on kaonic atoms at DAΦNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With precise X-ray spectroscopy on kaonic hydrogen at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at Laboratori Natzionali di Frascati the chiral symmetry breaking scenario in the strangeness sector will be investigated by studying the K-p and K-d s-wave interaction at threshold. The strong interaction induced shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s atomic state was measured with DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) and in future with SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research with Timing Application) the kaonic hydrogen system will be measured with utmost precision. In addition, data for the K-d system will become available for the first time. Kaonic hydrogen together with precision measurements of kaonic helium will allow the study of the sub-threshold Λ(1405) resonance, which might act as a doorway for the formation of antikaon-mediated deeply bound nuclear states in light nuclei. Therefore, these precision measurements are a powerful tool to test chiral symmetry breaking in systems with strangeness

  4. Moessbauer spectroscopy in kaolin iron study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In kaolin iron can be found in two distinct ways: First in solid solution replacing another element in the Kaolin structure. Second as oxides or oxide-hydroxide. The use of Moessbauer Spectroscopy allows to identify in which way iron is present and quantify its content in Kaolin. In this work Kaolin samples of two different sources were studied using this technique. (author)

  5. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  6. Determination of Elemental Ratio in an Atomic Column by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Hiroki

    2016-07-26

    Atomic-resolution quantification of the elemental ratio of Fe to Mn at the octahedral and tetrahedral sites in brownmillerite Ca2Fe1.07Mn0.93O5 was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The combined techniques revealed that oversampling of the spectral imaging data yielded a spatially resolved area that very nearly reflects atomic resolution (∼1.2 Å radius). The average experimental ratios of Fe to Mn within this region were 17.5:82.5 for the octahedral sites and 81.6:18.4 for the tetrahedral sites. The elemental ratio in an octahedral atomic column was successfully extracted by estimating the mixing of signals from nearest neighbor columns. The results indicated that the ratio of Fe to Mn was 13:87 at the octahedral site, which is in good agreement with the results of neutron diffraction analysis. In addition, the uncertainty of experimental results obtained by using an average 1.2 Å radius was less than 10% at octahedral sites, depending on the sample thickness. In contrast, the experimental error due to dechanneling of incident electrons was larger at the tetrahedral sites. This experimental procedure has wide application for determining the spatially resolved composition ratio of elements in perovskite-like compounds. PMID:27341006

  7. Evaluation on corrosively dissolved gold induced by alkanethiol monolayer with atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have monitored a gold corrosive dissolution behavior accompanied in n-alkanethiol like n-dodecanethiol assembled process with in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and then observed it with atomic force microscopy (AFM) which showed an evident image of corrosive defects or holes produced on gold substrate, corresponding to gold dissolution induced by the alkanethiol molecules in the presence of oxygen. For detection of the dissolved gold defects during alkanethiol assembled process, an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) has been carried out in this paper, and the detection limit for the dissolved gold could be evaluated to be 15.4 ng/mL. The amount of dissolved gold from the substrates of gold plates as functions of immersion time, acid media, solvents and thiol concentration has been examined in the oxygen saturated solutions. In comparison with in situ QCM method, the kinetics behavior of the long-term gold corrosion on the gold plates in 1.0 mmol/L of n-dodecanethiol solution determined with AAS method was a slow process, and its corrosion rate on gold dissolution could be evaluated to be about 4.4 x 10-5 ng.cm-2.s-1, corresponding to 1.3 x 108 Au atoms.cm-2.s-1, that was much smaller than that of initial rate monitored with in situ QCM. Both kinetics equations obtained with QCM and AAS showed a consistent corrosion behavior on gold surfaces.

  8. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, H; Beer, G; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    In the exotic atoms where one atomic $1s$ electron is replaced by a $K^{-}$, the strong interaction between the $K^{-}$ and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z=1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the $1s$ state of $K^{-}p$ and the $2p$ state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  9. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of a |M|=1 Rydberg barium atom in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Quan Wei; Shen Li; Yang Hai-Feng; Shi Ting-Yun; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We observe strong energy-dependent quantum defects in the scaled-energy Stark spectra for |M|=1 Rydberg states of barium atoms at three scaled energies: ε= -2.000, ε= -2.500 and ε=-3.000. In an attempt to explain the observations, theoretical calculations of closed orbit theory based on a model potential including core effect are performed for non-hydrogenic atoms. While such a potential has been uniformly successful for alkali atoms with a single valence electron, it fails to match experimental results for barium atoms in the 6snp Rydberg states with two valence electrons. Our study points out that this discrepancy is due to the strong perturbation from the 5d8p state, which voids the simple approximation for constant quantum defects of principle quantum number n.

  10. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity Rydberg states of atomic sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, S.; Milan, J. B.; Buma, W. J.; de Lange, C. A.

    1996-12-01

    A (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy study of the sulfur atom was performed in the one-photon energy region between 260 and 240 nm. Some 20 previously unobserved even-parity Rydberg states of the sulfur atom are reported, which were accessed by two-photon transitions from the 3P ground state of the atom, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The (4So)np 3P series could be followed up to n=25. This series is perturbed around n=7 by an interloping Rydberg state converging to the first excited ionic limit 2Do. A two-channel quantum defect theory analysis was performed in order to estimate the composition of the wave functions of the perturbed series members, which is compared with the ionic state branching ratios obtained from photoelectron spectra. This analysis, moreover, enabled the determination of the ionization energy of the lowest ionic state 4So with an improved accuracy as compared to the previously reported value.

  11. Determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure has been developed to determine 30 trace elements in high-purity uranium hexafluoride (UF6) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The analytical method consists of a liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities with a tri-(2-ethyl-hexyl)-phosphate (TEHP)-hexane mixture. A computer-controlled scanning monochromator system interfaced to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is then used to determine the levels of 30 trace elements present in the UF6. A single sample dissolution procedure is used for all elements investigated. This preliminary report details experimental work done to date as part of a countinuing program to determine metallic impurities in uranium by ICP

  12. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  13. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  14. On mechanism of buffer action of La and Sr in atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possible mechanism is considered for eliminating the effect of a number of macrocomponents on the determination of alkali earth elements with the addition of La and Sr salts. It is shown that the macroelements with the strongest effect in atom absorption flame spectroscopy are the basic elements of rocks. It is established that the effect increases in the order: Fe, Al, Si, i.e., as the crystal chemical radii of the cations decreases. It is suggested that the effect of La, Sr, Ba and other buffer element with large cations very probably leads to an increase in the diffusion coe'ficient of a determined element in less ''dense'' structures than the depressing component which are formed by the buffer element

  15. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra. PMID:26550881

  16. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  17. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.(KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, 3001, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-g...

  18. Semiconductor studies by radioactive probe atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a growing number of experimental techniques that have in common the usage of radioactive isotopes for the characterization of semiconductors. These techniques deliver atomistic information about identity, formation, lattice environment, and electronic structure, as well as dynamics of defects and defect complexes. The results obtained by different hyperfine techniques are discussed in context with the study of intrinsic and extrinsic defects, i.e. of vacancies or self-interstitials and dopant or impurity atoms, respectively. In addition, the employment of electrical and optical techniques in combination with radioactive isotopes is presented

  19. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    OpenAIRE

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support ...

  20. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  1. Atomic-Scale Spectroscopy of Gated Monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kang, Kibum; Xie, Saien; Dadgar, Ali; Monahan, Nicholas R; Zhu, X-Y; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2016-05-11

    The electronic properties of semiconducting monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides can be tuned by electrostatic gate potentials. Here we report gate-tunable imaging and spectroscopy of monolayer MoS2 by atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Our measurements are performed on large-area samples grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques on a silicon oxide substrate. Topographic measurements of defect density indicate a sample quality comparable to single-crystal MoS2. From gate voltage dependent spectroscopic measurements, we determine that in-gap states exist in or near the MoS2 film at a density of 1.3 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2). By combining the single-particle band gap measured by STS with optical measurements, we estimate an exciton binding energy of 230 meV on this substrate, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulation. Grain boundaries are observed in these polycrystalline samples, which are seen to not have strong electronic signatures in STM imaging. PMID:27064662

  2. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    CERN Document Server

    Ciurylo, R; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and Ca--Ca$^*$ short-range {\\it ab initio} potentials and long-range van der Waals and resonance dipole potentials. The similar van der Waals coefficients of ground $^{1}S_{0} + ^{1}S_{0}$ and excited $^{1}S_{0} + ^{3}P_{1}$ states cause the PA to differ greatly from those of strong, allowed transitions with resonant dipole interactions. The density of spectral lines is lower, the Condon points are at relatively short range, and the reflection approximation for the Franck-Condon factors is not applicable, and the spontaneous ...

  3. Ion-atom collisions for materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion process of silver in aluminium was studied in thin films as a function of temperature, the most important characteristics of dispersor atoms that technique permits us to study are the atomic mass and depth into the solid. This is possible because when a sample is bombarded with ions of a given energy, the ions are dispersed with different energies for different masses and depths, hence this technique is a useful instrument for research into the physical processes which ocurr in thin films up to depths of several microns, one of the results obtained after the bombardment of the target with protons having an energy of 650 KeV was that when the target reached a temperature of approximately 400C, 800C, 1100C and 1600C during 15 minutes and the spectra of heated and unheated targets were compared it was found that the aluminium peak, the valley, the silver peak and the peak over the silver peak change with the increase of temperature and tend to get mixed, that is to say that silver and the aluminium are diffusing themselves. The analysis is essentially qualitative with this technique we ca also measure the thickness of thin films, the silver thickness was measured (3320A). (author)

  4. XPS study of duplex stainless steel oxidized by oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donik, Crtomir [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: crtomir.donik@imt.si; Kocijan, Aleksandra [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton OH 45469-0051 (United States); Jenko, Monika [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drenik, Aleksander [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pihlar, Boris [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Askerceva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-04-15

    Surface oxidation of the duplex stainless steel DSS alloy 2205 was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and SEM imaging. The experiments were performed on the alloy after controlled oxidation with oxygen atoms created in an inductively coupled plasma. Experiments were performed at temperatures from room temperature up to 700 deg. C. Compositions of the modified oxidized surfaces were obtained from XPS survey scans, and the chemistries of selected elements from higher energy resolution scans of appropriate peaks. The morphologies of the surfaces were obtained using field emission scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications, up to 10,000x. Different Fe/Cr/Mn oxidized layers and different oxide thicknesses were observed and correlated with temperature.

  5. Interferometric measurement of lines shift in flames in connection with interpretation of lined absorption method in atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned with interferometric measuring of the line shift in flames in the view of interpretation of absorption lines in the atomic absorption spectroscopy. The newly measured line shifts were compared to the known data on Lorentz broadening of the same lines obtained by methods free of the systematic errors. The resonant lines of the alkaline earth elements (Sr, Ca, Ba) were investigated. To reduce self-absorption in the flame the solutions with minimum concentrations of the elements were used. The computation scheme includes the spectrometer apparatus width and line broadening due to the self-absorption. Formulae are given for computing the values studied. Good agreement was observed between the computed and experimental results. Error analysis was performed. It was concluded that any line shifts in the hydrocarbons were correctly taken into an account in the absolute computations of absorption

  6. Zinc, lead and copper in human teeth measured by induced coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) has been used to determine Pb, Zn and Cu levels in 47 exfoliated human teeth (all of which required extraction for orthodontic reasons). Lead concentrations for the group were 1.7 μg (g tooth mass)-1 to 40.5 μg (g tooth mass)-1, with a median of 9.8 (g (g tooth mass)-1. A median lead level in excess of the group value was found for the teeth of six lorry drivers who were included in the study. A more significant enhancement was found for the seven subjects whose age was in excess of 60 years. The median values for Zn and Cu were 123.0 and 0.6 μg (g tooth mass)-1 respectively. Present values for tooth-Zn are lower than published data for other ethnic groups

  7. Applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy in cement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades Moessbauer spectrometer has been employed to investigate cement and its clinker. In this work some of these investigations are exhibited briefly hoping that this would facilitate further investigations. It has already been seen that Moessbauer spectroscopy gives good information about some vague points which were present before using this technique as a tool in cement studies such as clinker formation, iron solubility, the iron states in the different phases of clinker as well as the effect of hydration at different times on the states of iron cement pastes, methods for the quality control of the manufactured clinker, the evaluation of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength have been assessed. A concept about the Moessbauer spectroscopy is presented. (author)

  8. [Studies on Cancer Diagnosis by Using Spectroscopy Combined with Chemometrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo-yong

    2015-09-01

    Studies on cancer diagnosis using various spectroscopic methods combined with chemometrics are briefly reviewed. Elemental contents in serum samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), bidirectional associative memory (BAM) networks were used to establish diagnosis models for the relationships between elemental contents and lung cancer, liver cancer, and stomach cancer, respectively. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-destructive detection technology. Near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples were determined and spectral features were extracted by chemoometric methods, a fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES) was used for establishing diagnosis model, satisfactory results were obtained. We also proposed a novel variable selection method based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) for near infrared spectra of endometrial carcinoma samples. Spectra with optimized variable were then modeled by support victor machine (SVM). Terahertz technology is an emerging technology for non-destructive detection, which has some unique characteristics. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used for cervical carcinoma measurement. Absorption coefficients were calculated from the measured time domain spectra and then processed with derivative, orthogonal signal correction (PC-OSC) to reduce interference components, and then fuzzy rule-based expert system (FuRES), fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM), support victor machine (SVM), and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used for diagnosis model establishment. The above results provide useful information for cancer occurring and development, and provide novel approaches for early stage diagnosis of various cancers. PMID:26669135

  9. Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, W C; Lindle, D W; Sant'Anna, M M; Savin, D W

    2014-01-01

    Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is so...

  10. Aging studies in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the studies of the effect of ionizing radiation on atomic bomb survivors have not produced any evidence of radiation-induced aging, there have been studies on experimental animals and man which suggest accelerated aging after exposure to ionizing radiation. To determine if certain physiologic functions could be related to exposure to ionizing radiation, a battery of age-related tests was given at the time of the physical examinations at ABCC. Some 11,351 persons were given these non-invasive age-related tests. The results were essentially negative. Until a satisfactory operational definition of biologic or physiologic age is developed, the administration of functional tests as a measure of aging does not seem justified. (author)

  11. Atomic Force Microscope Spectroscopy Reveals a Hemifusion Intermediate during Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor-Attachment Protein Receptors-Mediated Membrane Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Bhalla, Akhil; Chapman, Edwin R.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs) on the fusion of egg L-α-phosphatidylcholine bilayers using atomic force microscope (AFM) spectroscopy. AFM measurements of the fusion force under compression were acquired to reveal the energy landscape of the fusion process. A single main energy barrier governing the fusion process was identified in the absence and presence of SNAREs in the bilayers. Under compression...

  12. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  13. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  14. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  15. A Study of Confined Helium Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The helium atom confined by a spherical parabolic potential well is studied employing the adiabatic hyperspherical approach method. Total energies of the ground and three low-excited states are obtained as a function of the confined potential radii. We find that the energies of a spherical parabolic potential well are in good agreement with those of an impenetrable spherical box for the larger confined potential radius. We find also that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-excited states and the inversion of the energy values. The results for the three-dimensional spherical potential well and the two-dimensional disc-like potential well are compared with each other. We find that the energy difference between states in a two-dimensional parabolic potential is also obviously larger than the corresponding levels for a spherical parabolic potential.

  16. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P1/2 transition in atomic hydrogen on a cold thermal beam of optically excited 2S atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'proton size puzzle', i.e. the discrepancy between the values for the proton r.m.s. charge radius deduced from precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen and electron-proton-scattering on one side and the value deduced from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy on the other side, has been persisting for more than two years now. Although huge efforts have been put into trying to resolve this discrepancy from experimental and theoretical side, no convincing argument could be found so far. In this talk, we report on a unique precision spectroscopy experiment on atomic hydrogen, which is aiming to bring some light to the hydrogen part of the puzzle: In contrast to any previous high resolution experiment probing a transition frequency between the meta-stable 2S state and a higher lying nL state (n=3,4,6,8,12, L=S,P,D), our measurement of the 2S-4P1/2 transition frequency is the first experiment being performed on a cold thermal beam of hydrogen atoms optically excited to the 2S state. We will discuss how this helps to efficiently suppresses leading systematic effects of previous measurements and present the preliminary results we obtained so far.

  17. Development of two-color laser system for high-resolution polarization spectroscopy measurements of atomic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, A H; Satija, A; Naik, S V; Lucht, R P

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a high-spectral-resolution laser system for two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe (TPP-PSP) measurements of atomic hydrogen in flames. In the TPP-PSP technique, a 243-nm laser beam excites the two-photon 1S-2S transition, and excited n=2 atoms are then detected by polarization spectroscopy of the n=2 to n=3 transition using 656-nm laser radiation. The single-frequency-mode 243 and 656-nm beams are produced using injection-seeded optical parametric generators coupled with pulsed dye amplifiers. The use of single-mode lasers allows accurate measurement of signal line shapes and intensities even with significant pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in pulse energies. Use of single-mode lasers and introduction of a scheme to select nearly constant laser energies enable repeatable extraction of important spectral features in atomic hydrogen transitions. PMID:22940950

  18. Compartmentalization of trace elements in guinea pig tissues by INAA [instrumental neutron activation analysis] and AAS [atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human scalp hair analysis has received considerable attention from a variety of disciplines over the last 20 yr or so. Trace element levels of hair have been used in environmental, epidemiological, forensic, nutritional, predictive, and preventive medicine studies. There still exist confusion, skepticism, and controversy, however, among the experts as well as lay persons in the interpretation of hair trace element data. Much of the criticism stems from the lack of quantitative and reliable data on the ability of hair to accurately reflect dose-response relationships. To better define the significance or hair trace element levels (under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency), the authors have undertaken a controlled set of animal experiments in which trace element levels in hair and other tissues have been measured after a mild state of systemic intoxication by chronic, low-does exposure to cadmium and selenium. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods have been developed for the determination of several elements with a high degree of precision and accuracy

  19. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  20. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the method of 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  4. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  5. Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy: study, development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been devoted to the development and the applications of a new technique of infrared (5-20 μm) spectroscopy allowing a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This technique relies on a source of ultrashort infrared pulses obtained by frequency mixing in a nonlinear material. In particular, the optical rectification of 12-fs visible pulses in gallium arsenide has allowed us to obtain 40-fs infrared pulses with a spectrum extending from 5 pm up to 15 μm. Spectral resolution has been achieved by Fourier transform spectroscopy, using a novel device we have called Diffracting FTIR. These developments allow to study inter-subband transitions in quantum-well structures. The inter-subband relaxation time has been measured by a pump-probe experiment, in which the sample was excited with a visible pulse, and the variations of inter-subband absorption probed with an infrared pulse. Besides, we have developed a method of coherent emission spectroscopy allowing to monitor the electric field emitted by coherent charge oscillations in quantum wells. The decay of the oscillations due to the loss of coherence between excited levels yields a direct measurement of the dephasing time between these levels. Other applications include biological macromolecules like reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria. We have shown that we were able to monitor variations of infrared absorption of about 10-4 optical densities with a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This would constitute a relevant tool to study the role of molecular vibrations during the primary steps of biological processes. (author)

  6. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 23Po,2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 23Po level of helium-like krypton

  7. Influence of atomic tip structure on the intensity of inelastic tunneling spectroscopy data analyzed by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy, force microscopy, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Gustafsson, Alexander; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-04-01

    Achieving a high intensity in inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is important for precise measurements. The intensity of the IETS signal can vary by up to a factor of 3 for various tips without an apparent reason accessible by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) alone. Here, we show that combining STM and IETS with atomic force microscopy enables carbon monoxide front-atom identification, revealing that high IETS intensities for CO/Cu(111) are obtained for single-atom tips, while the intensity drops sharply for multiatom tips. Adsorption of the CO molecule on a Cu adatom [CO/Cu/Cu(111)] such that the molecule is elevated over the substrate strongly diminishes the tip dependence of IETS intensity, showing that an elevated position channels most of the tunneling current through the CO molecule even for multiatom tips, while a large fraction of the tunneling current bypasses the CO molecule in the case of CO/Cu(111).

  8. Spectroscopy Study of Ar + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor

    2006-10-01

    A spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 gas mix is presented. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. Very different plasmas are produced following the relative importance of CO2 in the gas mixture. At low CO2 concentration, the plasmas are similar to those obtained with pure Ar with weak CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+ bands. The usual blue plasma core associated with intense Ar II transitions is observed with however a significant white glow coming from the outer plasma regions. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and can be described as an intense white plasma column. Molecular dissociative processes associated with the production of strong C and O atomic lines are observed under specific plasma conditions. The atomic spectral lines are compared with ADAS modeling results. This study indicates the possible advantages of using a helicon source to control the CO2 plasma chemistry for industrial applications.

  9. Study of the deuterated albumin by FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The albumin is a protein from the soluble or corpuscular protein class, which exists in cells, in dissolved state or in form of a hydrated gel. Proteins are essential constituents beside water, inorganic salts, lipids, carbon hydrates, vitamins, enzymes. The albumin is also a protein soluble in water and in diluted electrolyte solutions (acids, bases and salts). The investigation of the vibration isotopic effect has a great importance both for the diatomic molecules and for the polyatomic molecules. This paper is the first from a series of works which are intended to study the physico-chemical properties of the deuterated albumin and of the albumin solutions in heavy water by an isotopic exchange method. To put in evidence H-D exchange, the FT-IR spectroscopy is used when the deuterated albumin has different layer thickness. It is also of interest to elucidate the isotopic exchange between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in bovine serum albumin macromolecules. (authors)

  10. Valley polarization and coherence in atomically thin tungsten disulfide via optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Zeng, Hualing; Dai, Junfeng; Gong, Zhirui; Cui, Xiaodong

    Atomically thin group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) has been emerging as a family of intrinsic 2-dimensional crystals with a sizeable bandgap, opening a potential avenue for ultimate electronics and optoelectronics. Besides, the characteristic structural inversion symmetry breaking in monolayers leads to non-zero but contrasting Berry curvatures and orbital magnetic moments at K/K' valleys. These features provide an opportunity to manipulate electrons' additional internal degrees of freedom, namely the valley degree of freedom, making monolayer TMDC a promising candidate for the conceptual valleytronics. Here, our experimental approach on valley dependent circular dichroism in monolayer and bilayer WS2 via optical spectroscopy are elaborated. Consequently, the polarization of photoluminescence inherits that of excitations, circularly and linearly polarized, confirming the valley dependent selectivity rule. However, the valley polarization and valley coherence in bilayer WS2 owing to the coupling of spin, valley and layer degrees of freedom, are anomalously robust compared with monolayer WS2. We propose potential mechanisms of the anomalous behavior in WS2 bilayers.

  11. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the...

  12. Electron momentum spectroscopy and linear combination of atomic orbitals calculation of bulk Na sub 2 O

    CERN Document Server

    Mikajlo, E A; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental measurement of the electronic structure of Na sub 2 O in the solid phase using electron momentum spectroscopy and compares the results with ab initio calculations performed within the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) approximation. While Hartree-Fock (HF) can reproduce elastic properties we find it overestimates splitting of the oxygen valence bands by around 30% and the width of the O 2p band by a factor of 2. Our experimental values are 15.85 +- 0.2 and 0.6 +- 0.2 eV for these two quantities, respectively. Density functional methods are significantly better, with the hybrid functional PBE0 predicting the oxygen bandgap to within the experimental error. PBE0 also gives the best estimate of the Na core level energies. In contrast, HF performs best for the splitting between the oxygen and sodium bands. Our experimental values of 32.85 +- 0.2 and 27.45 +- 0.2 eV for the Na 2p-Na 2s and O 2p-Na 2p splittings agree well with previous measurements. Distribution of el...

  13. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J; Killian, T C

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered avoided crossing between the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ $0_u$ ($^3\\Pi^+_u$) and $^1S_0$$+$$^1D_2$ $0_u$ ($^1\\Sigma^+_u$) potential curves at short range and we build a mass scaled interaction model that quantitatively reproduces the available $0_u$ bound state energies for the three stable bosonic isotopes. We also provide a two-channel model that incorporates the rotational (Coriolis) mixing between the $0_u$ and $1_u$ curves which, while not mass scaled, is capable of quantitatively describing the vibrational splittings observed...

  14. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the “neutron discrepancy problem” – the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima – was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the nanosecond range for matrix-isolated Cu atoms and dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.; Rotermund, H. H.; Schrittenlacher, W.; Schroeder, W.

    1985-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the single-bunch mode was employed to study time-resolved emission from Cu atoms and dimers isolated in a Ne matrix. The decay time of the matrix-related emission at 3.5 eV for Cu in Ne after excitation of the 4s → 4p resonance transition was determined as 6.9±0.3 ns, while excitation into higher-lying 3d → 4p transitions resulted in a much slower decay of the 3.5 eV emission. From analysis of rise and decay times, a detailed diagram for energy dissipation in matrix-isolated Cu atoms has been derived. The B → X (Σ u → Σ g) emission of Cu 2 in Ne has a first-order decay time of about 10 ns.

  16. Determination of metallic impurities in raw materials for radioisotope production by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectrometry has been used for the determination of traces of calcium in scandium oxide, copper in zinc, iron in cobalt oxide, manganese In ferric oxide, nickel in copper and zinc in gallium oxide. The influences on the sensitivities arising from the hollow cathode currents, the gas pressures and the acid concentrations have been considered. A study of the interferences from the metallic matrices has also been performed, the interference due to the absorption of the manganese radiation by the atoms of iron being the most outstanding . In order to remove the interfering elements and increase sensitivity, pre-concentration methods have been tested. The addition methods has also been used. (Author) 14 refs

  17. Sub-doppler spectroscopy based on the transit relaxation of atomic particles in a thin gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the review of methods, achievements, and possibilities of the recently elaborated high-resolution laser spectroscopy based on sub-doppler absorption, fluorescence and polarization resonances (on centers of quantum transitions), which arise because of the specific optical selection of comparatively slow-speed atoms or molecules in a thin cell with a rarefied gas. It is considered two following mechanisms of such velocity selection of atomic particles connected with their flight durations between walls of the thin cell : 1) optical pumping of sublevels of the ground atomic term and 2) optical excitation of long-lived metastable quantum levels. Theoretical bases of elaborated spectroscopy methods are presented. In case of the optical pumping mechanism, experimental technique and results on the record of sub-doppler spectral structure of Cs and Rb atoms and on the frequency stabilization of diode lasers by given methods are described. Perspectives of further development and applications of this new direction of the high-resolution spectroscopy are discussed

  18. Studies of the Atomic and Crystalline Characteristics of Ceramic Oxide Nano Powders after Bio field Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been known for their extraordinary electrical and magnetic properties. In the present study, some transition metal oxides (Zinc oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide) which are widely used in the fabrication of electronic devices were selected and subjected to biofield treatment. The atomic and crystal structures of TMOs were carefully studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. XRD analysis reveals that biof...

  19. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  20. Study of niobium oxidation by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition of thin oxide layers, grown on clean niobium, in low oxygen pressure, was studied by a surface analysis method: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The purpose of this study was to find the best conditions for the building of Nb/Nb oxide/Pb Josephson junctions, and particularly to minimise the interface thickness during the formation of the insulator film (Nb2O5) on the metal (Nb). This interface is essentially formed by the monoxide (NbO) and dioxide (NbO2). Nb 3d XPS core level peak positions and area ratios (obtained by the signal decomposition) of the components of the total peak, were used to determine the presence of the different oxidation states II, IV and V, their relative abundance, oxide thicknesses and their depth distribution. All this information was extracted by a special numerical procedure

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of dimethylnitrosamine studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenderink, Egbert; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-01-01

    The initial molecular dynamics in the dissociative S1 (n, pi*) state of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We find that photochemical N-N bond cleavage in DMN proceeds via a bent conformation around the amine N atom, which supports the outcome of ab initio

  2. The development of high-resolution spectroscopic methods and their use in atomic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis discusses work performed during the last nine years in the field of atomic spectroscopy. Several high-resolution techniques, ranging from quantum beats, level crossings, rf-laser double resonances to nonlinear field atom interactions, have been employed. In particular, these methods have been adopted and developed to deal with fast accelerated atomic or ionic beams, allowing studies of problems in atomic-structure theory. Fine- and hyperfine-structure determinations in the He I and Li I isoelectronic sequences, in 51V I, and in 235U I, II have permitted a detailed comparison with ab initio calculations, demonstrating the change in problems when going towards heavier elements or higher ionization stage. The last part of the thesis is concerned with the fundamental question of obtaining very high optical resolution in the interaction between a fast accelerated atom or ion beam and a laser field, this problem being the core in the continuing development of atomic spectroscopy necessary to challenge the more precise and sophisticated theories advanced. (Auth.)

  3. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: light sidebands resonances in electromagnetically induced transparency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, H M; Theophilo, K; Nussenzveig, P; Martinelli, M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the non-zero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  4. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  5. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy in studies of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosynthesis is a process occurring in certain species of bacteria, algae and higher plants. It transforms solar energy into various forms of energy-rich organic molecules. Photosystem II (PSII) is the 'heart' of the photosynthetic apparatus because it delivers electrons and protons for further steps of the light-driven phases of photosynthesis. There are two enigmatic iron binding structures within the core of photosynthetic apparatus, which play an important role in the electron transfer within PSII. Many investigations focus on the determination of their function which is the key to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the energy and electron transfer within PSII. Among many methods used in this research field, the Moessbauer spectroscopy is a unique one, which gives the possibility to study changes of the valence and spin states of those two iron sites and the dynamical properties of their protein matrix in the presence of various physiological and stress conditions.

  7. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  8. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-04-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level.

  9. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  10. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickermann, Andreas

    2013-07-15

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  11. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Manfred Lange; Dennis van Vörden; Rolf Möller

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between...

  12. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pia C. Lansåker; Anders Hallén; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The v...

  13. Experimental Investigation Of Segregation Of Carbon Atoms Due To Sub-Zero Cryogenic Treatment In Cold Work Tool Steel By Mechanical Spectroscopy And Atom Probe Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present mechanical spectroscopy of cold work tool steel subjected to sub-zero cryogenic soaking treatment to reveal the carbon segregation and the subsequent carbides refinement. The maximum of Snoek-Köster (SK peak height was obtained in the sample subjected to soaking 1h at −130°C cryogenic treatment. The SK peak height is reduced with prolonging the soaking time. The results indicate that an increase in the height of SK peak is connected with an increase in dislocation density and the number of segregated carbon atoms in the vicinity of dislocations or twin planes after martensite transformation at −130°C which is confirmed by corresponding TEM and atom probe tomography measurement. Hence, it is suggested that the isothermal martensite, formed during the cryogenic soaking treatment decreases (APT the height of SK peak.

  14. First application of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Curceanu, C; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hirenzaki, S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Ikeno, N; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Koike, T; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.

  15. INVESTIGATIONS OF SUPERCONDUCTING AND NON-SUPERCONDUCTING YBa2 Cu3 O7-x BY FIELD ION MICROSCOPY, ATOM-PROBE MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND FIELD ELECTRON EMISSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kellogg, G.; Brenner, S

    1988-01-01

    The structure and composition of superconducting and non-superconducting samples of YBa2Cu3O7-x were examined by field ion microscopy, atom-probe mass spectroscopy and field-electron emission techniques. Field ion microscope images from both types of material exhibited ring structures associated with atomic or multiatomic layers and uniform, layer-by-layer field evaporation was possible. Atom-probe mass spectra contained signals corresponding to atomic and molecular oxygen, all three metals, ...

  16. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  17. Precise X-Ray spectroscopy of the hydrogenlike and heliumlike heavy ions and of the exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, we present four experiments designed to study hydrogenlike and heliumlike heavy ions, or exotic atoms. These experiments have been run at the Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforchung (GSI) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of this text, we begin with the description of a focusing, curved-crystal spectrometer in transmission geometry, coupled with a microstrip, germanium position-sensitive detector, which diffract X-ray photons in the range 50-100 keV. With this spectrometer, which can be mounted on the GSI accelerator, we will increase, by one order of magnitude, the accuracy on the measurement of the 1s Lamb shift in hydrogenlike uranium ions, in order to test QED in strong coulomb field. Next, we detail an experiment that will soon give a new value of the charged-pion mass with a relative accuracy of 1 ppm. For that, we perform X-ray spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen, at PSI. The experimental set-up is made up of a cyclotron trap, a spherical Bragg-crystal focusing spectrometer, in reflection geometry, and a CCD sensitive-position cooled detector. This set-up allows also test QCD and chiral perturbation theory by measurements of radiative transitions of pionic hydrogen. The main subject of the second part is a lifetime measurement of the metastable 23P0 state in heliumlike gold ions, by Beam Foil Spectroscopy. With this experiment, which provides an important test of relativistic many-body theory, we give, for the first time, an accurate value of the lifetime of this state for an ion with a Z larger than 64, our result is τ(exp) = (22.12 ± 1.21) ps

  18. Atom trapping: application to electron collision studies of metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We report on the first measurements of electron scattering from metastable helium atoms (He) confined in a magneto-optic trap (MOT). Using conventional crossed beam techniques, measurement of electron scattering cross sections for He is experimentally very difficult, due the intrinsically low atomic densities produced by nozzle discharge sources, and the need to locate the interaction region well away from stray electric and magnetic fields. Electron interactions with excited state atoms are fundamentally important to many naturally processes in atmospheric and astrophysical chemistry, gas lasers and plasma processing. Until these experiments, no data for He existed in the intermediate (10-100 eV) range to verify theoretical predictions. Our MOT contains up to 108 atoms at temperatures of ∼1mK that act as a high (∼109 cm-3) density target for a pulsed electron beam. We employ optical molasses to reduce the atomic velocity, and hence the trap decay time when released from the optical and magnetic fields. The total cross section is determined using phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the fractional loss rate of the trapped atoms with the electron gun on, and the electron current density is measured using scanning wire techniques to yield the absolute total cross section

  19. Strength of integration of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in lipid bilayers as determined by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganchev, Dragomir N; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Snel, Margot M E; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-30

    In this study we address the stability of integration of proteins in membranes. Using dynamic atomic force spectroscopy, we measured the strength of incorporation of peptides in lipid bilayers. The peptides model the transmembrane parts of alpha-helical proteins and were studied in both ordered peptide-rich and unordered peptide-poor bilayers. Using gold-coated AFM tips and thiolated peptides, we were able to observe force events which are related to the removal of single peptide molecules out of the bilayer. The data demonstrate that the peptides are very stably integrated into the bilayer and that single barriers within the investigated region of loading rates resist their removal. The distance between the ground state and the barrier for peptide removal was found to be 0.75 +/- 0.15 nm in different systems. This distance falls within the thickness of the interfacial layer of the bilayer. We conclude that the bilayer interface region plays an important role in stably anchoring transmembrane proteins into membranes. PMID:15554706

  20. Estimation of lead and zinc in human hair using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements analysis in hair can be useful in studying the impact of environmental and dietary factors on human in general for lead and zinc content in hair. Samples of people of different age groups, sex with varied living habits of the individual living in different areas of Sind, urban as well as rural areas were of special interest to be studied to find correlation of socioeconomic factors and the presence of these elements in hair samples. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age, sex and physiological status and environmental pollution affect composition of hair. The method of sample preparation and use of atomic absorption techniques providing unequivocal and direct estimation of metals in ppm/ppb range to arrive upon conclusion. (author)

  1. Transition rates and transition rate diagrams in atomic emission spectroscopy: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low pressure plasmas with low electron densities, such as glow discharges, radiative de-excitation is a major de-excitation process of most excited states. Their relative de-excitation rates can be determined by emission spectroscopy, making it possible to study excitation processes in these discharges. This is in contrast to denser plasmas, in which such considerations are usually based on relative populations of excited states and concepts related to thermodynamic equilibrium. In the approach using reaction rates rather than populations, a convenient tool is the recently introduced formalism of transition rate diagrams. This formalism is reviewed, its relevance to different plasmas is discussed and some recent results on glow discharge excitation of manganese, copper and iron ions are presented. The prospects for the use of this formalism for the comparison of rate constants and cross sections for charge transfer reactions with argon ions of elements of interest in analytical glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. - Highlights: • Radiative deexcitation is a major deexcitation process in some plasmas. • Rates of radiative transitions can be presented in transition rate diagrams. • Transition rate diagrams can be calculated based on emission spectra. • Transition rate diagrams can indicate collisional excitation processes. • Transition rate diagrams of Fe II, Cu II, Mn II in a glow discharge plasma are reviewed

  2. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 108. The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  3. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10{sup 8}. The atoms of several tens of {mu}K degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  4. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisenbacher, Lothar; Beyer, Axel; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-05-01

    A precision measurement of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen, when combined with the precisely known 1S-2S transition frequency, can be used to determine the value of the r.m.s.proton charge radius rp. We report on our progress towards an absolute frequency measurement, using a cryogenic beam of atoms optically excited to the metastable 2S state. This strongly suppresses the first order Doppler shift, which is further reduced using actively stabilized counter-propagating laser beams for the 2S-4P (one-photon) excitation. We experimentally verify this suppression using time-of-flight resolved detection. We present a theoretical and experimental study of interference effects due to spontaneous emission and the corresponding line center shifts, using a segmented detector to spatially resolved the emission pattern. An experimental scheme to suppress this systematic shift and extract the unperturbed transition frequency is shown and future measurements of transitions to higher nL states are discussed.

  5. A study of the kinetic energy density functional for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the rigorous kinetic energy density functional at the level of the Hartree-Fock method for closed electron shell atoms. The behaviour of the kinetic energy and its components, is analysed as the atomic number N increases. It is shown that the increments of the specific energies for two consecutive closed electron shells atoms depend distinctly on the electron configuration of the last electron shell. 35 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  6. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  7. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    OpenAIRE

    Senami, Masato; Ikeda, Yuji; Fukushima, Akinori; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsive...

  8. Kaonic atomsstudies of the strong interaction with strangeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of charged antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is a fascinating topic. The antikaon plays a peculiar role in hadron physics due to the strong attraction antikaon-nucleon which is a key question for possible kaonic nuclear bound states. A rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions to low-lying states in light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium. After the successful completion of precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and helium isotopes by SIDDHARTA at DAΦNE/LNF, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. In the future with kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-dependent scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the experimental results of SIDDHARTA and an outlook to future perspectives in the SIDDHARTA2 experiments in this frontier research field will be given.

  9. Kaonic atoms - studies of the strong interaction with strangeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, J.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-11-01

    The strong interaction of charged antikaons (K-) with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is a fascinating topic. The antikaon plays a peculiar role in hadron physics due to the strong attraction antikaon-nucleon which is a key question for possible kaonic nuclear bound states. A rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions to low-lying states in light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium. After the successful completion of precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and helium isotopes by SIDDHARTA at DAΦNE/LNF, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2). In the future with kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-dependent scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the experimental results of SIDDHARTA and an outlook to future perspectives in the SIDDHARTA2 experiments in this frontier research field will be given.

  10. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Mehrnoush [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 {mu}L, a sampling temperature of 27 {sup o}C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n = 7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 {mu}g L{sup -1} were also studied.

  11. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  12. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  13. Membrane surface modification and characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modifying macromolecules (SMMs) were used to modify the top surface of polymeric membranes. SMMs are oligomeric fluoropolymers synthesized by polyurethane chemistry and tailored with fluorinated end groups. In this study, the surface of polyetherimide (PEI) flat-sheet membranes prepared by the phase inversion method was modified using 2 wt.% of SMM and 15 wt.% PEI concentration in the polymer casting solution. The effect of solvent evaporation time on membrane surface modification was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows enrichment of fluorine on the modified PEI membrane surfaces and their contact angles were higher than those of the unmodified PEI membrane. Both the surface fluorine content and contact angles of the SMM/PEI blended membrane increased when the solvent evaporation time was increased up to 5 min. The SMM modified and unmodified PEI membranes were characterized by means of tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The mean pore size, nodule size, pore density, surface porosity and mean roughness of the modified membranes were determined and compared with those of the unmodified membrane

  14. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  15. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H2 R reactions where RH is CH4, C2H6, or C3H8, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  16. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy glovebox assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ''cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  17. Estimation of lead, cadmium and nickel content by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in dry fruit bodies of some macromycetes growing in Poland. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of lead, cadmium, and nickel in dry fruit bodies of 34 species of macromyoetes collected in Poland from 72 natural babitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was estimated.

  18. Interaction between atoms and slow light: a design study

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Faggiani, Rémi; Gill, Christopher; Petrov, Plamen G; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Bernon, Simon; Bouyer, Philippe; Boyer, Vincent; Lalanne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of on-chip integration of nanophotonic devices and cold atoms offers extremely-strong and pure light-matter interaction schemes, which may have profound impact on quantum information science. In this context, a longstanding obstacle is to achieve strong interaction between single atoms and single photons, while at the same time trap atoms in vacuum at large separation distances from dielectric surfaces. In this letter, we study new waveguide geometries that challenge these conflicting objectives. The designed photonic crystal waveguide is expected to offer a good compromise, which additionally allow for easy manipulation of atomic clouds around the structure.

  19. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  20. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  1. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy oflaser-ablated copper atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Andrejeva, Anna; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of laser-ablated copper atoms entrainedin a supersonic free jet expansion are reported. Depending on the ionization scheme employed, andthe conditions under which the copper atoms are produced, very different spectra are produced, whichare discussed. In some circumstances, high proportions of metastable atoms survive the ablation andexpansion process and are clearly seen in the spectra. The spectroscopic transitions for the observedlin...

  2. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Li; Dong, Ri-Chang; Deng, Jian-Liao; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere under the influence of a diffuse laser field have been systematically investigated. A pronounced dispersionlike structure centered at the light-shifted pump frequency is observed with a subnatural linewidth. In particular, two clearly resolved absorption resonances on the 5 S1 /2(F =2 ) →5 P3 /2(F'=3 ) transitions occur with variable probe beam intensity, which is consistent with our proposed theoretical model. Based on the two absorption resonances,we measure the dependence of light shifts, from which we can directly extract the effective Rabi frequency in a diffuse laser field, on the probe laser intensity, pump laser intensity, and pump laser detuning. Our work helps to identify the physical mechanisms behind these spectral features and is beneficial for studying the corresponding effect in a cold sample.

  3. The atomic structure of protons and hydrides in Sm1.92Ca0.08Sn2O7-δ pyrochlore from DFT calculations and FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Eurenius, K. E. J.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Knee, C. S.; Vegge, Tejs

    2012-01-01

    A combined density functional theory and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study of the structure and specific site preference of protons and hydrides in the pyrochlore Sm1.92Ca0.08Sn2O7-δ is presented. Two protonic sites of particular high stability are identified, both located on O(1......) oxygen atoms closely associated with a Ca dopant. Further, the unexpected presence of Ho hydride defects in undoped, oxygen deficient Sm2Sn2O7 is reported. Finally, the stretching frequencies and relative intensities for these and other sites are calculated. The main features of the Fourier transform...

  4. Influence of electrostatic forces on the investigation of dopant atoms in layered semiconductors by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of the atomic scale topography and electronic structure of dopant sites in semiconductor materials is a promising application of scanning probe microscopies. Dopants have been imaged with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on and near the surface of conventional semiconductor materials as well as on layered compounds. On both kinds of materials, dopants are detected as either protrusions or depressions in the STM image. The comparison of the measured heights between the materials shows that the values on layered materials are considerably larger than those on the conventional (three-dimensional) semiconductors. We interpret this as the influence of dopant induced electrostatic forces between the tip and sample leading to a structural deformation of the surface around dopant atoms. In order to investigate the influence of electrostatic forces, we performed STM measurements on p-type MoS2 at different bias voltages. The bias dependence of the images indicates the presence of electrostatic forces and demonstrates the influence of screening due to the surrounding electron density. Additional measurements with current imaging tunneling spectroscopy show that changes in the density of states at dopant sites plays only a minor role and cannot account for the large protrusions observed. Atomic force microscopy measurements, with an applied dc voltage between cantilever and sample, also confirm the role of electrostatic forces since voltage dependent changes in the topograpy were observed. copyright 1997 American Vacuum Society

  5. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  6. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  7. Spectroscopy as a major programme in ASDEX - a discussion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the objectives and possibilities of a spectroscopy programme in ASDEX and provides some basic information on the relevant processes of atomic physics in tokamaks. The spectroscopic analogies found in observation of astrophysical objects are also briefly treated. In addition, the possibilities for conducting investigations in alternative high-Z ion sources are discussed. A first proposal for an appropriate programme is then formulated. (orig.)

  8. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  9. Cavity cooling and normal-mode spectroscopy of a bound atom-cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Single atoms strongly coupled to the field of an optical cavity form an attractive system for the realization of an atom-light interface useful for quantum information protocols. An experimental implementation of these schemes requires atoms which are trapped, cooled and localized in the cavity mode at a region of strong coupling. In the experiment presented here, single atoms are trapped and stored in a far-detuned intracavity dipole trap. We demonstrate cavity cooling by illuminating the system with a weak, slightly blue-detuned light beam. This extends the storage time of an atom, which is limited by parametric heating from fluctuations of the intracavity dipole trap, by more than a factor of two. The observed cooling force is of Sisyphus-type and was predicted. A special feature of this force is that it does not rely on the spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom, and therefore the cooling force is at least five times larger than the force achievable for free-space cooling methods with comparable excitation of a two-level atom. Preparing single atoms strongly-coupled to the mode of a high-finesse cavity in this way, we observe two well-resolved normal-mode peaks both in transmission of the cavity as well as in the trap lifetime. The experimental data agree well with a Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrating the localization of the atom to within a tenth of a wavelength at a cavity antinode. The ability to individually excite the normal modes of a bound atom-cavity system shows that we have reached good control over this fundamental quantum system. (author)

  10. The Mossbauer spectroscopy studies of retained austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Frackowiak

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper: This paper completes the knowledge concerning the mechanisms of destabilization and properties of retained austenite. Investigations were performed on 120MnCrMoV8-6-4-2 steel, which was designed in 1998, in Phase Transformations Research Group of Department of Physical and Powder Metallurgy at the Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science at AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow.Design/methodology/approach: The samples of investigated steel were austenitized at the temperature of 900ºC and hardened in oil. Next, three from four samples were tempered. Tempering consisted of heating the samples up to chosen temperatures with a heating rate of 0.05ºC/s and, after reaching desired temperature, fast cooling. CEMS technique was applied for Mössbauer studies.Findings: Stabilized by heating up to 80ºC retained austenite, in the result of mechanical destabilization, transforms into low-temperature tempered martensite, with the structure of low bainite (into the structural constituent in which ε carbide exists.Research limitations/implications: The influence of the temperature, up to which the samples were heated during tempering, on the mechanical stability of retained austenite and on the products of its transformation, was determined.Practical implications: Changes occuring in retained austenite during tempering of steel of high hardenability (hardness, developed for potential applications on tools of enhanced wear resistance, were described.Originality/value: Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied not only for qantitative analysis of retained austenite, but also to analyze the values of quadrupole splitting and isomeric shift, what resulted in significant conclusions concerning the changes in its chemical composition, microstructure, and the level of stresses being present in it.

  11. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants; Spectroscopie atomique et mesures de grande precision: determination de constantes fonfamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, C

    2006-12-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm{sup -1}). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10{sup -9} began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is {alpha}{sub -1} = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10{sup -9}. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  12. Validity of automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy algorithm to determine the amount of substance and the depth distribution of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reports a systematic study of the range of validity of a previously developed algorithm for automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, which takes into account the variation in both peak intensity and the intensity in the background of inelastically scattered electrons. This test was done by first simulating spectra for the Au4d peak with gold atoms distributed in the form of a wide range of nanostructures, which includes overlayers with varying thickness, a 5 Å layer of atoms buried at varying depths and a substrate covered with an overlayer of varying thickness. Next, the algorithm was applied to analyze these spectra. The algorithm determines the number of atoms within the outermost 3 λ of the surface. This amount of substance is denoted AOS3λ (where λ is the electron inelastic mean free path). In general the determined AOS3λ is found to be accurate to within ∼10–20% depending on the depth distribution of the atoms. The algorithm also determines a characteristic length L, which was found to give unambiguous information on the depth distribution of the atoms for practically all studied cases. A set of rules for this parameter, which relates the value of L to the depths where the atoms are distributed, was tested, and these rules were found to be generally valid with only a few exceptions. The results were found to be rather independent of the spectral energy range (from 20 to 40 eV below the peak energy) used in the analysis.

  13. Studies on coherence and decoherence in Fast Atom Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few years ago, quantum effects were observed for the scattering of fast atoms from surfaces under a grazing angle of incidence. We discuss basic features of Fast Atom Diffraction (FAD) which adds a further powerful method to the established tools in ion beam analysis and surface science. Attractive features of FAD in studies on the structure of surfaces comprise negligible radiation damage, cost effective operation of the complete setup, no charging effects in studies with insulators, and an extreme sensitivity to the topmost layer of surface atoms. The observation of diffraction patterns is based on the quantum coherence which is preserved during the scattering process with the target surface. We will discuss basic features of the coherence phenomena and its role for the observation of quantum effects in the angular distributions for grazingly scattered atoms. In a comparison of data obtained for H and He atoms we demonstrate that two different mechanisms for decoherence are important

  14. Application of Solution NMR Spectroscopy to Study Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Göbl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in spectroscopic methods allow the identification of minute fluctuations in a protein structure. These dynamic properties have been identified as keys to some biological processes. The consequences of this structural flexibility can be far‑reaching and they add a new dimension to the structure-function relationship of biomolecules. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy allows the study of structure as well as dynamics of biomolecules in a very broad range of timescales at atomic level. A number of new NMR methods have been developed recently to allow the measurements of time scales and spatial fluctuations, which in turn provide the thermodynamics associated with the biological processes. Since NMR parameters reflect ensemble measurements, structural ensemble approaches in analyzing NMR data have also been developed. These new methods in some instances can even highlight previously hidden conformational features of the biomolecules. In this review we describe several solution NMR methods to study protein dynamics and discuss their impact on important biological processes.

  15. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of a natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the help of Moessbauer spectroscopy, it was established that iron in natural zeolites occupies positions in the aluminosilicate structure in place of aluminium; the positions of iron are octahedricals, and the valency is 3+; it was shown too, that the zeolite is geometrically stable to acid treatment, notwithstanding the formation of vacancies during acid treatments. (author)

  16. Dynamic and structural studies of molecular or atomic systems through the generation of high order harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High harmonic generation is a well known phenomenon explained by a three step model: because of the high intensity field generated by an ultrashort laser pulse, an atom or a molecule can be tunnel ionized. The ejected electron is then accelerated by the intense electric field, and eventually can recombine on its parent ion, leading to the emission of a XUV photon. Because of the generating process in itself, this light source is a promising candidate to probe the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, with an atto-second/sub-nanometer potential resolution (1 as=10-18 s). In this work, we have studied the sensitivity of the emitted light (in terms of amplitude, but also phase and polarization) towards the electronic structure of the generating medium. We have first worked on atomic medium, then on molecules (N2, CO2, O2). Comparing the experimental results with numerical simulations shows the necessity to model finely the generation process and to go beyond commonly used approximations. We have also shown the possibility to perform high harmonic spectroscopy in order to measure dynamics of complex molecules, such as Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2). This technic has obtained complementary results compared to classical spectroscopy and has revealed dynamics of the electronic wave packet along a conical intersection. In this experiment, we have adapted conventional optical spectroscopy technic to the XUV spectral area, which significantly improved the signal over noise ratio. (author)

  17. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Huyse, M; Bergh, P Van den; Van Duppen, P

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d^{10}4s^{2}S_{1/2} \\rightarrow 3d^{10}4p^{2}P_{1/2} transit...

  18. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  19. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few {mu}W c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions.

  20. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few μW c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions

  1. Laser spectroscopy on atoms and ions using short-wavelength radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative properties and energy structures in atoms and ions have been investigated using UV/VUV radiation. In order to obtain radiation at short wavelengths, frequency mixing of pulsed laser radiation in crystals and gases has been performed using recently developed frequency-mixing schemes. To allow the study of radiative lifetimes shorter than the pulses from standard Q-switched lasers, different techniques have been used to obtain sufficiently short pulses. The Hanle effect has been employed following pulsed laser excitation for the same purpose. High-resolution spectroscopic techniques have been adapted for use with the broad-band, pulsed laser sources which are readily available in the UV/VUV spectral region. In order to investigate sources of radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray spectral regions, harmonic generation in rare gases has been studied. The generation of coherent radiation by the interaction between laser radiation and relativistic electrons in a synchrotron storage ring has also been investigated. 60 refs

  2. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources they expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3-10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research. Widespread applications of noble gas detectors are due to the fact that small numbers of the chemically inert atoms can be recovered from very large targets of materials where they may be generated by rare events. In this lecture they show how lasers can be combined with mass spectrometers to detect a few noble gas atoms of one isotope in the presence of very large numbers of atoms of a neighboring isotope. This technique (which they have called Maxwell's demon because of the atom-sorting functions performed in the apparatus) is described and then followed with a brief discussion of two applications in weak interaction physics - double-beta decay and the solar neutrino problem

  3. Atomic Collisions and Spectroscopy at the Heavy-Ion Storage Ring TSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The storage ring TSR is used to cool and accumulate a wide range of heavy-ion beams produced at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. With ionization stages reaching up to 50 (bare nuclei up to Cl17) and beam energies of typically 5-8 MeV/u, storage lifetimes amount to minutes up to hours; repeated cycles of injection and electron cooling (reducing the ion beam diameter Tom centimeters to millimeters in about 2 sec) make it possible to accumulate beam currents up to 1 mA in the ring. With the circulating beam, in particular the interaction of multicharged atomic ions with electrons of variable, well defined energies (10 MeV to 3 keV) is studied, detecting recombination and electron impact ionization. High-resolution spectra of the dielectronic recombination cross section have been obtained, which provide a sensitive test for atomic-structure calculations describing the large number of doubly excited states contributing to the recombination rate. For lithiumlike ions (Si11+, Cl14+) all possible outer- and inner-shell excitations were investigated[1]. Low-energy di- electronic recombination measurements are presently being extended[2] also to more complex open-L-shell ions (F11+-F23+). Very recently the enhancement of dielectronic recombination by ambient electric fields was studied with Cl14=; at well-controlled fields of order 100 V /cm the enhancement of the cross section by up to a factor of 3 in certain energy regions could be followed in detail[3] . In addition to the information on doubly excited levels from dielectronic recombination experiments, spectroscopic results on multicharged ions were also obtained by laser-stimulated recombination[4] , allowing highly excited levels in multicharged ions to be reached by laser transitions from continuum states populated by surrounding free electrons. Moreover, for a number of metastable levels in multicharged ions the natural lifetimes in the millisecond to second range could be

  4. Authentication of organically grown plants - advantages and limitations of atomic spectroscopy for multi-element and stable isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjørring, Jan Kofod; Kelly, S.D.;

    2014-01-01

    Organic food products are believed to be healthier, safer and more environment-friendly than their conventional counterparts and are sold at premium prices. Consequently, adulteration of organic plants and fraudulent activities for economic profit are increasing. This has spurred the development of...... sophisticated analytical procedures for testing authenticity. We review the use of multi-element and stable-isotope analysis based on atomic spectroscopy for discriminating between organic and conventional plants. We conclude that inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, stable-isotope analysis of bulk...

  5. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM

  6. Using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy method for investigating iron atom behaviour on the TO-2 tokamak plasma filament periphery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical prerequisites and methods for laser fluorescent spectroscopy (LFS) to measure heavy impurity concentration in a tokamak with TO-2 diverter are described with the purpose of organizing plasma diagnostics in the T-15 tokamak. Results of measuring iron atom absolute concentrations during discharge in the TO-2 tokamak near-the well area by LFS method are presented. Preliminary experiments on detecting channel absolute calibration by the fluorescent signal of a tube with a hollow cathode, pumped by probing laser radiation are conducted

  7. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  8. Evaluation of emery dust on the manufacture of abrasives by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is presented an evaluation on the degree of contamination by emery dust in a working area where abrasives are manufactured, in a factory located in the industrial area of Toluca City by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected on Whatman filters and attacked with hot concentrated HCl. The elements founded were: Al, Si, V, Mg, Br, Mn, Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ca and Pb. They are a risk for the health of the workers. (Author)

  9. Determination of Hg(II) as a pollutant in Karachi coastal waters by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now a days, environmental monitoring has great importance and mercury is well known for its toxicity. Mercury (which is at trace level) is analyzed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy with amendments that are appropriate to the present laboratory need. The results are consistent with previous analysis, through other methods, two areas namely Ibrahim Hyderi and Fisheries were found to have mercury levels around 0.193 mu/L and 0.110 mu g/L, respectively. Whereas other areas have mercury levels similar to other places reported earlier. (author)

  10. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    OpenAIRE

    Woutersen, S.; Milan,, M; Lange; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoele...

  11. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  12. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  13. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evaluation of adhesion and nanostructure of thin Cr films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium (Cr) thin films were deposited on float glass using electron beam (e-beam) physical vapor deposition and radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering techniques. Surface morphology of these Cr films was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The e-beam deposited Cr films consisted of isolated surface mounds while in RF sputtered samples, these mounds combined to form larger islands. Lower surface adhesive properties were observed for e-beam deposited films, as determined from AFM force–distance curves, presumably due to the nanostructural differences. Similar amounts of adsorbed atmospheric carbonaceous contaminants and water vapor were detected on samples deposited using both methods with e-beam deposited samples having additional carbide species, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data. The dominant crystallographic plane in both e-beam deposited and RF sputtered Cr thin films was (110) of body-centered cubic Cr metal structure as determined from X-ray diffraction data. Weak (211) reflection was also observed in RF sputtered samples and was attributed to a different thin Cr film condensation and growth mechanism which resulted in nanostructural differences between films deposited using two different methods. - Highlights: ► Cr thin films were deposited on glass using different vacuum deposition methods. ► Surface morphological, chemical, adhesive and structural properties were studied. ► The e-beam deposited Cr thin films consisted of isolated surface mounds. ► In RF magnetron sputtered samples, surface mounds combined to form larger islands. ► Variations in surface adhesive force were due to nanostructural differences.

  14. Atomic beam study of a superconductor's magnetic vortex lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an atomic beam technique for studying magnetic vortices and vortex lattices of superconductors. Atoms moving near a superconductor's surface see a fluctuating magnetic field as they pass vortices. This field may drive magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine states. Measuring the magnetic resonance transition probability as a function of atom velocity probes the vortex lattice autocorrelation function. We demonstrate this technique by studying the vortex lattice of a niobium film sample and measuring the sample's penetration depth. We also identify a systematic problem that we think thwarted an earlier attempt to experimentally realize this technique. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  16. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SIDDHARTA experiment successfully measured kaonic atom X-rays using four gas targets of hydrogen, deuterium, helium-3, and helium-4 at the DAΦNH electron-positron collider. Excellent performance of the SDDs under beam conditions was found in terms of X-ray energy resolution and a good background suppression capability. The preliminary results of the strong-interaction shifts of the kaonic atoms with Z = 1 and 2 are given.

  17. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  18. Measurement of Urinary Cadmium in Glazers Using Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Shahtaheri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Glazers are exposed to a variety of heavy metals in the ceramic industry, causing adverse effect on the body systems. Cadmium is one of the major raw materials for production of colored glazes. To evaluate occupational exposure to cadmium, spot urine samples were collected from 49 tile and pottery glazers in Yazd City in 2010 at the beginning and end of the work shift (98 samples. Totally, 55 office workers were also evaluated as control group. Samples were prepared using solid phase extraction followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. All the participants filled out a self administered questionnaire comprises questions about work shift, kind of job, use of mask, ventilation,work history, overtime work, age, weight, and height. The lung function tests were performed in a standing position according to the American Thoracic Society recommendation on both control andcadmium exposed individuals. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to evaluate the data. The mean values of cadmium levels before and after shift in study group was 3.88 and 10.85 μg/gcreatinine,respectively. The mean values of cadmium levels at the end of the work shift in the glazers urine samples was almost 3.53 times higher than the control group and 2.17 times higher than the ACGIHbiological exposure indices (5 μg/g creatinine. In addition the lung functions of glazers was significantly lower than the office workers (p<0.001. Exposure to cadmium in ceramic industry can lead to the reduction of respiratory capacity. Hygienic behaviors such as using protective mask and working in efficient ventilated workplaces can decrease the rate of occupational exposure to cadmium.

  19. Study of the reaction of carbon with atomic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the study of reactions of carbon when in contact with atomic oxygen in order to have a better understanding of the combustion mechanism. It appears that, at room temperature, oxygen atoms impacting the carbon surface do not all react with this surface (the reaction shock efficiency is very low). At temperatures higher than 200 C, all atoms which reach the surface react with it and the efficiency is much higher. The study of the reaction rate with respect to temperature allows three domains of reaction conditions to be distinguished according to the stability of formed surface oxides. The initial degassing of carbon results in a temporary excitation of the reaction rate, even with atomic oxygen. Whatever is the temperature, reaction is localised at the vicinity of the sample outer surface (this means that the regime is constantly diffusion). The BET surface of carbons does not vary with the reaction. As texture, the structure of the different carbons does not seem to have an influence on the reaction with atomic oxygen. Even though results are obtained in very different temperature ranges (600 C with O2, less than 200 C with atomic oxygen), there is an analogy between some phenomena noticed with atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen: surface oxides play a prevailing role

  20. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  1. Tunneling spectroscopy of a phosphorus impurity atom on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinov, S. V.; Oreshkin, A. I., E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.phys.msu.su, E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, S. I. [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation); Haesendonck, C. van [Laboratorium voor Stoffysica en Magnetisme (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    We numerically model the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface electronic properties in the vicinity of a P donor impurity atom located near the surface. We find a notable increase in the surface local density of states (LDOS) around the surface dopant near the bottom of the empty surface state band π*, which we call a split state due to its limited spatial extent and energetic position inside the band gap. We show that despite the well-established bulk donor impurity energy level position at the very bottom of the conduction band, a surface donor impurity on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface might produce an energy level below the Fermi energy, depending on the impurity atom local environment. It is demonstrated that the impurity located in subsurface atomic layers is visible in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiment on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface. The quasi-1D character of the impurity image, observed in STM experiments, is confirmed by our computer simulations with a note that a few π-bonded dimer rows may be affected by the presence of the impurity atom. We elaborate a model that allows classifying atoms on the experimental low-temperature STM image. We show the presence of spatial oscillations of the LDOS by the density-functional theory method.

  2. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  3. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Os-with a view to laser cooling of atomic anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerbauer, Alban; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    Atomic anions are generally not amenable to optical spectroscopy because they are loosely bound systems and rarely have bound excited states. Until recently, there was only one known negative ion with a strong bound-bound electronic transition, the osmium anion Os-. The electric-dipole transition between the 4Fe9/2 ground and 6DoJ excited state of this ion provides unique insight into the structure of atomic anions. In addition, it may enable the preparation of ultracold ensembles of negative ions. Laser excitation of the electric-dipole transition in Os- ions could be used to laser-cool them to microkelvin temperatures. If demonstrated to be successful, the technique would allow the cooling of any species of negatively charged ions - from subatomic particles to molecular anions - to ultracold temperatures by sympathetic cooling. We have been investigating the bound-bound electric-dipole transition in Os- by high-resolution laser spectroscopy with a view to using it for the first laser cooling of negative ions. The principle of the method, its potential applications, as well as experimental results are presented.

  4. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  5. Astronomical spectroscopy an introduction to the atomic and molecular physics of astronomical spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Nearly all the information we know about the Universe comes from thestudy of light as it reaches us. The understanding of this informationcontained in light requires both telescopes capable of resolving lightinto its different component colors, as well as detailed knowledge ofthe quantum mechanical behavior of atoms and molecules. This uniquebook, which is based on a third-year undergraduate course given by theauthor at University College London, presents the basic atomic andmolecular physics necessary to understand and interpret astronomicalspectra. It explains what information can be extract

  6. Interactions between osmium atoms dissolved in iron observed by the 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konieczny Robert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for binary iron-based solid solutions Fe1−xOsx, with x in the range 0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.05, were analyzed in terms of binding energy Eb between two Os atoms in the Fe-Os system. The extrapolated values of Eb for x = 0 were used for computation of enthalpy of solution of osmium in iron. The result was compared with that resulting from the cellular atomic model of alloys by Miedema. The comparison shows that our findings are in qualitative agreement with the Miedema's model predictions.

  7. Atomic cesium 6h states observed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Kubelík, Petr; Jelínek, Petr; Chernov, V. E.; Knyazev, M. Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 22 (2011), s. 225006. ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : cesium * FTIR spectroscopy * infrared emission spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.875, year: 2011

  8. Lattice dynamic studies from {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katada, Motomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Hachioji (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-03-01

    New complexes {l_brace}(Eu(napy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3})(Fe(CN){sub 6})4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}, bpy({l_brace}(Eu(bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4})(Fe(CN){sub 6})1.5bpy4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}) and ({l_brace}(Eu(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})(Fe(CN){sub 6})2phen{r_brace}{sub x}) etc were synthesized using phenanthroline and bipyridine. Lattice dynamic behaviors of Eu and Fe atom in the complexes were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. By {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectrum and parameters of new complexes, bpy complex showed the largest quadrupole splitting value, indicating bad symmetry of Eu ligand in the environment. Molecular structure of napy, bpy and phen complex were shown. These complexes are consisted of Eu atom coordinated with ligand and water molecule, of which (Fe(CN){sub 6}){sup 3-} ion formed one dimentional polymer chain and naphthyridines formed stacking structure. New complexes were observed by {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, too. The quadrupole splitting values were very different each other, indicating change of symmetry of Fe atom in the environment and three valence low spin state of Fe in the complex. (S.Y.)

  9. FIM AND ATOM-PROBE STUDY OF POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, T.; Y. Hasegawa; Nishi, T; T. Sakurai

    1987-01-01

    A field ion microscope makes it possible to observe the surface structures of metals and semiconductors at the atomic level and an atom-probe (FIM), which is a FIM with a mass spectrometer, has been widely used to study the chemical compositions of specimens. Some attempts were made previously to visualize polymers such as biological molecules. They are usually insulators and, thus, are difficult to be imaged by the FIM. Furthermore, molecules are known to decompose or desorb before a needed ...

  10. Present status for the determination of metallic impurities in nuclear fuels by atomic emission spectroscopy (review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status for the determination of metallic impurities in nuclear fuels by atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) is reviewed. In the first chapter of introduction, brief progress of the developments of AES is described. In the second chapter, emission spectrograph with direct current arc (DCA) or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is shown with the emphasis on the confinement of plutonium. In the third chapter, impurity elements and maximum concentration limits in various nuclear fuels and equivalent boron content factors are given on the base of ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standards in 1987. In the fourth chapter, examples of the analyses of nuclear fuels by DCA-AES and carrier distillation method, and the results of standard uranium oxide analysis conducted by 15 AEC-connected laboratories in U.S.A. are presented. In the fifth chapter, the determination of rare earth elements by DCA-AES after the chemical separation of U and Pu by solvent extraction, ion-exchange and so on. In the sixth and seventh chapters, the determination of U and Pu, and metallic impurities in U and Pu fuels by ICP-AES are described, respectively. In the eighth chapter, the determination of Am by ICP-AES is explained. In the ninth chapter, a comparison of the detection limits in aqueous solutions for various spectrometric techniques including recently developed laser-induced atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) and laser-enhaned ionization spectroscopy (LEI) are given. In the last chapter, experimental plan using DCA-AES and ICP-AES installed this time at Plutonium Fuel Research Laboratory of Oarai Research Establishment is introduced. (author)

  11. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  12. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  13. Electric focusing preconcentration device for element composition monitoring of air aerosols by atomic emission spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Mikuška, Pavel; Šikola, T.; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Zlámal, J.

    Hamburg : University of Hamburg, 2006 - (Broekaert, J.). B56 [ISEAC34. International Symposium on Environmental Analytical Chemistry /34./. 04.06.2006-08.06.2006, Hamburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310505 Keywords : electrostatic pre-concentration * airborne particles * atomic emission spectrometric detection Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  15. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  16. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  17. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  18. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 1011 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.)

  19. Emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy of matrix isolated chromium and molybdenum atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making use of a combination of time-resolved emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to assign virtually all spectral features with energies below the z7P0 state of matrix isolated Cr atoms. The a5S state located at 7593 cm-1 in the free gaseous Cr atom has lifetimes of 6.32 and 5.1 s in Ar and Kr matrices, respectively. Matrix perturbations on Cr emission lines are small (-1). The dependence of nonradiative decay rates on the local density of states is elucidated. The magnitude of matrix shifts for a particular transition is correlated with the electronic configurations of ground and excited states and it is pointed out that states having only ''s'' electrons in addition to ''d'' electrons maintain their gas phase energy relationships in the matrix environment. Direct fluorescence is observed from the z7P0 level of Mo to the 7s ground state. The spin-orbit splitting of the ''relaxed'' z7P0 state is 690 cm-1, slightly lower than the 707 cm-1 splitting of the free gaseous Mo atom

  20. Activities 2009-2011 at the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD USA centered in the last two years on two main subjects: First, the data center completed and issued a new, significantly improved version of its principal product, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD Version 4.0 in September 2010, with an update 4.1.0 in May 2011). These versions contain new data for a good number of additional spectra as well as new, better quality and more extensive data replacing the earlier material. They are also for the first time completely integrated with the two NIST bibliographies on atomic energy levels and spectra, and on atomic transition probabilities. The sources of the material selected in ASD for the various spectra and transitions are identified there by their numbers in the respective bibliographies, so that the original papers can be directly accessed by users if they desire more background material. Secondly, new tabulations of atomic energy levels and wavelengths were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H, D, T), for argon (Ar II through Ar XVIII), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), barium (Ba III through Ba LVI) and tungsten (W III through W LXXIV). Compilations of energy levels and spectral lines are in progress on neon (Ne IV), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII), and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII). Data assessments and compilations of atomic transition probabilities were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H,D,T), for helium(He I and He II), for lithium (Li I through Li III), beryllium (Be I through Be IV), boron (B I through B V), sulfur (S I through S XVI), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), and barium (Ba III through Ba LVI). Additional compilations for the higher fluorine and neon ions (F V through F IX, Ne VI through Ne X), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII) and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII) are in progress. As in all our earlier work, the NIST data tables are limited to reference data, i.e. data

  1. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-02-01

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry-Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny-Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  2. The atomic structure of Pt on Si(1 1 1) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two kinds of ordered reconstruction surface were prepared on Pt/Si(1 1 1) surface. • The atomic structures were observed and verified by STM. • Calculation results confirmed the bonding energy between Si and Pt atoms. - Abstract: Two kinds of ordered reconstruction surface (√3 × √3) R30° and (√7 × √7) R19.1°, are prepared by depositing different amounts of Pt on Si(1 1 1). The atomic structure and electronic properties are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then two models are built to explain the results. And the calculated results using density functional theory based first principle calculation show that the distance between Pt and Si atoms in (√7 × √7) R19.1° structure is smaller than that in (√3 × √3) R30° structure, which can increase the bonding energy between Pt and Si atoms

  3. Electron spectroscopy studies in heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoemission experiments (whereby an electron absorbs a packet of light energy and is able to escape from the host material due to its increased energy) can measure directly the energy distribution of electrons in various materials. Our measurements on a recently-discovered class of metallic materials called ''heavy fermions'' show that the electrons that actually carry the electric current in these metals exist only within an extremely narrow range of energies. This range, which we will call the bandwidth, is narrower than that found in ordinary metals like copper by at least a factor of 10. Indeed it is surprising that they can carry electric current at all since such narrow energy ranges (or band widths) are characteristic of electrons confined to their host atoms, as in a non-metal, rather than of electrons that are free to wander through a metal. 8 refs

  4. Atomic states and collisional relaxation in plasma polarization spectroscopy: axially symmetric case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ensemble of atoms (or ions) is described in terms of the density matrix, and two quantities, population and alignment, are assigned to each atomic level for axially symmetric plasma environment. Collisional relaxation is treated semiclassically as transitions between vectors in the Liouville space and interpreted as elastic or inelastic transitions among the population and the alignment of the levels. A spatially anisotropic velocity distribution of perturbers is expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, and rate coefficients are defined for the transitions. A set of rate equations are constructed for the system of populations and another set for that of alignments. In the case of an isotropic Maxwellian distribution of perturbers the former reduces to the conventional collisional-radiative model describing the ionizing plasma component of populations. As an example, berylliumlike oxygen in an anisotropic plasma environment is treated by this method. (author)

  5. Investigations of the atomic structure of amorphous ytterbium-alloys by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic-scale structures of the amorphous alloys Yb80X20 (X = Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, Bi) have been investigated with a 174Yb-Moessbauer source. The distribution of the quadrupole splitting parameters obtained from the analysis of the Moessbauer spectra was compared with the theoretical function for a charge distribution corresponding to dense random packing (DRP) of ions. The atomic structure deduced from the distribution of splitting parameters was consistent with the DRP-model in the amorphous alloys Yb80Cu20, Yb80Ag20, Yb80Au20, Yb80Pd20. In contrast the Moessbauer spectrum of the amorphous alloy Yb80Bi20 showed clear evidence of short range order. This is presumably due to the tendency of bismuth to form covalent bondings. (orig./GSCH)

  6. Fine-structure constant variability surprises for laboratory atomic spectroscopy and cosmological evolution of quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, J D

    2003-01-01

    Calculation of the Dirac hydrogen atom spectrum in the framework of dynamical fine structure constant (alpha) variability discloses a small departure in the laboratory from Sommerfeld's formula for the fine structure shifts, possibly measurable today. And for a distant object in the universe, the wavelength shift of a spectral line specifically ascribable to cosmological alpha variation is found to depend differently on the quantum numbers than in the conventional view. This last result clashes with the conventional wisdom that an atom's spectrum can change with cosmological time only through evolution of the alpha parameter in the energy eigenvalue formula, and thus impacts on the Webb group's analysis of fine structure intervals in quasar absorption lines (which has been claimed to disclose cosmological alpha evolution). In particular, analyzing together a mix of quasar absorption lines from different fine structure multiplets can bias estimates of cosmological alpha variability.

  7. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology -Development of atomic spectroscopy technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, three principal techniques are developed. The laser photoionization spectrometry (LAPIS) is used for the ultrasensitive detection for heavy metals such as Pb and Cd. The Laser atomic fluorescence spectrometry is applied to the quantitative analysis of the lanthanide and actinide elements. And the DIAL remote sensing system is used for monitoring the ozone concentration and the atmospheric pollution. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high efficient atomic beam generator were designed and manufactured. Various spectroscopic parameters and optimum analytical condition were investigated. By using the laser fluorescence technique, U, Eu and Sm in solution were quantitatively analyzed. The basic researches for the direct analytical method of solid samples were also carried out. The DIAL system for ozone remote sensing was developed and ozone concentration above Taejon were obtained. (Author)

  8. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  9. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Christian P; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S P

    2016-01-01

    The CDMS was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of molecular species which may be observed in various astronomical sources using radio astronomy. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxilary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Seperate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases...

  10. High-Resolution Photoassociation Spectroscopy of Ultracold Ytterbium Atoms by Using the Intercombination Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0-3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested

  11. High-resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium atoms by using the intercombination transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Enomoto, Katsunari; Kato, Yutaka; Takasu, Yosuke; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2006-04-21

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0 - 3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested. PMID:16712155

  12. Time-resolved electron spectroscopy of atomic inner-shell dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extremely fast evolution of core-hole relaxation was not yet observable directly in the time-domain. A novel technique combining core-hole creation with attosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses and electron wave-packet sampling with a pulsed laser-field provides the necessary experimental tools. As a benchmark, the exponential decay of 3d holes in atomic krypton was tracked yielding a decay constant of 8 fs

  13. Computer programs in BASIC language for atomic absorption flame spectroscopy. Part 1. Operating instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These instructions describe how to use three BASIC language programs to process data from atomic absorption spectrophotometers operated in the flame mode. These programs will also control an automatic sampler if desired. The instructions cover loading the programs, responding to computer prompts, choosing among various options for processing the data, operating the automatic sampler, and producing reports. How the programs differ is also explained. Examples of computer/operator dialogue are presented for typical cases

  14. Measurement of the Si atom density in RF silane plasma using absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative measurements of various radical species in silane plasma are indispensable for the clarification of the amorphous silicon thin film formation mechanism. Therefore is necessary also to measure the Si atom density as well as the SiH3, SiH2 and SiH radical densities. Although there are few reports about the Si atom density, the measurements were made only at the low silane concentrations of 1--9% in the SiH4/Ar gas mixture for the 3p23P2 ground level. In this work, the authors have measured the Si atom densities at two levels 3p23P2 and 3p21D2 in on-off modulated RF (13.56 MHz) SiH4/Ar plasma using an uv absorption method. The silane concentration was varied in the wide region of 5 to 100% to investigate the behaviors of the two Si densities in the gas mixture

  15. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of metal vapor atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing electron spectrometry in conjunction with tuneable synchrotron radiation, we will present a detailed examination of the photoionization dynamics of selected metal vapor atoms. In particular, this paper will focus on the relative partial cross sections of the atomic Li K-shell main and satellite (ionization with excitation) photoelectron lines in the region of the strong 1snln'l' autoionizing transitions, the atomic Sc 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the region of the 3p→3d giant resonance, and also the atomic Fe 3d, 4s main and satellite photoelectron lines in the same resonance region. Our experimental data for Sc and Fe will be compared to our state-of-the-art calculations based on the superposition of configuration method developed by Cowan (The Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectra. University of California Berkeley Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1981). Our partial cross section measurements for Li and Sc will be complemented with measurements of the angular distribution parameter, β. In addition, our Li data will also be compared with recent R-matrix calculations (Phys. Rev. 57 (1998) 1045). In the case of Fe, we will also address the term dependent behavior of the partial cross sections on resonance. These results will highlight what can be achieved with today's technology and point the way towards future endeavors in the study of the photoionization dynamics of open-shell metal vapor atoms

  17. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  18. ATOM PROBE STUDY OF TITANIUM BASE ALLOYS : PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Menand, A.; Chambreland, S.; Martin, C

    1986-01-01

    Two different titanium base alloys, Ti46 Al54 and Ti88.8 Cu2.3, Al8.9, have been studied by atom probe microanalysis. A precipitate of Ti2 Al was analysed in the binary alloys. Micro-analysis of Ti Cu Al alloy revealed the presence of Copper enriched zones. The study has also exhibited a penetration of Hydrogen in the samples, probably due to preparation technique. The results demonstrate the feasibility of studies on titanium base alloys by mean of atom probe.

  19. Study of Cold Potassium Atom - Calcium Ion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egodapitiya, Kisra; Gang, Shu; Clark, Robert; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    We report on our progress towards constructing a hybrid system for studying reactions between cold Potassium (K) atoms and cold Calcium (Ca+) ions. Ca+ ions will be trapped and Doppler-cooled inside a linear quadrupole ion trap. Cold K atoms will be created inside a magneto optical trap, such that the ion and the atoms are in an overlapping volume. Trapping and re-pumping beams for the Potassium MOT are derived from the same laser with wavelength 766 nm using two acousto optic modulators. The reaction products will be detected using a time-of- flight mass spectrometer that is designed to detect radially ejected ions. The main objective of this experiment is to study the rate coefficients, and identification of reaction channels between cold K atoms and Ca+ ions. Subsequently this setup will be used to study reactions between cold K atoms and sympathetically cooled molecular ions such as CaO+, and to study internal state quenching of molecular ions.

  20. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10-16 accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10-18.

  1. NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of hybrid organic ů inorganic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špírková, Milena; Brus, Jiří

    Nürnberg : International Centre for Coatings Technology, 2003, s. 312-324. ISBN 3-87870-145-4. - (1). [Nürnberg Congress: Creative Advances in Coatings Technology /7./. Nürnberg (DE), 07.04.2003-08.04.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0735; GA ČR GA203/98/P290; GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : coatings and films * sol-gel process * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  3. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNA-enzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Such a construct is typically subject to several criteria. First, single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques often require an RNA construct that is longer than the RNA molecules used for bulk bio...

  4. Studies of lipid oxidation in Salmon by Near infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Poon, Cheau Ling

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy which is a rapid and non-destructive method, can be used to determine primary and secondary lipid oxidation products in salmon oils. PV (peroxide value) and TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) were used as chemical measures of lipid oxidation. PV measures the degree of primary oxidation products, while TBARS measures the degree of secondary oxidation products formed from the oil. NIR spectroscopy with tra...

  5. Time-resolved study of microorganisms by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Hároniková, A.; Obruča, S.; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Mlynariková, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2015, 953703:1-5. ISBN 9781628417029. ISSN 1605-7422. [Clinical and Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging /4./. Munich (DE), 22.06.2015-24.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : raman spectroscopy * time-resolved study * red yeast * Cupriavidus necator H16 Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  6. A Review of MR Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, D.G.; Hellem, T.L.; Shi, X.-F.; Sung, Y.H.; Prescot, A.P.; Kim, T.S.; Huber, R.S.; Forrest, L.N.; Renshaw, P.F.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness whose pathophysiology is poorly understood and for which there is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and treatment. MR spectroscopy is a neuroimaging method capable of in vivo measurement of neurochemicals relevant to bipolar disorder neurobiology. MR spectroscopy studies of adult bipolar disorder provide consistent evidence for alterations in the glutamate system and mitochondrial function. In bipolar disorder, these 2 phenomena may be...

  7. Analysis of the injection layer of PTCDA in OLEDs using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ou Gu-Ping; Song Zhen; Wu You-Yu; Chen Xiao-Qiang; Zhang Fu-Jia

    2006-01-01

    Through the investigation of the sample surface and interface of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride(PTCDA)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films using atomic force microscopy, it has been found that the surface is complanate, the growth is uniform and the defects cover basically the surface of ITO. Furthermore, the number of pinholes is small. The analysis of the sample surface and interface further verifies this result by using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. At the same time, PTCDA is found to have the ability of restraining the diffusion of chemical constituents from ITO to the hole transport layer, which is beneficial to the improvement of the performance and the useful lifetime of the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  8. Some investigation on trace elements content of Iranian breads using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since bread is consumed as a principal dietary staple by the majority of Iranian communities, actual natural portion of required protein and energy are provided via bread. Therefore, with respect to this matter, a considerable amount of needed minerals must also be met through this way. Literature survey indicates some elemental deficiencies as the result of consumption of bread in Iran. On the other hand, essentiality of these elements to human which are mostly in the range of trace amounts, makes this investigation very much important and interesting from both sides, nutritionally and instrumentally. To meet the above requirements, applications of very sensitive analytical tools are unavoidable. Hence, atomic absorption spectroscopy and neutron activation analysis both RNAA and INAA are employed. Results are controversial and constructive

  9. Prospects for precision measurements of atomic helium using direct frequency comb spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyler, E.E.; Chieda, D.E. [Connecticut Univ., Physics Dept., Storrs, CT (United States); Stowe, M.C.; Thorpe, M.J.; Schibli, T.R.; Ye, J. [Colorado Univ., Dept. of Physics, JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We analyze several possibilities for precisely measuring electronic transitions in atomic helium by the direct use of phase-stabilized femtosecond frequency combs. Because the comb is self-calibrating and can be shifted into the ultraviolet spectral region via harmonic generation, it offers the prospect of greatly improved accuracy for UV and far-UV transitions. To take advantage of this accuracy an ultracold helium sample is needed. For measurements of the triplet spectrum a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be used to cool and trap metastable 2{sup 3}S state atoms. We analyze schemes for measuring the two-photon 2{sup 3}S {yields} 4{sup 3}S interval, and for resonant two-photon excitation to high Rydberg states, 2{sup 3}S {yields} 3{sup 3}P {yields} n{sup 3}S, D. We also analyze experiments on the singlet-state spectrum. To accomplish this we propose schemes for producing and trapping ultracold helium in the 1{sup 1}S or 2{sup 1}S state via intercombination transitions. A particularly intriguing scenario is the possibility of measuring the 1{sup 1}S {yields} 2{sup 1}S transition with extremely high accuracy by use of two-photon excitation in a magic wavelength trap that operates identically for both states. We predict a 'triple magic wavelength' at 412 nm that could facilitate numerous experiments on trapped helium atoms, because here the polarizabilities of the 1{sup 1}S, 2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S states are all similar, small, and positive. (authors)

  10. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  11. δ-electron spectroscopy and the atomic clock effect in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of strongly bound electrons in superheavy quasimolecular systems with combined nuclear charge numbers Z = ZP + ZT ≥ 110 are investigated. The emission of δ-electrons may serve as an atomic clock for nuclear reactions which is associated with the large overlap of the electron probability density with the nuclear interior. Excitation and emission rates of inner-shell electrons in collisions of very heavy ions with beam energies at or above the nuclear Coulomb barrier depend explicitly on details of the nuclear dynamics. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed. (orig.)

  12. Precision Spectroscopy of Kaonic Helium-3 Atoms X-rays at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iio, M.; Bhang, H.; Cargnelli, M.; Choi, Seonho; Curceanu, C.; Doce, O. V.; Enomoto, S.; Fujioka, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Guaraldo, C.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hiraiwa, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Ishiwatari, T.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kou, H.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Noumi, H.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Sakuma, F.; Sato, M.; Sekimoto, M.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, T.; Tanida, K.; Tatsuno, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tomono, D.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Vidal, A. R.; Widmann, E.; Wunschek, B.; Yamazaki, T.; Zmeskal, J.

    2010-04-01

    We will measure the Balmer-series x-rays of kaonic-3He atoms using large-area high-resolution silicon drift x-rays detectors in order to provide the crucial information of K--nucleus strong interaction at the low energy limit. The strong interaction 2p level shift will be determined with a precision of a few eV. At the present status, the construction of all detectors is in progress. In February, 2009, the first tuning of K1.8BR beamline was performed by the secondary beam generated in J-PARC hadron facility. The data taking will be started soon.

  13. Prospects for precision measurements of atomic helium using direct frequency comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eyler, E E; Stowe, Matthew C; Thorpe, Michael J; Schibli, T R; Ye, Jun

    2007-01-01

    We analyze several possibilities for precisely measuring electronic transitions in atomic helium by the direct use of phase-stabilized femtosecond frequency combs. Because the comb is self-calibrating and can be shifted into the ultraviolet spectral region via harmonic generation, it offers the prospect of greatly improved accuracy for UV and far-UV transitions. To take advantage of this accuracy an ultracold helium sample is needed. For measurements of the triplet spectrum a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be used to cool and trap metastable $2 ^3S$ state atoms. We analyze schemes for measuring the two-photon $2 ^3S \\to 4 ^3S$ interval, and for resonant two-photon excitation to high Rydberg states, $2 ^3S \\to 3 ^3P \\to n^3S,D$. We also analyze experiments on the singlet-state spectrum. To accomplish this we propose schemes for producing and trapping ultracold helium in the $1 ^1S$ or $2 ^1S$ state via intercombination transition. A particularly intriguing scenario is the possibility of direct singlet state sp...

  14. Local surrounding of vanadium atoms in CuCr1 - x V x S2: X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Yu. O.; Smolentsev, N. Yu.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Glatzel, P.; Korotaev, E. V.; Soldatov, A. V.; Mazalov, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    In the present work local surrounding of vanadium atoms in layered copper-chromium disulfides CuCr1 - x V x S2 is investigated using high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy above vanadium K-edge. Based on experimental and theoretically simulated spectra comparison it is shown that vanadium atoms replace chromium ones even at high concentrations of vanadium and that they are in 3+ oxidation state.

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  16. Energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms: A time-resolved fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Schroeder, W.; Kolb, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    The fluorescence from optically excited Ag atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices has been investigated in a time-resolved synchrotron-radiation study. A detailed energy dissipation model could be established from a systematic analysis of rise and decay times of all the observed fluorescence bands after pulsed excitation into the Ag (4d105p)2P1/2,3/2 levels, and by setting time windows between the excitation pulses in emission and emission-yield spectroscopy. Although the overall wavelength dependence of the decay time follows the λ3 law, the decay time is independent of λ within a given emission band. Finally, the role of energy transfer between Ag atoms and dimers for the evaluation of decay times is briefly addressed.

  17. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Lange

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements. When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111 √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  18. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred; van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force-distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  19. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Health Study formally began in April 1980. The purpose of the study is to determine the causes of death among a population of radiation workers and to compare this information with data available for the causes of death in the general population. The study population and the implementation are briefly discussed. The aim of the study is to determine the real occupational risk of being a radiation worker. 3 refs

  20. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.