WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic spectroscopy study

  1. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  3. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  4. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  5. Spectroscopy and Photochemistry of Europium atoms in low temperature solids - an experimental and theoretical study

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Owen

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental and theoretical study of the luminescence, reactivity and ionisation of atomic europium isolated in cryogenic thin films of rare gases argon, krypton and xenon. Many studies are available concerning the spectroscopy of matrix-isolated main group metal atoms, however, the lanthanide series remains relatively undocumented. A thorough investigation of matrix-isolated europium is performed in this thesis in an effort to develop the spectroscopy ...

  6. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  8. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  9. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  10. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  11. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  12. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  13. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  14. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  15. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  16. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  17. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  18. Light-induced changes in an alkali metal atomic vapor cell coating studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, A. M.; Bernasek, S. L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Seltzer, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Balabas, M. V. [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Morse, M. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Budker, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-07

    The light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from a paraffin coating is studied with depth-profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using tunable synchrotron radiation. Following Rb exposure, shifts of the C1s signal to higher binding energies, as well as the appearance of lower binding energy components in the O1s region, were observed. These effects were diminished after irradiation with desorbing light. Additionally, following desorbing-light irradiation, changes in the depth-dependent concentration of carbon were observed. These observations offer an insight into the microscopic changes that occur during light-induced atomic desorption and demonstrate the utility of XPS in understanding atom-coating interactions.

  19. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  20. Bioavailability study of calcium sandoz-250 by atomic absorption spectroscopy in albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Bimalkumar N.; Krishnaveni, N.; Jivani, Nurrrudin P.; Khodakiya, Akruti S.; Khodakiya, Moorti S.; Parida, Saswat K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium sandoz-250 is an Ayurvedic calcium supplement, containing Khatika Churna. Bioavailability study of the formulation is essential for estimation of peak plasma concentration (C max), time to C max and rate of absorption. Aim: To evaluate the absorption parameters of calcium sandoz-250 in albino rats by atomic absorption spectroscopic (AAS) method. Materials and Methods: Study was carried out as a single dose, open-label, randomized study. Estimation of calcium was carried ou...

  1. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  2. Atomic scale study of ball milled Ni-Fe2O3 using Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ravi Kumar; Govindaraj, R.; Vinod, K.; Kumar, P. A. Manoj; Amarendra, G.

    2016-05-01

    Evolution of hyperfine fields at Fe atoms has been studied in a detailed manner in a mixture of Ni and α-Fe2O3 subjected to high energy ball milling using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Mossbauer results indicate the dispersion of α-Fe2O3 particles in Ni matrix in the as ball milled condition. Evolution of α-Fe2O3 due to ball milling, reduction of the valence of associated Fe and possible interaction between the oxide particles with Ni in the matrix due to annealing treatments has been elucidated in the present study.

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  4. Interactions between solute atoms in Fe-Si-Al-C alloys as studied by mechanical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinning, H.-R., E-mail: hr.sinning@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Golovin, I.S. [Physics of Metals Department, Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics of Metals and Materials Science Department, Tula State University, Tula (Russian Federation); Strahl, A. [Institut fuer Fachdidaktik der Naturwissenschaften, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Sokolova, O.A. [Physics of Metals and Materials Science Department, Tula State University, Tula (Russian Federation); Sazonova, T. [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    In Fe-Si-Al-C alloys, point-defect relaxation includes both the interstitial carbon Snoek-type relaxation, split into a 'pure iron' (Fe-C-Fe) Snoek peak and an 'interstitial-substitutional' (Fe-C-Me; Me = Al, Si) peak, and the substitutional Zener relaxation. The influence of Al and Si, with varying Al/Si ratio, on these effects is used to study the qualitative characteristics of substitutional-interstitial (Si-C, Al-C) and substitutional-substitutional (Al-Al, Si-Si, Al-Si) interactions in these alloys. Concerning the latter, there is a mutual compensation of the elastic distortion fields, produced in the Fe matrix by the relatively bigger Al and smaller Si atoms, respectively, which largely suppresses the Zener relaxation in the ternary Fe-Si-Al alloys, probably without affecting the elastic dipole strength of interstitial carbon. From the kinetic behavior of the two components of the Snoek-type relaxation, it is concluded that the substitutional-interstitial interaction is generally attractive and sufficient for modifying the distribution of the C atoms, but not for trapping to become dominant.

  5. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de Sissi; Ende, van den Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat su

  6. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunklev, M

    1999-03-01

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  7. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  8. The spectroscopy in the atomic vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Hyung; Chang, Joon Sung; Jhe, Won Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    As spectroscopies in the atomic vapor, we perform experiments on fluorescence in dense atomic vapor, single color two-photon resonant three photon ionization, production of high temperature oven and its spectroscopic application, atomic trap and cold atomic beam. We observe lengthening of lifetime as atomic density increase and compare this result with Holstein equation. Dependence on pressure an d polarization reveals the result is due to collisions between Yb atom and Ar buffer gas. At high atomic density, self-focusing and conical emission are observed. In two-photon resonant three photon ionization scheme, ionization rate is dependent on polarization. From selection rule, we determined the energy level. At higher energy, asymmetry and broadening of ionization linewidth due to AC Stark effect are observed. As the result of numerical simulation of time evolution in the two-photon transition, distortion of time evolution of density is obtained. For spectroscopy of high-melting-point elements, we design and produce high temperature oven. We observe absorption spectra of high-melting-point elements, Er and Sm. As high temperature nonlinear spectroscopies, we perform conical emission and self-diffraction in Sm vapor. We produce magneto-optical trap system and measure fluorescence from trapped atoms and temperature. By trapping Rb isotopes simultaneously, we perform collision experiment at low temperature. Using hollow mirror system, we trap atoms and produce cold atomic beam. (author). 160 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  10. Adsorption, X-ray Diffraction, Photoelectron, and Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Benchmark Studies for the Eighth Industrial Fluid Properties Simulation Challenge*+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Richard B.; Aeschliman, David B.; Ahmad, Riaz; Brennan, John K.; Brostrom, Myles L.; Frankel, Kevin A.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Moore, Joshua D.; Mountain, Raymond D.; Poirier, Derrick M.; Thommes, Matthias; Shen, Vincent K.; Schultz, Nathan E.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the eighth industrial fluid properties simulation challenge was to test the ability of molecular simulation methods to predict the adsorption of organic adsorbates in activated carbon materials. The challenge focused on the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon standard BAM-P109 (Panne and Thünemann 2010). Entrants were challenged to predict the adsorption of perfluorohexane in the activated carbon at a temperature of 273 K and at relative pressures of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6. The relative pressure (P/Po) is defined as that relative to the bulk saturation pressure predicted by the fluid model at a given temperature (273 K in this case). The predictions were judged by comparison to a set of experimentally determined values, which are published here for the first time and were not disclosed to the entrants prior to the challenge. Benchmark experimental studies, described herein, were also carried out and provided to entrants in order to aid in the development of new force fields and simulation methods to be employed in the challenge. These studies included argon, carbon dioxide, and water adsorption in the BAM-P109 activated carbon as well as X-ray diffraction, X-ray microtomography, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic emission spectroscopy studies of BAM-P109. Several concurrent studies were carried out for the BAM-P108 activated carbon (Panne and Thünemann 2010). These are included in the current manuscript for comparison. PMID:27840543

  11. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Santini, Simona; Coppari, Emilia; Bucciantini, Monica; Di Agostino, Silvia; Yamada, Tohru; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.

  12. Comparative Study of Cl-Atom Reactions in Solution Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2016-04-28

    A Cl atom can react with 2,3-dimethylbutane (DMB), 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (DMBE), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexadiene (DMHD) in solution via a hydrogen-abstraction reaction. The large exoergicity of the reaction between a Cl atom and alkenes (DMBE and DMHD) makes vibrational excitation of the HCl product possible, and we observe the formation of vibrationally excited HCl (v = 1) for both reactions. In CCl4, the branching fractions of HCl (v = 1), Γ (v = 1), for the Cl-atom reactions with DMBE and DMHD are 0.14 and 0.23, respectively, reflecting an increased amount of vibrational excitation in the products of the more exoergic reaction. In addition, Γ (v = 1) for both reactions is larger in the solvent CDCl3, being 0.23 and 0.40, as the less viscous solvent apparently dampens the vibrational excitation of the nascent HCl less effectively. The bimolecular reaction rates for the Cl reactions with DMB, DMBE, and DMHD in CCl4 are diffusion limited (having rate constants of 1.5 × 10(10), 3.6 × 10(10), and 17.5 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). In fact, the bimolecular reaction rate for Cl + DMHD exceeds a typical diffusion-limited reaction rate, implying that the attractive intermolecular forces between a Cl atom and a C═C bond increase the rate of favorable encounters. The 2-fold increase in the reaction rate of the Cl + DMBE reaction from that of the Cl + DMB reaction likely reflects the effect of the C═C bond, while both the number of C═C bonds and the molecular geometry likely play a role in the large reaction rate of the Cl + DMHD reaction.

  13. Role of trimer-trimer interaction of bacteriorhodopsin studied by optical spectroscopy and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hayato; Inoue, Keiichi; Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Jun; Kandori, Hideki; Ando, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) trimers form a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. However, the physiological significance of forming the lattice has long been elusive. Here, we study this issue by comparing properties of assembled and non-assembled bR trimers using directed mutagenesis, high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), optical spectroscopy, and a proton pumping assay. First, we show that the bonds formed between W12 and F135 amino acid residues are responsible for trimer-trimer association that leads to lattice assembly; the lattice is completely disrupted in both W12I and F135I mutants. HS-AFM imaging reveals that both crystallized D96N and non-crystallized D96N/W12I mutants undergo a large conformational change (i.e., outward E-F loop displacement) upon light-activation. However, lattice disruption significantly reduces the rate of conformational change under continuous light illumination. Nevertheless, the quantum yield of M-state formation, measured by low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy, and proton pumping efficiency are unaffected by lattice disruption. From these results, we conclude that trimer-trimer association plays essential roles in providing bound retinal with an appropriate environment to maintain its full photo-reactivity and in maintaining the natural photo-reaction pathway.

  14. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  15. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  16. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  17. Influence on electron energy loss spectroscopy of the niobium-substituted uranium atom: A density functional theory study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We present the electronic structure and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for uranium, niobium and U3Nb in which uranium is substituted by niobium. Comparing the electronic structures and optical properties for uranium, niobium and U3Nb, we found that when niobium atom replaces uranium atom in the center lattice, density of state (DOS) of U3Nb shifts downward to low energy. Niobium affects DOS forfand d electrons more than that for p and s electrons. U3Nb is similar to uranium for the electronic energy loss spectra.

  18. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Frine [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Benzo, Zully [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Quintal, Manuelita [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Garaboto, Angel [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Albornoz, Alberto [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Brito, Joaquin L. [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: joabrito@ivic.ve

    2006-10-15

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 2+}) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO{sub 3}. Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 5+}) and carbide (Mo{sup 2+}) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar{sup +} ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform.

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.G.

    1979-07-01

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target.

  1. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizzarri AR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Rita Bizzarri1, Simona Santini1, Emilia Coppari1, Monica Bucciantini2, Silvia Di Agostino3, Tohru Yamada4, Craig W Beattie4, Salvatore Cannistraro11Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, CNISM, Facoltà di Scienze, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, 2Department of Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 3Molecular Oncogenesis Laboratory, Experimental Oncology Department, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.Keywords: AFS, cancer physics, unbinding forces

  2. Various applications of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.

    1978-06-01

    The application of the Zeeman effect to atomic absorption spectroscopy has been studied over the past several years. This technique has a larger area of application than conventional AAS because of its high degree of selectivity. The ZAA technique can be used for organometallic species determination by interfacing with a high-pressure liquid chromatograph. Various kinds of eluents can be directly introduced in the ZAA system; even organic solvents or high-concentration salt solutions. For example, the Co atom in the functional center of Vitamin B12 molecule was separately analyzed in the presence of much larger amounts of inorganic Co. In the ZAA technique, interference caused by direct spectral overlap can also be corrected. As a typical example, the Sb line at 217.02 nm overlaps the Pb absorption line at 217.00 nm. However, 1000 ppM of Pb did not cause any interference signal in the Sb analysis by ZAA. This is especially important in the analysis of gun powder residue that is often carried out by chemists working in the forensic field. In the determination of trace elements in matrices of unknown composition, the ZAA technique achieved highly reliable results by employing the standard addition method to correct for chemical interferences, because any nonspecific absorption or emission does not give rise to interference signals with this technique.

  3. Antiprotonic atom formation and spectroscopy-ASACUSA experiment at CERN-AD

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    1999-01-01

    This talk describes the experiments on atomic spectroscopy and atomic collisions as proposed by the ASACUSA collaboration for the forthcoming AD facility at CERN. They consist of high-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms, the study of anti-protonic atom formation processes, and stopping power and ionization measurements in low-pressure gases. (18 refs).

  4. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  5. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  6. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  8. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  9. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of fibrin 'A-a' polymerization interactions via the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Laurel E.

    Fibrin, the polymerized form of the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen, plays a critical role in hemostasis as the structural scaffold of blood clots. The primary functions of fibrin are to withstand the shear forces of blood flow and provide mechanical stability to the clot, protecting the wound. While studies have investigated the mechanical properties of fibrin constructs, the response to force of critical polymerization interactions such as the 'A--a' knob--hole interaction remains unclear. Herein, the response of the 'A--a' bond to force was examined at the single-molecule level using the atomic force microscope. Force spectroscopy methodology was developed to examine the 'A--a' interaction while reducing the incidence of both nonspecific and multiple molecule interactions. The rupture of this interaction resulted in a previously unreported characteristic force profile comprised of up to four events. We hypothesized that the first event represented reorientation of the fibrinogen molecule, the second and third represented unfolding of structures in the D region of fibrinogen, and the last event was the rupture of the 'A--a' bond weakened by prior structural unfolding. The configuration, molecular extension, and kinetic parameters of each event in the characteristic pattern were examined to compare the unfolding of fibrin to other proteins unfolded by force. Fitting the pattern with polymer models showed that the D region of fibrinogen could lengthen by ˜50% of the length of a fibrin monomer before rupture of the 'A--a' bond. Analysis showed that the second and third events had kinetic parameters similar to other protein structures unfolded by force. Studies of the dependence of the characteristic pattern on calcium, concentration of sodium chloride, pH, and temperature demonstrated that the incidence of the last event was affected by solution conditions. However, only low pH and high temperatures reduced the probability that an interaction was characteristic

  10. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  11. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  12. Principles and calibration of collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Toivonen, Juha

    2014-06-01

    The kinetics of signal formation in collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) are discussed, and theoretical equations describing the relation between the concentration of the target molecule and the detected atomic absorption in case of pure and impure samples are derived. The validity of the equation for pure samples is studied experimentally by comparing measured target molecule concentrations to concentrations determined using two other independent techniques. Our study shows that CPFAAS is capable of measuring target molecule concentrations from parts per billion (ppb) to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) in microsecond timescale. Moreover, the possibility to extend the dynamic range to cover eight orders of magnitude with a proper selection of fragmentation light source is discussed. The maximum deviation between the CPFAAS technique and a reference measurement technique is found to be less than 5 %. In this study, potassium chloride vapor and atomic potassium are used as a target molecule and a probed atom, respectively.

  13. Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourshaw, Ivan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-07-09

    The diatomic halogen atom-rare gas diatomic complexes KrBr-, XeBr-, and KrCl- are studied in this work by zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy in order to characterize the weak intermolecular diatomic potentials of these species. Also, the ZEKE and threshold photodetachment spectra of the polyatomic clusters ArnBr- (n = 2-9) and ArnI- (n = 2-19) are studied to obtain information about the non-additive effects on the interactions among the atoms. This work is part of an ongoing effort to characterize the pair and many-body potentials of the complete series of rare gas halide clusters. In these studies we obtain information about both the anionic and neutral clusters.

  14. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  15. Study of some Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants for the essential trace elemental contents by instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokhande, R.S.; Singare, P.U.; Andhele, M.L. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Mumbai, Santacruz, Mumbai (India); Acharya, R.; Nair, A.G.C.; Reddy, A.V.R. [Radiochemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2009-07-01

    Elemental analysis of some medicinal plants used in the Indian Ayurvedic system was performed by employing instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques. The samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor and the induced activity was counted by gamma ray spectrometry using an efficiency calibrated high resolution high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Most of the medicinal plants were found to be rich in one or more of the elements under study. The variation in elemental concentration in same medicinal plants samples collected in summer, winter and rainy seasons was studied and the biological effects of these elements on human beings are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Study of apical oxygen atoms in a spin-ladder cuprate compound by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near the Cu K edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatterer, C.J.; Eustache, B.; Collin, L.; Beuran, C.F.; Partiot, C.; Germain, P.; Xu, X.Z.; Lagues, M. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs; Michalowicz, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France)]|[LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Moscovici, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Deville Cavellin, C. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs]|[Laboratoire d`Electronique, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 av. du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Traverse, A. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-04-01

    The structure of high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate compounds is based on CuO{sub 2} planes alternating with blocks that behave as charge reservoirs. The apical oxygen atoms which belong to these reservoirs are suspected to play a role in the mechanism of superconductivity. It thus seems necessary to measure the amount of apical oxygen atoms in various compounds, as a function of the superconducting properties. Polarisation dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were performed near the Cu K-edge on three types of phases. We collected information about the neighbourhood of the copper atom in the cuprate planes and in the direction perpendicular to these planes. Two of these phases have well known structures: Bi2212 in which copper atoms are on a pyramidal site and infinite layer phase, a square planar cuprate without apical oxygen. We used the obtained results as reference data to study a new copper-rich phase related to the spin-ladder series. (orig.)

  17. Precision spectroscopy of pionic atoms and chiral symmetry in nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itahashi Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We conduct an experimental project to make spectroscopy of deeply bound pionic atoms systematically over wide range of nuclei. We aim at studying the strong interaction in the low energy region, which has close connection to spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and its partial restoration in nuclear matter. First experimental results show improved spectral resolution and much better statistical sensitivity than previous experiments. Present status of the experiment is reported.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy study of initial stages of oxidation in a copper - 19.6-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine the initial stages of oxidation of a polycrystalline copper - 19.6 a/o-aluminum alloy. The growth of the 55-eV aluminum oxide peak and the decay of the 59-, 62-, and 937-eV copper peaks were examined as functions of temperature, exposure, and pressure. Pressures ranged from 1x10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0005 torr of O2. Temperatures ranged from room temperature to 700 C. A completely aluminum oxide surface layer was obtained in all cases. Complete disappearance of the underlying 937-eV copper peak was obtained by heating at 700 C in O2 at 0.0005 torr for 1 hr. Temperature studies indicated that thermally activated diffusion was important to the oxidation studies. The initial stages of oxidation followed a logarithmic growth curve.

  19. Introducing many-body physics using atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Dietrich; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Atoms constitute relatively simple many-body systems, making them suitable objects for developing an understanding of basic aspects of many-body physics. Photoabsorption spectroscopy is a prominent method to study the electronic structure of atoms and the inherent many-body interactions. In this article the impact of many-body effects on well-known spectroscopic features such as Rydberg series, Fano resonances, Cooper minima, and giant resonances is studied, and related many-body phenomena in other fields are outlined. To calculate photoabsorption cross sections the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) model is employed. The conceptual clearness of TDCIS in combination with the compactness of atomic systems allows for a pedagogical introduction to many-body phenomena.

  20. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  1. [Digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Rui-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Min; Narenhua

    2008-01-01

    A microwave digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) method was developed for the determination of metal elements Na, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg in Mongolian patents. The instrument parameters for the determination were optimized, and the appropriate digestion solvent was selected. The recovery of the method was between 95.8% and 104.3%, and the RSD was between 1.6% and 4.2%. The accuracy and precision of the method was tested by comparing the values obtained from the determination of the standard sample, bush twigs and leaves (GSV-1) by this method with the reference values of GSV-1. The determination results were found to be basically consistent with the reference values. The microwave digestion technique was applied to process the samples, and the experimental results showed that compared to the traditional wet method, the present method has the merits of simplicity, saving agents, rapidness, and non-polluting. The method was accurate and reliable, and could be used to determine the contents of seven kinds of metal elements in mongolian patents.

  2. All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulationsand NMR Spectroscopy Study on Interactions and Structures in N-Glycylglycine Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Zhang; Wen-juan Wu; Jing-man Huang; Xin Meng

    2011-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and the NMR spectra are used to investigate the interactions in N-glycylglycine aqueous solution.Different types of atoms exhibit different capability in forming hydrogen bonds by the radial distribution function analysis.Some typical dominant aggregates are found in different types of hydrogen bonds by the statistical hydrogen-bonding network.Moreover,temperature-dependent NMR are used to compare with the results of the MD simulations.The chemical shifts of the three hydrogen atoms all decrease with the temperature increasing which reveals that the hydrogen bonds are dominant in the glycylglycine aqueous solution.And the NMR results show agreement with the MD simulations.All-atom MD simulations and NMR spectra are successful in revealing the structures and interactions in the N-glycylglycine-water mixtures.

  3. Sensitive spectroscopy of an ytterbium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Guttridge, A; Kemp, S L; Boddy, D; Freytag, R; Tarbutt, M R; Hinds, E A; Cornish, S L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of ultracold ytterbium atoms generally involve the frequency stabilisation (locking) of lasers to two transitions at 399 and 556 nm in order to implement laser cooling. Here we present a simple and robust apparatus for generation of suitable, narrow fluorescence signals with a high signal to noise ratio at both wavelengths. The design utilises easily acquired vacuum parts, optics and electronics and requires very little laser power. We demonstrate the stability and precision of the frequency stabilisation at 556 nm by presenting sensitive measurements of the gravitational sag of an ytterbium MOT as a function of laser power.

  4. Influences of the propyl group on the van der Waals structures of 4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms studied by electronic and cationic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhijun [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Gu, Quanli [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Trindle, Carl O., E-mail: cot@virginia.edu [Chemistry Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Knee, J. L., E-mail: jknee@wesleyan.edu [Chemistry Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms formed in the molecular beam were studied in the first excited electronic state, S{sub 1}, using resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy and in the cation ground state, D{sub 0}, using mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The combination of electronic and cationic spectra of the clusters allows two conformations to be identified in both aniline-Ar{sub 1} and aniline-Ar{sub 2}, which are assigned to either the gauche configuration or anti-configuration of 4-propylaniline. The gauche isomer exhibits complex bands shifted 29 cm{sup −1} and 89 cm{sup −1} from the S{sub 1} origin bands and 83 cm{sup −1} and 148 cm{sup −1} from the ionization potential assigned to the Ar{sub 1} and Ar{sub 2} complexes, respectively. For the anti-rotamer, the corresponding shifts actually become nearly additive, 53 cm{sup −1} and 109 cm{sup −1} for the S{sub 1} origin bands, and 61 cm{sup −1} and 125 cm{sup −1} for the ionization potentials. Ab initio calculations provide insights into the influences of the propyl and amino groups on the positions of the argon atoms within the clusters. In addition, the binding energy of one argon with the gauche isomer of 4-propylaniline has been measured to be 550 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the D{sub 0} state, 496 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 1} state, and 467 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the neutral ground state, S{sub 0}.

  5. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  6. Dopant Diffusion and Activation in Silicon Nanowires Fabricated by ex Situ Doping: A Correlative Study via Atom-Probe Tomography and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Hazut, Ori; Huang, Bo-Chao; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Chang, Chia-Seng; Yerushalmi, Roie; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Seidman, David N

    2016-07-13

    Dopants play a critical role in modulating the electric properties of semiconducting materials, ranging from bulk to nanoscale semiconductors, nanowires, and quantum dots. The application of traditional doping methods developed for bulk materials involves additional considerations for nanoscale semiconductors because of the influence of surfaces and stochastic fluctuations, which may become significant at the nanometer-scale level. Monolayer doping is an ex situ doping method that permits the post growth doping of nanowires. Herein, using atom-probe tomography (APT) with subnanometer spatial resolution and atomic-ppm detection limit, we study the distributions of boron and phosphorus in ex situ doped silicon nanowires with accurate control. A highly phosphorus doped outer region and a uniformly boron doped interior are observed, which are not predicted by criteria based on bulk silicon. These phenomena are explained by fast interfacial diffusion of phosphorus and enhanced bulk diffusion of boron, respectively. The APT results are compared with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, which yields information concerning the electrically active dopants. Overall, comparing the information obtained by the two methods permits us to evaluate the diffusivities of each different dopant type at the nanowire oxide, interface, and core regions. The combined data sets permit us to evaluate the electrical activation and compensation of the dopants in different regions of the nanowires and understand the details that lead to the sharp p-i-n junctions formed across the nanowire for the ex situ doping process.

  7. Impedance spectroscopy study of the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching states of atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaenen, Irina; Shkabko, Andrey; Aslam, Nabeel; Meuffels, Paul; Waser, Rainer; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne [Peter Gr, ue, nberg Institut and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt Strasse, 52425, Juelich (Germany); Heikkilae, Mikko; Vehkamaeki, Marko; Niinistoe, Jaakko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelae, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P. O. Box 55, Helsinki, 00014 (Finland)

    2015-04-01

    The polarity of the resistive switching (RS) characteristic of metal-oxide-metal devices from atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} films was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy. Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/Ti/Pt cells made with 10 nm Ti and 30 nm Pt capping top electrodes, served as unipolar switching (US) devices. Bipolar switching (BS) devices were represented by Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/30 nm TiN cells. Temperature measurements of the ON-state resistances clearly show metallic and semiconducting behavior for the US and BS cells, respectively. The pristine and the ON and OFF states of the devices were analyzed by means of impedance spectroscopy. All ZrO{sub 2} based RS devices exhibited similar impedance characteristics in the pristine states. In contrast, after electroforming clear differences in the Nyquist-plots of the US and BS devices were observed. The effect of the device structure on the RS polarity is discussed under consideration of the pillar-shaped grainy microstructure of the ZrO{sub 2} thin films. An empirical model based on redox reactions between ZrO{sub 2} and the non-noble metal electrode is proposed emphasizing defect formation prior at the ZrO{sub 2} grain boundaries. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  9. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  10. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  11. Design of a WWW database server for Atomic Spectroscopy Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contis, A.

    1995-12-01

    The department of Atomic Spectroscopy at Lund Univ produces large amounts of experimental data on energy levels and emissions for atomic systems. In order to make this data easily available to users outside the institution, a database has been produced and made available on the Internet. This report describes the organization of the data and the Internet interface of the data base. 4 refs.

  12. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  13. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  14. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  15. Signals for Lorentz and CPT Violation in Atomic Spectroscopy Experiments and Other Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas, Arnaldo J

    2016-01-01

    The prospects of studying nonminimal operators for Lorentz violation using spectroscopy experiments with light atoms and muon spin-precession experiments are presented. Possible improvements on bounds on minimal and nonminimal operators for Lorentz violation are discussed.

  16. Neutrino Spectroscopy with Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fukumi, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanjo, Hajime; Ohae, Chiaki; Sasao, Noboru; Tanaka, Minoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Uetake, Satoshi; Wakabayashi, Tomonari; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    We give a comprehensive account of our proposed experimental method of using atoms or molecules in order to measure parameters of neutrinos still undetermined; the absolute mass scale, the mass hierarchy pattern (normal or inverted), the neutrino mass type (Majorana or Dirac), and the CP violating phases including Majorana phases. There are advantages of atomic targets, due to the closeness of available atomic energies to anticipated neutrino masses, over nuclear target experiments. Disadvantage of using atomic targets, the smallness of rates, is overcome by the macro-coherent amplification mechanism. The atomic or molecular process we use is a cooperative deexcitation of a collective body of atoms in a metastable level |e> emitting a neutrino pair and a photon; |e> -> |g> + gamma + nu_i nu_j where nu_i's are neutrino mass eigenstates. The macro-coherence is developed by trigger laser irradiation. We discuss aspects of the macro-coherence development by setting up the master equation for the target quantum st...

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  18. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  19. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  20. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  1. On-line laser spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    CERN Document Server

    Thibault, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Duong, H T; Guimbal, P; Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pesnelle, A; Pillet, P; Pinard, J; Serre, J M; Touchard, F; Vialle, J L

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a CW tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. /sup 76-98/Rb, /sup 118-145 /Cs and /sup 208-213/Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while /sup 30-31/Na and /sup 38-47/K have been studied by setting the apparatus directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. The hyperfine structure, spins and isotope shifts of the alkali isotopes and isomers are measured. (8 refs).

  2. A compact atomic beam based system for Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of Strontium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Gunjan; Vishwakarma, Chetan; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Rapol, Umakant D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the construction of a simple, light weight and compact atomic beam spectroscopy cell for Strontium atoms. The cell is built using glass blowing technique and includes a simple Titanium Sublimation Pump for active pumping of the residual and background gases to maintain ultra-high vacuum. Commercially available and electrically heated dispenser source is used to generate the beam of Sr atoms. We perform spectroscopy on the $5s^2\\ ^1S_0\\longrightarrow 5s\\ 5p\\ ^1P_1$ transition to obta...

  3. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  4. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  5. Local atomic structure investigation of AlFeCuCrMgx (0.5, 1, 1.7) high entropy alloys: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, Ornov; Patra, N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-02-01

    The present paper reports local atomic structure investigation of novel AlFeCuCrMgx (x=0.5, 1, 1.7) high entropy alloys (HEAs) produced by mechanical alloying using Fe, Cr and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. XANES spectra measured at Fe and Cr K-edges resemble that of the respective pure metal foils, while the spectrum measured at Cu K-edge manifests the presence of some other phases in the as-milled alloys. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) obtained from Fourier transformation of EXAFS spectra support the formation of disordered BCC structure.

  6. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  7. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Chenli Gan

    2005-01-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atomfield interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L <λ/4) in experiments.

  8. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  9. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  10. [Burner head with high sensitivity in atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Yang, Y

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents a burner head with gas-sample separate entrance and double access, which is used for atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to comparison and detection, the device can improve sensitivity by a factor of 1 to 5. In the meantime it has properties of high stability and resistance to interference.

  11. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfas, C.A., E-mail: kalfas@inp.demokritos.gr [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Axiotis, M. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Tsabaris, C. [Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Institute of Oceanography, 46.7 Km Athens-Sounio Ave, P.O. Box 712, Anavyssos 19013 (Greece)

    2016-09-11

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  12. Application of dynamic impedance spectroscopy to atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Darowicki, Artur Zieliński and Krzysztof J Kurzydłowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a universal imaging technique, while impedance spectroscopy is a fundamental method of determining the electrical properties of materials. It is useful to combine those techniques to obtain the spatial distribution of an impedance vector. This paper proposes a new combining approach utilizing multifrequency scanning and simultaneous AFM scanning of an investigated surface.

  13. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  14. Interaction of human plasma fibrinogen with commercially pure titanium as studied with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keere, Isabel Van De; Willaert, Ronnie; Hubin, Annick; Vereecken, Jean

    2008-03-04

    The surface of a biomaterial interacts with the body fluid upon implantation in the human body. The biocompatibility of a material is strongly influenced by the adsorption of proteins onto the surface. Titanium is frequently used as a biomaterial for implants in orthopedics and cardiovascular devices. Understanding the biocompatibility is very important to improve implants. The surface chemistry of an implant material and its influence on the interaction with body fluid is crucial in that perspective. The main goal of this study was to investigate the conformation of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) adsorbed on commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) on a molecular level by means of ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). With X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with argon ion beam depth profiling, it was shown that the oxide layer present at the surface was mainly composed of TiO2, with a small percentage of Ti2O3. Ex situ AFM imaging showed the conformation of HPF on CP Ti. Single molecules and aggregates of fibrinogen were observed. The trinodular structure of single HPF molecules (two spherical D domains at the distal ends of the extended molecule and the central spherical E domain) adsorbed onto CP Ti was visualized. Aggregate formation through the connection of the D domains of the HPF molecules was observed on CP Ti. The alphaC domains of HPF were not visible on CP Ti. The ex situ AFM images indicated conformational changes of HPF upon adsorption onto CP Ti. The conformation of the adsorbed HPF molecules was different on mica and titanium. The difference in wettability between both substrates caused a larger spread of the protein on the CP Ti surface and thus resulted in a larger perturbation to the native structure of HPF as compared to mica.

  15. Sub-Doppler two-photon-excitation Rydberg spectroscopy of atomic xenon: mass-selective studies of isotopic and hyperfine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Mitsuhiko; He, Yabai; Baldwin, Kenneth G. H.; Orr, Brian J.

    2016-03-01

    Mass-selective sub-Doppler two-photon excitation (TPE) spectroscopy is employed to resolve isotopic contributions for transitions to high-energy Rydberg levels of xenon in an atomic beam, using narrowband pulses of coherent ultraviolet light at 205-213 nm generated by nonlinear-optical conversion processes. Previous research (Kono et al 2013 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 46 35401), has determined isotope energy shifts and hyperfine structure for 33 high-energy Rydberg levels of gas-phase xenon and accessed Rydberg levels at TPE energies in the range of 94 100-97 300 cm-1 with unprecedented spectroscopic resolution. The new isotopic-mass-resolved results were obtained by adding a pulsed free-jet atomic-beam source and a mass-selective time-of-flight detector to the apparatus in order to discern individual xenon isotopes and extract previously unresolved spectroscopic information. Resulting isotope energy shifts and hyperfine-coupling parameters are examined with regard to trends in principal quantum number n and in atomic angular-momentum quantum numbers, together with empirical and theoretical precedents for such trends.

  16. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  17. Geometries of H2S⋯MI (M = Cu, Ag, Au) complexes studied by rotational spectroscopy: The effect of the metal atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medcraft, Chris; Bittner, Dror M.; Tew, David P.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-11-01

    Complexes formed between H2S and each of CuI, AgI, and AuI have been isolated and structurally characterised in the gas phase. The H2S⋯ MI complexes (where M is the metal atom) are generated through laser vaporisation of a metal rod in the presence of a low concentration of H2S and CF3I in a buffer gas of argon undergoing supersonic expansion. The microwave spectra of six isotopologues of each of H2S⋯ CuI , H2S⋯ AgI and three isotopologues of H2S⋯ AuI have been measured by chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The spectra are interpreted to determine geometries for the complexes and to establish the values of structural parameters. The complexes have Cs symmetry at equilibrium and have a pyramidal configuration about the sulfur atom. The local C2 axis of the hydrogen sulfide molecule intersects the linear axis defined by the three heavy atoms at an angle, ϕ = 75.00(47)° for M = Cu, ϕ = 78.43(76)° for M = Ag, and ϕ = 71.587(13)° for M = Au. The trend in the molecular geometries is consistent with significant relativistic effects in the gold-containing complex. The force constant describing the interaction between the H2S and MI sub-units is determined from the measured centrifugal distortion constant, ΔJ, of each complex. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, χa a(M) and χa a(I) (where M denotes the metal atom), are determined for H2S⋯ CuI and H2S⋯ AuI for the first time.

  18. Development of narrowband lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We review some lasers developed by the ASACUSA collaboration of CERN, to carry out spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. These lasers were based on the technique of continuous-wave injection seeding of pulsed lasers. The laser output covered the wavelength regions 264–1154 nm, with peak powers of ~ 1 MW and spectral resolutions of 6–40 MHz. The devices were recently used to measure the transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium atoms to a fractional precision of several parts in ~ 109.

  19. [Measurement of trace elements in blood serum by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogul'skiĭ, Iu V; Danil'chenko, S N; Lushpa, A P; Sukhodub, L F

    1997-09-01

    Describes a method for measuring trace elements Cr, Mn, Co, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo in the blood serum using non-flame atomization (KAC 120.1 complex). Optimal conditions for preparing the samples were defined, temperature regimens for analysis of each element selected, and original software permitting automated assays created. The method permits analysis making use of the minimal samples: 0.1 ml per 10 parallel measurements, which is 100 times less than needed for atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomization of liquid samples. Metrological characteristics of the method are assessed.

  20. Metallomics – The Future of Atomic Spectroscopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-02-01

    Metallomics is defined as the study of metals and metal species, and their interactions, transformations, and functions in biological systems. The full complement of metals and metal moieties (free and bound) is accordingly known as the metallome. The terms are relatively new ones, first coined by R.J.P. Williams of Oxford University and Hiroki Haraguchi of Nagoya University early in the present millennium. Metallomics is a new moniker for the field of bioinorganic chemistry, extending and broadening that discipline much as genomics has done for genetics, and is appositely harmonious with other ''ohmics'' terms like genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Metallomics is also distinguished from other terms (e.g. speciation) by consideration of the global role of all metals/metalloids in a system.

  1. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)], E-mail: Sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of {approx}5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  2. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  3. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Li; XU Xin-Ye

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp.The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition.

  4. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications.

  5. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  6. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  7. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  8. Study of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ponciano-Ojeda, Francisco; López-Hernández, Oscar; Mojica-Casique, Cristian; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ramírez-Martínez, Fernando; Flores-Mijangos, Jesús; Sahagún, Daniel; Jáuregui, Rocío; Jiménez-Mier, José

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room temperature rubidium cell with continuous wave extended cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the non-dipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5p3/2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6p3/2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (~ 13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F - 1, F and F + 1 splitting of the 6p3/2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5s -> 5p3/2 preparation dynamics, the...

  9. Quantitative analysis of immobilized metalloenzymes by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opwis, Klaus; Knittel, Dierk; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    2004-12-01

    A new, sensitive assay for the quantitative determination of immobilized metal containing enzymes has been developed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). In contrast with conventionally used indirect methods the described quantitative AAS assay for metalloenzymes allows more exact analyses, because the carrier material with the enzyme is investigated directly. As an example, the validity and reliability of the method was examined by fixing the iron-containing enzyme catalase on cotton fabrics using different immobilization techniques. Sample preparation was carried out by dissolving the loaded fabrics in sulfuric acid before oxidising the residues with hydrogen peroxide. The iron concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after calibration of the spectrometer with solutions of the free enzyme at different concentrations.

  10. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  11. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium.

  12. Laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence spectroscopy: a facile technique for molecular spectroscopy of spin-forbidden states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang; Keil, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Spectra of spin-forbidden and spin-allowed transitions in the mixed b (3)Pi(u) approximately A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state of Na(2) are measured separately by two-photon excitation using a single tunable dye laser. The two-photon excitation produces Na(*)(3p) by photodissociation, which is easily and sensitively detected by atomic fluorescence. At low laser power, only the A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state is excited, completely free of triplet excitation. At high laser power, photodissociation via the intermediate b (3)Pi(u) triplet state becomes much more likely, effectively "switching" the observations from singlet spectroscopy to triplet spectroscopy with only minor apparatus changes. This technique of perturbation-assisted laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence may therefore be especially useful as a general vehicle for investigating perturbation-related physics pertinent to the spin-forbidden states, as well as for studying allowed and forbidden states of other molecules.

  13. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B Vol. 86 (2010) No. 1 P 1-10 Language: Next Article http://dx.doi.org/10.2183/pjab.86.1 JST.JSTAGE/pjab/86.1 Reviews Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants Ryugo S. HAYANO1) 1) Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo Released 2010/01/14 Keywords: antiproton, CERN, fundamental physical constants, laser spectroscopy Full Text PDF [1604K] Abstracts References(25) Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended val...

  14. Antimony quantification in Leishmania by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W L; Rainey, P M

    1993-05-15

    Tri- and pentavalent antimony were quantified in Leishmania mexicana pifanoi amastigotes and promastigotes by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization. Leishmania grown in axenic culture were treated with either potassium antimony tartrate [Sb(III)] or sodium stibogluconate [Sb(V)]. The parasites were collected, digested with nitric acid, and subjected to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was linear from 0 to 7 ng of antimony. The interassay coefficients of variation were 9.6 and 5.7% (N = 5) for 0.52 and 3.7-ng samples of leishmanial antimony, respectively. The limit of detection was 95 pg of antimony. The assay was used to characterize Sb(III) and Sb(V) influx and efflux kinetics. Influx rates were determined at antimony concentrations that produced a 50% inhibition of growth (IC50). The influx rates of Sb(V) into amastigotes and promastigotes were 4.8 and 12 pg/million cells/h, respectively, at 200 micrograms antimony/ml. The influx rate of Sb(III) into amastigotes was 41 pg/million cells/h at 20 micrograms antimony/ml. Influx of Sb(III) into promastigotes at 1 microgram antimony/ml was rapid and reached a plateau of 175 pg/million cells in 2 h. Efflux of Sb(III) and Sb(V) from amastigotes and promastigotes exhibited biphasic kinetics. The initial (alpha) half-life of Sb(V) efflux was less than 4 min and that of Sb(III) was 1-2 h. The apparent terminal (beta) half-lives ranged from 7 to 14 h.

  15. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  16. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  17. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  18. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin Cu{sub 2}O and subsequent reduction to Cu studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Dileep [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Assim, Khaybar; Lang, Heinrich [Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Bruener, Philipp; Grehl, Thomas [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstr. 15, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Georgi, Colin; Waechtler, Thomas; Ecke, Ramona; Schulz, Stefan E., E-mail: stefan.schulz@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de; Gessner, Thomas [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz, Germany and Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems—ENAS, Technologie-Campus 3, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The growth of ultrathin (<5 nm) Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films deposited on SiO{sub 2} by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and Cu films by subsequent reduction of the Cu{sub 2}O using HCO{sub 2}H or CO is reported. Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O has been deposited by a mixture of 16: 99 mol. % of [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] as Cu precursor and 17: 1 mol. % of [Ru(η{sup 5}-C{sub 7}H{sub 11})(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3})] as Ru precursor. The catalytic amount of Ru precursor was to support low temperature reduction of Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by formic acid (HCO{sub 2}H) on arbitrary substrate. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film indicated nearly 1 at. % of carbon contamination and a phosphorous contamination below the detection limit after sputter cleaning. Systematic investigations of the reduction of Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by HCO{sub 2}H or CO as reducing agents are described. Following the ALD of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O, the ultrathin films are reduced between 100 and 160 °C. The use of HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C enabled the reduction of around 90% Cu{sub 2}O. HCO{sub 2}H is found to be very effective in the removal of oxygen from Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films with 2.5–4.7 nm thickness. In contrast, CO was effective for the removal of oxygen from the Cu{sub 2}O films only below 3.0 nm at 145 °C. Root mean square surface roughness of 0.4 ± 0.1 nm was observed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations after the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O, followed by the subsequent reduction of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O using either HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C or CO at 145 °C on SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, ex situ low energy ion scattering and AFM investigations confirmed that the Cu{sub 2}O film after ALD and Cu films after subsequent reduction was continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  19. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  20. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  1. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge, E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Chambers, Scott A. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  2. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  3. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Eloy, Aurélien; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-10-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly be used to investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. This conversion is studied here in detail. We show that, while experimental intensity noise spectra collapse onto the same curve at low Fourier frequencies, some differences appear at higher frequencies when the probe beam is detuned from the center of the resonance line. A simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features. Using this model, the noise spectra allow extracting some quantitative information on the laser noise as well as on the atomic sample.

  4. Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Niering, M

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the present thesis the internal structure of the hydrogen atom is studied by means of optical spectroscopic methods. The main interest is thereby devoted to the transition of the 1S ground-state into the metastable 2S-state.

  5. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  6. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  7. Determination of Aluminum Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetry and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-11-30

    this was also high. 5 . ,Irj ~ - • lri*; llo. TALLE 2 ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DETEPIJINATION OF ALUMINU1 CONCENTRATIO11 OF SEAWATER OCEAN...Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetr-y and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Charles A. Greene, Jr. and Everett N. Jones Ocean Science Department T14

  8. Determination of copper, zinc and iron in broncho-alveolar lavages by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlyk, C; Mccourt, J; Bordin, G; Rodriguez, A R; van der Eeckhout, A

    1997-11-01

    Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Fe were measured in 157 broncho-alveolar lavages (BAL), before and after centrifugation, collected at the Leuven University Hospital (Belgium). Zn was measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy, using direct calibration, while Cu and Fe were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy, using the method of standard additions. For Fe only 56 samples were measured. Most of the studied elements are present in the liquid phase (supernatant). About 90% of Cu concentrations lie between 0 and 15 micrograms/kg, while 90% of Zn concentrations are lower than 230 micrograms/kg, with 30% between 30 and 70 micrograms/kg, and 50% between 100 and 200 micrograms/kg. There seems to be a reverse relationship between Cu and Zn levels with high Cu going along with low Zn and vice versa.

  9. [Constant scaled-energy spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in a static electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun-wen; Liu, Xiao-jun; Zhao, Zhi; Zhan, Ming-sheng

    2002-02-01

    In the past years, scaled energy spectroscopy is under active investigation because this method can simplify the analysis of atomic spectra in the external field based on classic mechanics. A fully computer-controlled experimental system to study the constant scaled-energy spectroscopy was established and described in this paper. The excitation energy E and the strength of the external electric field F were controlled synchronously to keep the scaled-energy epsilon = E/square root of F constant. With this system, constant scaled-energy spectra of Strontium Rydberg atoms at epsilon = -3.0 in a static electric field were successfully recorded for the first time, and the recurrence spectra were obtained by a Fourier transform.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of interfaces for spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.infm.it; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Georgieva, M.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM CNR-INFM (Italy); Goikhman, A.; Barantsev, N.; Lebedinskii, Yu.; Zenkevich, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    The submonolayer sensitivity and element-specificity of conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, combined with the use of {sup 57}Fe enriched tracer layers, enable to carefully investigate thin films and interfaces at the atomic-scale. This paper reports on the main achievements we obtained so far in the study of structural, chemical, and magnetic properties of a variety of interfaces between oxides and Fe-based films having potential interest in the field of spintronics.

  11. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1998-01-01

    The basic research on the control of atoms using the coherent interaction, such as the development of the generator of the thermal atomic beam with high directionality, the photodeflection of atomic beam and the coherent excitation of atoms, has been performed. Yb atomic beam with small divergence was generated and the deflection mechanism of the atomic beam was studied by using a broad band dye laser and a narrow band laser. It has been proved that the single mode dye laser with narrow bandwidth was suitable for deflection of atoms but the frequency locking system was indispensable. And the apparatus for intermodulated optogalvanic (IMOG) experiment was developed and the high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy was studied for laser frequency stabilization. (author). 74 refs., 1 tab., 26 figs

  12. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  13. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  14. Intimate relationship between spectroscopy and collisions: a scenario to calculate relevant atomic data for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Han, Xiao-Ying; Li, Jia-Ming

    2016-11-01

    An extended atomic data base with sufficiently high precision in energy levels and transition/collision rates is required for satellite observation in astrophysics studies and energy development research in inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion. We summarize in this paper a scenario for performing calculations leading to such large-scale atomic data with high precision based on the analytical continuation properties of the scattering matrices, connecting spectroscopy and collisions. Based on the scenario, we calculate directly the scattering matrices with spectroscopic accuracy, i.e. the accurate multi-channel quantum defect theory parameters in both bound and continuum energy regions based on the recently developed eigenchannel R-matrix approach. Applications of the related atomic processes are presented to demonstrate the advantages enjoyed by this approach, which is hoped to meet the requirements in the stages of precision physics for astrophysics and energy research.

  15. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  16. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  17. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  18. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  19. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  20. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; R Behera; A K Das

    2012-04-01

    The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as the external DC magnetic field is changed. The technical difficulty of tuning laser frequency under locked condition over a large frequency span is discussed along with possible solutions.

  1. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  2. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  3. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization.

  4. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential.

  5. Multiparametric characterisation of metal-chalcogen atomic multilayer assembly by potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragoisha, G.A.; Bondarenko, A.S.; Osipovich, N.P.; Rabchynski, S.M.; Streltsov, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    An approach to multiparametric characterisation of variable electroactive interfaces based on potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PDEIS) [G.A. Ragoisha, A.S. Bondarenko, Electrochim. Acta 50 (2005) 1553] has been extended to atomic multilayer assembly monitoring. The multilayers

  6. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  7. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McAlexander, W.I.; Abraham, E.R.I.; Ritchie, N.W.M.; Williams, C.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Hulet, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σg+ state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σg+ state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the molec

  8. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  9. Two-Pulse Atomic Coherent Control (2PACC) Spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal Reactions. An Application of an Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, S F; Jorgensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC employs the coherent properties of matter-waves from a two pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters.

  10. Rotational spectra of N$_2^+$: An advanced undergraduate laboratory in atomic and molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B; Arndt, P T

    2015-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive instructional experiment that demonstrates the rotational energy levels of diatomic nitrogen, using the emission band spectrum of molecular nitrogen ionized by various processes in a commercial AC capillary discharge tube. The simple setup and analytical procedure is introduced as part of a sequence of educational experiments employed by a course of advanced atomic and molecular spectroscopy, where the study of rotational spectra is combined with the analysis of vibrational characteristics for a multifaceted picture of the quantum states of diatomic molecules.

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  12. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  13. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yuechun; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (RF) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the RF field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed RF-induced phenomena progresses from AC level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous RF-modulation sidebands to complex state-mixing and level-crossings with high-l hydrogen-like states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the RF field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg-EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based and calibration-free technique to measure and map RF electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms – new results and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, J. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Dep. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O.Box 3055, Victoria B.C. Canada V8W3P6 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, P.O. box MG-6, R76900 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); D' Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sez. di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita I-00161, Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    The antikaon interaction on nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is neither simple nor well understood. Rather direct access to this field is provided by x-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium isotopes. A series of precision measurements on kaonic atoms was performed very successfully by the SIDDHARTA Collaboration at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy). Consequently, new precision data on the strong interaction observables (i.e. energy shift and broadening of low-lying atomic states) were delivered having an important impact on the theory of low-energy QCD with strangeness. Presently, the follow-up experiment, SIDDHARTA-2, is in preparation, aiming at a determination of the strong interaction observables in kaonic deuterium as the highest priority; other type of measurements (light and heavier kaonic atoms) are as well foreseen. With the kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-resolved scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the progress and present status of experimental studies and an outlook to future perspectives in this fascinating research field is given.

  15. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  16. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  17. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  18. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. We show that a simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features of this conversion observed in the experimental intensity noise spectrum.

  19. Observation and optimization of 4He atomic polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Gong, Wei; Zhan, Yuanzhi; Lin, Zaisheng; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2013-03-15

    Polarization spectroscopy in (4)He around 1083 nm is observed and optimized with a distributed feedback fiber laser and is applied for frequency stabilization. In order to improve the accuracy and long-term stability of the frequency-locking performance, a power stabilization module is added, and the dependences of the peak-to-peak amplitude and frequency difference (width) of the polarization spectroscopy signal on various pump and probe powers are investigated.

  20. Investigation of the atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules in CF4 plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiliang; Li, Jie; Tang, Caixue; Deng, Wenhui; Chen, Xianhua

    2016-10-01

    The surface chemistry reaction involved in the processing of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) produced from CF4 precursor has been explored. The atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules was investigated as they contribute to substrate etching and FC film formation during APPJ processing. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) spectra were acquired for CF4 plasma, relative concentrations of excited state species of F atoms and CF2 molecules were also dependent upon plasma parameters. The densities of F atoms increased dramatically with increasing applied RF power, whereas CF2 molecules decreased monotonically over the same power range, the subsequent electron impacted decomposition of plasma species after CF4 precursor fragmentation. The spectrum of the F atoms and CF2 molecules fallowed the same tendency with the increasing concentration of gas CF4, reaching the maximum at the 20sccm and 15sccm respectively, and then the emission intensity of reactive atoms decreased with more CF4 molecules participating. Addition certain amount O2 into CF4 plasma resulted in promoting CF4 dissociation, O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF2 molecules, which inhibit the compound of the F atoms, so with the increasing concentration of O2, the concentration of the CF2 molecules decreased and the emission intensities of F atoms showed the maximum at the O2/CF4 ratio of 20%. These results have led to the development of a scheme that illustrates the mechanisms of surface chemistry reaction and the affection of plasma parameters in CF4 plasma systems with respect to F and CF2 gas-phase species.

  1. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  2. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies.

  3. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  4. Investigation of hydrogen atom addition to vinyl monomers by time resolved ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K.

    1983-07-01

    By means of time resolved ESR spectroscopy in the microsecond time scale the H atom addition to different vinyl monomers was investigated. The H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions show a strong recombination CIDEP effect which also allows the recombination rate constant of H atoms to be determined. By analysis of ESR time profiles with the modified Bloch equations the relaxation times T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, the polarization factors and the chemical rate constants with scavengers were obtained. Besides the H atom addition rate constants to different vinyl monomers the structure of the monomer radical was determined for acrylic acid.

  5. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of the Atomic Structure of Zirconium-Doped Lithium Silicate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics, Zirconium-Doped Lithium Borate Glasses, and Vitreous Rare-Earth Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Changhyeon

    In the first part of this work, the atomic-scale structure around rare-earth (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, and Er) cations (RE3+) in rare-earth sodium ultraphosphate (REUP) glasses were investigated using RE LIII -edge (RE = Nd, Er, Dy, and Eu) and K-edge (RE = Pr and Dy) Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. (RE2O 3)x(Na2O)y(P2O5) 1-x-y glasses in the compositional range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.14 and 0.3 ≤ x + y ≤ 0.4 were studied. For the nearest oxygen shell, the RE-oxygen (RE-O) coordination number decreases from 10.8 to 6.5 with increasing RE content for Pr-, Nd-, Dy-, and Er-doped sodium ultraphosphate glasses. For Eu-doped samples, the Eu-O coordination number was between 7.5 and 8.8. Also, the RE-O mean distance ranges were between 2.43-2.45 A, 2.40-2.43 A, 2.36-2.38 A, 2.30-2.35 A, and 2.28-2.30 A for Pr-, Nd-, Eu-, Dy-, and Er-doped samples, respectively. In the second part, a series of Zr-doped (3-10 mol%) lithium silicate (ZRLS) glass-ceramics and their parent glasses and a series of Zr-doped (2-6 mol% ZrO2) lithium borate (ZRLB) glasses were investigated using Zr K-edge EXAFS and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Immediate coordination environments of all ZRLS glasses are remarkably similar for different compositions. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number ranges were between 6.1 and 6.3 for nucleated and crystallized samples, respectively. Also, the Zr-O mean distance remains similar around 2.10 A. For these glasses, the composition dependence of structural parameters was small. Small changes in the coordination environment were observed for ZRLS glass-ceramics after thermal treatments. In contrast, Zr coordination environment in ZRLB glasses appear to depend appreciably on the Zr concentration. For the nearest oxygen shell, the Zr-O coordination number increased from 6.1 to 6.8 and the Zr-O distance decreased from 2.18 A to 2.14 A with decreasing ZrO2 content.

  6. Double-resonance spectroscopy in Rubidium vapour-cells for high performance and miniature atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Mileti, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report our studies on using microwave-optical double-resonance (DR) spectroscopy for a high-performance Rb vapour-cell atomic clock in view of future industrial applications. The clock physics package is very compact with a total volume of only 0.8 dm3. It contains a recently in-house developed magnetron-type cavity and a Rb vapour cell. A homed-made frequency-stabilized laser system with an integrated acousto-optical-modulator (AOM) – for switching and controlling the light output power– is used as an optical source in a laser head (LH). The LH has the overall volume of 2.5 dm3 including the laser diode, optical elements, AOM and electronics. In our Rb atomic clock two schemes of continuous-wave DR and Ramsey-DR schemes are used, where the latter one strongly reduces the light-shift effect by separation of the interaction of light and microwave. Applications of the DR clock approach to more radically miniaturized atomic clocks are discussed.

  7. Precision Spectroscopy of Kaonic Atoms at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scordo A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The SIDDHARTA experiment aims at a precise measurement of K -series kaonic hydrogen x-rays and the first-ever measurement of the kaonic deuterium x-rays to determine the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the lowest lying atomic states. These measurements offer a unique possibility to precisely determine the isospin-dependent $ar{K}$-nucleon scattering lengths.

  8. Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Effects of Nitrates and Sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    oxide by graphite followed by sublimation of the metal. Frech and Cedergren investigated high temperature equilibria in graphite furnace atomizers. 1 4...Acta, 72, 49 (1974). 13. R.E. Sturgeon, C.L. Chakrabarti, and C.H. Langford, Anal. Chem., 48, 1792 (1976). 14. W. Frech and A. Cedergren , Anal. Chim...Acta, 82, 83 (1976). 15. W. Frech, Anal. Chim. Acta, 77, 43 (1975). 16. W. Frech and A. Cedergren , Anal. Chim. Acta, 88, 57 (1977). CHAPTER III

  9. The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of Sized Airborne Particulate in Dayton, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    PERIOD COVERED " AneT Appication of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy ’ and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of THESIS/DISSERTATION 4 Sized...1978 U I HEREBY REC04MEND THAT THE THESIS PREPARED ’NDER MY SUPERVISION BY Lorelei Ann Krebs ENTITLED The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and...acid and diluted with distilled water in a 25 milliliter volumetric flask. Atomic absorption . spectroscopy was used to analyze the solutions for

  10. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  11. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  12. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  13. Stiffness, resilience, compressibility. Atomic scale force spectroscopy of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2016-12-01

    The flexibility of a protein is an important component of its functionality. We use nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to quantify the flexibility of the heme iron environment in the electron-carrying protein cytochrome c by measuring the stiffness and the resilience. These quantities are sensitive to structural differences between the active sites of different proteins, as illustrated by a comparative analysis with myoglobin. The elasticity of the entire protein, on the other hand, can be probed quantitatively from NRVS and high energy-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) measurements, an approach that we used to extract the bulk modulus of cytochrome c.

  14. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  15. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  16. Determination of palladium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy without matrix matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X; Wang, T; Wu, J

    2001-05-30

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of the palladium (Pd) content in bulk pharmaceutical drug substances and their intermediates prepared in aqueous solutions is extended to samples prepared in acetonitrile (ACN) and ACN-water mixtures as well to samples prepared in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO-water mixtures. The Pd content in samples solubilized in these solvents can be accurately determined with calibration established with standards prepared in aqueous solutions without matrix matching or using the method of standard additions. The validity of this method is demonstrated by spike recovery studies and by the agreement with results for the same samples prepared in these solvents, in concentrated nitric acid, and prepared by a microwave digestion system.

  17. Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy for detection of multimetal traces in low-voltage electrical marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubeniene, Marija; Zakaras, Algirdas; Minkuviene, Zita Nijole; Benoshys, Alvydas

    2006-08-10

    Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy to detect multimetal traces in injured skin is a promising tool for investigation of fatalities caused by electrocution. The present paper is aimed at testing the reliability of this method for metal traces detection in electric current marks and is focused on study of peculiarities of metal penetration into the skin exposed to a current impact. Bare aluminum wire, tin-lead coated copper multistrand wire, and zinc-plated steel rope were used to make electrical marks on pig skin. It is demonstrated that amount of copper, zinc, lead, and iron may serve as statistically reliable indicators for the type of wire, which caused the electrical mark, in spite of the background content of these metals in the skin without injury. Different penetration rates for different metals contained in the wire inflicting an electrical mark were observed.

  18. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  19. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  20. Quantitation of a novel metalloporphyrin drug in plasma by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K L; Feng, M R; Rossi, D T

    1999-03-01

    A bioanalytical method to quantify cobalt mesoporphyrin (CoMP), a novel therapeutic agent, in plasma has been developed and validated. The approach involves atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine total cobalt in a sample and a back-calculation of the amount of compound present. Endogenous plasma cobalt concentrations were small ( <0.2 ng/ml(-1) Co in rat plasma) in comparison to the quantitation limit (4.5 ng/ml(-1) Co). The inter-day imprecision of the method was 10.0% relative standard deviation (RSD) and the inter-day bias was +/- 8.0% relative error (RE) over a standard curve range of 4.5- 45.0 ng/ml(-1) Co. Because it quantifies total cobalt, the method cannot differentiate between parent drug and metabolites, but negligible metabolism allows reliable estimates of the actual parent drug concentration. A correlation study between the atomic absorption method and 14C-radiometry demonstrated excellent agreement (r = 0.9868, slope = 1.041 +/- 0.028, intercept = 223.7 +/- 190.0) and further substantiated the accuracy of the methods. Methodology was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of CoMP in rat, with pharmacokinetic parameter estimation. The elimination half-lives, after intra-muscular and subcutaneous administration, were 7.7 and 8.8 days, respectively.

  1. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  2. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  3. Sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Htwe Htwe Yin; YIN Ze-Jie; TANG Shi-Biao; HUANG Huan; ZHU Da-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films was investigated by using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that free volume radius and intensity depend on the variation of sulfonation degree and solvent evaporation time of the films. Pore size and distribution determined from PALS and AFM measurements showed reasonable agreement.

  4. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips.

  5. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  6. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  7. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  8. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Y., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov, E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov, E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Li, G. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Y.; Droubay, T. C.; Liyu, A. V.; Li, G.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  12. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-03-01

    We present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  13. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  14. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  15. Spectroscopy of ^1S0 -- ^3P1^88Sr Atomic Transition in a 1.06 μm Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effects of laser light near-resonant with the ^1S0-- ^3P1^88Sr transition in an optical dipole trap (ODT). We observe laser cooling of our ODT atomic sample as the atoms collide in the presence of red-detuned 689 nm light. Heating of the atoms was also observed at a different range of frequency detunings while performing spectroscopy. Both processes were accompanied with atom loss, but the increase of phase space density observed during 689 nm laser cooling could aid pursuits of quantum degeneracy with Sr.

  16. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic strontium for ultracold atom physics, high-precision spectroscopy and quantum sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; G. M. Tino

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the production of atomic strontium samples at ultra-low temperature and at high phase-space density, and their possible use for physical studies and applications. We describe the process of loading a magneto-optical trap from an atomic beam and preparing the sample for high precision measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the applications of ultracold Sr samples, spanning from optical frequency metrology to force sensing at micrometer scale.

  17. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; DENIS A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  18. Determination of zinc in serum, blood, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients on hemofiltration by graphite furnace/atomic absorption spectroscopy or flow injection analysis/atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas, O J; Rodriguez, R S; Mendez, J H; Tomero, J A; Gomez, B de L; Gonzalez, S V

    1994-01-01

    Two methods were optimized for the determination of zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration. In the first procedure, after acid digestion of the samples, Zn in blood and serum is determined by a system coupled to flow injection analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method is rapid, automated, simple, needs small amounts of sample, and has acceptable analytical characteristics. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.05-2.0 ppm of Zn; precision as coefficient of variation (CV), 5.3%; recovery, 95-105%; and detection limit (DL), 0.02 ppm. The second method is optimized for ultrafiltrate fluid because the sensitivity of the first procedure is not suitable for the levels of Zn (ppb or ng/mL) in these samples. The technique chosen was atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization in a graphite furnace. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.3-2.0 ppb Zn; CV, 5.7%; recovery, 93-107%; and DL, 0.12 ppb. The methods were used to determine zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from 5 patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration to discover whether there were significant differences in the zinc contents of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid after the hemofiltration process. An analysis of variance of the experimental data obtained from a randomly selected group of 5 patients showed that zinc concentrations in the ultrafiltrate fluid, venous blood, and venous serum do not vary during hemofiltration (p < 0.05), whereas in arterial blood and serum, the time factor has a significant effect.

  19. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  20. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  1. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  2. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the spectroscopy of atomic Bose-Hubbard systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kensuke; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We provide a numerical method to calculate comprehensively the microwave and the laser spectra of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices at finite temperatures. Our formulation is built up with the sum rules, up to the second order, derived from the general principle of spectroscopy. The sum rule approach allows us to discuss the physical origins of a spectral peak shift and also a peak broadening. We find that a spectral broadening of superfluid atoms can be determined from number fluctuations of atoms, while that of normal-state atoms is mainly attributed to quantum fluctuations resulting from hopping of atoms. To calculate spectra at finite temperatures, based on the sum rule approach, we provide a two-mode approximation assuming that spectra of the superfluid and normal state atoms can be calculated separately. Our method can properly deal with multipeak structures of spectra resulting from thermal fluctuations and also coexisting of the superfluid and the normal states. By combining the two-mode approximation with a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we calculate spectra at finite temperatures by considering realistic systems, and the calculated spectra show nice agreements with those in experiments.

  4. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beida Information Research (BIR), Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  5. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  6. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an atomically thin material using a single-spin qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J. D.; Urbach, E. K.; Choi, S.; Fang, S.; Andersen, T. I.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bylinskii, A.; Kaxiras, E.; Kim, P.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a promising platform for exploring condensed matter phenomena and developing technological applications. However, the reduction of material dimensions to the atomic scale poses a challenge for traditional measurement and interfacing techniques that typically couple to macroscopic observables. We demonstrate a method for probing the properties of 2D materials via nanometer-scale nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy using individual atomlike impurities in diamond. Coherent manipulation of shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers enables the probing of nanoscale ensembles down to approximately 30 nuclear spins in atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The characterization of low-dimensional nanoscale materials could enable the development of new quantum hybrid systems, combining atomlike systems coherently coupled with individual atoms in 2D materials.

  8. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  9. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  10. Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Cesium Atoms in a Cesium Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardis, Robert G.; Gardner, Bernard W.; Smith, R. Seth

    1997-11-01

    A Cesium Heat Pipe has been constructed to produce a cesium metal vapor for use in laser spectroscopy. The heat pipe consists of a 24 inch stainless steel pipe with 2 inch diameter calcium fluoride windows on each end. Electric heaters are used to control the cesium vapor pressure. An argon buffer gas is used to maintain high transmittance through the end windows. Sensors are used to monitor both temperature and pressure. A Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser system is used to probe the cesium atoms via resonance ionization spectroscopy. Details of the construction of the heat pipe and the experimental setup will be presented. The results of the resonance ionization spectroscopy will be discussed. This experimental setup can be utilized with undergraduates in courses such as Optics, Laser Physics, and Senior Laboratory/Research.

  11. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  12. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure.

  13. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  14. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  15. The Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Group IV 2-15 Atom Cluster Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craycraft, Mary Jo.

    The ability to map valence electronic structure is the result of a recent advance in photoelectron spectroscopy; its union with cluster molecular beam technology. The task of interpreting the spectra is hampered by a serious lack of understanding of cluster electronic structure in general. Recently progress has been made in finding models for single s valence electron systems. Alkali and noble metal clusters can be treated as free electron systems and simple interatomic potentials can be used with rare gas clusters. Neither a smeared jellium background nor a simple interatomic potential is adequate to describe covalent bonding, however. The isoelectronic Group IV members have a valence configuration of ns^2 np^2. All readily form clusters, and the elements differ in both their atomic and bulk properties; thus the series provides an ideal system for studying electronic structure. The mass selected cluster ion beam is crossed with a beam (6.42 or 7.9eV) and the resulting photodetached electrons collected with the aid of judiciously arranged magnetic fields. The spectra are found to be unique for each size cluster. Some spectra show a significant gap between the two lowest binding energy features, indicating that the neutral cluster is a closed shell species. The clusters with such gaps are minima in a plot of EA as a function of cluster size. The UPS also vary with the cluster composition. Carbon is unique; an even -odd alternation in electron affinities switches from odd minima for clusters containing less than ten atoms to odd maxima for larger clusters. This corresponds with an alternation in singlet and triplet ground states and a switch from chain to ring structures previously predicted by theory (K. S. Pitzer, E. Clementi, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 81 4477 (1958) and R. Hoffmann, Tetrahedron 22 521 (1965)). The spectra of the remaining group IV members are remarkably similar to each other for clusters of up to ten atoms, as is the trend in the electron affinities as

  16. [Study on the method for the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current arc full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhi-hong; Yao, Jian-zhen; Tang, Rui-ling; Zhang, Xue-mei; Li, Wen-ge; Zhang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determmation of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES) was established. Direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectrometer with a large area of solid-state detectors has functions of full spectrum direct reading and real-time background correction. The new electrodes and new buffer recipe were proposed in this paper, and have applied for national patent. Suitable analytical line pairs, back ground correcting points of elements and the internal standard method were selected, and Ge was used as internal standard. Multistage currents were selected in the research on current program, and each current set different holding time to ensure that each element has a good signal to noise ratio. Continuous rising current mode selected can effectively eliminate the splash of the sample. Argon as shielding gas can eliminate CN band generating and reduce spectral background, also plays a role in stabilizing the are, and argon flow 3.5 L x min(-1) was selected. Evaporation curve of each element was made, and it was concluded that the evaporation behavior of each element is consistent, and combined with the effects of different spectrographic times on the intensity and background, the spectrographic time of 35s was selected. In this paper, national standards substances were selected as a standard series, and the standard series includes different nature and different content of standard substances which meet the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 1.1, 0.09, 0.01, 0.41, and 0.56 microg x g(-1) respectively, and the precisions (RSD, n=12) for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 4.57%-7.63%, 5.14%-7.75%, 5.48%-12.30%, 3.97%-10.46%, and 4.26%-9.21% respectively. The analytical accuracy was

  17. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly-ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser- and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large scale ab initio calculations. Large blocks of data are predictively systematized and parameterized along isoelectric, homologous, isoionic, Rydberg, and yrast series, to provide a comprehensive and reliable data base.

  18. Measurement of nickel, cobalt and chromium in toy make-up by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Baldo, Federica; Pagnoni, Antonella; Miscioscia, Roberta; Virgili, Annarosa

    2009-01-01

    Cosmetics should not contain more than 5 ppm of nickel, chromium or cobalt and, in order to minimize the risk of sensitization in very sensitive subjects, the target amount should be as low as 1 ppm. However, there are no published reports on the presence of these metals in toy make-up. This study analysed 52 toy make-ups using atomic absorption spectroscopy. More than 5 ppm of nickel was present in 14/52 (26.9%) samples. Chromium exceeded 5 ppm in 28/52 (53.8%) samples, with values over 1000 ppm in 3 eye shadows. Cobalt was present in amounts over 5 ppm in 5/52 (9.6%) samples. Powdery toy make-up (eye shadows) had the highest levels of metals, and "creamy" toy make-up (lip gloss and lipsticks) the lowest. Toy make-ups are potentially sensitizing items, especially for atopic children, who have a damaged skin barrier that may favour penetration of allergens.

  19. Improved preparation of small biological samples for mercury analysis using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, B M; Cobb, G P

    1999-05-01

    Concentrations of mercury in biological samples collected for environmental studies are often less than 0.1 microgram/g. Low mercury concentrations and small organ sizes in many wildlife species (approximately 0.1 g) increase the difficulty of mercury determination at environmentally relevant concentrations. We have developed a digestion technique to extract mercury from small (0.1 g), biological samples at these relevant concentrations. Mean recoveries (+/- standard error) from validation trials of mercury fortified tissue samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy for analysis ranged from 102 +/- 4.3% (2.5 micrograms/L, n = 15) to 108 +/- 1.4% (25 micrograms/L, n = 15). Recoveries of inorganic mercury were 99 +/- 5 (n = 19) for quality assurance samples analyzed during environmental evaluations conducted during a 24 month period. This technique can be used to determine total mercury concentrations of 60 ng Hg/g sample. Samples can be analyzed in standard laboratories in a short time, at minimal cost. The technique is versatile and can be used to determine mercury concentrations in several different matrices, limiting the time and expense of method development and validation.

  20. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of atomically thin two-dimensional magnetic iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingzhi; Du, Kezhao; Liu, Yu Yang Fredrik; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Owen, Man Hon Samuel; Lu, Xin; Gan, Chee Kwan; Sengupta, Pinaki; Kloc, Christian; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-09-01

    Metal phosphorous trichalcogenide is an important group of layered two-dimensional (2D) materials with potentially diverse applications in low-dimensional magnetic and spintronic devices. Herein we present a comprehensive investigation on the lattice dynamics and spin-phonon interactions of mechanically exfoliated atomically thin 2D magnetic material—iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) by Raman spectroscopy and first principle calculations. Layer-number and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy suggests a magnetic persistence in FePS3 even down to monolayer regime through the spin-phonon coupling, while the Néel temperature decreases from 117 K in bulk to 104 K in monolayer sample. Our studies advocate the intriguing magnetic properties in 2D crystals and suggest that FePS3 is a promising candidate material for future magnetic applications.

  2. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAFNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound kaonic hydrogen atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated ...

  3. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons (K-) with nucleons and nuclei in the low energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K-pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DA?NE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K-p atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering le...

  4. Ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells in atomic spectroscopy: reflection, transmission, fluorescence, and nonadiabatic transitions at the walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazgalev, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Cartaleva, S.; Przhibelskii, S.; Vartanyan, T.

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-narrow cells with the thicknesses in the range from several wavelengths to the small fractions of the wavelength brought a number of new opportunities for atomic spectroscopy. Depending on the cell thickness, spectral lines recorded in ultra-narrow cells are either Doppler-free or Doppler-broadened. With careful selection of the cell thickness hyperfine structure may be easily resolved without resorting on the multibeam nonlinear optical techniques. Moreover, frequent collisions with the walls leads to the important modifications of velocity selective optical pumping resonances. Finally, ultra-narrow cells provide with the unique opportunity to study collisions of the excited atoms with the solid surfaces. In this contribution several examples of the use of the ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells filled with the alkali atomic vapour is presented. First, we discuss general aspects of the transient polarisation that defines all peculiarities of an ultra-narrow cell as a spectroscopic tool. Second, we demonstrate the resolution of the magnetic sublevels in the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime in the Cs hyperfine structure. Third, new aspects of velocity selective optical pumping resonances in reflection and transmission of resonant radiation by the 6 wavelengths thick cell filled with Cs are discussed. Forth, the experimental evidences of the nonadiabatic transitions between excited states of Rb atoms in the course of collisions with the sapphire surface are presented.

  5. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  6. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  7. Surface-charge differentiation of streptavidin and avidin by atomic force microscopy-force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Lisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Baró, Arturo M

    2014-09-15

    Chemical information can be obtained by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) with atomic or molecular resolution, even in liquid media. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that single molecules of avidin and streptavidin anchored to a biotinylated bilayer can be differentiated by using AFM, even though AFM topographical images of the two proteins are remarkably alike. At physiological pH, the basic glycoprotein avidin is positively charged, whereas streptavidin is a neutral protein. This charge difference can be determined with AFM, which can probe electrostatic double-layer forces by using FS. The force curves, owing to the electrostatic interaction, show major differences when measured on top of each protein as well as on the lipid substrate. FS data show that the two proteins are negatively charged. Nevertheless, avidin and streptavidin can be clearly distinguished, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of AFM to detect small changes in the charge state of macromolecules.

  8. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  9. [Determination of trace selenium in edible fungi with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Mei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing; Jing, Kui; Zang, Shu-liang; Li, Hua-wei

    2006-01-01

    In the present article, samples were digested by a quartz high-pressure digestion pot, reducing the loss of selenium in digestion. The content of selenium in edible fungi was determined by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and the results showed that when the content of selenium in edible fungi was determined by using 1% Ni(NO3)2 as a matrix modifier, ashing temperature of 500 degreed C, and atomization temperature of 2 500 degrees C, and rectifying background by deuterium light, the recovery was in the range of 92.1%-115.5%, the relative standard deviation of the method was 1.28%, and the limit of detection was 15.8 microg x L(-1). The method was suitable for the determination of trace selenium in edible fungi with the advantages of being simple, rapid, sensitive, stable and accurate etc., and the results were satisfactory.

  10. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  11. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  13. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  14. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  15. Zeeman Effect of Sm Atoms by High-Resolution Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution atomic-beam diode-laser spectroscopy in Sm I has been performed. Zeeman spectra have been measured for the three optical transitions at different external magnetic fields and well resolved at the magnetic fields of stronger than 6.0 mT. Using the known precise Landé -factors of the ground multiplet, the Landé -factors of the upper 4f66s6p   and levels have been determined, and their precision has been improved compared with the reference values.

  16. Effects of nonlinear forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P A; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of nonlinear tip-sample forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy. The jumps and hysteresis observed in the vibration amplitude (A) versus tip-sample distance (h) curves have been traced to bistability in the resonance curve. A numerical analysis of the basic dynamic equation was used to explain the hysteresis in the experimental curve. It has been found that the location of the hysteresis in the A-h curve depends on the frequency of the forced oscillation relative to the natural frequency of the cantilever.

  17. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  18. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  19. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  20. Theoretical analysis on two-photon absorption spectroscopy in a confined four-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Jintao Bai; Li Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Xun Hou

    2009-01-01

    We investigate theoretically two-photon absorption spectroscopy modified by a control field in a confined Y-type four-level system. Dicke-narrowing effect occurs both in two-photon absorption lines and the dips of transparency against two-photon absorption due to enhanced contribution of slow atoms. We also find that the suppression and the enhancement of two-photon absorption can be modified by changing the strength of the control field and the detuning of three laser fields. This control of two-photon absorption may have some applications in information processing and optical devices.

  1. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  2. Energy landscape investigation by wavelet transform analysis of atomic force spectroscopy data in a biorecognition experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Force fluctuations recorded in an atomic force spectroscopy experiment, during the approach of a tip functionalized with biotin towards a substrate charged with avidin, have been analyzed by a wavelet transform. The observation of strong transient changes only when a specific biorecognition process between the partners takes place suggests a drastic modulation of the force fluctuations when biomolecules recognize each other. Such an analysis allows to investigate the peculiar features of a biorecognition process. These results are discussed in connection with the possible role of energy minima explored by biomolecules during the biorecognition process.

  3. The use of atomic spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry for the determination of trace elements in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewen, Nancy

    2011-06-25

    The subject of the analysis of various elements, including metals and metalloids, in the pharmaceutical industry has seen increasing importance in the last 10-15 years, as modern analytical instrumentation has afforded analysts with the opportunity to provide element-specific, accurate and meaningful information related to pharmaceutical products. Armed with toxicological data, compendial and regulatory agencies have revisited traditional approaches to the testing of pharmaceuticals for metals and metalloids, and analysts have begun to employ the techniques of atomic spectroscopy, such as flame- and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS, Flame AA or FAA and GFAAS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), to meet their analytical needs. Newer techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LAICP-MS) are also beginning to see wider applications in the analysis of elements in the pharmaceutical industry.This article will provide a perspective regarding the various applications of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in drug products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API's), raw materials and intermediates. The application of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in clinical samples, nutraceutical, metabolism and pharmacokinetic samples will not be addressed in this work.

  4. Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy of Muonic Hydrogen Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J

    2001-01-01

    Studies of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules have been performed traditionally in bulk targets of gas, liquid or solid. At TRIUMF, Canada's meson facility, we have developed a new type of target system using multilayer thin films of solid hydrogen, which provides a beam of muonic hydrogen atoms in vacuum. Using the time-of-flight of the muonic atoms, the energy-dependent information of muonic reactions are obtained in direct manner. We discuss some unique measurements enabled by the new technique, with emphasis on processes relevant to muon catalyzed fusion.

  5. Time-of-flight spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Science, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Adamczak, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Faifman, M.P. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Huber, T.M. [Dept. of Physics, Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P. [Dept. of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Dept. of Physics, Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju City (Korea); Knowles, P.E.; Mulhauser, F. [Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E.; Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Porcelli, T.A. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC (Canada); Zmeskal, J. [Inst. for Medium Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    Studies of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules have been performed traditionally in bulk targets of gas, liquid or solid. At TRIUMF, Canada's meson facility, we have developed a new type of target system using multilayer thin films of solid hydrogen, which provides a beam of muonic hydrogen atoms in vacuum. Using the time-of-flight of the muonic atoms, the energy-dependent information of muonic reactions are obtained in direct manner.We discuss some unique measurements enabled by the new technique, with emphasis on processes relevant to muon catalyzed fusion.

  6. Kinetic theory and atomic physics corrections for determination of ion velocities from charge-exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Solomon, W. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Chrystal, C.

    2013-09-01

    Charge-exchange spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for determining ion temperatures, densities and rotational velocities in tokamak plasmas. This technique depends on detailed understanding of the atomic physics processes that affect the measured apparent velocities with respect to the true ion rotational velocities. These atomic effects are mainly due to energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-sections, and in the case of poloidal velocities, due to gyro-motion of the ion during the finite lifetime of the excited states. Accurate lifetimes are necessary for correct interpretation of measured poloidal velocities, specially for high density plasma regimes on machines such as ITER, where l-mixing effects must be taken into account. In this work, a full nl-resolved atomic collisional radiative model coupled with a full kinetic calculation that includes the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the ion gyro-motion is presented for the first time. The model directly calculates from atomic physics first principles the excited state lifetimes that are necessary to evaluate the gyro-orbit effects. It is shown that even for low density plasmas where l-mixing effects are unimportant and coronal conditions can be assumed, the nl-resolved model is necessary for an accurate description of the gyro-motion effects to determine poloidal velocities. This solution shows good agreement when compared to three QH-mode shots on DIII-D, which contain a wide range of toroidal velocities and high ion temperatures where greater atomic corrections are needed. The velocities obtained from the model are compared to experimental velocities determined from co- and counter-injection of neutral beams on DIII-D.

  7. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, H; Beer, G; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    In the exotic atoms where one atomic $1s$ electron is replaced by a $K^{-}$, the strong interaction between the $K^{-}$ and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z=1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the $1s$ state of $K^{-}p$ and the $2p$ state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  8. An Effective-Hamiltonian Approach to CH5+, Using Ideas from Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk we present the first steps in the design of an effective Hamiltonian for the vibration-rotation energy levels of CH5+. Such a Hamiltonian would allow calculation of energy level patterns anywhere along the path travelled by a hypothetical CH5+ (or CD5+) molecule as it passes through various coupling cases, and might thus provide some hints for assigning the observed high-resolution spectra. The steps discussed here, which have not yet addressed computational problems, focus on mapping the vibration-rotation problem in CH5+ onto the five-electron problem in the boron atom, using ideas and mathematical machinery from Condon and Shortley's book on atomic spectroscopy. The mapping ideas are divided into: (i) a mapping of particles, (ii) a mapping of coordinates (i.e., mathematical degrees of freedom), and (iii) a mapping of quantum mechanical interaction terms. The various coupling cases along the path correspond conceptually to: (i) the analog of a free-rotor limit, where the H atoms see the central C atom but do not see each other, (ii) the low-barrier and high-barrier tunneling regimes, and (iii) the rigid-molecule limit, where the H atoms remain locked in some fixed molecular geometry. Since the mappings considered here often involve significant changes in mathematics, a number of interesting qualitative changes occur in the basic ideas when passing from B to CH5+, particularly in discussions of: (i) antisymmetrization and symmetrization ideas, (ii) n,l,ml,ms or n,l,j,mj quantum numbers, and (iii) Russell-Saunders computations and energy level patterns. Some of the mappings from B to CH5+ to be discussed are as follows. Particles: the atomic nucleus is replaced by the C atom, the electrons are replaced by protons, and the empty space between particles is replaced by an "electron soup." Coordinates: the radial coordinates of the electrons map onto the five local C-H stretching modes, the angular coordinates of the electrons map onto three rotational

  9. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of a |M|=1 Rydberg barium atom in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Quan Wei; Shen Li; Yang Hai-Feng; Shi Ting-Yun; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We observe strong energy-dependent quantum defects in the scaled-energy Stark spectra for |M|=1 Rydberg states of barium atoms at three scaled energies: ε= -2.000, ε= -2.500 and ε=-3.000. In an attempt to explain the observations, theoretical calculations of closed orbit theory based on a model potential including core effect are performed for non-hydrogenic atoms. While such a potential has been uniformly successful for alkali atoms with a single valence electron, it fails to match experimental results for barium atoms in the 6snp Rydberg states with two valence electrons. Our study points out that this discrepancy is due to the strong perturbation from the 5d8p state, which voids the simple approximation for constant quantum defects of principle quantum number n.

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  11. Single Ra{sup +} ion spectroscopy - towards a measurement of atomic parity violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Mohanti, A.; Dijck, E.A.; Bekker, H.; Boell, O.; Berg, J. van den; Giri, G.S.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Santra, B.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The sensitivity of the Atomic Parity Violation (APV) signal grows faster than the third power of the atomic number Z. Ra{sup +} (Z=88) is heaviest alkaline earth ion available. A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion opens a very promising path for a measurement atomic parity violation. One of the experimental challenges is the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. For this the current experiments are focused on trapping and laser cooling of Ba{sup +} ions as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Ba{sup +} ions are trapped and laser cooled in a precision hyperbolic Paul trap. Work towards single Ba{sup +} ion localization and detection is in progress. Recently the hyperfine structure of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2} states and the isotope shift of the 6d{sub 2}D{sub 3/2}-7p{sub 2}P{sub 1/2} transition in the isotopes {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +} has been measured in online laser spectroscopy experiments at the KVI AGOR/TRIμP facility. These results are essential for the interpretation of an APV measurement in Ra{sup +}.

  12. Probing Co/Si interface behaviour by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the Co-Si reaction, the Co growth mode at room temperature, diffusion behaviour as well as morphology evolution during annealing on both H-terminated and clean Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. From in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation, "Co-Si" reaction appears to occur on both H-terminated and clean surfaces at room temperature (RT) and the silicide crystallinity is improved upon annealing.Co growth mode on H-terminated Si surfaces occurs in a pseudo layer-by-layer manner while small close-packed island growth mode is observed on the clean Si surface. Upon annealing at different temperatures, Co atom concentration decreases versus annealing time, which in part is attributed to Co atoms inward diffusion. The diffusion behaviour on both types of surfaces demonstrates a similar trend. Morphology study using ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the islands formed on Si(001) surface after annealing at 700 ℃ are elongated with growth directions alternate between the two perpendicular [(-1)10] and [110] directions. Triangular islands are observed on Si(111) surface.

  13. Undergraduate Research Projects in Atomic Collisions and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J. M.; Varghese, S. L.; Haywick, D. W.; Fearn, M. L.

    2003-08-01

    Research projects at University of South Alabama, an undergraduate physics department, have employed a 150-kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator for atomic collisions and sodium-iodide and high-purity germanium detectors for gamma-ray studies. The atomic collision experiments dealt with electron capture and electron loss in collisions of protons and hydrogen atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. Gamma-ray studies with NaI scintillators determined the potassium content of food using 40K gamma-rays. Environmental studies of river sedimentation use a HPGe detector to determine 137Cs and 210Pb content. Students learn the physics of the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter, while acquiring a familiarity with high-vacuum technique, electronics, data acquisition and analysis, and reporting of results.

  14. HCl yield and chemical kinetics study of the reaction of Cl atoms with CH3I at the 298K temperature using the infra-red tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R C; Blitz, M; Wada, R; Seakins, P W

    2014-07-15

    Pulsed ArF excimer laser (193 nm)-CW infrared (IR) tunable diode laser Herriott type absorption spectroscopic technique has been made for the detection of product hydrochloric acid HCl. Absorption spectroscopic technique is used in the reaction chlorine atoms with methyl iodide (Cl+CH3I) to the study of kinetics on reaction Cl+CH3I and the yield of (HCl). The reaction of Cl+CH3I has been studied with the support of the reaction Cl+C4H10 (100% HCl) at temperature 298 K. In the reaction Cl+CH3I, the total pressure of He between 20 and 125 Torr at the constant concentration of [CH3I] 7.0×10(14) molecule cm(-3). In the present work, we estimated adduct formation is very important in the reaction Cl+CH3I and reversible processes as well and CH3I molecule photo-dissociated in the methyl [CH3] radical. The secondary chemistry has been studied as CH3+CH3ICl = product, and CH3I+CH3ICl = product2. The system has been modeled theoretically for secondary chemistry in the present work. The calculated and experimentally HCl yield nearly 65% at the concentration 1.00×10(14) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3I] and 24% at the concentration 4.0×10(15) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3I], at constant concentration 4.85×10(12) molecule cm(-3) of [CH3], and at 7.3×10(12) molecule cm(-3) of [Cl]. The pressure dependent also studied product of HCl at the constant [CH3], [Cl] and [CH3I]. The experimental results are also very good matching with the modelling work at the reaction CH3+CH3ICl = product (k = (2.75±0.35)×10(-10) s(-1)) and CH3I+CH3ICl = product2 (k = 1.90±0.15)×10(-12) s(-1). The rate coefficients of the reaction CH3+CH3ICl and CH3I+CH3ICl has been made in the present work. The experimental results has been studied by two method (1) phase locked and (2) burst mode.

  15. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  16. The structure and function of cell membranes examined by atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-07

    The cell membrane is one of the most complicated biological complexes, and long-term fierce debates regarding the cell membrane persist because of technical hurdles. With the rapid development of nanotechnology and single-molecule techniques, our understanding of cell membranes has substantially increased. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided several unprecedented advances (e.g., high resolution, three-dimensional and in situ measurements) in the study of cell membranes and has been used to systematically dissect the membrane structure in situ from both sides of membranes; as a result, novel models of cell membranes have recently been proposed. This review summarizes the new progress regarding membrane structure using in situ AFM and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), which may shed light on the study of the structure and functions of cell membranes.

  17. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  18. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and atomic models of highly charged heavy ions in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, C.; Murakami, I.; Koike, F.; Tamura, N.; Sakaue, H. A.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Sudo, S.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report recent results of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions in plasmas produced in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The LHD is an ideal source of experimental databases of EUV spectra because of high brightness and low opacity, combined with the availability of pellet injection systems and reliable diagnostic tools. The measured heavy elements include tungsten, tin, lanthanides and bismuth, which are motivated by ITER as well as a variety of plasma applications such as EUV lithography and biological microscopy. The observed spectral features drastically change between quasicontinuum and discrete depending on the plasma temperature, which leads to some new experimental identifications of spectral lines. We have developed collisional-radiative models for some of these ions based on the measurements. The atomic number dependence of the spectral feature is also discussed.

  20. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  1. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  2. Use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy in immune cytolysis for nonradioactive determination of killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Salvioli, S; Cossarizza, A

    1996-02-01

    We describe here a novel method to evaluate natural killer (NK) cytolytic activity by use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). This technique may be adopted for use in laboratories equipped with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometers. Nonradioactive Cr as Na2CrO4 was used to label target cells (K562), and cell lysis was evaluated by measuring Cr released after 4 h of incubation with the effectors. We selected 520 micrograms/L as the optimal dose for labeling targets, between 12 and 20 h as the optimal incubation time, and 10(4) cells as the optimal target size. Advantages of this method include: (a) exclusion of radioactive tracer, with no risk for workers; (b) limited costs; (c) high sensitivity and reproducibility; (d) possibility to store samples; and (e) better control of Cr used for labeling cells due to well-determined, fixed Cr concentrations in the range of nontoxic and linear cellular uptake. Comparison with data obtained by conventional 51Cr labeling of targets killed by the same effectors was excellent, yielding comparable results and corroborating the method.

  3. Nanobiosensors exploiting specific interactions between an enzyme and herbicides in atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aline C N; Deda, Daiana K; Bueno, Carolina C; Moraes, Ariana S; Da Roz, Alessandra L; Yamaji, Fabio M; Prado, Rogilene A; Viviani, Vadim; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Leite, Fábio L

    2014-09-01

    The development of sensitive methodologies for detecting agrochemicals has become important in recent years due to the increasingly indiscriminate use of these substances. In this context, nanosensors based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are useful because they provide higher sensitivity with operation at the nanometer scale. In this paper we exploit specific interactions between AFM tips functionalized with the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS) to detect the ALS-inhibitor herbicides metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin. Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) we could measure the adhesion force between tip and substrate, which was considerably higher when the ALS-functionalized tip (nanobiosensor) was employed. The increase was approximately 250% and 160% for metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin, respectively, in comparison to unfunctionalized probes. We estimated the specific enzyme-herbicide force by assuming that the measured force comprises an adhesion force according to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model, the capillary force and the specific force. We show that the specific, biorecognition force plays a crucial role in the higher sensitivity of the nanobiosensor, thus opening the way for the design of similarly engineered tips for detecting herbicides and other analytes.

  4. Atomic-Scale Spectroscopy of Gated Monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kang, Kibum; Xie, Saien; Dadgar, Ali; Monahan, Nicholas R; Zhu, X-Y; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2016-05-11

    The electronic properties of semiconducting monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides can be tuned by electrostatic gate potentials. Here we report gate-tunable imaging and spectroscopy of monolayer MoS2 by atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Our measurements are performed on large-area samples grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques on a silicon oxide substrate. Topographic measurements of defect density indicate a sample quality comparable to single-crystal MoS2. From gate voltage dependent spectroscopic measurements, we determine that in-gap states exist in or near the MoS2 film at a density of 1.3 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2). By combining the single-particle band gap measured by STS with optical measurements, we estimate an exciton binding energy of 230 meV on this substrate, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulation. Grain boundaries are observed in these polycrystalline samples, which are seen to not have strong electronic signatures in STM imaging.

  5. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate.

  6. Revealing subsurface vibrational modes by atom-resolved damping force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Makoto; Wiesendanger, Roland; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Berber, Savas; Tománek, David

    2009-05-15

    We propose to use the damping signal of an oscillating cantilever in dynamic atomic force microscopy as a noninvasive tool to study the vibrational structure of the substrate. We present atomically resolved maps of damping in carbon nanotube peapods, capable of identifying the location and packing of enclosed Dy@C_{82} molecules as well as local excitations of vibrational modes inside nanotubes of different diameter. We elucidate the physical origin of damping in a microscopic model and provide quantitative interpretation of the observations by calculating the vibrational spectrum and damping of Dy@C_{82} inside nanotubes with different diameters using ab initio total energy and molecular dynamics calculations.

  7. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  8. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  9. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christian P.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of mostly molecular species which are or may be observed in various astronomical sources (usually) by radio astronomical means. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxiliary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Separate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC, was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases. A dedicated infrastructure was developed to provide a common data format in the various databases enabling queries to a large variety of databases on atomic and molecular data at once. For CDMS, the incorporation in VAMDC was combined with several modifications on the generation of CDMS catalog entries. Here we introduce related changes to the data structure and the data content in the CDMS. The new data scheme allows us to incorporate all previous data entries but in addition allows us also to include entries based on new theoretical descriptions. Moreover, the CDMS entries have been transferred into a mySQL database format. These developments within the VAMDC framework have in part been driven by the needs of the astronomical community to be able to deal efficiently with large data sets obtained with the Herschel Space Telescope or, more recently, with the Atacama Large

  10. Laser spectroscopy with nanometric gas cells distance dependence of atom-surface interaction and collisions under confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdi, I; Yarovitski, A; Dutier, G; Maurin, I; Saltiel, S; Li, Y; Lezama, A; Vartapetyan, T; Sarkisyan, D; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Bloch, D; Ducloy, M; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Todorov, Petko; Yarovitski, Alexander; Dutier, Gabriel; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Li, Yuanyuan; Lezama, Arturo; Varzhapetyan, Tigran; Sarkisyan, David; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    The high sensitivity of Laser Spectroscopy has made possible the exploration of atomic resonances in newly designed "nanometric" gas cells, whose local thickness varies from 20nm to more than 1000 nm. Following the initial observation of the optical analogous of the coherent Dicke microwave narrowing, the newest prospects include the exploration of long-range atom surface van der Waals interaction with spatial resolution in an unprecedented range of distances, modification of atom dielectric resonant coupling under the influence of the coupling between the two neighbouring dielectric media, and even the possible modification of interatomic collisions processes under the effect of confinement.

  11. The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with human serum albumin as determined by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Li, Nana; Chen, Gaopan; Lin, Yuejuan; Gao, Wenhua

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. This study used fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling techniques. Association constants, the number of binding sites and basic thermodynamic parameters were used to investigate the quenching mechanism. Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and MBI was 2.495 nm. The ΔG(0), ΔH(0), and ΔS(0) values across temperature indicated that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding Force. The UV, FT-IR, CD and Raman spectra confirmed that the HSA secondary structure was altered in the presence of MBI. In addition, the molecular modeling showed that the MBI-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which resulted from amino acid residues. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with MBI. Overall, this study suggested a method for characterizing the weak intermolecular interaction. In addition, this method is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of MBI when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and other experiments.

  12. Evaluation of trace elements in chewing tobacco and snuff using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waheed, S.; Siddique, N.; Rahman, S. [Chemistry Div., Directorate of Science, Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Tech., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2009-07-01

    Nine samples of chewing tobacco, snuff, tobacco leaf and ash were analyzed using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff studied in this work contain substantial amounts of Mg, Mn, Na, K. V. Sc, Rb and Fe. Furthermore, varying amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co and Zn were also detected in all tobacco samples. Of the toxic elements which were determined using INAA. As, Sb and Hg were quantified in only few tobacco samples. However, other toxic elements, which were determined using AAS, such as Cu, Pb and Cd were detected in almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff. The concentration of majority of the detected elements is high in ash samples which imply that most elements in chewing tobacco and snuff may originate from the addition of ash. (orig.)

  13. Zinc, lead and copper in human teeth measured by induced coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, L.T.; Bradley, D.A. E-mail: D.A.Bradley@exeter.ac.uk; Mohd, Y.; Jamil, M

    2000-11-15

    Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) has been used to determine Pb, Zn and Cu levels in 47 exfoliated human teeth (all of which required extraction for orthodontic reasons). Lead concentrations for the group were 1.7 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1} to 40.5 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1}, with a median of 9.8 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1}. A median lead level in excess of the group value was found for the teeth of six lorry drivers who were included in the study. A more significant enhancement was found for the seven subjects whose age was in excess of 60 years. The median values for Zn and Cu were 123.0 and 0.6 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1} respectively. Present values for tooth-Zn are lower than published data for other ethnic groups.

  14. In situ Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Formation of Graphene from Urea and Graphite Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Mowry, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Graphene, 10 or fewer atomic layers of carbon atoms, has attracted much attention during recent years due to its unique structure and exceptional physical properties. While there exist a wide range of potential applications, as with many nanomaterials, new synthesis techniques are required that allow for a production of graphene on an industrial scale. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to study the formation and doping...

  15. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H., E-mail: nakano@nifs.ac.jp; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 5095292 (Japan); Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K. [Graduate school of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 0608628 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  16. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  17. Absorption of copper(II) by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata): use of atomic and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J L; Arteaga, S; Tiemann, K J; Chianelli, R; Pingitore, N; Mackay, W

    2001-11-01

    Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a common North American native desert shrub, exhibits the ability to take up copper(II) ions rapidly from solution. Following hydroponic studies, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 200.3 was used to digest the plant samples, and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) was used to determine the amount of copper taken up in different parts of the plant. The amount of copper(II) found within the roots, stems, and leaves was 13.8, 1.1, and 0.6 mg/g, respectively, after the creosote bush was exposed to a 63.5-ppm copper(II) solution for 48 h. When the plant was exposed to a 635-ppm copper(II) solution, the roots, stems, and leaves contained 35.0, 10.5, and 3.8 mg/g, respectively. In addition to FAAS analysis, x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis of the plant samples provided further confirmation of copper absorption by the various plant parts. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) elucidated the oxidation state of the copper absorbed by the plants. The copper(II) absorbed from solution remained as copper(II) bound to oxygen-containing ligands within the plant samples. The results of this study indicate that creosote bush may provide a useful and novel method of removing copper(II) from contaminated soils in an environmentally friendly manner.

  18. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  19. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  20. Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy by detection of a metastable hydrogen atom for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kouchi, Noriyuki [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H, E-mail: joe@chem.titech.ac.j [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-11-01

    Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen has been newly developed, where a metastable hydrogen atom dissociating in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the electric vector of the linearly polarized incident light is detected.

  1. Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, W C; Lindle, D W; Sant'Anna, M M; Savin, D W

    2014-01-01

    Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is so...

  2. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  3. Lattice Studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses of lattice QCD studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions are briefly reviewed. Some emphasis are given on a new proposal for a method, which enable us to calculate potentials between hadrons. As an example of the method, the extraction of nuclear potential in lattice QCD is discussed in detail.

  4. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  5. Surface Acidity and Properties of TiO2/SiO2 Catalysts Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition: UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance, DRIFTS, and Visible Raman Spectroscopy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-15

    commercial anatase titania was also measured. The edge energy (Eg) for allowed transitions was determined by finding the intercept of the straight...150 °C (xTS-150C, where x is the number of cycles (1, 4, 10, and 20)) are depicted in Figure 1, where silica gel and anatase titania were also measured...titanium (atoms/nm2) BET surface area (m2/g) pore diameter (Å) chlorine (wt %, XRF) Eg (eV) silica powder 91.6 301.5 anatase TiO2 3.47 1TS-TTIP-150C 1.92

  6. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  7. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Kris O.; McKellar, Thomas; Fekete, Julia; Rakonjac, Ana; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optical deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along the guide, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addres...

  8. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy,Photoionization Mass Spectroscopy,and Theoretical Study on CCI3SSCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Du; Li Yao; Mao-fa Ge

    2008-01-01

    Trichloromethanesulfenyl thiocyanate,CCI3SSCN,was generated and studied by photoelectron spectroscoy (PES),photoionization mass spectroscopy(PIMS),and theoretical calculations.This molecule exhibits a gaucho conformation,and the torsional angle around S-S bond is 91.4° due to the sulfur-sulfur lone pair interactions.After ionization,the ground-state cationic-radical form of CC13SSCN+ adopts a trans planar main-atom structure with Cs symmetry.The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of CCI3SSCN corresponds to the electrons mainly localized on the sulfur 3p lone pair MO.The first ionization energy is determined to be 10.40 eV.

  10. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  11. A Study of Confined Helium Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The helium atom confined by a spherical parabolic potential well is studied employing the adiabatic hyperspherical approach method. Total energies of the ground and three low-excited states are obtained as a function of the confined potential radii. We find that the energies of a spherical parabolic potential well are in good agreement with those of an impenetrable spherical box for the larger confined potential radius. We find also that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-excited states and the inversion of the energy values. The results for the three-dimensional spherical potential well and the two-dimensional disc-like potential well are compared with each other. We find that the energy difference between states in a two-dimensional parabolic potential is also obviously larger than the corresponding levels for a spherical parabolic potential.

  12. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  13. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  14. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  15. Development of a helium cryostat for laser spectroscopy of atoms with unstable nuclei in superfluid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Kei, E-mail: kimamura@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Furukawa, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Instutute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    We are developing a new nuclear laser spectroscopic technique for the study of nuclear structure that can be applied to short-lived low-yield atoms with unstable nuclei. The method utilizes superfluid helium (He II) as a trapping medium for high-energy ion beams. A liquid helium cryostat with optical windows is a key apparatus for this type of experiment. We describe the design and the performance of the cryostat which is developed for the present project.

  16. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  17. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the...

  18. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  19. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  20. Determination of firing distance. Lead analysis on the target by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano-Candela, Roberto; Colucci, Anna P; Napoli, Salvatore

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports a method for the determination of the firing distance. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine the lead (Pb) pattern around bullet holes produced by shots on test targets from the gun. Test shots were made with a Colt 38 Special at 5, 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 80, and 100 cm target distance. The target was created with sheets of Whatman no. 1 paper on a polystyrene support. The target was subdivided into three carefully cut out rings (1, 2, and 3; with external diameters of 1.4 cm; 5 cm; 10.2 cm, respectively). Each sample was analyzed with graphite furnace AAS. Lead values analysis performed for each ring yielded a linear relation between the firing distance (cm) and the logarithm of lead amounts (microg/cm(2)) in definite target areas (areas 2 + 3): [ln dPb(2+3) = a(0) + a(1)l]; where dPb(2+3) = lead microg/cm(2) of area 2 + 3; a(0) and a(1) are experimentally calculated; l = distance in cm.

  1. Investigating the mechanical properties of zona pellucida of whole human oocytes by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Masiero, Elena; Giolo, Elena; Martinelli, Monica; Luppi, Stefania; Dal Zilio, Simone; Delfino, Ines; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina; Ricci, Giuseppe; Lazzarino, Marco

    2016-08-08

    The role of mechanics in numerous biological processes is nowadays recognized, while in others, such as the fertilization process, it is still neglected. In the case of oocytes the description of their mechanical properties could improve the comprehension of the oocyte-spermatozoon interaction and be helpful for application in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. Herein the mechanical properties of whole human oocytes (HOs) immediately after retrieval are investigated by indentation measurements with atomic force spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Measurements are performed on immature (metaphase I - MI) and mature (metaphase II - MII) HOs. According to their morphological characteristics MII-HOs are classified as "suitable" and "rejected"; these latter would be usually rejected for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). For all maturation stages we observe that the elastic response of the zona pellucida (ZP) outer layer was different and distinguishable from the rest of the ZP-HO. The elasticity of this ZP outer layer varies with maturation and quality: stiffness decreases from immature MI to good quality MII, up to poor-quality rejected MII. An indirect analysis with IVF outcome indicates that the ZP outer layer of analysed HOs donated by women who achieved pregnancy is stiffer than that of HOs from women with negative outcome. Our findings suggest that mechanical properties can represent important oocyte quality indicators that may be exploited for the design of innovative ICSI dedicated cell sorters.

  2. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  3. Characterization of a SiC/SiC composite by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and positron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, G. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: g.brauer@fz-rossendorf.de; Anwand, W. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Eichhorn, F. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Skorupa, W. [Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hofer, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Teichert, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Kuriplach, J. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Cizek, J. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Prochazka, I. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Coleman, P.G. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7 AY (United Kingdom); Nozawa, T. [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS6151, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6151 (United States); Kohyama, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2006-02-28

    A SiC/SiC composite is characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and various positron spectroscopies (slow positron implantation, positron lifetime and re-emission). It is found that besides its main constituent 3C-SiC the composite still must contain some graphite. In order to better interpret the experimental findings of the composite, a pyrolytic graphite sample was also investigated by slow positron implantation and positron lifetime spectroscopies. In addition, theoretical calculations of positron properties of graphite are presented.

  4. Theoretical study on single-molecule spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Guang-cun; HUANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The photon-by-photon approach for single molecule spectroscopy experiments utilizes the information carried by each detected photon and allows the measurements of conformational fluctuation with time resolution on a vast range of time scales,where each photon represents a data point.Here,we theoretically simulate the photon emission dynamics of a single molecule spectroscopy using the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to understand the underlying complex photon dynamic process of a single molecule.In addition,by following the molecular process in real time,the mechanism of complex biochemical reactions can be revealed.We hope that this theoretical study will serve as an introduction and a guideline into this exciting new field.

  5. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  6. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  7. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium \\|M\\|=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kips, Annemieke; Vassen, Wim; Hogervorst, Wim; Dando, Paul A.

    1998-10-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. \\|M\\|=1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 1S0 metastable state. Spectra were recorded for ɛ=-2.940(4), ɛ=-2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and ɛ=-1.760(4), above the saddle point. Closed-orbit theory was applied to interpret the spectra. A recent extension to closed-orbit theory, incorporating core effects, was used. This significantly improved agreement between experiment and theory.

  8. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  9. Authentication of organically grown plants - advantages and limitations of atomic spectroscopy for multi-element and stable isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjørring, Jan Kofod; Kelly, S.D.

    2014-01-01

    of sophisticated analytical procedures for testing authenticity. We review the use of multi-element and stable-isotope analysis based on atomic spectroscopy for discriminating between organic and conventional plants. We conclude that inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, stable-isotope analysis of bulk...... production. We therefore recommend that analytical techniques are combined and coupled with chemometrics to develop statistical models that can classify the agricultural origin of plant products. © 2014 Elsevier B.V....

  10. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: Light sideband resonances in electromagnetically-induced-transparency condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, H. M.; Kumar, A.; Theophilo, K.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.

    2016-07-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the nonzero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  11. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: light sidebands resonances in electromagnetically induced transparency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, H M; Theophilo, K; Nussenzveig, P; Martinelli, M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the non-zero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  12. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  13. Mismatch detection in DNA monolayers by atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse D. Nkoua Ngavouka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA hybridization is at the basis of most current technologies for genotyping and sequencing, due to the unique properties of DNA base-pairing that guarantee a high grade of selectivity. Nonetheless the presence of single base mismatches or not perfectly matched sequences can affect the response of the devices and the major challenge is, nowadays, to distinguish a mismatch of a single base and, at the same time, unequivocally differentiate devices read-out of fully and partially matching sequences.Results: We present here two platforms based on different sensing strategies, to detect mismatched and/or perfectly matched complementary DNA strands hybridization into ssDNA oligonucleotide monolayers. The first platform exploits atomic force microscopy-based nanolithography to create ssDNA nano-arrays on gold surfaces. AFM topography measurements then monitor the variation of height of the nanostructures upon biorecognition and then follow annealing at different temperatures. This strategy allowed us to clearly detect the presence of mismatches. The second strategy exploits the change in capacitance at the interface between an ssDNA-functionalized gold electrode and the solution due to the hybridization process in a miniaturized electrochemical cell. Through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements on extended ssDNA self-assembled monolayers we followed in real-time the variation of capacitance, being able to distinguish, through the difference in hybridization kinetics, not only the presence of single, double or triple mismatches in the complementary sequence, but also the position of the mismatched base pair with respect to the electrode surface.Conclusion: We demonstrate here two platforms based on different sensing strategies as sensitive and selective tools to discriminate mismatches. Our assays are ready for parallelization and can be used in the detection and quantification of single nucleotide mismatches in microRNAs or

  14. Probing the interaction of individual amino acids with inorganic surfaces using atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvag, Yair; Gutkin, Vitaly; Reches, Meital

    2013-08-13

    This article describes single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements of the interaction between individual amino acid residues and inorganic surfaces in an aqueous solution. In each measurement, there is an amino acid residue, lysine, glutamate, phenylalanine, leucine, or glutamine, and each represents a class of amino acids (positively or negatively charged, aromatic, nonpolar, and polar). Force-distance curves measured the interaction of the individual amino acid bound to a silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with a silcon substrate, cut from a single-crystal wafer, or mica. Using this method, we were able to measure low adhesion forces (below 300 pN) and could clearly determine the strength of interactions between the individual amino acid residues and the inorganic substrate. In addition, we observed how changes in the pH and ionic strength of the solution affected the adsorption of the residues to the substrates. Our results pinpoint the important role of hydrophobic interactions among the amino acids and the substrate, where hydrophobic phenylalanine exhibited the strongest adhesion to a silicon substrate. Additionally, electrostatic interactions also contributed to the adsorption of amino acid residues to inorganic substrates. A change in the pH or ionic strength values of the buffer altered the strength of interactions among the amino acids and the substrate. We concluded that the interplay between the hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions will determine the strength of adsorption among the amino acids and the surface. Overall, these results contribute to our understanding of the interaction at the organic-inorganic interface. These results may have implications for our perception of the specificity of peptide binding to inorganic surfaces. Consequently, it would possibly lead to a better design of composite materials and devices.

  15. First application of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Curceanu, C; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hirenzaki, S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Ikeno, N; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Koike, T; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of excited atoms sputtered on a Ti surface under irradiation with multicharged Ar ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, K [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Saitoh, Y [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kitazawa, S, E-mail: motohasi@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of ITER Project, Fusion Research Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of excited atoms was carried out in order to investigate the sputtering processes on solid surfaces under irradiation of slow, multicharged ions. Many atomic lines of Ti I (neutral) and Ti II (single-charged ions) were observed in wavelengths from 250 to 750 nm with irradiation by Ar{sup 3+} (30 keV) on a Ti surface which was placed in a low pressure O{sub 2} atmosphere. The emission intensity of Ti I (520 nm) decreased monotonically with an increase of O{sub 2} partial pressure, whereas that of Ti I / II (670 nm, a 2nd order wavelength of 335 nm) slightly increased. From a semi-logarithmic plot of emission intensity for the 670 nm spectrum as a function of distance from the surface, the mean velocity of the excited Ti atoms and ions in a normal direction parallel to the surface, or

  18. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10{sup 8}. The atoms of several tens of {mu}K degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  19. Signatures of distinct impurity configurations in atomic-resolution valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy: Application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Oxley, Mark P.; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-10-01

    The detection and identification of impurities and other point defects in materials is a challenging task. Signatures for point defects are typically obtained using spectroscopies without spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the power of valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission-electron microscope (STEM) to provide energy-resolved and atomically resolved maps of electronic excitations of individual impurities which, combined with theoretical simulations, yield unique signatures of distinct bonding configurations of impurities. We report VEELS maps for isolated Si impurities in graphene, which are known to exist in two distinct configurations. We also report simulations of the maps, based on density functional theory and dynamical scattering theory, which agree with and provide direct interpretation of observed features. We show that theoretical VEELS maps exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures for the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated configurations of Si impurities in different energy-loss windows, corresponding to impurity-induced bound states, resonances, and antiresonances. With the advent of new monochromators and detectors with high energy resolution and low signal-to-noise ratio, the present work ushers an atomically resolved STEM-based spectroscopy of individual impurities as an alternative to conventional spectroscopies for probing impurities and defects.

  20. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  1. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I

    2016-12-19

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.

  2. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores.

  3. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santomauro, Fabio G.; Grilj, Jakob; Mewes, Lars; Nedelcu, Georgian; Yakunin, Sergii; Rossi, Thomas; Capano, Gloria; Al Haddad, André; Budarz, James; Kinschel, Dominik; Ferreira, Dario S.; Rossi, Giacomo; Gutierrez Tovar, Mario; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Valerie; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Smolentsev, Grigory; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr)3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs+ cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials. PMID:28083541

  4. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information. PMID:27999368

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  7. Francium Spectroscopy for Weak Interaction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Francium, a radioactive element, is the heaviest alkali. Its atomic and nuclear structure makes it an ideal laboratory to study the weak interaction. Laser trapping and cooling in-line with the superconducting LINAC accelerator at Stony Brook opened the precision study of its atomic structure. I will present our proposal and progress towards weak interaction measurements at TRIUMF, the National Canadian Accelerator in Vancouver. These include the commissioning run of the Francium Trapping Facility, hyperfine anomaly measurements on a chain of Fr isotopes, the nuclear anapole moment through parity non-conserving transitions in the ground state hyperfine manifold. These measurements should shed light on the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction. This work is done by the FrPNC collaboration: S. Aubin College of William and Mary, J. A. Behr TRIUMF, R. Collister U. Manitoba, E. Gomez UASLP, G. Gwinner U. Manitoba, M. R. Pearson TRIUMF, L. A. Orozco UMD, M. Tandecki TRIUMF, J. Zhang UMD Supported by NSF and DOE from the USA; TRIUMF, NRC and NSERC from Canada; and CONACYT from Mexico

  8. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery.

  9. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  10. [Determination of trace elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn from different habitat by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xue, Yue-Qin; Gui, Ren-Yi; Sun, Su-Qin; Yin, Ming-Wen

    2010-03-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique was proposed to determine the content of Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, K, Ca, Mg, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Al, Se and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The RSD of the method was between 1.23% and 3.32%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method were between 95.8% and 104.20%. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method has the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity. It is suitable for the determination of the contents of metal elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn. The experimental results also indicated that different areas' Lophantherum gracile brongn had different trace elements content. The content of trace elements K, Mg, Ca, Fe and Mn beneficial to the human body was rich. The content of the heavy metal trace element Pb in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Hunan province was slightly high. The content of the heavy metal trace element Cu in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Guangdong province and Anhui province is also slightly higher. Beside, the contents of harmful trace heavy metal elements Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat are all lower than the limits of Chinese Pharmacopoeia and Green Trade Standard for Importing and Exporting Medicinal Plant and Preparation and National Food Sanitation Standard. These determination results provided the scientific data for further discussing the relationship between the content of trace elements in Lophantherum gracile brongn and the medicine efficacy.

  11. Comparison of selenium determination in liver samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, Irina Rudik; Buckley, Carol L; Carpenter, Nancy P; Poppenga, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that is often deficient in the natural diets of domestic animal species. The measurement of Se in whole blood or liver is the most accurate way to assess Se status for diagnostic purposes. This study was conducted to compare hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection and quantification of Se in liver samples. Sample digestion was accomplished with magnesium nitrate and nitric acid for HG-AAS and ICP-MS, respectively. The ICP-MS detection was optimized for 82Se with yttrium used as the internal standard and resulted in a method detection limit of 0.12 microg/g. Selenium was quantified by both methods in 310 samples from a variety of species that were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory at New Bolton Center (Kennett Square, PA) for routine diagnostic testing. Paired measurements for each sample were evaluated by a mean difference plot method. Limits of agreement were used to describe the maximum differences likely to occur between the 2 methods. Results suggest that under the specified conditions ICP-MS can be reliably used in place of AAS for quantitation of tissue Se at or below 2 microg/g to differentiate between adequate and deficient liver Se concentrations.

  12. Standardization and validation of a new atomic absorption spectroscopy technique for determination and quantitation of aluminium adjuvant in immunobiologicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arti; Bhalla, Sumir Rai; Rawat, Sameera; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kumar, Sunil

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, Aluminium quantification in immunobiologicals has been described using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The assay was found to be linear in 25-125 microg/ml Aluminium range. The procedure was found to be accurate for different vaccines with recoveries of external additions ranging between 93.26 and 103.41%. The mean Limit of Variation (L.V.) for both intra- and inter-assay precision was calculated to be 1.62 and 2.22%, respectively. Further the procedure was found to be robust in relation to digestion temperature, alteration in acid (HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)) ratio used for sample digestion and storage of digested vaccine samples up to a period of 15 days. After validation, AAS method was compared for its equivalency with routinely used complexometric titration method. On simultaneously applying on seven different groups of both bacterial and viral vaccines, viz., DPT, DT, TT, Hepatitis-A and B, Antirabies vaccine (cell culture) and tetravalent DPT-Hib, a high degree of positive correlation (+0.85-0.998) among AAS and titration methods was observed. Further AAS method was found to have an edge over complexometric titration method that a group of vaccines, viz., ARV (cell culture, adsorbed) and Hepatitis-A, in which Aluminium estimation is not feasible by pharmacopoeial approved complexometric titration method (possibly due to some interference in the sample matrix), this newly described and validated AAS assay procedure delivered accurate and reproducible results.

  13. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Habib; Naderi, Mehrnoush

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 microL, a sampling temperature of 27 degrees C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 microg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n=7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 microg L(-1) were also studied.

  14. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  15. Estimation of lead, cadmium and nickel content by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in dry fruit bodies of some macromycetes growing in Poland. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of lead, cadmium, and nickel in dry fruit bodies of 34 species of macromyoetes collected in Poland from 72 natural babitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was estimated.

  16. Quantitative estimatation of lead, cadmium. and nickel contents by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in fruitbodies of some macromycetes in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The contents of lead, cadmium and nickel in dry fruitbodies of 13 species of macromycetes collected in Poland from 33 natural habitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS were estimated.

  17. Interaction between atoms and slow light: a design study

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Faggiani, Rémi; Gill, Christopher; Petrov, Plamen G; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Bernon, Simon; Bouyer, Philippe; Boyer, Vincent; Lalanne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of on-chip integration of nanophotonic devices and cold atoms offers extremely-strong and pure light-matter interaction schemes, which may have profound impact on quantum information science. In this context, a longstanding obstacle is to achieve strong interaction between single atoms and single photons, while at the same time trap atoms in vacuum at large separation distances from dielectric surfaces. In this letter, we study new waveguide geometries that challenge these conflicting objectives. The designed photonic crystal waveguide is expected to offer a good compromise, which additionally allow for easy manipulation of atomic clouds around the structure.

  18. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  19. Atomic Defects in Two-Dimensional Materials: From Single-Atom Spectroscopy to Functionalities in Opto-/Electronics, Nanomagnetism, and Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinhua; Jin, Chuanhong; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2017-04-01

    Two-dimensional layered graphene-like crystals including transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received extensive research interest due to their diverse electronic, valleytronic, and chemical properties, with the corresponding optoelectronics and catalysis application being actively explored. However, the recent surge in two-dimensional materials science is accompanied by equally great challenges, such as defect engineering in large-scale sample synthesis. It is necessary to elucidate the effect of structural defects on the electronic properties in order to develop an application-specific strategy for defect engineering. Here, two aspects of the existing knowledge of native defects in two-dimensional crystals are reviewed. One is the point defects emerging in graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, as probed by atomically resolved electron microscopy, and their local electronic properties, as measured by single-atom electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The other will focus on the point defects in TMDs and their influence on the electronic structure, photoluminescence, and electric transport properties. This review of atomic defects in two-dimensional materials will offer a clear picture of the defect physics involved to demonstrate the local modulation of the electronic properties and possible benefits in potential applications in magnetism and catalysis.

  20. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  1. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Detection of copper in water using on-line plasma-excited atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porento, Mika; Sutinen, Veijo; Julku, Timo; Oikari, Risto

    2011-06-01

    A measurement method and apparatus was developed to measure continuously toxic metal compounds in industrial water samples. The method was demonstrated by using copper as a sample metal. Water was injected into the sample line and subsequently into a nitrogen plasma jet, in which the samples comprising the metal compound dissolved in water were decomposed. The transmitted monochromatic light was detected and the absorbance caused by copper atoms was measured. The absorbance and metal concentration were used to calculate sensitivity and detection limits for the studied metal. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and quantification for copper were 0.45 ± 0.02, 0.25 ± 0.01, and 0.85 ± 0.04 ppm, respectively.

  3. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  4. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M; Sokolov, I

    2015-07-28

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7 s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  5. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10–70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  6. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickermann, Andreas

    2013-07-15

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  7. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  8. Studies on coherence and decoherence in Fast Atom Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, J.; Lienemann, J. [Institut für Physik der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Schüller, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), AG 6.21, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Winter, H., E-mail: winter@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    A few years ago, quantum effects were observed for the scattering of fast atoms from surfaces under a grazing angle of incidence. We discuss basic features of Fast Atom Diffraction (FAD) which adds a further powerful method to the established tools in ion beam analysis and surface science. Attractive features of FAD in studies on the structure of surfaces comprise negligible radiation damage, cost effective operation of the complete setup, no charging effects in studies with insulators, and an extreme sensitivity to the topmost layer of surface atoms. The observation of diffraction patterns is based on the quantum coherence which is preserved during the scattering process with the target surface. We will discuss basic features of the coherence phenomena and its role for the observation of quantum effects in the angular distributions for grazingly scattered atoms. In a comparison of data obtained for H and He atoms we demonstrate that two different mechanisms for decoherence are important.

  9. State-to-state dynamics of elementary chemical reactions using Rydberg H-atom translational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming

    In this review, a few examples of state-to-state dynamics studies of both unimolecular and bimolecular reactions using the H-atom Rydberg tagging TOF technique were presented. From the H2O photodissociation at 157 nm, a direction dissociation example is provided, while photodissociation of H2O at 121.6 has provided an excellent dynamical case of complicated, yet direct dissociation process through conical intersections. The studies of the O(1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction has also been reviewed here. A prototype example of state-to-state dynamics of pure insertion chemical reaction is provided. Effect of the reagent rotational excitation and the isotope effect on the dynamics of this reaction have also been investigated. The detailed mechanism for abstraction channel in this reaction has also been closely studied. The experimental investigations of the simplest chemical reaction, the H3 system, have also been described here. Through extensive collaborations between theory and experiment, the mechanism for forward scattering product at high collision energies for the H + HD reaction was clarified, which is attributed to a slow down mechanism on the top of a quantized barrier transition state. Oscillations in the product quantum state resolved different cross sections have also been observed in the H + D2 reaction, and were attributed to the interference of adiabatic transition state pathways from detailed theoretical analysis. The results reviewed here clearly show the significant advances we have made in the studies of the state-to-state molecular reaction dynamics.

  10. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants; Spectroscopie atomique et mesures de grande precision: determination de constantes fonfamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, C

    2006-12-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm{sup -1}). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10{sup -9} began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is {alpha}{sub -1} = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10{sup -9}. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  11. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-10-21

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions.

  12. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  13. Atomic absorption spectroscopy for mercury, automated by sequential injection and miniaturized in lab-on-valve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erxleben, Holger; Ruzicka, Jaromir

    2005-08-15

    Sodium borohydride-based hydride generation was automated by using programmable flow within the lab-on-valve module. Mercury vapor, generated in the reaction mixture, was extracted in a gas/liquid separator. The gas-expansion separator was miniaturized and compared with the performance of a novel gas separator that exploits the combination of Venturi effect and reduced pressure. Cold vapor atomic spectroscopy was used as a model system, with detection of mercury by absorption at 254 nm and limit of detection of 9 microg of Hg/L, using 300 microL of sample and 100 microL of borohydride. This work introduces, for the first time, sequential injection technique for hydride generation, highlights advantages of using programmable flow, and outlines means for miniaturization of assays based on spectroscopy of volatile species.

  14. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  15. Performance of sheath electric field measurement by saturation spectroscopy in Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shusuke; Katayama, Kento; Nakano, Haruhisa; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We developed a diode laser-based system for measuring the sheath electric fields in low-temperature plasmas. The Stark spectrum of the Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen was measured by saturation spectroscopy with a fine spectral resolution. The spectrum observed experimentally was consistent with the theoretical Stark spectrum, and we succeeded in evaluating the electric field strength on the basis of the experimental Stark spectrum. A sensitive detection limit of 10 V/cm was achieved by the developed system.

  16. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  17. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  18. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few {mu}W c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions.

  19. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  20. Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of hydrogen sulfide by metastable helium and neon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Candori, Pietro; Bettoni, Marta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2014-08-21

    The dynamics of the Penning ionization of hydrogen sulfide molecules by collision with helium and metastable neon atoms, occurring in the thermal energy range, has been studied by analyzing the energy spectra of the emitted electrons obtained in our laboratory in a crossed beam experiment. These spectra are compared with the photoelectron spectra measured by using He(I) and Ne(I) photons under the same experimental conditions. In this way we obtained the negative energy shifts for the formation of H2S(+) ions in the first three accessible electronic states by He*(2(3,1)S1,0) and Ne*((3)P2,0) Penning ionization collisions: the 2b1 (X̃(2)B1) fundamental one, the first 5a1 (Ã(2)A1), and the second 2b2 (B̃(2)B2) excited states, respectively. The recorded energy shifts indicate that in the case of He* and Ne*-H2S the autoionization dynamics depends on the features of the collision complex and is mainly driven by an effective global attraction that comes from a balance among several non covalent intermolecular interaction components. This suggests that the Penning ionization should take place, in a specific range of intermolecular distances, as we have already observed in the case of Penning ionization of water molecules [Brunetti, B. G.; Candori, P.; Falcinelli, S.; Pirani, F.; Vecchiocattivi, F. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 164305-1-164305-8].

  1. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution.

  2. Determination of toxic metals in some herbal drugs through atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Bushra; Rizwani, Ghazala Hafeez; Naseem, Shahid

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a picture of occurrence of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Co, Fe, Ni, Zn) in some selected valuable herbal drugs (G. glabra, O. bracteatum, V. odorata , F. vulgare, C. cyminum, C. sativum, and Z. officinalis) purchased from three different zones (southern, eastern, and western) of Karachi city using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metal concentrations in these drugs were found in the range of: 3.26-30.46 for Pb, 1.6-4.91 for Cd, 0.65-120.21 for Cu, 83.74-433.76 for Zn, 1.61-186.75 for Cr, 0.48-76.97 for Ni, 5.54-77.97 for Co and 65.68-1652.89 µg/g for Fe. Percentage of heavy metals that were found beyond the permissible limits were: 71.4% for Pb, 28.51% for Cd, 14.2% for Cu, and 9.5 % for Cr. Significant difference was noticed for each heavy metal among herbal drugs as well as their zones of collection using two way ANOVA followed by least significant (LSD) test at p<0.05.Purpose of this research is to detect each type of heavy metal contaminant of herbal drugs by environmental pollution, as well as to highlight the health risks associated with the use of such herbal drugs that contain high levels of toxic heavy metals.

  3. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg.

  4. He atom surface spectroscopy: Surface lattice dynamics of insulators, metals and metal overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    During the first three years of this grant (1985--1988) the effort was devoted to the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom scattering (HAS) instrument which would be capable of determining the structure and dynamics of metallic, semiconductor or insulator crystal surfaces. The second three year grant period (1988--1991) has been dedicated to measurements. The construction of the instrument went better than proposed; it was within budget, finished in the proposed time and of better sensitivity and resolution than originally planned. The same success has been carried over to the measurement phase where the concentration has been on studies of insulator surfaces, as discussed in this paper. The experiments of the past three years have focused primarily on the alkali halides with a more recent shift to metal oxide crystal surfaces. Both elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were carried out on LiF, NaI, NaCl, RbCl, KBr, RbBr, RbI, CsF, CsI and with some preliminary work on NiO and MgO.

  5. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  6. Exploring the binding of 4-thiothymidine with human serum albumin by spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juling; Gu, Huaimin; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2014-01-30

    The interaction of 4-thiothymidine (S(4)TdR) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis under normal physiological conditions. In this work, the mechanism of the interaction between S(4)TdR and human serum albumin (HSA) was exploited by fluorescence, UV, CD circular, and SERS spectroscopic. Fluorescence and UV spectroscopy suggest that HSA intensities are significantly decreased when adding S(4)TdR to HAS, and the quenching mechanism of the fluorescence is static. Also, the ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS values across temperature indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The CD circular results show that there is little change in the secondary structure of HSA except the environment of amino acid changes when adding S(4)TdR to HSA. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) shows that the interaction between S(4)TdR and HSA can be achieved through different binding sites which are probably located in the II A and III A hydrophobic pockets of HSA which correspond to Sudlow's I and II binding sites. In addition, the molecular modeling displays that S(4)TdR-HSA complex is stabilized by hydrophobic forces, which result from amino acid residues. The atomic force microscopy results revealed that the single HSA molecular dimensions were larger after interaction of 4-thiothymidine. This work would be useful to understand the state of the transportation, distribution, and metabolism of the anticancer drugs in the human body, and it could provide a useful biochemistry parameter for the development of new anti-cancer drugs and research of pharmacology mechanisms.

  7. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  9. In-situ measurements of low-level mercury vapor exposure from dental amalgam with zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Stefan; Welzl, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Alongside food, emissions from amalgam fillings are an essential contribution to man's mercury burden. Previous methods for the determination of intraoral mercury vapor (Hg degrees ) release used principally some form of preconcentration of Hg on gold (film or wool), allowing relatively few measurements with unknown precision and sensitivity at selected times. Recently available computer-controlled Hg detectors operating on Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAAS) facilitate the direct real-time measurement of Hg degrees concentrations. It was the aim to adapt this method for a comparative investigation of emission processes from fillings in situ and from amalgam specimens in vitro. In addition to the ZAAS instrument, the apparatus consisted of a pump, magnetic valves, an electronic flow controller and a handle with a disposable mouth piece for aspiration of oral air. A programmable timer integrated the computer-controlled instrument operation and the data collection into a standard sampling protocol. A fast exponential decay of the emission was found after stimulation of amalgam specimens and of fillings in situ (halftimes 8.6 and 10.7 min). Precision was evaluated by a series of measurements on a single patient which indicated a consistently low coefficient of variation between 18% and 25%. After insertion of a few new fillings, sensitivity was high enough to detect a significant increase in emission against the background emission from the majority of old fillings. Zeeman-AAS in connection with a semi-automated sampling protocol and data storage provides precise in-situ measurements of Hg degrees emission from dental amalgam with real-time resolution. This facilitates the detailed exploration of the Hg degrees release kinetics and the applicability to large-scale studies.

  10. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andolfi

    Full Text Available Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  11. Atomic fluorescence study of high temperature aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.; Sethi, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet laser induced atomic fluorescence has been used to characterize supersonic jet aerodynamic levitation experiments. The levitated specimen was a 0.4 cm sapphire sphere that was separately heated at temperatures up to 2327 K by an infrared laser. The supersonic jet expansion and thermal gradients in the specimen wake were studied by measuring spatial variations in the concentration of atomic Hg added to the levitating argon gas stream. Further applications of atomic fluorescence in containerless experiments, such as ideal gas fluorescence thermometry and containerless process control are discussed.

  12. Tunneling spectroscopy of a phosphorus impurity atom on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinov, S. V.; Oreshkin, A. I., E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.phys.msu.su, E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, S. I. [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation); Haesendonck, C. van [Laboratorium voor Stoffysica en Magnetisme (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    We numerically model the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface electronic properties in the vicinity of a P donor impurity atom located near the surface. We find a notable increase in the surface local density of states (LDOS) around the surface dopant near the bottom of the empty surface state band π*, which we call a split state due to its limited spatial extent and energetic position inside the band gap. We show that despite the well-established bulk donor impurity energy level position at the very bottom of the conduction band, a surface donor impurity on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface might produce an energy level below the Fermi energy, depending on the impurity atom local environment. It is demonstrated that the impurity located in subsurface atomic layers is visible in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiment on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface. The quasi-1D character of the impurity image, observed in STM experiments, is confirmed by our computer simulations with a note that a few π-bonded dimer rows may be affected by the presence of the impurity atom. We elaborate a model that allows classifying atoms on the experimental low-temperature STM image. We show the presence of spatial oscillations of the LDOS by the density-functional theory method.

  13. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  14. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  15. Velocity-changing collisional effects in nonlinear atomic spectroscopy and photon echo decay in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    A general theory of atomic dipole coherence under the influence of collisional phase changes, inelastic effects and optically active atom velocity changes, including those due to anisotropic interactions is presented. Velocity change effects are obtained in closed form. Line shapes appear as convolutions of standard pressure broadening contours with velocity-change contours. Width and shift parameters for the He-broadened Na D lines at 2 m bar pressure, 380 K are calculated, as are He-induced photon echo decay rates for these lines. Overall agreement with xperiment is reasonably good.

  16. Noncollinear wave mixing of attosecond XUV and few-cycle optical laser pulses in gas-phase atoms: Toward multidimensional spectroscopy involving XUV excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Fidler, Ashley; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, which records transient wave-mixing signals in a medium, is a powerful tool to access microscopic information using light sources in the radio-frequency and optical regimes. The extension of this technique towards the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or even x-ray regimes holds the promise to uncover rich structural or dynamical information with even higher spatial or temporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate noncollinear wave mixing between weak XUV attosecond pulses and a strong near-infrared (NIR) few-cycle laser pulse in gas phase atoms (one photon of XUV and two photons of NIR). In the noncollinear geometry the attosecond and either one or two NIR pulses interact with argon atoms. Nonlinear XUV signals are generated in a spatially resolved fashion as required by phase matching. Different transition pathways can be identified from these background-free nonlinear signals according to the specific phase-matching conditions. Time-resolved measurements of the spatially gated XUV signals reveal electronic coherences of Rydberg wave packets prepared by a single XUV photon or XUV-NIR two-photon excitation, depending on the applied pulse sequences. These measurements open possible applications of tabletop multidimensional spectroscopy to the study of dynamics associated with valence or core excitation with XUV photons.

  17. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  18. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors.

  19. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  20. Atomic-resolution chemical mapping of ordered precipitates in Al alloys using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Sigurd; Jones, Lewys; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2017-05-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a common technique for chemical mapping in thin samples. Obtaining high-resolution elemental maps in the STEM is jointly dependent on stepping the sharply focused electron probe in a precise raster, on collecting a significant number of characteristic X-rays over time, and on avoiding damage to the sample. In this work, 80kV aberration-corrected STEM-EDS mapping was performed on ordered precipitates in aluminium alloys. Probe and sample instability problems are handled by acquiring series of annular dark-field (ADF) images and simultaneous EDS volumes, which are aligned and non-rigidly registered after acquisition. The summed EDS volumes yield elemental maps of Al, Mg, Si, and Cu, with sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise ratio to determine the elemental species of each atomic column in a periodic structure, and in some cases the species of single atomic columns. Within the uncertainty of the technique, S and β" phases were found to have pure elemental atomic columns with compositions Al2CuMg and Al2Mg5Si4, respectively. The Q' phase showed some variation in chemistry across a single precipitate, although the majority of unit cells had a composition Al6Mg6Si7.2Cu2.

  1. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  2. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  3. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  4. Microtesla NMR J-coupling spectroscopy with an unshielded atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Baranga, Andrei Ben-Amar; Dancheva, Yordanka; Rossi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical interpretation of NMR spectra of remotely magnetized samples, detected in an unshielded environment by means of a differential atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed in an ultra-low-field at an intermediate regime, where the J-coupling and the Zeeman energies have comparable values and produce rather complex line sets, which are satisfactorily interpreted.

  5. Microtesla NMR J-coupling spectroscopy with an unshielded atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Biancalana, Valerio; Baranga, Andrei Ben-Amar; Dancheva, Yordanka; Rossi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical interpretation of NMR spectra of remotely magnetized samples, detected in an unshielded environment by means of a differential atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed in an ultra-low-field at an intermediate regime, where the J-coupling and the Zeeman energies have comparable values and produce rather complex line sets, which are satisfactorily interpreted.

  6. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  7. Interface Energy Alignment of Atomic-Layer-Deposited VOx on Pentacene: an in Situ Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Gao, Yuanhong; Guo, Zheng; Su, Yantao; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-01-18

    Ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) vanadium oxide (VOx) interlayer has recently been demonstrated for remarkably reducing the contact resistance in organic electronic devices (Adv. Funct. Mater. 2016, 26, 4456). Herein, we present an in situ photoelectron spectroscopy investigation (including X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies) of ALD VOx grown on pentacene to understand the role of the ALD VOx interlayer for the improved contact resistance. The in situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations allow us to monitor the ALD growth process of VOx and trace the evolutions of the work function, pentacene HOMO level, and VOx defect states during the growth. The initial VOx growth is found to be partially delayed on pentacene in the first ∼20 ALD cycles. The underneath pentacene layer is largely intact after ALD. The ALD VOx is found to contain a high density of defect states starting from 0.67 eV below the Fermi level, and the energy level of these defect states is in excellent alignment with the HOMO level of pentacene, which therefore allows these VOx defect states to provide an efficient hole-injection pathway at the contact interface.

  8. Multi-channel atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography: a configuration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Begus, Samo; Xia, Hui; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Jazbinsek, Vojko; Trontelj, Zvonko; Romalis, Michael V

    2014-04-01

    Atomic magnetometers are emerging as an alternative to SQUID magnetometers for detection of biological magnetic fields. They have been used to measure both the magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. One of the virtues of the atomic magnetometers is their ability to operate as a multi-channel detector while using many common elements. Here we study two configurations of such a multi-channel atomic magnetometer optimized for MEG detection. We describe measurements of auditory evoked fields (AEF) from a human brain as well as localization of dipolar phantoms and auditory evoked fields. A clear N100m peak in AEF was observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of higher than 10 after averaging of 250 stimuli. Currently the intrinsic magnetic noise level is 4fTHz(-1/2) at 10Hz. We compare the performance of the two systems in regards to current source localization and discuss future development of atomic MEG systems.

  9. Studying the universality of field induced tunnel ionization times via high-order harmonic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soifer, Hadas; Negro, Matteo; Devetta, Michele; Faccialà, Davide; Vozzi, Caterina; de Silvestri, Sandro; Stagira, Salvatore; Dudovich, Nirit

    2014-01-01

    High-harmonics generation spectroscopy is a promising tool for resolving electron dynamics and structure in atomic and molecular systems. This scheme, commonly described by the strong field approximation, requires a deep insight into the basic mechanism that leads to the harmonics generation. Recently, we have demonstrated the ability to resolve the first stage of the process -- field induced tunnel ionization -- by adding a weak perturbation to the strong fundamental field. Here we generalize this approach and show that the assumptions behind the strong field approximation are valid over a wide range of tunnel ionization conditions. Performing a systematic study -- modifying the fundamental wavelength, intensity and atomic system -- we observed a good agreement with quantum path analysis over a range of Keldysh parameters. The generality of this scheme opens new perspectives in high harmonics spectroscopy, holding the potential of probing large, complex molecular systems.

  10. Thermal decomposition of CH3CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Zhang, Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; David, Donald E.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2012-10-01

    A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 μs after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 μs) are identified: H, H2, CH3, CO, CH2=CHOH, HC≡CH, H2O, and CH2=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH3CHO (+M) → CH3 + H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH2CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

  11. Unfolding features of bovine testicular hyaluronidase studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Nina; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Tang, Kai; Zou, Guolin

    2005-11-01

    Chemical unfolding of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (HAase) has been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermodynamic parameters were determined for unfolding HAase from changes in the intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity and the formations of several possible unfolding intermediates have been identified. This was further confirmed by representation of fluorescence data in terms of 'phase diagram'. The secondary structures of HAase have been assigned and semiquantitatively estimated from the FTIR. The occurrence of conformational change during chemical unfolding as judged by fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy indicated that the unfolding of HAase may not follow the typical two-state model.

  12. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved.

  13. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Christian P; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S P

    2016-01-01

    The CDMS was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of molecular species which may be observed in various astronomical sources using radio astronomy. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxilary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Seperate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases...

  14. Probing Electronic States of Magnetic Semiconductors Using Atomic Scale Microscopy & Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    N000140710348 Final Report as of December 2013 Objective: This project was focused on the application of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM...magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor can be used as a versatile platform for creating a topological superconductor . These initial...the application of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to understand the electronic structure of magnetically doped semiconductors and to develop

  15. Application of microemulsions in determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, B; Wei, Q; Wang, S; Yu, W

    1997-10-01

    A new method using microemulsified samples is presented. It is for the determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame absorption spectroscopy. The method has the advantage of simplicity, speed and the use of aqueous standards for calibration instead of organic standards. Coexistent elements do not disturb the determination. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  16. Structural Characterization of Atomically Thin Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    successfully been doped with carbon for use in neutron detectors [8]. 3 Figure 1.1: Currently, only graphene on a h-BN substrate has been...collecting the h- BN spectra to include the selection of appropriate excitation sources, use of filtering packages, and focusing objective. Chapter 4...of one another, it is often the practice of Raman spectroscopy to filter out both the Rayleigh laser line and anti- Stokes lines to solely isolate

  17. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gohary, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)]. E-mail: zhelgohary@yahoo.com

    2005-08-15

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO{sub 3} was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  18. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Z.

    2005-08-01

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO3 was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  19. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, N.A.; Fisher, R.F.; Asher, S.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is used to study hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Core-level and plasma excitations were examined as a function of hydrogen content. This technique and its interpretation reveals a consistent picture of the electron excitations within this important material. The a-Si:H thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. Their hydrogen concentrations ranged from 0% to 15%. Hydrogen content was determined by infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inspection of the silicon Auger-KLL peak confirmed the silicon core levels.

  20. Release profiles and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy of 99mTechnetium-fluconazole nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Danielle Nogueira; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Vilela, José Mário Carneiro; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2008-02-12

    Several classes of antifungal have been employed in candidiasis treatment, but patients with advanced immunodeficiency can present unsatisfactory results after therapy. In these cases, high doses of drugs or the use of multiple agents are sometimes used, and hence increasing the risk of serious side effects. Considering theses difficulties, the encapsulation of antifungal agents in nanoparticulate carriers has been used with the objective of modifying the pharmacokinetic of drugs resulting in more efficient treatments with less side effects. The purpose of this work was the preparation, characterization and the investigation of the release profiles of radiolabeled fluconazole nanocapsules. The size, homogeneity and zeta potential of NC preparations were determined with a Zetasizer 3000HS. The morphology and the structural organization were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The release study in vitro of NC was evaluated in physiologic solution with or without 70% mouse plasma. The labeling yield of fluconazole with 99mTc was 94% and the radiolabeled drug was stable within 24h period. The encapsulation percentage of 99mTc-fluconazole in PLA-POLOX NC and PLA-PEG NC was approximately of 30%. The average diameter calculated by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) varied from 236 to 356 nm, while the average diameter determined by AFM varied from 238 to 411 nm. The diameter/height relation decreased significantly when 25% glutaraldehyde was used for NC fixation on mica. The zeta potential varied from -55 to -69 nm and surface-modified NC showed lower absolute values than conventional NC. The in vitro release of 99mTc-fluconazole in plasma medium of the conventional and surface-modified NC was greater than in saline. The drug release in plasma medium from conventional NC was faster than for surface-modified NC. The results obtained in this work suggest that the nanocapsules containing fluconazole could be used to identify infectious foci, due to the properties

  1. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  2. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  3. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  4. Extraction and analysis of lead in sweeteners by flow-injection Donnan dialysis with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, A; Allen, L B

    2001-10-01

    Flow-injection Donnan dialysis is demonstrated for the extraction of lead in sweeteners using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). For spiked concentrations in the low microgram per gram range, recoveries were greater than 90%, and the relative standard deviation was typically less than 10% for a 15-min dialysis procedure. The method detection limit is 350 ng/g. Donnan dialysis is shown to be successful for the extraction of lead in sucrose, corn syrup, and honey but limited in performance for molasses and artificial syrup. This paper also includes a comparison to other procedures for the determination of lead in sweeteners and presents options for realizing improved method performance with Donnan dialysis.

  5. Systematic effects in the measurement of the negatively charged pion mass using laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2016-01-01

    The collision-induced shift and broadening of selected dipole transition lines of pionic helium in gaseous helium at low temperatures up to $T=12$ K and pressure up to a few bar are calculated within variable phase function approach. We predict blue shift of the resonance frequencies of the $(n,l)=(16,15) \\rightarrow (16,14) $ and $(16,15) \\rightarrow (17,14)$ unfavored transitions and red shift for the favored transition $(17,16) \\rightarrow (16,15)$. The result may be helpful in reducing the systematic error in proposed future experiments for determination of the negatively charged pion mass from laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms.

  6. Testing the distance-dependence of the van der Waals interaction between an atom and a surface through spectroscopy in a vapor nanocell

    CERN Document Server

    Laliotis, A; Todorov, P; Hamdi, I; Dutier, G; Yarovitski, A; Saltiel, S; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Ducloy, M; Bloch, D; Laliotis, Athanasdios; Maurin, Isabelle; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Dutier, Gabriel; Yarovitski, Alexander; Saltiel, Solomon; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Ducloy, Martial; Bloch, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents our current measurements in a vapor nanocell aiming at a test of the distance-dependence of the atom-surface interaction, when simple asymptotic descriptions may turn to be not valid. A state-of-the-art of atom-surface interaction measurements is provided as an introduction, along with the comparison with the theory of the van der Waals (or Casimir-Polder) interaction; it is followed by a presentation of the most salient features of nanocell spectroscopy

  7. FTIR Spectroscopy for Carbon Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţucureanu, Vasilica; Matei, Alina; Avram, Andrei Marius

    2016-11-01

    Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a versatile technique for the characterization of materials belonging to the carbon family. Based on the interaction of the IR radiation with matter this technique may be used for the identification and characterization of chemical structures. Most important features of this method are: non-destructive, real-time measurement and relatively easy to use. Carbon basis for all living systems has found numerous industrial applications from carbon coatings (i.e. amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films: diamond-like carbon (DLC) films) to nanostructured materials (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene) and carbon materials at nanoscale or carbon dots (CDots). In this paper, we present the FTIR vibrational spectroscopy for the characterization of diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerene and carbon quantum dots (CQDs), without claiming to cover entire field.

  8. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method.

  9. Optical detection of potassium chloride vapor using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective optical technique to detect potassium chloride (KCl) vapor is introduced. The technique is based on the photofragmentation of KCl molecules, using a pulsed UV laser, and optical probing of the temporarily increased amount of potassium atoms with a near-infrared laser. The two laser beams are aligned to go through the sample volume along the same optical path. The performance of the technique is demonstrated by detecting KCl concentrations from 25 ppb to 30 ppm in a temperature-controlled cell.

  10. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  12. Lattice dynamic studies from {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katada, Motomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Hachioji (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-03-01

    New complexes {l_brace}(Eu(napy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3})(Fe(CN){sub 6})4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}, bpy({l_brace}(Eu(bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4})(Fe(CN){sub 6})1.5bpy4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}) and ({l_brace}(Eu(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})(Fe(CN){sub 6})2phen{r_brace}{sub x}) etc were synthesized using phenanthroline and bipyridine. Lattice dynamic behaviors of Eu and Fe atom in the complexes were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. By {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectrum and parameters of new complexes, bpy complex showed the largest quadrupole splitting value, indicating bad symmetry of Eu ligand in the environment. Molecular structure of napy, bpy and phen complex were shown. These complexes are consisted of Eu atom coordinated with ligand and water molecule, of which (Fe(CN){sub 6}){sup 3-} ion formed one dimentional polymer chain and naphthyridines formed stacking structure. New complexes were observed by {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, too. The quadrupole splitting values were very different each other, indicating change of symmetry of Fe atom in the environment and three valence low spin state of Fe in the complex. (S.Y.)

  13. Optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, C.; Münchow, F.; Görlitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of {}^{87}Rb and {}^{176}Yb in a continuously loaded double-species magneto-optical trap. An excited vibrational level of Rb*Yb which is energetically close to the 5^2P_{1/2} state of Rb is coupled by a strong laser field to a vibrational level in the ground state of RbYb and probed by a weak probe laser field. The induced Autler-Townes splittings in the photoassociation spectra allow us to determine relative Franck-Condon factors of molecular transitions in RbYb.

  14. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscetti I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Moscetti,1 Emanuela Teveroni,2,3 Fabiola Moretti,3 Anna Rita Bizzarri,1 Salvatore Cannistraro1 1Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Department DEB, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Università Cattolica di Roma, Roma, Italy; 3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR, Roma, Italy Abstract: Murine double minute 2 (MDM2 and 4 (MDM4 are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. Keywords: MDM2, MDM4, atomic force spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance

  15. Hyperfine Interactions in Iron Meteorites: Comparative Study by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Grokhovsky, V. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2004-11-15

    The iron meteorites Sikhote-Alin, Bilibino, Chinga and Dronino with different Ni concentration and terrestrial age were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Different Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were determined for studied meteorites and possible Fe-Ni phases were supposed.

  16. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  17. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  18. Determination of metal concentration in fat supplements for swine nutrition by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Marina; Faeti, Valerio; Manfredini, Matteo; Manzini, Daniela; Marchetti, Andrea; Sighinolfi, Simona

    2005-01-01

    The presence of some essential and toxic metals in fat supplements for swine diet was investigated. Collected samples represented a relevant production of the Italian industry. In particular, some samples were enriched with antioxidants or waste cooking oils. The method for the determination of Ca, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fat samples was developed by means of a certified reference material (CRM 186) and a representative fatty sample (RFS). All samples were digested in closed vessels in a microwave oven and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The entire analytical method provided a satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility confirmed by agreement between the experimental recovery data obtained for the CRM 186 sample and, with the method of standard additions, for the RFS material. The samples generally showed a small amount of metals compared with the recommended daily intake for the essential elements. On the other hand, some samples contained a significant concentration, from an analytical point of view, of Cd, Ni, and Pb. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to inspect the experimental data obtained from samples analysis. Basically no differences were detected in terms of metal concentration among the fat supplements analyzed.

  19. Review of atomic data needs for active charge-exchange spectroscopy on ITERa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, O.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Jaspers, R.; Reiter, D.

    2008-10-01

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1×1012-2×1012cm-3, which is significantly below the ITER density of 1014cm-3.

  20. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  1. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fraia, M., E-mail: michele.di.fraia@desy.de [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); O’Keeffe, P. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Lyamayev, V. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Feyer, V.; Moise, A. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 – Km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Devetta, M.; Piseri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  2. Mechanically functional amyloid fibrils in the adhesive of a marine invertebrate as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Mostaert, Anika; Crockett, Rowena; Kearn, Graham; Cherny, Izhack; Gazit, Ehud; C Serpell, Louise; P Jarvis, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are primarily known in a pathogenic context for their association with a wide range of debilitating human diseases. Here we show a marine invertebrate (Entobdella soleae) utilizes functional amyloid fibrils comparable to those of a unicellular prokaryote (Escherichia coli). Thioflavin-T binding and Raman spectroscopy provided evidence for the presence of amyloid in the adhesive of Entobdella soleae. We elucidated that for these two very different organisms, amyloid fibrils provide adhesive and cohesive strength to their natural adhesives. Comparing the nanoscale mechanical responses of these fibrils with those of pathogenic amyloid by atomic force microscopy revealed that the molecular level origin of the cohesive strength was associated with the generic intermolecular β-sheet structure of amyloid fibrils. Functional adhesive residues were found only in the case of the functional amyloid. Atomic force microscopy provided a useful means to characterize the internal structural forces within individual amyloid fibrils and how these relate to the mechanical performance of both functional and pathogenic amyloid. The mechanistic link of amyloid-based cohesive and adhesive strength could be widespread amongst natural adhesives, irrespective of environment, providing a new strategy for biomimicry and a new source of materials for understanding the formation and stability of amyloid fibrils more generally.

  3. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Lange

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements. When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111 √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  4. Identification of Dimeric Methylalumina Surface Species during Atomic Layer Deposition Using Operando Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ryan A; McAnally, Michael O; Schatz, George C; Stair, Peter C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2017-02-15

    Operando surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to successfully identify hitherto unknown dimeric methylalumina surface species during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a silver surface. Vibrational modes associated with the bridging moieties of both trimethylaluminum (TMA) and dimethylaluminum chloride (DMACl) surface species were found during ALD. The appropriate monomer vibrational modes were found to be absent as a result of the selective nature of SERS. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed to locate and identify the expected vibrational modes. An operando localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrometer was utilized to account for changes in SER signal as a function of the number of ALD cycles. DMACl surface species were unable to be measured after multiple ALD cycles as a result of a loss in SERS enhancement and shift in LSPR. This work highlights how operando optical spectroscopy by SERS and LSPR scattering are useful for probing the identity and structure of the surface species involved in ALD and, ultimately, catalytic reactions on these support materials.

  5. Analytical study of ultrasound influence on the molten metals atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonnikova, A.; Arkhipov, V.; Boiko, V.; Basalaev, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Zolotorev, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the study of influence of ultrasound on liquid atomization using ejection nozzles. Two principles of influence of ultrasound on the atomization process such as a change of conditions on gas-liquid boundary during the generation of ultrasound oscillation in the gas and liquid jet (film) disintegration under the action of capillary forces in cases of generation of ultrasound oscillation in the liquid are considered. The optimal values of the ultrasound oscillation frequencies are calculated. Two constructions of the nozzles patented are proposed.

  6. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium vertical bar M vertical bar=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kips, A.; Vassen, W.; Hogervorst, W.; Dando, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. /M/ = 1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 S-1(0) metastable state. Spectra were recorded for epsilon = -2.940(4), epsilon = -2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and epsilon = -1.760(4), above the saddl

  7. Dielectric barrier discharges with steep voltage rise: mapping of atomic nitrogen in single filaments measured by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, C.; Spaan, M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Thomson, M.; Wegst, R.; Döbele, H. F.; Neiger, M.

    2001-08-01

    Space and time resolved relative atomic density distributions of nitrogen have been measured for the first time at a single filament within a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with submillimetre radial dimensions. Two-photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy of atomic nitrogen using radiation at λ = 206.7 nm is applied to a DBD with fast rising voltage amplitudes. The decay time of the atomic nitrogen density depends strongly on the position within the discharge and the distance from the dielectric where the lifetime is maximum. Admixed oxygen leads to an increase of the N density decay by an order of magnitude even at small fractions.

  8. Mapping chemical disorder and ferroelectric distortions in the double perovskite compound Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6 by atomic resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biškup, Neven; Álvarez-Serrano, Inmaculada; Veiga, Maria; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Pennycook, Stephen J; Varela, Maria

    2014-06-01

    In this work we report a study of the chemical and structural order of the double perovskite compound Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6 for compositions x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1. A noticeable disorder at the B-site in the Mn and Ti sublattice is detected at the atomic scale by electron energy-loss spectroscopy for all x values, resulting in Mn-rich and Ti-rich regions. For x ≥ 0.75, the cubic unit cell doubles and lowers its symmetry because of structural rearrangements associated with a giant ferroelectric displacement of the perovskite B-site cation. We discuss this finding in the light of the large electroresistance observed in Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6, x ≥ 0.75.

  9. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  10. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in unused lubricating oils by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, A P

    1995-12-01

    Varying concentrations of lanthanum and strontium were added to solutions of ashed unused lubricating oils for the determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc content using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. At least 3000 mug g(-1) of lanthanum or strontium was required to completely overcome the interference of the phosphate ion, PO(3-)(4), and give peak values for calcium. The presence of lanthanum or strontium did not cause an appreciable increase in the amount of magnesium and zinc obtained from the analyses. The method is fast and reproducible, and the coefficients of variation calculated for the elements using one of the samples were 1.6% for calcium, 3.5% for magnesium and 0.2% for zinc. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  11. A constraint on antigravity of antimatter from precision spectroscopy of simple atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of antigravity for antiparticles is an attractive target for various experimental projects. There are a number of theoretical arguments against it but it is not quite clear what kind of experimental data and theoretical suggestions are involved. In this paper we present straightforward arguments against a possibility of antigravity based on a few simple theoretical suggestions and some experimental data. The data are: astrophysical data on rotation of the Solar System in respect to the center of our galaxy and precision spectroscopy data on hydrogen and positronium. The theoretical suggestions for the case of absence of the gravitational field are: equality of electron and positron mass and equality of proton and positron charge. We also assume that QED is correct at the level of accuracy where it is clearly confirmed experimentally.

  12. A constraint on antigravity of antimatter from precision spectroscopy of simple atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshenboim, S. G.

    2009-10-01

    Consideration of antigravity for antiparticles is an attractive target for various experimental projects. There are a number of theoretical arguments against it but it is not quite clear what kind of experimental data and theoretical suggestions are involved. In this paper we present straightforward arguments against a possibility of antigravity based on a few simple theoretical suggestions and some experimental data. The data are: astrophysical data on rotation of the Solar System in respect to the center of our galaxy and precision spectroscopy data on hydrogen and positronium. The theoretical suggestions for the case of absence of the gravitational field are: equality of electron and positron mass and equality of proton and positron charge. We also assume that QED is correct at the level of accuracy where it is clearly confirmed experimentally.

  13. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atoms in Strong Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Charles; Nayfeh, Munir

    1990-01-01

    This book collects the lectures given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Atoms in Strong Fields", which took place on the island of Kos, Greece, during the two weeks of October 9-21,1988. The designation "strong field" applies here to an external electromagnetic field that is sufficiently strong to cause highly nonlinear alterations in atomic or molecular struc­ ture and dynamics. The specific topics treated in this volume fall into two general cater­ gories, which are those for which strong field effects can be studied in detail in terrestrial laboratories: the dynamics of excited states in static or quasi-static electric and magnetic fields; and the interaction of atoms and molecules with intense laser radiation. In both areas there exist promising opportunities for research of a fundamental nature. An electric field of even a few volts per centimeter can be very strong on the atom­ ic scale, if it acts upon a weakly bound state. The study of Rydberg states with high reso­ lution laser spectroscop...

  15. Some studies of the interaction between N-two level atoms and three level atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.M. Abo-Kahla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the analytical solution for the model that describes the interaction between a three level atom and two systems of N-two level atoms. The effect of the quantum numbers on the atomic inversion and the purity, for some special cases of the initial states, are investigated. We observe that the atomic inversion and the purity change remarkably by the change of the quantum numbers.

  16. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-06-01

    Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. The temperature is obtained using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha– Boltzmann equation method. Both parameters are studied as a function of delay time with respect to the onset of the laser pulse. The results are discussed. The time window where the plasma is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), necessary for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of samples, is deduced from the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Cu I lines. It is found to be 700–1000 ns.

  17. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  18. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  19. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miccio, Luis A. [Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, P. M. de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain and Departamento de Física de Materiales UPV/EHU, Fac. de Química, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Schwartz, Gustavo A. [Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, P. M. de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain and Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  20. Evaluating the Optoelectronic Quality of Hybrid Perovskites by Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy with Noise Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byungho; Lee, Sangheon; Cho, Duckhyung; Kim, Jinhyun; Hwang, Taehyun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Hong, Seunghun; Moon, Taeho; Park, Byungwoo

    2016-11-16

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have emerged as promising candidates for next-generation solar cells. To attain high photovoltaic efficiency, reducing the defects in perovskites is crucial along with a uniform coating of the films. Also, evaluating the quality of synthesized perovskites via facile and adequate methods is important as well. Herein, CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites were synthesized by applying second solvent dripping to nonstoichiometric precursors containing excess CH3NH3I. The resulting perovskite films exhibited a larger average grain size with a better crystallinity compared to that from stoichiometric precursors. As a result, the performance of planar perovskite solar cells was significantly improved, achieving an efficiency of 14.3%. Furthermore, perovskite films were effectively analyzed using a conductive AFM and noise spectroscopy, which have been uncommon in the field of perovskite solar cells. Comparing the topography and photocurrent maps, the variation of photocurrents in nanoscale was systematically investigated, and a linear relationship between the grain size and photocurrent was revealed. Also, noise analyses with a conductive probe enabled examination of the defect density of perovskites at specific grain interiors by excluding the grain-boundary effect, and reduced defects were clearly observed for the perovskites using CH3NH3I-rich precursors.

  1. Photons and (artificial) atoms: an overview of optical spectroscopy techniques on quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamivakas, A. N.; Atatüre, M.

    2010-01-01

    In most branches within experimental physics technical prowess lies at the heart of many seminal works. From the observation of the photoelectric effect and the ultraviolet catastrophe that led to the development of quantum mechanics to the first transistor that shaped the modern age of electronics, significant physical insight has been achieved on the shoulders of technical advances and progress. Research on self-assembled quantum dots may be a drop in the sea of physics, but it still is no exception to this trend, and more physical insight continues to be revealed as the tools of the trade get increasingly more complex and advanced. This article is written primarily for senior undergraduate students and first year graduate students of experimental physics involving optically active quantum dots. More often than not, we have seen students shuffling through journal articles trying to relate the reported physics to the used experimental techniques. What we want to cover here is not in any way the history or the recent progress in quantum dot research - there are an ample number of topical books and review articles for that - but rather to highlight a selection of optics-based measurement techniques that have led to significant progress in our understanding of quantum dot physics as well as their applications in the last two decades. We hope a basic survey of the relevant optical spectroscopy techniques will help the newcomers in connecting the dots between measurements and physics.

  2. Repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled Sr atoms using the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition

    CERN Document Server

    Mickelson, P G; Anzel, P; DeSalvo, B J; Nagel, S B; Traverso, A J; Yan, M; Killian, T C

    2009-01-01

    We describe repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled strontium (Sr) atoms using the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition. Atom number in a magneto-optical trap is enhanced by driving this transition because Sr atoms that have decayed into the (5s5p)3P2 dark state are repumped back into the (5s2)1S0 ground state. Spectroscopy of 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr improves the value of the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition frequency for 88Sr and determines the isotope shifts for the transition.

  3. Repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled Sr atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Anzel, P.; De Salvo, B. J.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Yan, M.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    We describe repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled strontium (Sr) atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition. Atom number in a magneto-optical trap is enhanced by driving this transition because Sr atoms that have decayed into the (5s5p)3P2 dark state are repumped back into the (5s2)1S0 ground state. Spectroscopy of 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr and 88Sr improves the value of the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition frequency and determines the isotope shifts for the transition accurately enough to guide laser-cooling experiments with less abundant isotopes.

  4. Total internal reflection spectroscopy for studying soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David A; Bain, Colin D

    2014-02-28

    Total internal reflection (TIR) spectroscopy is a widely used technique to study soft matter at interfaces. This tutorial review aims to provide researchers with an overview of the principles, experimental design and applications of TIR spectroscopy to enable them to understand how this class of techniques might be used in their research. It also highlights limitations and pitfalls of TIR techniques, which will assist readers in critically analysing the literature. Techniques covered include attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), TIR fluorescence, TIR Raman scattering and cavity-enhanced techniques. Other related techniques are briefly described.

  5. Multi-Electron Coincidence Studies of Atoms and Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Egil

    2010-01-01

    This thesis concerns multi-ionization coincidence measurements of atoms and small molecules using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer designed for multi-electron coincidence studies. Also, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used together with the TOF electron  spectrometer for electron-ion coincidence measurements. The multi-ionization processes have been studied by employing a pulsed discharge lamp in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region and synchrotron radiation i...

  6. A tight-binding study of single-atom transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hoon; Lee, Sunhee; Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Simmons, Michelle Y; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2015-01-21

    A detailed theoretical study of the electronic and transport properties of a single atom transistor, where a single phosphorus atom is embedded within a single crystal transistor architecture, is presented. Using a recently reported deterministic single-atom transistor as a reference, the electronic structure of the device is represented atomistically with a tight-binding model, and the channel modulation is simulated self-consistently with a Thomas-Fermi method. The multi-scale modeling approach used allows confirmation of the charging energy of the one-electron donor charge state and explains how the electrostatic environments of the device electrodes affects the donor confinement potential and hence extent in gate voltage of the two-electron charge state. Importantly, whilst devices are relatively insensitive to dopant ordering in the highly doped leads, a ∼1% variation of the charging energy is observed when a dopant is moved just one lattice spacing within the device. The multi-scale modeling method presented here lays a strong foundation for the understanding of single-atom device structures: essential for both classical and quantum information processing.

  7. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  8. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  10. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  11. Atomic force microscope study of three-dimensional nanostructure sidewalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa [SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Gondran, Carolyn F H [Advanced Technology Development Facility, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Michelson, Diane K [International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States)

    2007-08-22

    Next generation planar and non-planar complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) structures are three-dimensional nanostructures with multi-layer stacks that can contain films thinner than ten atomic layers. The high resolution of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is typically chosen for studying properties of these stacks such as film thickness, interface and interfacial roughness. However, TEM sample preparation is time-consuming and destructive, and TEM analysis is expensive and can provide problematic results for surface and interface roughness. Therefore, in this paper, we present the use of direct measurements of sidewall surface structures by conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an alternative or complementary method for studying multi-layer film stacks and as the preferred method for studying FinFET sidewall surface roughness. In addition to these semiconductor device applications, this AFM sidewall measurement technique could be used for other three-dimensional nanostructures.

  12. Studies of Atomic Free Radicals Stored in a Cryogenic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David M.; Hubbard, Dorthy (Technical Monitor); Alexander, Glen (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-Helium Solids are porous gel-like solids consisting of impurity atoms and molecules surrounded by thin layers of solid helium. They provide an ideal medium for matrix isolation of free radicals to prevent recombination and store chemical energy. In this work electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and ultrasound techniques have all been employed to study the properties of these substances. Detailed studies via electron spin resonance of exchange tunneling chemical reactions involving hydrogen and deuterium molecular and atomic impurities in these solids have been performed and compared with theory. Concentrations of hydrogen approaching the quantum solid criterion have been produced. Structured studies involving X ray diffraction, ultrasound, and electron spin resonance have shown that the impurities in impurity helium solids are predominantly contained in impurity clusters, with each cluster being surrounded by thin layers of solid helium.

  13. Sliding of poly(vinyl chloride) on metals studied by Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    The sliding of polyvinyl chloride on nickel, iron and S-Monel has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Polymer was not transferred to the metals, rather shear appeared to take place at the interface. The metal was progressively chlorinated as the polymer made multiple passes on the surface. The thickness of this chlorine film was the order of one atomic layer. Electron-induced desorption studies indicate that the chlorine is chemisorbed to the metal. These results are interpreted as evidence for mechanically induced and/or thermal degradation of the polymer during sliding. Degradation products of HCl and Cl2 which chemisorb to the metal are evolved near the interface.

  14. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  15. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C [Grupo de Fisica de Superfcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao/Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J S, E-mail: caio@ufba.br [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente-INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-280 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the {Gamma} point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  16. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy 2. Appendix A: Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1992: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    This work supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Services, Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy during the period July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1992, resulted in noteworthy scientific results in three categories which we shall discuss in turn: The spectroscopy of high-lying doubly-excited states of H{sup {minus}}, interactions with thin foils, and multiphoton processes. Radiological safety concerns and slow beam studies are also briefly discussed.

  17. Firing of Clays Studied by X-ray Diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    Three bentonites of varying purity were fired in air under controlled conditions up to 1300{sup o}C in an attempt to provide data for the assessment of firing techniques used in prehistoric pottery making. X-ray diffraction of samples heated at increasing temperatures allows to study the mineral transformations, the breakdown of the clay structure and the formation of new minerals in the high-temperature region. Moessbauer spectroscopy reveals the change of valence state and of the environment of the iron atoms on heating. Non iron-bearing minerals are only accessible by X-ray diffraction, while iron-containing oxidic and amorphous phases may be difficult to detect, due to poor crystallinity and small particle size. The combination of X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy therefore has a considerable potential in the study of the chemical and physical transformations occurring in pottery clays during firing.

  18. Firing of Clays Studied by X-ray Diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, W.

    2004-06-01

    Three bentonites of varying purity were fired in air under controlled conditions up to 1300°C in an attempt to provide data for the assessment of firing techniques used in prehistoric pottery making. X-ray diffraction of samples heated at increasing temperatures allows to study the mineral transformations, the breakdown of the clay structure and the formation of new minerals in the high-temperature region. Mössbauer spectroscopy reveals the change of valence state and of the environment of the iron atoms on heating. Non iron-bearing minerals are only accessible by X-ray diffraction, while iron-containing oxidic and amorphous phases may be difficult to detect, due to poor crystallinity and small particle size. The combination of X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy therefore has a considerable potential in the study of the chemical and physical transformations occurring in pottery clays during firing.

  19. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  20. Fingerprinting of complex mixtures with the use of high performance liquid chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Yongnian [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China)], E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn; Peng Yunyan [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Kokot, Serge [Inorganic Materials Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2008-05-26

    The molecular and metal profile fingerprints were obtained from a complex substance, Atractylis chinensis DC-a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), with the use of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) techniques. This substance was used in this work as an example of a complex biological material, which has found application as a TCM. Such TCM samples are traditionally processed by the Bran, Cut, Fried and Swill methods, and were collected from five provinces in China. The data matrices obtained from the two types of analysis produced two principal component biplots, which showed that the HPLC fingerprint data were discriminated on the basis of the methods for processing the raw TCM, while the metal analysis grouped according to the geographical origin. When the two data matrices were combined into a one two-way matrix, the resulting biplot showed a clear separation on the basis of the HPLC fingerprints. Importantly, within each different grouping the objects separated according to their geographical origin, and they ranked approximately in the same order in each group. This result suggested that by using such an approach, it is possible to derive improved characterisation of the complex TCM materials on the basis of the two kinds of analytical data. In addition, two supervised pattern recognition methods, K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) method, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were successfully applied to the individual data matrices-thus, supporting the PCA approach.

  1. Force spectroscopy of hyaluronan by atomic force microscopy: from hydrogen-bonded networks toward single-chain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Marina I; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Vancso, G Julius

    2007-09-01

    The conformational behavior of hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharide chains in aqueous NaCl solution was characterized directly at the single-molecule level. This communication reports on one of the first single-chain atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed at variable temperatures, investigating the influence of the temperature on the stability of the HA single-chain conformation. Through AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the temperature destabilization of a local structure was proven. This structure involved a hydrogen-bonded network along the polymeric chain, with hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of HA and possibly water, and a change from a nonrandom coil to a random coil behavior was observed when increasing the temperature from 29 +/- 1 to 46 +/- 1 degrees C. As a result of the applied force, this superstructure was found to break progressively at room temperature. The use of a hydrogen-bonding breaker solvent demonstrated the hydrogen-bonded water-bridged nature of the network structure of HA single chains in aqueous NaCl solution.

  2. Elemental Content in Brown Rice by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Reveals the Evolution of Asian Cultivated Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yawen Zeng; Luxiang Wang; Juan Du; Jiafu Liu; Shuming Yang; Xiaoying Pu; Fenghui Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship for classification traits and eight mineral elements in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) from Yunnan Province in China was carried out using microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and the analytical procedures were carefully controlled and validated. In general, the results show that the mean levels of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Cu in brown rice for 789 accessions of rice landraces was distinctly lower than that of improved cultivars. They further demonstrate that Ca plays an important role in the differentiation of subspecies indica-japonica, especially to enhance adaptation of cold stress, and that five mineral elements in brown rice enhance the eurytopicity from landrace to improved cultivar. Hierarchical cluster analysis, using average linkage from SPSS software based on eight mineral elements in brown rice, showed that Yunnan rice could be grouped into rice landrace and improved cultivar, with the rice landrace being further clustered into five subgroups, and that, interestingly, purple rice does not cluster with either of the groups. Our present data confirm that indica is the closest relative of late rice and white rice, and that they constitute rice landraces together, whereas japonica is the closest relatives of non-nuda, early-mid and glutinous rice. It is further shown that japonica, non-nuda, early-mid, glutinous, white and red rice might be more primitive than indica, nuda, late, non-glutinous and purple rice, respectively.

  3. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  4. Study of nanoscale damage evolution using embedded atom method potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Horstemeyer, Mark; Gullet, Phillip

    2004-03-01

    Damage evolution at nanoscale has been studied using embedded atom method (EAM) potentials based on molecular dynamics principles. The simulations were performed using WARP, a parallel computing atomistic stress simulator based on Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials for Aluminum. By varying the number of atoms from a few hundred to a few hundred thousands, we analyzed void nucleation, growth and coalescence at increasing material length scale. Rectangular specimens with and without voids were subjected to uniaxial tension up to a total strain of 50rates. Uniaxial stress-strain curves, void-volume fraction evolution and stress triaxiality were monitored. The results indicated that nucleation process is highly dependent on the material length scale, while the void growth and void coalescence mechanisms were almost indifferent to the increasing length scale. Material length scale mostly affects dislocation nucleation mechanisms that lead to void formation. Strain rate also significantly influences the stress-strain response during plastic deformation at various length scales.

  5. Metal release in metallothioneins induced by nitric oxide: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Elena; Martín-Gago, José A; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2004-12-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins that include metal ions in thiolate clusters. The capability of metallothioneins to bind different metals has suggested their use as biosensors for different elements. We study here the interaction of nitric oxide with rat liver MTs by using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. We univocally show that the presence of NO induces the release of Zn atoms from the MT structure to the solution. Zn ions transform in the presence of NO from a tetrahedral four-fold coordinated environment in the MT into a regular octahedral six-fold coordinated state, with interatomic distances compatible with those of Zn solvated in water.

  6. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  7. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  8. VSI@ESS: Case study for a vibrational spectroscopy instrument at the european spallation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, Marco; Fedrigo, Anna; Celli, Milva; Colognesi, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique where elementary excitations at relatively high frequency are detected via inelastic neutron scattering. This technique attracts a high interest in a large fraction of the scientific community in the fields of chemistry, materials science, physics, and biology, since one of its main applications exploits the large incoherent scattering cross section of the proton with respect to all the other elements, whose dynamics can be spectroscopically detected, even if dissolved in very low concentration in materials composed of much heavier atoms. We have proposed a feasibility study for a Vibrational Spectroscopy Instrument (VSI) at the European Spallation Source ESS. Here, we will summarize the preliminary design calculations and the corresponding McStas simulation results for a possible ToF, Inverted Geometry, VSI beamline.

  9. VSI@ESS: Case study for a vibrational spectroscopy instrument at the european spallation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoppi Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique where elementary excitations at relatively high frequency are detected via inelastic neutron scattering. This technique attracts a high interest in a large fraction of the scientific community in the fields of chemistry, materials science, physics, and biology, since one of its main applications exploits the large incoherent scattering cross section of the proton with respect to all the other elements, whose dynamics can be spectroscopically detected, even if dissolved in very low concentration in materials composed of much heavier atoms. We have proposed a feasibility study for a Vibrational Spectroscopy Instrument (VSI at the European Spallation Source ESS. Here, we will summarize the preliminary design calculations and the corresponding McStas simulation results for a possible ToF, Inverted Geometry, VSI beamline.

  10. The ^1S+^1S asymptote of Sr_2 studied by Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, A; Tiemann, E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of the long range behavior of the ground state X^1\\Sigma^+_g of Sr_2 is performed by high resolution spectroscopy of asymptotic vibrational levels and the use of available photoassociation data. Ground state levels as high as v"=60 (outer turning point at 23 \\AA and 0.1 cm^-1 below the asymptote) could be observed by Fourier-transform spectroscopy of fluorescence progressions induced by single frequency laser excitation of the v'=4, J'=9 rovibrational level of the state 2^1\\Sigma^+_u. A precise value of the scattering length for the isotopologue ^88Sr_2 is derived and transferred to all other isotopic combinations by mass scaling with the given potential. The derived potential together with already published information about the state 2^1\\Sigma^+_u directs to promising optical paths for producing cold molecules in the electronic ground state from an ultracold ensemble of Sr atoms.

  11. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel, lead and thallium in total digested sediment samples and available fractions by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ET AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, María Á; Carrillo, Génesis

    2012-08-15

    This study describes the optimization and validation of a quick and simple method for the simultaneous determination of total content and available fractions of As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl in sediments by ET AAS, which has been proved to be useful for environmental research. The optimization was carried out using a 3(3) Box-Behnken factorial design which was applied to matrices of total digestion and to stages 1 and 2 of the modified BCR sequential extraction scheme for sediments in order to determine the appropriate atomization temperatures and masses for the chemical modifiers: Pd(NO(3))(2) and Mg(NO(3))(2). The simultaneous determination of the elements in all matrices considered was performed, without the use of chemical modifiers at atomization temperatures of 1700 °C for Cd and Tl, and 2100 °C for As, Cu, Cr, Ni and Pb, using a standard calibration curve for calibration purposes. The characteristic masses and limits of detection obtained were 36.5, 1.8, 6.5, 28, 34, 46.5 and 48 ρg and 0.11, 0.001, 0.022, 0.04, 0.2, 0.03 and 0.003 μg g(-1) for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl, respectively. The analytical procedure was validated by analyzing three sediment certified reference materials (CRM NCS DC 73315 and LKSD-4 for total content and BCR 701 for available fractions). Good accuracy was obtained (tested statistically, P=0.05, and shown by the high recovery for each element in each matrix), except for total As in the matrix of total digestion, where losses of the analyte could be attributed to sample treatment with HNO(3). The precision of the procedure was between 0.6% and 6%.

  12. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, S K; Felfer, P J; Araullo-Peters, V J; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Cairney, J M

    2013-09-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping.

  13. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess.

  14. Model study in chemisorption: atomic hydrogen on beryllium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauschlicher, C.W. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The interaction between atomic hydrogen and the (0001) surface of Be metal has been studied by ab initio electronic structure theory. Self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations have been performed using minimum, optimized minimum, double zeta and mixed basis sets for clusters as large as 22 Be atoms. The binding energy and equilibrium geometry (the distance to the surface) were determined for 4 sites. Both spatially restricted (the wavefunction was constrained to transform as one of the irreducible representations of the molecular point group) and unrestricted SCF calculations were performed. Using only the optimized minimum basis set, clusters containing as many as 22 beryllium atoms have been investigated. From a variety of considerations, this cluster is seen to be nearly converged within the model used, providing the most reliable results for chemisorption. The site dependence of the frequency is shown to be a geometrical effect depending on the number and angle of the bonds. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen through a perfect beryllium crystal is predicted to be energetically unfavorable. The cohesive energy, the ionization energy and the singlet-triplet separation were computed for the clusters without hydrogen. These quantities can be seen as a measure of the total amount of edge effects. The chemisorptive properties are not related to the total amount of edge effects, but rather the edge effects felt by the adsorbate bonding berylliums. This lack of correlation with the total edge effects illustrates the local nature of the bonding, further strengthening the cluster model for chemisorption. A detailed discussion of the bonding and electronic structure is included. The remaining edge effects for the Be/sub 22/ cluster are discussed.

  15. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  16. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.;

    of the mechanisms of bacterial attachment. An alternative way to study the adhesion of single bacterial cells is to measure the adhesion between immobilized bacterial cells and coated AFM cantilevers. This strategy was used to investigate the adhesive properties of novel high density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG......) coatings on titanium. We investigate the ability of a high density poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) coating to resist bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from three clinically relevant bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermis. The high...

  17. Unexpected temporal evolution of atomic spectral lines of aluminum in a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Rawad, E-mail: rawad.saad@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); L' Hermite, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lhermite@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bousquet, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.bousquet@u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the laser induced breakdown (LIBS) signal of a pure aluminum sample was studied under nitrogen and air atmospheres. In addition to the usual decrease of signal due to plasma cooling, unexpected temporal evolutions were observed for a spectral lines of aluminum, which revealed the existence of collisional energy transfer effects. Furthermore, molecular bands of AlN and AlO were observed in the LIBS spectra, indicating recombination of aluminum with the ambient gas. Within the experimental conditions reported in this study, both collisional energy transfer and recombination processes occurred around 1.5 μs after the laser shot. This highlights the possible influence of collisional and chemical effects inside the plasma that can play a role on LIBS signals. - Highlights: • Persistence of two Al I lines related to the 61,844 cm{sup −1} energy level only under nitrogen atmosphere. • Collisional energy transfer effect exists between aluminum and nitrogen. • Observation of molecular band of AlN (under nitrogen) and AlO (under air) after a delay time of 1.5 µs. • 20% of oxygen in air is sufficient to annihilate both the collisional energy transfer effect and the AlN molecular formation.

  18. Measurements @ Sub-Mm Spectroscopy Laboratory of Bologna: Rotational Spectroscopy Applied to Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The physico-chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere has been one of the main subjects of studies over last years. In particular, the composition of the atmosphere is indeed very important to understand chemical processes linked to depletion of stratospheric ozone and greenhouse effect. The vertical concentration profiles of atmospheric gases can be provided by remote sensing measurements, but they require the accurate knowledge of the parameters involved: line positions, transition intensities, pressure-broadened half-widths, pressure-induced frequency shifts and their temperature dependence. In particular, the collisional broadening parameters have a crucial influence on the accuracy of spectra calculations and on reduction of remote sensing data. Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, by applying the source frequency modulation technique it has been found that rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having an high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations. A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the work carried out at the Laboratory of Millimeter/submillimeter-wave Spectroscopy of Bologna in the field of atmospheric studies.

  19. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Pettersson, L.G.M.;

    2010-01-01

    and the interaction between the water monolayer and the surface. By combining synchrotron radiation-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques with density functional theory (DFT) computational methods we obtain element......-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived....

  20. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  1. Study of humic substances by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Konecna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine main fluorophores of soil humic substances using 2D and 3D synchronous fluorescencespectroscopy (SFS. The measured synchronous spectra werecompared with standards IHSS. Differences between humic andfulvic acids as well as our and IHSS samples are discussed.

  2. Study of atomic and condensed atomic indices for reactive sites of molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kolandaivel; G Praveena; P Selvarengan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we have introduced the atomic descriptors () to determine the local reactive sites of the molecular systems during electrophilic, nucleophilic and radical attacks. The condensed Fukui function and the newly introduced condensed atomic descriptor have been calculated for six different systems, namely glycine, alanine, aniline, BH2Cl, trans-FC(O)OF and -anisidine. The individual atomic charges (gross charge) calculated by the MPA scheme have been used to calculate the condensed Fukui functions () and the newly derived condensed atomic descriptors ()$^{\\alpha}_{k}$ at B1-DZP level of theory. We carried out the calculation using the ``stockholders” charge partitioning technique (i.e., Hirshfeld population scheme). The newly derived quantity gives the same reactive sites as the condensed Fukui functions, and the complexities associated with the negative Fukui functions are removed.

  3. 发射光谱研究多针对板电晕放电O活性原子特性%Study of Characteristics of Excited O Atom Generated in Multi-Needle-to-Plate Corona Discharge by Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛辉; 阎玲; 宓东; 朱益民; 张路

    2012-01-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p5P→3s5S02 777. 4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases.%利用发射光谱技术在大气压下测量了空气中多针对板负直流电晕放电和正电晕流光放电产生的O(3p5P→3s5S02 777.4 nm)活性原子发射光谱.在负电晕放电中,研究了放电功率、电极间距、N2含量和相对湿度等因素对O活性原子产生过程的影响;在正电晕流光放电阶段,研究了O活性原子相对密度在放电反应空间的分布特点.结果表明:O活性原子产量随放电功率的增加而增大,随电极间距增大而减少,随相对湿度和氮气含量的增加,其产量先增大后减少;O活性原子相对密度沿针尖轴向呈先增大后减小的趋势.

  4. First-principles studies of atomic dynamics in tetrahedrite thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cu12Sb4S13-based tetrahedrites are high-performance thermoelectrics that contain earth-abundant and environmentally friendly elements. At present, the mechanistic understanding of their low lattice thermal conductivity (<1 W m−1 K−1 at 300 K remains limited. This work applies first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, along with inelastic neutron scattering (INS experiments, to study the incoherent and coherent atomic dynamics in Cu10.5NiZn0.5Sb4S13, in order to deepen our insight into mechanisms of anomalous dynamic behavior and low lattice thermal conductivity in tetrahedrites. Our study of incoherent dynamics reveals the anomalous “phonon softening upon cooling” behavior commonly observed in inelastic neutron scattering data. By examining the dynamic Cu-Sb distances inside the Sb[CuS3]Sb cage, we ascribe softening to the decreased anharmonic “rattling” of Cu in the cage. On the other hand, our study of coherent dynamics reveals that acoustic modes are confined in a small region of dynamic scattering space, which we hypothesize leads to a minimum phonon mean free path. By assuming a Debye model, we obtain a lattice minimum thermal conductivity value consistent with experiments. We believe this study furthers our understanding of the atomic dynamics of tetrahedrite thermoelectrics and will more generally help shed light on the origin of intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity in these and other structurally similar materials.

  5. First-principles studies of atomic dynamics in tetrahedrite thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junchao; Zhu, Mengze; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Ke, Xianglin; Morelli, Donald T.; Lai, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Cu12Sb4S13-based tetrahedrites are high-performance thermoelectrics that contain earth-abundant and environmentally friendly elements. At present, the mechanistic understanding of their low lattice thermal conductivity (applies first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, along with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments, to study the incoherent and coherent atomic dynamics in Cu10.5NiZn0.5Sb4S13, in order to deepen our insight into mechanisms of anomalous dynamic behavior and low lattice thermal conductivity in tetrahedrites. Our study of incoherent dynamics reveals the anomalous "phonon softening upon cooling" behavior commonly observed in inelastic neutron scattering data. By examining the dynamic Cu-Sb distances inside the Sb[CuS3]Sb cage, we ascribe softening to the decreased anharmonic "rattling" of Cu in the cage. On the other hand, our study of coherent dynamics reveals that acoustic modes are confined in a small region of dynamic scattering space, which we hypothesize leads to a minimum phonon mean free path. By assuming a Debye model, we obtain a lattice minimum thermal conductivity value consistent with experiments. We believe this study furthers our understanding of the atomic dynamics of tetrahedrite thermoelectrics and will more generally help shed light on the origin of intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity in these and other structurally similar materials.

  6. Direct and combined methods for the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel in honey by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez García, J C; Barciela García, J; Herrero Latorre, C; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R M

    2005-08-24

    In the present work, direct methods for the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel in honey by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy were developed using experimental design as an optimization tool. Once the optimum conditions for the individual methods were established, a direct method for the combined determination of the three elements was optimized using the response surface tool. Palladium was used as chemical modifier in all cases. Honey was diluted in water, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid. Triton X-100 was added to minimize the matrix effect and the viscosity of the sample. The RSD (better than 10%) and the analytical recovery (98-103%) were acceptable for all of the developed methods. Calibration graphs were used in the four methods to determine the concentration of the analytes in the sample. The detection limits of the combined method (0.21, 0.35, and 0.37 microg L(-)(1) for Cr, Cu, and Ni, respectively) were similar to those obtained for the individual methods (LOD = 0.17, 0.21, 0.33 microg L(-)(1) for Cr, Cu, and Ni, respectively). The direct-combined proposed method has been applied to the determination of chromium, copper, and nickel content in representative honey samples from Galicia (northwestern Spain). The concentrations found in the analyzed samples were in the range of (5.75 +/- 0.64)-(26.4 +/- 0.38) ng g(-)(1) of Cr, (79 +/- 7.8)-(2049 +/- 80) ng g(-)(1) of Cu, and (12.6 +/- 1.36)-(172 +/- 6.88) ng g(-)(1) of Ni.

  7. Simple decomposition procedure for determination of selenium in whole blood, serum and urine by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiran, B; Tiran, A; Rossipal, E; Lorenz, O

    1993-12-01

    A digestion procedure for selenium determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in whole blood, serum and urine is described, it employs sulfuric acid, hydrogen peroxide and vanadium (V) sulfuric acid reagent solution. The method is rapid, uses no explosive reagents and can be performed at a constant temperature of 100 degrees C. Therefore, it is easily applicable in a routine clinical laboratory for a large amount of samples. The coefficient of intra-assay variation was 4.3-5.6%, the coefficient for inter-assay variation was 5-5.9% in the medium and high concentration range, and 5.8-8.6% in the low range. In analyzing several commercial reference materials our results showed good agreement with the target values. Analytical recovery by addition of sodium selenite and seleno-DL-methionine to samples ranged between 97 and 104%. The correlation between the described digestion procedure and the nitric, sulfuric and perchloric acid digestion procedure recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry showed good agreement for whole blood, serum and for urine. We determined selenium in serum (n = 58) and whole blood (n = 50) in a collective of healthy children from 1 to 5 years living in Styria, Austria. The low values in serum (35 +/- 11 micrograms/L) and whole blood (42 +/- 6 micrograms/L) at one year of life increased significantly to 48 +/- 13 mu/L (p = 0.033) and 55 +/- 6 micrograms/L (p = 0.004) at three years of life in serum and whole blood, respectively. The selenium concentration showed no further increase up to five years of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Evaluation of lithium determination in three analyzers: flame emission, flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Aliasgharpour

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lithium carbonate salt has become an increasingly important substance in the treatment of manic depressive disorders, and its relatively narrow therapeutic range has caused laboratories to monitor the serum concentration carefully. In the present work we evaluated lithium measurement in 3 different analyzers. Methods & Materials: Three different analyzers including Flame Emission (FES, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS, and Ion Selective Electrode (ISE were used. All chemicals had a grade suitable for trace metal analysis. Results: Within-day precision of CV was ≤ 1.5% for FES & FAAS, except for ISE (1.9% CV. Between-days precision of CV was less for FES than for FAAS and ISE (1.3% versus 2.2% & 2.3%. The percent recovery of added lithium in pooled patients’ serum was higher for ISE than for FASS and FES (103.4% versus 96.2% and 94.6%. We also obtained a higher average lithium concentration for patients’ serum samples (n=16 measured by ISE than for FAAS and FES (0.825±0.30 versus 0.704±0.26 & 0.735±0.19. Paired t-test results revealed a significant difference (p< 0.001 for patient sera analyzed with FAAS and ISE. Conclusion: We report higher results for ISE than the other two analyzers and conclude that the choice between the two flame methods for patients’ serum lithium determination is arbitrary and that FES analyzer is a more attractive routine alternative for lithium determination than FAAS because of its cost and ease of performance. In addition, the results obtained by ISE are precise. However, its accuracy may depend on other interfering factors.

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  10. Magnetic excitations studied with time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainford, B. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    An introduction to time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy is presented in the context of the study of magnetic materials. Examples are taken from the class of rare earth and actinide magnetic materials known as `strongly correlated electron` systems. (author) 11 figs., 24 refs.

  11. A polarized Infrared Spectroscopy Studies of Waterborne Polyurethane Orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Guangkui; Cui Liyan; Yao Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In this article,we prepare waterborne polyurethane(WPU)by polycarbonate diol,polyoxytetramethylene,dimethylol propionic acid and isophorone diisocyanate.We studied the stretch-oriented behavior of waterborne polyurethane films by universal tensile testing machine and FT-IR. And we analyzed the behavior of polyurethane orientation by infrared dichroism spectroscopy.

  12. Surface oxidation of cobalt nanoparticles studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Charles, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    The surface oxide formed on cobalt nanoparticles has been studied by Mossbauer emission spectroscopy. Exposure of the cobalt particles to oxygen at room temperature was found to result in the formation of a relatively well-ordered surface oxide with Mossbauer parameters similar to those of CoO....

  13. Biomolecular recognition mechanisms studied by NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to study the mechanism of biomolecular recognition with two model systems: i) lipid II-binding lantibiotics (lanthionine-containing antibiotics) and ii) the human immunodef

  14. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Su

  15. Social Perception in Infancy: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Blasi, Anna; Volein, Agnes; Everdell, Nick; Elwell, Claire E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to engage and communicate in a social world is one of the defining characteristics of the human species. While the network of regions that compose the social brain have been the subject of extensive research in adults, there are limited techniques available for monitoring young infants. This study used near infrared spectroscopy to…

  16. How to Study Intermediate Filaments in Atomic Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyatina, Anastasia A; Hess, John F; Guzenko, Dmytro; Voss, John C; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the intermediate filament (IF) structure are a prerequisite of understanding their function. In addition, the structural information is indispensable if one wishes to gain a mechanistic view on the disease-related mutations in the IFs. Over the years, considerable progress has been made on the atomic structure of the elementary building block of all IFs, the coiled-coil dimer. Here, we discuss the approaches, methods and practices that have contributed to this advance. With abundant genetic information on hand, bioinformatics approaches give important insights into the dimer structure, including the head and tail regions poorly assessable experimentally. At the same time, the most important contribution has been provided by X-ray crystallography. Following the "divide-and-conquer" approach, many fragments from several IF proteins could be crystallized and resolved to atomic resolution. We will systematically cover the main procedures of these crystallographic studies, suggest ways to maximize their efficiency, and also discuss the possible pitfalls and limitations. In addition, electron paramagnetic resonance with site-directed spin labeling was another method providing a major impact toward the understanding of the IF structure. Upon placing the spin labels into specific positions within the full-length protein, one can evaluate the proximity of the labels and their mobility. This makes it possible to make conclusions about the dimer structure in the coiled-coil region and beyond, as well as to explore the dimer-dimer contacts.

  17. Inner-shell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, W. C.; Jonauskas, V.; Lindle, D. W.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-02-01

    Inner-shell ionization of a 1s electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD), which results as the 1s-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for inner-shell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of 403-475 eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N+, {{{N}}}2+, and {{{N}}}3+, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to {{{N}}}2+ is somewhat reduced, that for N+ is greatly increased, and that to {{{N}}}3+, which was predicted to be zero, grows to ≈ 10% at the higher photon energies studied. This work demonstrates some of the shortcomings in the theoretical CSD data base for inner-shell ionization and points the way for the improvements needed to more reliably model the role of inner-shell ionization of cosmic plasmas.

  18. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  19. Study of molybdenum oxide by means of Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC) and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Among transition-metal oxides, the molybdenum oxide compounds are particularly attractive due to the structural (2D) anisotropy and to the ability of the molybdenum ion to change its oxidation state. These properties make it suitable for applications on, e.g., chemical sensors, solar cells, catalytic and optoelectronic devices. At ISOLDE we aim studying the incorporation of selected dopants by ion implantation, using the nuclear techniques of Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). Both techniques make use of highly diluted radioactive probe nuclei, which interact – as atomic-sized tips – with the host atoms and defects. The objectives of this project are to study at the atomic scale the probe’s local environment, its electronic configuration and polarization, the probe’s lattice sites, point defects and its recombination dynamics. In the case of e-$\\gamma$ PAC, the electron mobility on the host can be further studied, e.g., as a function of temperature.

  20. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesh Kashyap; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha; B K Godwal

    2004-02-01

    X-ray holography is a new method of structure determination based on measurement of interference of a known reference wave with an unknown object wave (containing information on atomic sites scattering the reference wave) so that phase information is preserved. Unlike X-ray diffraction, it does not demand for translational periodicity in the material. It is based on the idea similar to that of optical holography and has been tested on crystals, quasicrystals, thin films and doped semiconductors for their structure determination. In order to analyse potentials and limitations of this technique, we have carried out theoretical simulation studies on simple structures. In this paper we describe the basic algorithm of hologram generation and reconstruction of atomic positions from generated data. We illustrate this technique using Fe (bcc) single crystal as sample case to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Simulations were carried out on the Cu (fcc) structure and on complex structure such as the Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal. Technical issues such as low signal to noise ratio, twin image problem etc have been discussed briefly to emphasize the need for high intensity X-ray source such as synchrotron for experiments and proper reconstruction algorithm. Finally the scope and potential of this technique have been discussed.