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Sample records for atomic spectroscopy study

  1. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  2. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  3. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  5. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  7. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  9. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  10. Atomic and molecular photoelectron and Auger-electron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were also measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the ejected electrons. The double-angle-TOF method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collection efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. An electron spectroscopy study of inner-shell photoexcitation and ionization of Xe, photoelectron angular distributions from H2 and D2, and photoionization cross sections and photoelectron asymmetries of the valence orbitals of NO are reported

  11. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  13. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  14. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  16. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  17. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  18. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  19. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  20. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  1. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study of bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.M.; Jimenez, I.; Vazquez, L.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Albella, J.M.; Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco28049, Madrid (Spain); Terminello, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States); Himpsel, F.J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin53706 (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on Si(100) has been studied by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and atomic force microscopy, two techniques well suited to characterize nanometric crystallites. Diamond nuclei of {approximately}15nm are formed after 5 min of bias-enhanced treatment. The number of nuclei and its size increases with the time of application of the bias voltage. A nanocrystalline diamond film is attained after 20 min of bias-enhanced nucleation. At the initial nucleation stages, the Si substrate appears covered with diamond crystallites and graphite, without SiC being detected by XANES. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. One-atom detection and statistical studies with resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To learn how to take matter apart atom-by-atom and to count each atom according to its type, regardless of its initial chemical or physical state, is presumably a worthy goal in scientific research. The advent of the laser created real hope that these aspirations will be realized. The counting of atoms is not merely an intellectual exercise set apart from real-world applications. On the contrary, even though the capability is scarcely more than five years old, practical applications have been made in many fields of chemistry, physics, the environment, and industry. In this lecture we wish to review how the laser made possible the counting of atoms and how this capability has been put to use in situations where atoms are free to react chemically as they diffuse through a medium. Fluctuation phenomena and statistical mechanics can also be examined in these situations

  4. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de Sissi; Ende, van den Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat su

  5. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunklev, M

    1999-03-01

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  6. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  7. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  8. Surface chemistry of plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 studied by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface groups created during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were studied by infrared spectroscopy. For temperatures in the range of 25-150 deg. C, -CH3 and -OH were unveiled as dominant surface groups after the Al(CH3)3 precursor and O2 plasma half-cycles, respectively. At lower temperatures more -OH and C-related impurities were found to be incorporated in the Al2O3 film, but the impurity level could be reduced by prolonging the plasma exposure. The results demonstrate that -OH surface groups rule the surface chemistry of the Al2O3 process and likely that of plasma-assisted ALD of metal oxides from organometallic precursors in general

  9. Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-ming HU; Zheng-Tian LU; Zong-Chao YAN

    2009-01-01

    Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally.Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in ls2p3pJ can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

  10. Photodetachment Studies Of Atomic Negative Ions Through Velocity-Map Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartkunchand, Kiattichart

    The technique of velocity-map imaging (VMI) spectroscopy as been adapted to a keV-level negative ion beamline for studies of photon-negative ion collisions. The design and operation of the VMI spectrometer takes into consideration the use of continuous, fast-moving (5 keV to 10 keV) ion beams, as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser as the source of photons. The VMI spectrometer has been used in photodetachment studies of the Group 14 negative ions Ge--, Sn--, and Pb-- at a photon wavelength of 532 nm. Measurements of the photoelectron angular distributions and asymmetry parameters for Ge-- and Sn-- were benchmarked against those measured previously [W. W. Williams, D. L. Carpenter, A. M. Covington, and J. S. Thompson, Phys. Rev. A 59, 4368 (1999), V. T. Davis, J. Ashokkumar, and J. S. Thompson, Phys. Rev. A 65, 024702 (2002)], while fine-structure-resolved asymmetry parameters for Pb-- were measured for the first time. Definitive evidence of a "forbidden" 4S 3/2→1D2 transition was observed in both the Ge-- and Sn-- photoelectron kinetic energy spectra. This transition is explained in terms of the inadequacy of the single-configuration description for the 1D2 excited state in the corresponding neutral. Near-threshold photodetachment studies of S-- were carried out in order to measure the spectral dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution. The resulting asymmetry parameters were measured at several photon wavelengths in the range of 575 nm (2.156 eV photon energy) to 615 nm (2.016 eV photon energy). Comparison of the measurements to a qualitative model of p-electron photodetachment [D. Hanstorp, C. Bengtsson, and D. J. Larson, Phys. Rev. A 40, 670 (1989)] were made. Deviations of the measured asymmetry parameters from the Hanstorp model near photodetachment thresholds suggests a reduced degree of suppression of d partial-waves than predicted by models. Measurement of the electron affinity of terbium was performed along with a determination of the

  11. Comparative Study of Cl-Atom Reactions in Solution Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2016-04-28

    A Cl atom can react with 2,3-dimethylbutane (DMB), 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (DMBE), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexadiene (DMHD) in solution via a hydrogen-abstraction reaction. The large exoergicity of the reaction between a Cl atom and alkenes (DMBE and DMHD) makes vibrational excitation of the HCl product possible, and we observe the formation of vibrationally excited HCl (v = 1) for both reactions. In CCl4, the branching fractions of HCl (v = 1), Γ (v = 1), for the Cl-atom reactions with DMBE and DMHD are 0.14 and 0.23, respectively, reflecting an increased amount of vibrational excitation in the products of the more exoergic reaction. In addition, Γ (v = 1) for both reactions is larger in the solvent CDCl3, being 0.23 and 0.40, as the less viscous solvent apparently dampens the vibrational excitation of the nascent HCl less effectively. The bimolecular reaction rates for the Cl reactions with DMB, DMBE, and DMHD in CCl4 are diffusion limited (having rate constants of 1.5 × 10(10), 3.6 × 10(10), and 17.5 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). In fact, the bimolecular reaction rate for Cl + DMHD exceeds a typical diffusion-limited reaction rate, implying that the attractive intermolecular forces between a Cl atom and a C═C bond increase the rate of favorable encounters. The 2-fold increase in the reaction rate of the Cl + DMBE reaction from that of the Cl + DMB reaction likely reflects the effect of the C═C bond, while both the number of C═C bonds and the molecular geometry likely play a role in the large reaction rate of the Cl + DMHD reaction.

  12. Electronic properties of atomic layer deposition films, anatase and rutile TiO2 studied by resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, C.; Richter, M.; Tallarida, M.; Schmeisser, D.

    2016-07-01

    The TiO2 films are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using titanium isopropoxide precursors at 250 °C and analyzed using resonant photoemission spectroscopy (resPES). We report on the Ti2p and O1s core levels, on the valence band (VB) spectra and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data, and on the resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES) profiles at the O1s and the Ti3p absorption edges. We determine the elemental abundance, the position of the VB maxima, the partial density of states (PDOS) in the VB and in the conduction band (CB) and collect these data in a band scheme. In addition, we analyze the band-gap states as well as the intrinsic states due to polarons and charge-transfer excitations. These states are found to cause multiple Auger decay processes upon resonant excitation. We identify several of these processes and determine their relative contribution to the Auger signal quantitatively. As our resPES data allow a quantitative analysis of these defect states, we determine the relative abundance of the PDOS in the VB and in CB and also the charge neutrality level. The anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2 are analyzed in the same way as the TiO2 ALD layer. The electronic properties of the TiO2 ALD layer are compared with the anatase and rutile polymorphs of TiO2. In our comparative study, we find that ALD has its own characteristic electronic structure that is distinct from that of anatase and rutile. However, many details of the electronic structure are comparable and we benefit from our spectroscopic data and our careful analysis to find these differences. These can be attributed to a stronger hybridization of the O2p and Ti3d4s states for the ALD films when compared to the anatase and rutile polymorphs.

  13. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  14. Atomic physics for fusion plasma spectroscopy; a soft x-ray study of molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the radiative patterns of the ions of heavy atoms (Z approx-gt 18) is crucial to fusion experiments. The present thesis applies ab initio, relativistic calculations of atomic data to modeling the emission of molybdenum (Z = 42) ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The models are compared to observations made in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Experimental confirmation of these models allows confidence in calculations of the total molybdenum concentration and quantitative estimates of the total power lost from the plasmas due to molybdenum line radiation. Charge states in the plasma core (Mo33+ to Mo29+) emit strong x-ray and XUV spectra which allow benchmarking of models for the spatial distribution of highly stripped molybdenum ions; the models only achieve agreement with observations when the rates of indirect ionization and recombination processes are included in the calculation of the charge state distribution of the central molybdenum ions. The total concentration of molybdenum in the core of the plasma is found, and the total power radiated from the plasma core is computed. Observations of line emission from more highly charged molybdenum ions (Mo36+ to Mo34+) are presented. open-quotes Bulkclose quotes molybdenum charge states (Mo25+ to Mo23+) emit complicated XUV spectra from a position in the plasma near C-Mod's half radius; spatial profiles of these ions' emission are analyzed. Models for the line-emission spectra of adjacent ions (Mo28+ to Mo26+) are offered, and the accuracy and limits of ab initio energy level calculations are discussed. open-quotes Edgeclose quotes charge states (Mo22+ to Mo15) extend to the last closed magnetic flux surface of the C-Mod plasma. The strongest features from these charge states are emitted in a narrow band from ∼70 Angstrom

  15. Influence on electron energy loss spectroscopy of the niobium-substituted uranium atom: A density functional theory study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We present the electronic structure and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for uranium, niobium and U3Nb in which uranium is substituted by niobium. Comparing the electronic structures and optical properties for uranium, niobium and U3Nb, we found that when niobium atom replaces uranium atom in the center lattice, density of state (DOS) of U3Nb shifts downward to low energy. Niobium affects DOS forfand d electrons more than that for p and s electrons. U3Nb is similar to uranium for the electronic energy loss spectra.

  16. THE SPECTROSCOPY OF URANIUM ATOM WITHIN THE "SILVA" PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, R.; Ebrardt, J.; Petit, A.; Viala, F.; Vors, E.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (SILVA) has been recognized as beeing an attractive powerful technique for the enrichment of uranium for light water reactor fuel. Since the heart of the AVLIS process is based on selective multistep photoionization of an uranium atomic vapor stream, the development of this process in France, has stimulated intensive studies in the field of uranium spectroscopy.

  17. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthey, Christian Godehard

    2011-12-15

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as {delta}{integral}{sub exp}=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, {delta}{integral}{sub th}=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub d}- left angle r{sup 2} right angle {sub p}=3.82007(65) fm{sup 2} and the deuteron structure radius r{sub str}=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10{sup -15}. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of {integral}{sub 1S-2S}=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c{sub (TX)}-0.29c{sub (TY)}-0.08 c{sub (TZ)}=(2.2{+-}1.8) x 10{sup -11} within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level ({partial_derivative})/({partial_derivative}t)ln ({mu}{sub Cs})/({mu}{sub B})=-(3.0{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}.

  18. Precision spectroscopy on atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Thesis reports on three measurements involving the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and deuterium conducted on a 5.8 K atomic beam. The transition is excited Doppler-free via two counter-propagating photons near 243 nm. The H/D isotope shift has been determined as Δ∫exp=670 994 334 606(15) Hz. Comparing with the theoretical value for the isotope shift, excluding the leading nuclear size effect, Δ∫th=670 999 566.90(66)(60) kHz we confirm, twice more accurate, the rms charge radius difference of the deuteron and the proton as left angle r2 right angle d- left angle r2 right angle p=3.82007(65) fm2 and the deuteron structure radius rstr=1.97507(78) fm. The frequency ratio of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen to the cesium ground state hyperfine transition provided by the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM is measured to be ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 035 (10) Hz which presents a fractional frequency uncertainty of 4.2 x 10-15. The second absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen presents the first application of a 900 km fiber link between MPQ and Physikalisch- Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig which we have used to calibrate the MPQ hydrogen maser with the stationary cesium fountain clock CSF1 at PTB. With the result of ∫1S-2S=2 466 061 413 187 017 (11) Hz we can put a constraint on the electron Lorentz boost violating coefficients 0.95c(TX)-0.29c(TY)-0.08 c(TZ)=(2.2±1.8) x 10-11 within the framework of minimal standard model extensions. We limit a possible drift of the strong coupling constant through the ratio of magnetic moments at a competitive level (∂)/(∂t)ln (μCs)/(μB)=-(3.0±1.2) x 10-15 yr-1.

  19. USEPA METHOD STUDY 38 - SW-846 METHOD 3010, ACID DIGESTION OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES AND EXTRACTS FOR TRACE METALS BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted on SW-846 Method 3010, "Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts for Total Metals for Analysis by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy", to determine the mean recovery and precision for analyses of 21 trace metals in surf...

  20. Mechanistic study of atomic layer deposition of AlxSiyO thin film via in-situ FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of surface reaction mechanism on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum silicate (AlxSiyO) was conducted with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as precursors and H2O as the oxidant. In-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to elucidate the underlying surface mechanism that enables the deposition of AlxSiyO by ALD. In-situ FTIR study revealed that ineffective hydroxylation of the surface ethoxy (–OCH2CH3) groups prohibits ALD of SiO2 by TEOS/H2O. In contrast, effective desorption of the surface ethoxy group was observed in TEOS/H2O/TMA/H2O chemistry. The presence of Al-OH* group in vicinity of partially hydroxylated ethoxy (–OCH2CH3) group was found to propagate disproportionation reaction, which results in ALD of AlxSiyO. The maximum thickness from incorporation of SiOx from alternating exposures of TEOS/H2O chemistry in AlxSiyO was found to be ∼2 Å, confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements

  1. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizzarri AR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Rita Bizzarri1, Simona Santini1, Emilia Coppari1, Monica Bucciantini2, Silvia Di Agostino3, Tohru Yamada4, Craig W Beattie4, Salvatore Cannistraro11Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, CNISM, Facoltà di Scienze, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, 2Department of Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 3Molecular Oncogenesis Laboratory, Experimental Oncology Department, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.Keywords: AFS, cancer physics, unbinding forces

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target

  3. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  4. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  5. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  6. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  7. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  8. Studies on mercury contamination in the Brazilian Amazonic region using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technique, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and it was concluded that most of the mercury was present in the hair as the dangerous methylmercury. It is known already that the most probable source of methylmercury for humans is fish ,due to the fact that they can concentrate methylmercury many times. Since the Indians consume fish on a daily basis, this could be the reason for the presence of very high amounts of mercury in their hair and also in their blood, as shown by other studies. (author)

  9. Modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (authors)

  10. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  11. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  12. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Balabanski, Dimiter L.; Bissell, Mark L.; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ sta...

  13. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES - A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) had been an essential tool to gather spectroscopic information about atomic energy level structure in the early decades of this century. The correct interpretation of the oscillatory structure in the x-ray absorption cross-section above the absorption edge has transformed XAS from a spectroscopic tool to a structural technique. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) yields information about the interatomic distances, near neighbor coordination numbers, and lattice dynamics. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure), on the other hand, gives information about the valence state, energy bandwidth and bond angles. Today, there are about 50 experimental stations in various synchrotrons around the world dedicated to collecting x-ray absorption data from the bulk and surfaces of solids and liquids. In this chapter, they will give the basic principles of XAS, explain the information content of essentially two different aspects of the absorption process leading to EXAFS and XANES, and discuss the source and sample limitations

  15. Collinear laser spectroscopy of atomic cadmium

    CERN Document Server

    Frömmgen, Nadja; Bissell, Mark L; Bieroń, Jacek; Blaum, Klaus; Cheal, Bradley; Flanagan, Kieran; Fritzsche, Stephan; Geppert, Christopher; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Kreim, Kim; Krieger, Andreas; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Rajabali, Mustafa M; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Papuga, Jasna; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine structure $A$ and $B$ factors of the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\rm{P}_2 \\rightarrow 5s\\,6s\\,\\; ^3\\rm{S}_1$ transition are determined from collinear laser spectroscopy data of $^{107-123}$Cd and $^{111m-123m}$Cd. Nuclear magnetic moments and electric quadrupole moments are extracted using reference dipole moments and calculated electric field gradients, respectively. The hyperfine structure anomaly for isotopes with $s_{1/2}$ and $d_{5/2}$ nuclear ground states and isomeric $h_{11/2}$ states is evaluated and a linear relationship is observed for all nuclear states except $s_{1/2}$. This corresponds to the Moskowitz-Lombardi rule that was established in the mercury region of the nuclear chart but in the case of cadmium the slope is distinctively smaller than for mercury. In total four atomic and ionic levels were analyzed and all of them exhibit a similar behaviour. The electric field gradient for the atomic $5s\\,5p\\,\\; ^3\\mathrm{P}_2$ level is derived from multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculatio...

  16. AMO Database in KAERI and Atomic Structure Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Park, H. M.; Kwon, D. H.

    2005-05-01

    Atomic spectroscopy studies carried out at the Laboratory for Quantum Optics in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are introduced together with the AMO (Atomic, Molecular, and Optical) database established based upon those studies.

  17. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related question...

  18. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Introducing many-body physics using atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krebs, Dietrich; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Atoms constitute relatively simple many-body systems, making them suitable objects for developing an understanding of basic aspects of many-body physics. Photoabsorption spectroscopy is a prominent method to study the electronic structure of atoms and the inherent many-body interactions. In this article the impact of many-body effects on well-known spectroscopic features such as Rydberg series, Fano resonances, Cooper minima, and giant resonances is studied, and related many-body phenomena in other fields are outlined. To calculate photoabsorption cross sections the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) model is employed. The conceptual clearness of TDCIS in combination with the compactness of atomic systems allows for a pedagogical introduction to many-body phenomena.

  20. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  1. Adsorption and deposition of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on alumina studied by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, Morihide [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)], E-mail: higo@apc.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Miake, Takeshi; Mitsushio, Masaru; Yoshidome, Toshifumi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Ozono, Yoshihisa [Center for Instrumental analysis, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2008-04-30

    The adsorption state of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) deposited from acetone solutions (0.01-1.00 mg/ml) on native oxide surfaces of Al films was characterized by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide was prepared on evaporated Al films at room temperature in an oxygen-dc glow discharge. The morphology of the deposited AQ-2-COOH on the oxide surfaces was observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. These surface analyses showed that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed predominantly as a uniform nanometer-scale film of carboxylate anions on the oxide surfaces deposited from solutions with concentrations lower than or equal to 0.02 mg/ml. It was found that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed as both a uniform film of anions and as micron-sized particles of neutral molecules with heights of a few tens of nanometers when AQ-2-COOH is deposited from solutions with concentrations higher than 0.02 mg/ml. A comparison of the results obtained by these surface analytical techniques clearly shows the features and advantages of these analytical techniques.

  2. Adsorption and deposition of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on alumina studied by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption state of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) deposited from acetone solutions (0.01-1.00 mg/ml) on native oxide surfaces of Al films was characterized by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide was prepared on evaporated Al films at room temperature in an oxygen-dc glow discharge. The morphology of the deposited AQ-2-COOH on the oxide surfaces was observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. These surface analyses showed that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed predominantly as a uniform nanometer-scale film of carboxylate anions on the oxide surfaces deposited from solutions with concentrations lower than or equal to 0.02 mg/ml. It was found that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed as both a uniform film of anions and as micron-sized particles of neutral molecules with heights of a few tens of nanometers when AQ-2-COOH is deposited from solutions with concentrations higher than 0.02 mg/ml. A comparison of the results obtained by these surface analytical techniques clearly shows the features and advantages of these analytical techniques

  3. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li+-He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li+-He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He)+-quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  4. Influences of the propyl group on the van der Waals structures of 4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms studied by electronic and cationic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhijun [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Gu, Quanli [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Trindle, Carl O., E-mail: cot@virginia.edu [Chemistry Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Knee, J. L., E-mail: jknee@wesleyan.edu [Chemistry Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms formed in the molecular beam were studied in the first excited electronic state, S{sub 1}, using resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy and in the cation ground state, D{sub 0}, using mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The combination of electronic and cationic spectra of the clusters allows two conformations to be identified in both aniline-Ar{sub 1} and aniline-Ar{sub 2}, which are assigned to either the gauche configuration or anti-configuration of 4-propylaniline. The gauche isomer exhibits complex bands shifted 29 cm{sup −1} and 89 cm{sup −1} from the S{sub 1} origin bands and 83 cm{sup −1} and 148 cm{sup −1} from the ionization potential assigned to the Ar{sub 1} and Ar{sub 2} complexes, respectively. For the anti-rotamer, the corresponding shifts actually become nearly additive, 53 cm{sup −1} and 109 cm{sup −1} for the S{sub 1} origin bands, and 61 cm{sup −1} and 125 cm{sup −1} for the ionization potentials. Ab initio calculations provide insights into the influences of the propyl and amino groups on the positions of the argon atoms within the clusters. In addition, the binding energy of one argon with the gauche isomer of 4-propylaniline has been measured to be 550 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the D{sub 0} state, 496 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 1} state, and 467 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the neutral ground state, S{sub 0}.

  5. Impedance spectroscopy study of the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching states of atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkkaenen, Irina; Shkabko, Andrey; Aslam, Nabeel; Meuffels, Paul; Waser, Rainer; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne [Peter Gr, ue, nberg Institut and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt Strasse, 52425, Juelich (Germany); Heikkilae, Mikko; Vehkamaeki, Marko; Niinistoe, Jaakko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelae, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P. O. Box 55, Helsinki, 00014 (Finland)

    2015-04-01

    The polarity of the resistive switching (RS) characteristic of metal-oxide-metal devices from atomic layer deposited polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} films was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy. Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/Ti/Pt cells made with 10 nm Ti and 30 nm Pt capping top electrodes, served as unipolar switching (US) devices. Bipolar switching (BS) devices were represented by Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/30 nm TiN cells. Temperature measurements of the ON-state resistances clearly show metallic and semiconducting behavior for the US and BS cells, respectively. The pristine and the ON and OFF states of the devices were analyzed by means of impedance spectroscopy. All ZrO{sub 2} based RS devices exhibited similar impedance characteristics in the pristine states. In contrast, after electroforming clear differences in the Nyquist-plots of the US and BS devices were observed. The effect of the device structure on the RS polarity is discussed under consideration of the pillar-shaped grainy microstructure of the ZrO{sub 2} thin films. An empirical model based on redox reactions between ZrO{sub 2} and the non-noble metal electrode is proposed emphasizing defect formation prior at the ZrO{sub 2} grain boundaries. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Dopant Diffusion and Activation in Silicon Nanowires Fabricated by ex Situ Doping: A Correlative Study via Atom-Probe Tomography and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Hazut, Ori; Huang, Bo-Chao; Chiu, Ya-Ping; Chang, Chia-Seng; Yerushalmi, Roie; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Seidman, David N

    2016-07-13

    Dopants play a critical role in modulating the electric properties of semiconducting materials, ranging from bulk to nanoscale semiconductors, nanowires, and quantum dots. The application of traditional doping methods developed for bulk materials involves additional considerations for nanoscale semiconductors because of the influence of surfaces and stochastic fluctuations, which may become significant at the nanometer-scale level. Monolayer doping is an ex situ doping method that permits the post growth doping of nanowires. Herein, using atom-probe tomography (APT) with subnanometer spatial resolution and atomic-ppm detection limit, we study the distributions of boron and phosphorus in ex situ doped silicon nanowires with accurate control. A highly phosphorus doped outer region and a uniformly boron doped interior are observed, which are not predicted by criteria based on bulk silicon. These phenomena are explained by fast interfacial diffusion of phosphorus and enhanced bulk diffusion of boron, respectively. The APT results are compared with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, which yields information concerning the electrically active dopants. Overall, comparing the information obtained by the two methods permits us to evaluate the diffusivities of each different dopant type at the nanowire oxide, interface, and core regions. The combined data sets permit us to evaluate the electrical activation and compensation of the dopants in different regions of the nanowires and understand the details that lead to the sharp p-i-n junctions formed across the nanowire for the ex situ doping process.

  7. Production of ultra slow antiprotons, its application to atomic collisions and atomic spectroscopy - ASACUSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) project aims at studying collision dynamics with slow antiprotons and high precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms. To realize these purposes, the production of high quality ultra slow antiproton beams is essential, which is achieved by the combination of antiproton decelerator (AD) from 3 GeV to 5 MeV, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) decelerator from 5 MeV to 50 keV, and finally an electromagnetic trap from 50 keV to 10 eV. From the atomic physics point of view, an antiproton is an extremely heavy electron and/or a negatively charged proton, i.e., the antiproton is a unique tool to shed light on collision dynamics from the other side of the world. In addition to this fundamentally important feature, the antiproton has also a big practical advantage, i.e., it annihilates with the target nuclei emitting several energetic pions, which provides high detection efficiency with very good time resolution. Many-body effects which are of great importance to several branches of science will be studied through ionization and antiprotonic atom formation processes under single collision conditions. Various antiprotonic atoms including protonium (p anti-p) are expected to be meta-stable in vacuum, which is never true for those in dense media except for antiprotonic helium. High precision spectroscopy of protonium will for the first time become feasible benefited by this meta-stability. The present review reports briefly the production scheme of ultra slow antiproton beams and several topics proposed in the ASACUSA project

  8. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  9. Design of a WWW database server for Atomic Spectroscopy Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contis, A.

    1995-12-01

    The department of Atomic Spectroscopy at Lund Univ produces large amounts of experimental data on energy levels and emissions for atomic systems. In order to make this data easily available to users outside the institution, a database has been produced and made available on the Internet. This report describes the organization of the data and the Internet interface of the data base. 4 refs.

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  11. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Breuker, H; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  12. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  13. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  14. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design. PMID:27193551

  15. Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study on oxidative etching of diamond-like carbon films by hyperthermal atomic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface structural changes of a hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film exposed to a hyperthermal atomic oxygen beam were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). It was confirmed that the DLC surface was oxidized and etched by high-energy collisions of atomic oxygen. RBS and real-time mass-loss data showed a linear relationship between etching and atomic oxygen fluence. SR-PES data suggested that the oxide layer was restricted to the topmost surface of the DLC film. NEXAFS data were interpreted to mean that the sp2 structure at the DLC surface was selectively etched by collisions with hyperthermal atomic oxygen, and an sp3-rich region remained at the topmost DLC surface. The formation of an sp3-rich layer at the DLC surface led to surface roughening and a reduced erosion yield relative to the pristine DLC surface.

  16. Surface compositions of atomic layer deposited Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O thin films studied using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ting; Romero, Danilo; Gomez, Romel D., E-mail: rdgomez@umd.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the authors present Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) studies of Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O (ZMO) films grown via interrupted atomic-layer deposition (ALD) techniques. The ZMO films were fabricated by alternating ALD deposition of ZnO and MgO layers up to 1000 cycles. Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O films with progressively decreasing Mg/Zn ratios (Mg/Zn = 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/9, and 2/8, 3/12, 4/16, and 5/20) were fabricated for this study. The AES results exhibit an abrupt drop of Mg composition on the ZMO surface when the Mg/Zn < 1/3. Additionally, the surface composition ratios of O to Mg, O to Zn, and Mg to Zn were estimated with known Auger sensitivity factors. The results indicate that Mg ions diffuse into the bulk, forming Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O alloys.

  17. Chemical ordering of Co and Ni in a W-(AlCoNi) crystalline approximant related to Al-Co-Ni decagonal quasicrystals studied by atomic resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Akira; Hiraga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A W-(AlCoNi) crystalline approximant, which is closely related to Al-Co-Ni decagonal quasicrystals, in an Al72.5Co20Ni7.5 alloy has been studied by atomic resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), in an instrument attached to a spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. On high-resolution EDS maps of Co and Ni elements, obtained by integrating many sets of EDS data taken from undamaged areas, chemical ordering of Co and Ni is clearly detected. In the structure of the W-(AlCoNi) phase, consisting of arrangements of transition-metal (TM) atoms located at vertices of pentagonal tilings and pentagonal arrangements of mixed sites (MSs) of TM and Al atoms, Co atoms occupy the TM atom positions with the pentagonal tiling and Ni is enriched in part of the pentagonal arrangements of MSs.

  18. Radioimmunoassay (RIA), radioreceptorassay (RRA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) applied to studies on animal nutrition and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, our group began working in the development of a sensitive method to measure the active principle (1,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D3-glycoside) of Solanum glaucophyllum, a plant that grows wild in our country causing calcinosis of breeding cattle. RIA and RRA have been applied to determine this glycoside in the aqueous extracts of the plant leaves and the free vitamin D metabolite in animal plasma samples, respectively. AAS was also used to determine calcium, together with phosphorus determined by colorimetric methods, in blood and tissues of experimental animals in order to study the relationship between the active principle kinetics and its effects. More recently, this plant has been proposed as a source of vitamin D activity (VDA) that might contribute with environment care improving calcium and phosphorus utilization by animals. Our group is by now, as a first step, studying the effects of different diet levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) [covering the range between commercial recommendations and half of NRC requirements (1994)], as well as different sources of those minerals, upon productive, nutritional, skeletal and biochemical parameters, in a series of experiments covering either a part or the entire breeding cycle of broilers. We think that the high levels of vitamin D3 employed in commercial farms (4 times NRC recommendations) could enable birds fed on basal diets to enhance the synthesis of the active metabolite of the vitamin in order to overcome partially these minerals deficiency. These methods of analysis have been applied successfully in our research projects contributing to the improvement of animal health and production and our approach has been considered adequate for the study of this additive and therefore has been required by the private industry of foreign countries. (author)

  19. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  20. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  1. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  2. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)3]3[CoW12O40]·9H2O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)3]2[FeW12O40]·H3O·H2O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)3]2+ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm−1, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. - Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate

  3. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  4. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π− beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π− occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN

  5. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M., E-mail: Masaki.Hori@mpq.mpg.de; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Dax, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π{sup −} beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π{sup −} occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  6. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Chenli Gan

    2005-01-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atomfield interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L <λ/4) in experiments.

  7. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (atomic and molecular physics)

  8. Transformation of amyloid-like fibers, formed from an elastin-based biopolymer, into a hydrogel: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamia, R; Salvi, A M; D'Alessio, L; Castle, J E; Tamburro, A M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the propensity of elastin-based biopolymers to form amyloid-like fibers when dissolved in water. These are of interest when considered as "ancestral units" of elastin in which they represent the simplest sequences in the hydrophobic regions of the general type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu). We normally refer to these biopolymers based on elastin or related to elastin units as "elastin-like polypeptides". The requirement of water for the formation of amyloids seems quite interesting and deserves investigation, the water representing the natural transport medium in human cells. As a matter of fact, the "natural" supramolecular organization of elastin is in the form of beaded-string-like filaments and not in the form of amyloids whose "in vivo" deposition is associated with some important human diseases. Our work is directed, therefore, to understanding the mechanism by which such hydrophobic sequences form amyloids and any conditions by which they might regress to a non-amyloid filament. The elastin-like sequence here under investigation is the ValGlyGlyValGly pentapeptide that has been previously analyzed both in its monomer and polymer form. In particular, we have focused our investigation on the apparent stability of amyloids formed from poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), and we have observed these fibers evolving to a hydrogel after prolonged aging in water. We will show how atomic force microscopy can be combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to gain an insight into the spontaneous organization of an elastin-like polypeptide driven by interfacial interactions. The results are discussed also in light of fractal-like assembly and their implications from a biomedical point of view. PMID:17206798

  9. Application of dynamic impedance spectroscopy to atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Darowicki, Artur Zieliński and Krzysztof J Kurzydłowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a universal imaging technique, while impedance spectroscopy is a fundamental method of determining the electrical properties of materials. It is useful to combine those techniques to obtain the spatial distribution of an impedance vector. This paper proposes a new combining approach utilizing multifrequency scanning and simultaneous AFM scanning of an investigated surface.

  10. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  11. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  12. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  13. Atomic spectroscopy introduction to the theory of hyperfine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Anatoli V

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Spectroscopy provides a comprehensive discussion on the general approach to the theory of atomic spectra, based on the use of the Lagrangian canonical formalism. This approach is developed and applied to explain the hydrogenic hyperfine structure associated with the nucleus motion, its finite mass, and spin. The non-relativistic or relativistic, spin or spin-free particle approximations can be used as a starting point of general approach. The special attention is paid to the theory of Lamb shift formation. The formulae for hydrogenic spectrum including the account of Lamb shift are written in simple analytical form. The book is of interest to specialists, graduate and postgraduate students, who are involved into the experimental and theoretical research in the field of modern atomic spectroscopy.

  14. One-atom detection using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measuring technique which can detect a single atom of a given kind, even in the presence of 1019 or more atoms of another kind, with good space and time resolution, was utilized to study the density fluctuation of less than 100 cesium atoms in a small volume of space filled with inert gases. Repeated measurements of the absolute number of atoms in a defined volume at an arbitrary time were recorded for the first time in order to obtain a statistical distribution giving the fluctuation of the number of atoms around the mean value. Numerous other physics applications of the one-atom detector are briefly described

  15. Spectroscopy of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms for applications in quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B; Entin, V M; Yakshina, E A

    2016-01-01

    Atoms in highly excited (Rydberg) states have a number of unique properties which make them attractive for applications in quantum information. These are large dipole moments, lifetimes and polarizabilities, as well as strong long-range interactions between Rydberg atoms. Experimental methods of laser cooling and precision spectroscopy enable the trapping and manipulation of single Rydberg atoms and applying them for practical implementation of quantum gates over qubits of a quantum computer based on single neutral atoms in optical traps. In this paper, we give a review of the experimental and theoretical work performed by the authors at the Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University on laser and microwave spectroscopy of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap and on their possible applications in quantum information. We also give a brief review of studies done by other groups in this area.

  16. In-situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 on Silicon Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youb Lee, Seung; Jeon, Cheolho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Yooseok; Jung, Woosung; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2012-03-01

    In-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the initial stages of TiO2 growth on a Si(001) substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The core level spectra of Si 2p, C 1s, O 1s, and Ti 2p were measured at every half reaction in the titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP)-H2O ALD process. The ligand exchange reactions were verified using the periodic oscillation of the C 1s concentration, as well as changes in the hydroxyl concentration. XPS analysis revealed that Ti2O3 and Si oxide were formed at the initial stages of TiO2 growth. A stoichiometric TiO2 layer was dominantly formed after two cycles and was chemically saturated after four cycles.

  17. Metallomics – The Future of Atomic Spectroscopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-02-01

    Metallomics is defined as the study of metals and metal species, and their interactions, transformations, and functions in biological systems. The full complement of metals and metal moieties (free and bound) is accordingly known as the metallome. The terms are relatively new ones, first coined by R.J.P. Williams of Oxford University and Hiroki Haraguchi of Nagoya University early in the present millennium. Metallomics is a new moniker for the field of bioinorganic chemistry, extending and broadening that discipline much as genomics has done for genetics, and is appositely harmonious with other ''ohmics'' terms like genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Metallomics is also distinguished from other terms (e.g. speciation) by consideration of the global role of all metals/metalloids in a system.

  18. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  19. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  20. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Poli, N.; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Drullinger, R. E.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable View the MathML source state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trap...

  1. Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy of Ytterbium Atoms in a Hollow Cathode Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Li; XU Xin-Ye

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp.The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition.

  2. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  3. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  4. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  5. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  6. Nuclear properties studied by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of atomic nuclei are determined by means of laser spectroscopy model-independently. Laser-rf techniques enable us to make precision measurement of these moments. The hfs anomaly, i.e., Bohr-Weisskopf effect will be studied systematically at CERN ISOLDE shortly. (author)

  7. Study of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ponciano-Ojeda, Francisco; López-Hernández, Oscar; Mojica-Casique, Cristian; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ramírez-Martínez, Fernando; Flores-Mijangos, Jesús; Sahagún, Daniel; Jáuregui, Rocío; Jiménez-Mier, José

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room temperature rubidium cell with continuous wave extended cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the non-dipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5p3/2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6p3/2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (~ 13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F - 1, F and F + 1 splitting of the 6p3/2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5s -> 5p3/2 preparation dynamics, the...

  8. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ν less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts

  9. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, G; T.M. Brzozowski; R. DRULLINGER; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Toninelli, C.; Tino, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser Optics 2003: Solid State Lasers and Nonlinear Frequency Conversion, edited by Vladimir I. Ustugov abstract: We present a new laser setup suited for high precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium. The source is used for an absolute frequency measurement of the visible 5s21S0-5s5p3P1 intercombination line of strontium which is considered a possible candidate for a future optical frequency standard. The optical frequency is measured with an optical comb generator referenced to the SI t...

  10. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  11. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  12. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975. [Program, abstracts, and author index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics. (GHT)

  13. Laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence spectroscopy: a facile technique for molecular spectroscopy of spin-forbidden states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang; Keil, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Spectra of spin-forbidden and spin-allowed transitions in the mixed b (3)Pi(u) approximately A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state of Na(2) are measured separately by two-photon excitation using a single tunable dye laser. The two-photon excitation produces Na(*)(3p) by photodissociation, which is easily and sensitively detected by atomic fluorescence. At low laser power, only the A (1)Sigma(u)(+) state is excited, completely free of triplet excitation. At high laser power, photodissociation via the intermediate b (3)Pi(u) triplet state becomes much more likely, effectively "switching" the observations from singlet spectroscopy to triplet spectroscopy with only minor apparatus changes. This technique of perturbation-assisted laser-induced atomic fragment fluorescence may therefore be especially useful as a general vehicle for investigating perturbation-related physics pertinent to the spin-forbidden states, as well as for studying allowed and forbidden states of other molecules.

  14. Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan, E-mail: fanzhang@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pan, Jinshan [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Claesson, Per Martin [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Div. of Surface and Corrosion Science, Drottning Kristinas vaeg.51, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute for Surface Chemistry, P.O. Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Brinck, Tore [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, Teknikringen 36, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO{sub 4} induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mussel protein was tested as 'green' corrosion protection strategy for steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 9, the protein adsorbs on carbon steel and forms a multilayer-like film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaIO{sub 4} leads to structural changes and cross-linking of the protein film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking results in a dense and compact film with increased stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cross-linking of preformed film significantly enhances the corrosion protection.

  15. Search for ultralight scalar dark matter with atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilaton-like couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant alpha. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in alpha. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span is analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1 rad/s. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilaton-like photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3 * 10^-18 eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control data set, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave sub...

  16. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm-1). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10-9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α-1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10-9. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  17. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin Cu{sub 2}O and subsequent reduction to Cu studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Dileep [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Assim, Khaybar; Lang, Heinrich [Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Bruener, Philipp; Grehl, Thomas [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstr. 15, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Georgi, Colin; Waechtler, Thomas; Ecke, Ramona; Schulz, Stefan E., E-mail: stefan.schulz@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de; Gessner, Thomas [Center for Microtechnologies—ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz, Germany and Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems—ENAS, Technologie-Campus 3, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The growth of ultrathin (<5 nm) Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films deposited on SiO{sub 2} by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and Cu films by subsequent reduction of the Cu{sub 2}O using HCO{sub 2}H or CO is reported. Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O has been deposited by a mixture of 16: 99 mol. % of [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] as Cu precursor and 17: 1 mol. % of [Ru(η{sup 5}-C{sub 7}H{sub 11})(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3})] as Ru precursor. The catalytic amount of Ru precursor was to support low temperature reduction of Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by formic acid (HCO{sub 2}H) on arbitrary substrate. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film indicated nearly 1 at. % of carbon contamination and a phosphorous contamination below the detection limit after sputter cleaning. Systematic investigations of the reduction of Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O to metallic Cu by HCO{sub 2}H or CO as reducing agents are described. Following the ALD of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O, the ultrathin films are reduced between 100 and 160 °C. The use of HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C enabled the reduction of around 90% Cu{sub 2}O. HCO{sub 2}H is found to be very effective in the removal of oxygen from Ru-doped Cu{sub 2}O films with 2.5–4.7 nm thickness. In contrast, CO was effective for the removal of oxygen from the Cu{sub 2}O films only below 3.0 nm at 145 °C. Root mean square surface roughness of 0.4 ± 0.1 nm was observed from atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations after the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O, followed by the subsequent reduction of 3.0 nm Cu{sub 2}O using either HCO{sub 2}H at 110 °C or CO at 145 °C on SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, ex situ low energy ion scattering and AFM investigations confirmed that the Cu{sub 2}O film after ALD and Cu films after subsequent reduction was continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  19. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  20. Modulation transfer spectroscopy in a lithium atomic vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-16

    We have investigated modulation transfer spectroscopy of D2 transitions of 7Li atoms in a vapor cell. The role of the intensity of the probe beam in the spectrum is important, we have seen unique characteristics of the signal in the crossover peak. In order to find the best signal for laser locking, the slope and frequency offset of the zero-crossing signal are determined. The dependence of the modulation transfer spectra on polarizations of pump and probe beam is demonstrated. The residual amplitude modulation in the system is also considered, and the distortion of the spectra due to the modulation is analyzed. It was found that the crossover peak is more suitable for frequency stabilization due to its better residual amplitude modulation compensation. PMID:27409886

  1. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Eloy, Aurélien; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-10-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly be used to investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. This conversion is studied here in detail. We show that, while experimental intensity noise spectra collapse onto the same curve at low Fourier frequencies, some differences appear at higher frequencies when the probe beam is detuned from the center of the resonance line. A simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features. Using this model, the noise spectra allow extracting some quantitative information on the laser noise as well as on the atomic sample.

  2. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atomic physics and foundations of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique, unified presentation of these partial fields and by this exclusive. With the highly reputed co-author Prof. Dr. Ingolf Volker Hertel. Eminent presentation makes it possible, together also over set connections. For bachelor/master and diploma curricula. The book applies primarily to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until promotion. It offers a detailed introduction to the most important theme complexes of atomic and molecular physics and the methods of modern optical physics connected with this. In many selected partial fields it leads until the actual status of research. Simultaneously it also appeals to the active scientist and wants to be a standard work of the field. By the clearly stuctured chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics - step-wise made familiar with the most important phenomena and models of atomic and molecular physics and led wherever it is offered, to their actual developments in modern research. In the first part here present the to a certain degree canonical knowledge with the main topic structure of atoms and molecules and the competent spectroscopy is summarized. In the second part still being in work deepening knowledge for this is mediated, and selected chapters of modern optics, lase physics, cluster research, and scattering physics is treated, as well a short excursus in the world of cold atoms and molecules is given. At the whole both volumes of this textbook want to show to the interested reader that atomic, molecular, and optical physics, are still as usual an alive field of modern physical research

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy in electrical fields: An element-selective probe of atomic polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, V.; Wilhelm, F.; Ollefs, K.; Rogalev, A.; Ney, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied a range of polar and nonpolar materials using x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) in external electric fields. An energy shift of the XANES by a few meV/kV is found which scales linearly with the applied voltage, thus being reminiscent of the linear Stark effect. This is corroborated by the consistent presence of this energy shift in polar thin films and bulk crystals and its absence in nonpolar materials as well as in conducting films. The observed energy shift of the XANES is different between two atomic species in one specimen and appears to scale linearly with the atomic number of the studied element. Therefore, XANES in electrical fields opens the perspective to study atomic polarization with element specificity in a range of functional materials.

  4. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  5. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Okaba, Shoichi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturisation. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kKagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the $^1 S_0-{}^3P_1$ (m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibresHC-PCFs improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  6. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  7. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  8. Combined atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilised onto self-assembled monolayer on the gold film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fabrication of biosensors, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) are an attractive method of immobilising enzymes at electrode surface since it allows precise control over the amount and spatial distribution of the immobilized enzyme. The covalent attachment of glucose oxidase (GOx) to a carboxylic terminated SAM chemisorbed onto gold films was achieved via carbodiimide activation of the carboxylic acids to a reactive intermediate susceptible to nucleophilic attack by amines on free lysine chains of the enzyme. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements were used for characterisation of GOx modified gold surfaces. Tapping mode AFM studies have revealed that GOx molecules form slightly disordered arrays of pentagonal or hexagonal clusters. Observed features of immobilised GOx are distributed as a submonolayer on the SAM surface which has allowed visualisation of native and unfolded enzyme structure. The presence of the SAM and enzyme on the gold surface was detected by XPS spectroscopy. Spectra show typical peaks for the C 1s, O 1s and N 1s regions. A kinetic study of the adsorption of GOx onto activated SAM using in-situ QCM allowed determination the amount of immobilised GOx on the layer and consequently the optimal immobilisation conditions. Performance parameters of the biosensor such as sensitivity to glucose concentration as a function of enzyme loading were evaluated amperometrically using the redox mediator p-benzoquinone

  9. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  10. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface: Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste

  11. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1998-01-01

    The basic research on the control of atoms using the coherent interaction, such as the development of the generator of the thermal atomic beam with high directionality, the photodeflection of atomic beam and the coherent excitation of atoms, has been performed. Yb atomic beam with small divergence was generated and the deflection mechanism of the atomic beam was studied by using a broad band dye laser and a narrow band laser. It has been proved that the single mode dye laser with narrow bandwidth was suitable for deflection of atoms but the frequency locking system was indispensable. And the apparatus for intermodulated optogalvanic (IMOG) experiment was developed and the high resolution optogalvanic spectroscopy was studied for laser frequency stabilization. (author). 74 refs., 1 tab., 26 figs

  12. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  13. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  14. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  15. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; R Behera; A K Das

    2012-04-01

    The magnetically modulated saturation absorption profile is studied for a wide range of external DC magnetic field. The salient features of Doppler-free signal generated by laser frequency modulation and atomic energy level modulation are compared. The DC offset of the signal profile is found to be unstable as the external DC magnetic field is changed. The technical difficulty of tuning laser frequency under locked condition over a large frequency span is discussed along with possible solutions.

  16. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization.

  17. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  18. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  20. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Arsenic in Bottled Drinking Water Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Guţu Claudia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been performed in the past few years, to determine arsenic speciation in drinking water, food chain and environment, arsenic being a well-recognized carcinogenic and toxic agent mainly in its inorganic species. The instrumental techniques used for arsenic determination, such as hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, can provide a great sensitivity only on the total amount. Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method and to analyze the concentration of total inorganic arsenic in bottled drinking water. Methods: Total arsenic was determined in samples from six different types of commercially available bottled drinking water using atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal or hydride generation vaporisation. All drinking water samples were acidified with 0.1M nitric acid to match the acidity of the standards. Results: The method was linear within the studied range (1-5 μg/L, R = 0.9943. The quantification limits for arsenic determination were 0.48 μg/L (HGAAS and 0.03 μg/L (GFAAS. The evaluated arsenic content in drinking water was within the accepted limits provided by law. Conclusions: A simple and sensitive method for the quantification of arsenic in drinking water using atomic absorbtion spectroscopy was described, which can be further used in toxicological studies. As an additional advantage, the system is very fast, efficient and environmental friendly

  2. Velocity selective bi-polarization spectroscopy for laser cooling of metastable Krypton atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Y B; Singh, S; Mishra, S R; Rawat, H S

    2014-01-01

    We report a velocity selective bi-polarization spectroscopy (VS-BPS) technique to generate a background-free, dispersion-like reference signal which is tunable over a wide range of frequency. In this technique, a pair of linearly polarized weak probe beams passing through a gas cell of metastable Krypton (Kr*) atoms, overlaps with a pair of counter-propagating circularly polarized strong pump beams derived from an independently tunable control laser. The polarization spectroscopy signals from the two probe beams, after subtraction, result in VS-BPS signal. The spectral shifting in VS-BPS signal can be achieved by tuning the frequency of the control laser. The dependence of the amplitude and slope of the VS-BPS signal on the RF power used for excitation of Kr atoms in the gas cell and on the power of pump beams has been studied. The frequency stability of a diode laser locked with VS-BPS signal has been found to be better than the frequency stability of the laser locked with a saturated absorption spectroscopy...

  3. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  4. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  6. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  7. Rotational spectra of N$_2^+$: An advanced undergraduate laboratory in atomic and molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B; Arndt, P T

    2015-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive instructional experiment that demonstrates the rotational energy levels of diatomic nitrogen, using the emission band spectrum of molecular nitrogen ionized by various processes in a commercial AC capillary discharge tube. The simple setup and analytical procedure is introduced as part of a sequence of educational experiments employed by a course of advanced atomic and molecular spectroscopy, where the study of rotational spectra is combined with the analysis of vibrational characteristics for a multifaceted picture of the quantum states of diatomic molecules.

  8. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  9. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping; Van Benthem, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1411 (United States); Xiong, Jie; Jia, Quanxi [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-04-29

    Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and antiferromagnetic BiFeO{sub 3} quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

  10. Continuation of Atomic Spectroscopy on Alkali Isotopes at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Laser optical measurements on Rb, Cs and Fr have already been performed at ISOLDE in 1978-79. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of |7|6|-|9|8Rb, |1|1|8|-|1|4|5Cs, |2|0|8|-|2|1|3Fr and 14 of their isomers have been studied. Among the wealth of information which has been obtained, the most important are the first observation of an optical transition of the element Fr, the evidence of the onset of nuclear deformation at N~=~60 for Rb isotopes and the shape isomerism isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ From both the atomic and nuclear physics point of view, new studies seem very promising: \\item - the search for new optical transitions in Fr; the shell effect in the rms charge radius at N~=~126 for Fr isotopes \\item - the study of a possible onset of deformation for Cs isotopes beyond |1|4|5Cs \\item - the study of a region of static deformation in neutron-deficient Rb isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ \\end{enumerate} A new apparatus has been built. The principle remains the same as used in our earlier experiments. The improvements concern ess...

  11. Atom-surface studies with Rb Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical progress studying atom-surface interactions using rubidium Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms can be strongly coupled to surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes of a dielectric material. The coherent interaction between Rydberg atoms and SPhPs has potential applications for quantum hybrid devices. Calculations of TM-mode SPhPs on engineered surfaces of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and lithium tantalate (PPLT) for different periodic domains and surface orientations, as well as natural materials such as quartz, are presented. Our SPhP calculations account for the semi-infinite anisotropic nature of the materials. In addition to theoretical calculations, we show experimental results of measurements of adsorbate fields and coupling of Rydberg atoms to SPhPs on quartz.

  12. USEPA METHOD STUDY 35 - SW-846 METHOD 3005, ACID DIGESTION OF WATERS FOR TOTAL RECOVERABLE OR DISSOLVED METALS FOR ANALYSES BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted to determine the precision and bias (recovery) of Solid Waste (SW) Method 3005 for the analysis of 21 elements in ground water. SW Method 3005 is entitled, "Acid Digestion of Waters for Total Recoverable Metals for Analyses by ...

  13. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  14. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  15. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yuechun; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (RF) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the RF field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed RF-induced phenomena progresses from AC level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous RF-modulation sidebands to complex state-mixing and level-crossings with high-l hydrogen-like states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the RF field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg-EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based and calibration-free technique to measure and map RF electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  16. The study of materials at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atom probe is a projection microscope whose principle is based on the pin effect: the sample is shaped under the form of a very sharp pin and is submitted to a high electrical potential. Under the influence of the electrical field, the atoms are ejected and the sample surface can be peeled away atom by atom. The ejected atom carries 2 pieces of information: its trajectory and its speed. The knowledge of the trajectory allows the determination of the initial position site of the atom on the surface and the measurement of the time taken by the ion to reach the detector allows the identification of the atom through the use of a time-of-flight spectroscopy method. The development of new position detectors that can detect and record simultaneous impacts has led to the possibility of 3-dimensional imaging of the sample. The last generation of 3-dimensional atom probes has been used to study the position of the different species of atoms in an alloy and to study the formation of atom clusters around impurities in neutron irradiated ferritic steels. (A.C.)

  17. Updated Atomic Data and Calculations for X-ray Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, A R; Smith, R K; Brickhouse, N S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the latest release of AtomDB, version 2.0.2, a database of atomic data and a plasma modeling code with a focus on X-ray astronomy. This release includes several major updates to the fundamental atomic structure and process data held within AtomDB, incorporating new ionization balance data, state-selective recombination data, and updated collisional excitation data for many ions, including the iron L-shell ions from Fe$^{+16}$ to Fe$^{+23}$ and all of the hydrogen- and helium-like sequences. We also describe some of the effects that these changes have on calculated emission and diagnostic line ratios, such as changes in the temperature implied by the He-like G-ratios of up to a factor of 2.

  18. Precise atomic radiative lifetime via photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained spectra of the high-lying vibrational levels of the 13Σ+g state of 6Li2 via photoassociation of ultracold 6Li atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap. The 13Σ+g state of the diatomic molecule correlates to a 2S1/2 state atom plus a 2P1/2 state atom. The long-range part of the molecular interaction potential for this state depends on the 2P atomic radiative lifetime. By calculating the energy eigenvalues of a model potential for the 13Σ+g state and fitting them to the experimentally measured vibrational levels, we have extracted a value for the 2P lifetime of 26.99±0.16 ns. The precision is currently limited by the accuracy of a region of the model potential provided by ab initio calculations

  19. Noise spectroscopy with large clouds of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kashanian, Samir Vartabi; Guerin, William; Lintz, Michel; Fouché, Mathilde; Kaiser, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Noise measurement is a powerful tool to investigate many phenomena from laser characterization to quantum behavior of light. In this paper, we report on intensity noise measurements obtained when a laser beam is transmitted through a large cloud of cold atoms. While this measurement could possibly investigate complex processes such as the influence of atomic motion, one is first limited by the conversion of the intrinsic laser frequency noise to intensity noise via the atomic resonance. We show that a simple model, based on a mean-field approach, which corresponds to describing the atomic cloud by a dielectric susceptibility, is sufficient to understand the main features of this conversion observed in the experimental intensity noise spectrum.

  20. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  1. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    OpenAIRE

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of e...

  2. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  3. Investigation of hydrogen atom addition to vinyl monomers by time resolved ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K.

    1983-07-01

    By means of time resolved ESR spectroscopy in the microsecond time scale the H atom addition to different vinyl monomers was investigated. The H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions show a strong recombination CIDEP effect which also allows the recombination rate constant of H atoms to be determined. By analysis of ESR time profiles with the modified Bloch equations the relaxation times T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, the polarization factors and the chemical rate constants with scavengers were obtained. Besides the H atom addition rate constants to different vinyl monomers the structure of the monomer radical was determined for acrylic acid.

  4. Studies on the interaction of hydrogen atoms with diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration modes of hydrogen-atom adsorption on the diamond surface were studied with high resolution-electron energy loss spectroscopy. Two main losses were observed at 360 MeV and 160 MeV. They are assigned to the C-H stretch vibrations and the angle-changing deformation vibrations respectively. Replacing H-atom with D-atom, isotopic shifts were observed in the loss spectra. Heating the diamond surface to 900 deg C, all of the loss features disappear, but an inelastic continuous loss-structure was observed. Due to H-atom desorption, the dangling-bonds became horizontal bonds on the diamond surface, resulting in the graphitization of diamond surface. The appearance of the inelastic continuous loss-structure was the characteristic of graphite π-band. The graphitization of the diamond surface was affirmed further by UPS and AES studies

  5. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, T. M.; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J. E.; Ortega, D.; Diddams, S. A.; Oates, C. W.; Hollberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrat...

  6. PETOS-BASIC programs for treating data and reporting results in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PETOS-BASIC program was written which provides the off-line treatment of data in optical emission spectroscopy, flame photometry and, atomic absorption spectroscopy. Polynomial calibration functions are fitted in overlapped steps by the least squares method. The calculated concentrations in unknown samples are stored in sequential files (one per element, up to four), from which they can be read to be reported in a second program. (Author) 7 refs

  7. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  8. A STUDY OF TIN IMPURITY ATOMS IN AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Rabchanova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Using the Mössbauer spectroscopy method for the 119 Sn isotope the state of tin impurity atoms in amorphous a-Si silicon is studied. The electrical and optical properties of tin doped films of thermally spray-coated amorphous silicon have been studied. It is shown that in contrast to the crystalline silicon where tin is an electrically inactive substitution impurity, in vacuum deposited amorphous silicon it produces an acceptor band near the valence band and a fraction of the tin atoms become...

  9. Nuclear structure of light thallium isotopes as deduced from laser spectroscopy on a fast atom beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After optimizing the system by experiments on /sup 201,203,205/Tl, the neutron-deficient isotopes 189-193Tl have been studied using the collinear fast atom beam laser spectroscopy system at UNISOR on-line to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. A sensitive system for the measurements was developed since the light isotopes were available in mass-separated beams of only 7 x 104 to 4 x 105 atoms per second. By laser excitation of the 535 nm atomic transitions of atoms in the beam, the 6s27s 2S/sub 1/2/ and 6s26s 2P/sub 3/2/ hyperfine structures were measured, as were the isotope shifts of the 535 nm transitions. From these, the magnetic dipole moments, spectroscopic quadrupole moments and isotopic changes in mean-square charge radius were deduced. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous data. The /sup 190,192/Tl isotopes show a considerable difference in quadrupole deformations as well as an anomalous isotope shift with respect to 194Tl. A large isomer shift in 193Tl is observed implying a larger deformation in the 9/2- isomer than in the 1/2+ ground state. The /sup 189,191,193/Tl isomers show increasing deformation away from stability. A deformed shell model calculation indicates that this increase in deformation can account for the dropping of the 9/2- band in these isotopes while an increase in neutron pairing correlations, having opposite and compensating effects on the rotational moment of inertia, maintains the 9/2- strong-coupled band structure. 105 refs., 27 figs

  10. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  11. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  12. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  13. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  15. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  16. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  17. Ionization potential of neutral atomic plutonium determined by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization potential of the neutral plutonium atom, Pu i, has been determined by two- and three-step resonance photoionization observation of the threshold of ionization and of the Rydberg series. The Rydberg series were observed by field ionization as series that converge to the first ionization limit and as autoionizing series the converge to the second and to several higher convergence limits. The threshold and Rydberg series were obtained through a number of two- and three-step pathways. The photoionization threshold value for the 239Pu i ionization potential is 48 582(30) cm-1, and the more accurate value from the Rydberg series is 48 604(1) cm-1 or 6.0262(1) eV

  18. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  19. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  20. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  1. New niobium and rhenium halides synthesis routes by atomic vaporization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New synthetic route as the so called 'chimie douce' or MVS (Metal Vapor Synthesis) has been an increasing field lately to synthesize new kind of solid state structures. Our interest is the assembly of small molecular building blocks of early transition metal halides. We illustrate the use of vaporized rare earth metals to condense NbCls units. We probed the local order around the Nb atom with X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, far Infra-Red and XPS in order to better understand the mechanisms involved. A first EXAFS, IR and XPS study on solid state products has shown the evolution of the NbCl5 dimer towards a chain like structure. However, the condensation patterns depends on the rare earth atoms vaporized. These results have been confirmed by X-ray Absorption ab initio calculations. Because our compounds are extremely air sensitive we have developed in situ MVS reactor to take 'snapshots' of the structural intermediates by EXAFS. This study showed the condensation of the initial NbCl5 building blocks by reduction of the Nb oxidation state by rare earth vaporization. This method is a new way of looking at condensation mechanisms via structural evolution observed by EXAFS. (author)

  2. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  3. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  4. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K−pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAΦNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K−p atom leading to a hadronic shift ϵ1s and a hadronic broadening Γ1s of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated constrained by the SIDDHARTA data on kaonic hydrogen. For the extraction of the isospin-dependent scattering lengths a measurement of the hadronic shift and width of kaonic deuterium is necessary. Therefore, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. Many improvements in the experimental setup will allow to measure kaonic deuterium which is challenging due to the anticipated low X-ray yield. Especially important are the data on the X-ray yields of kaonic deuterium extracted from a exploratory experiment within SIDDHARTA.

  5. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  6. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal

  7. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  8. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  9. Studies in Composing Hydrogen Atom Wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putnam, Lance Jonathan; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Peliti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present our studies in composing elementary wavefunctions of a hydrogen-like atom and identify several relationships between physical phenomena and musical composition that helped guide the process. The hydrogen-like atom accurately describes some of the fundamental quantum mechanical phenomen...

  10. Theoretical Studies of Atomic Transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic structure calculations were performed for properties such as energy levels, binding energies, transition probabilities, lifetimes, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts. Accurate computational procedures were devised so that properties could be predicted even when they could not be obtained from experiment, and to assist in the identification of observed data. The method used was the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, optionally corrected for relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Fully relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations also were performed using the GRASP code A database of energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities was designed and implemented and, at present, includes many results for Be-like to Ar-like

  11. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  12. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy in atomic and molecular physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine topics of current interest in which we feel the use of RIS can yield significant contributions. To this end we discuss several previous studies as examples of the methods involved and then suggest a variety of specific experiments, the performance of which, we endeavor to show, should be possible with present-day technology. The areas of consideration are: (1) laser excitation with relatively broad bandwidth lasers; (2) measurements of photoionization cross sections; and (3) studies of collision and transport processes. Particular attention is given to the inert gases and to diatomic molecules

  13. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; Denis, A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  14. Spectroscopy of ^1S0 -- ^3P1^88Sr Atomic Transition in a 1.06 μm Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effects of laser light near-resonant with the ^1S0-- ^3P1^88Sr transition in an optical dipole trap (ODT). We observe laser cooling of our ODT atomic sample as the atoms collide in the presence of red-detuned 689 nm light. Heating of the atoms was also observed at a different range of frequency detunings while performing spectroscopy. Both processes were accompanied with atom loss, but the increase of phase space density observed during 689 nm laser cooling could aid pursuits of quantum degeneracy with Sr.

  15. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    OpenAIRE

    Ciurylo, R.; Tiesinga, E.; Kotochigova, S.; P.S. Julienne

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and ...

  16. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  17. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    87Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na+ projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  18. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and

  19. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Torun, H.; Finkler, O.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a ...

  20. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Morzyński, Piotr; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S.; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J.; Killian, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered ...

  1. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  2. Theoretical analysis of the spectroscopy of atomic Bose-Hubbard systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kensuke; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We provide a numerical method to calculate comprehensively the microwave and the laser spectra of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices at finite temperatures. Our formulation is built up with the sum rules, up to the second order, derived from the general principle of spectroscopy. The sum rule approach allows us to discuss the physical origins of a spectral peak shift and also a peak broadening. We find that a spectral broadening of superfluid atoms can be determined from number fluctuations of atoms, while that of normal-state atoms is mainly attributed to quantum fluctuations resulting from hopping of atoms. To calculate spectra at finite temperatures, based on the sum rule approach, we provide a two-mode approximation assuming that spectra of the superfluid and normal state atoms can be calculated separately. Our method can properly deal with multipeak structures of spectra resulting from thermal fluctuations and also coexisting of the superfluid and the normal states. By combining the two-mode approximation with a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we calculate spectra at finite temperatures by considering realistic systems, and the calculated spectra show nice agreements with those in experiments.

  3. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  4. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beida Information Research (BIR), Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  5. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  6. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  7. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bonert, A E [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zanon-Willette, T; Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10$^{-18}$ level.

  9. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  10. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  11. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly-ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser- and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large scale ab initio calculations. Large blocks of data are predictively systematized and parameterized along isoelectric, homologous, isoionic, Rydberg, and yrast series, to provide a comprehensive and reliable data base

  12. Semiempirical studies of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy level structure, transition probabilities, and general spectroscopic properties of highly ionized many-electron systems are studied through the combined use of sensitive semiempirical data systematizations, selected precision experimental measurements, and specialized theoretical computations. Measurements are made primarily through the use of fast ion beam excitation methods, which are combined with available data from laser-and tokamak-produced plasmas, astrophysical sources, and conventional light sources. The experimental studies are strengthened through large-scale ab initio calculations. Typical examples are the following: lifetime measurements in the neon isoelectronic sequence; multiplexed decay curve measurements of Li-like Si XII; and isoelectronic specification of intershell resonance and intercombination decay rates using measured transition probabilities and spectroscopically determined singlet-mixing amplitudes

  13. Raman spectroscopy of atomically thin two-dimensional magnetic iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingzhi; Du, Kezhao; Liu, Yu Yang Fredrik; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Owen, Man Hon Samuel; Lu, Xin; Gan, Chee Kwan; Sengupta, Pinaki; Kloc, Christian; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-09-01

    Metal phosphorous trichalcogenide is an important group of layered two-dimensional (2D) materials with potentially diverse applications in low-dimensional magnetic and spintronic devices. Herein we present a comprehensive investigation on the lattice dynamics and spin-phonon interactions of mechanically exfoliated atomically thin 2D magnetic material—iron phosphorus trisulfide (FePS3) by Raman spectroscopy and first principle calculations. Layer-number and temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy suggests a magnetic persistence in FePS3 even down to monolayer regime through the spin-phonon coupling, while the Néel temperature decreases from 117 K in bulk to 104 K in monolayer sample. Our studies advocate the intriguing magnetic properties in 2D crystals and suggest that FePS3 is a promising candidate material for future magnetic applications.

  14. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  15. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  16. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  17. Visualization of subsurface nanoparticles in a polymer matrix using resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Yao, Atsushi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    A visualization technique of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale spatial resolution is strongly demanded. Some research groups have demonstrated the visualization of subsurface features using various techniques based on atomic force microscopy. However, the imaging mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the visualization of subsurface Au nanoparticles buried in a polymer matrix 900 nm from the surface using two techniques; i.e., resonance tracking atomic force acoustic microscopy and contact resonance spectroscopy. It was clarified that the subsurface features were visualized by the two techniques as the area with a higher contact resonance frequency and a higher Q-factor than those in the surrounding area, which suggests that the visualization is realized by the variation of the contact stiffness and damping of the polymer matrix due to the existence of the buried nanoparticles.

  18. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    2013-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Collision Physics II focuses on studies on the role of atomic collision processes in astrophysical plasmas, including ionic recombination, electron transport, and position scattering. The book first discusses three-body recombination of positive and negative ions, as well as introduction to ionic recombination, calculation of the recombination coefficient, ions recombining in their parent gas, and three-body recombination at moderate and high gas-densities. The manuscript also takes a look at precision measurements of electron transport coefficients and differential cr

  19. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  20. In-situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Andreas; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present an in-situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly-polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence $\\Delta n$ at the level of $10^{-8}$ and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  1. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  2. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/2 5/2[413] neutron and g9/2 9/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction. (orig.)

  3. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  4. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons (K-) with nucleons and nuclei in the low energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states - the prototype system being K-pp. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DA?NE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound K-p atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering le...

  5. Strong interaction studies with kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J; Beer, G; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction of antikaons with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime represents an active research field connected intrinsically with few-body physics. There are important open questions like the question of antikaon nuclear bound states. A unique and rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions in low-lying states of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen isotopes. In the SIDDHARTA experiment at the electron-positron collider DAFNE of LNF-INFN we measured the most precise values of the strong interaction observables, i.e. the strong interaction on the 1s ground state of the electromagnetically bound kaonic hydrogen atom leading to a hadronic shift and a hadronic broadening of the 1s state. The SIDDHARTA result triggered new theoretical work which achieved major progress in the understanding of the low-energy strong interaction with strangeness. Antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths have been calculated ...

  6. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  7. Processes in Geophysics Studied by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helgason, Orn [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland)

    2004-12-15

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been appreciated in geoscience as a powerful tool to study magnetic and structural properties of a wide range of minerals and rocks. In this presentation the application of Moessbauer spectroscopy in different geophysical processes such as tracing the development of magma during volcanic eruptions and phase transitions of magnetic minerals due to thermal impact of dikes in earlier lava formation or hydrothermal alteration will be discussed.

  8. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  9. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and abs...

  10. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  11. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  12. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  13. Kinetic theory and atomic physics corrections for determination of ion velocities from charge-exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Solomon, W. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Chrystal, C.

    2013-09-01

    Charge-exchange spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for determining ion temperatures, densities and rotational velocities in tokamak plasmas. This technique depends on detailed understanding of the atomic physics processes that affect the measured apparent velocities with respect to the true ion rotational velocities. These atomic effects are mainly due to energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-sections, and in the case of poloidal velocities, due to gyro-motion of the ion during the finite lifetime of the excited states. Accurate lifetimes are necessary for correct interpretation of measured poloidal velocities, specially for high density plasma regimes on machines such as ITER, where l-mixing effects must be taken into account. In this work, a full nl-resolved atomic collisional radiative model coupled with a full kinetic calculation that includes the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the ion gyro-motion is presented for the first time. The model directly calculates from atomic physics first principles the excited state lifetimes that are necessary to evaluate the gyro-orbit effects. It is shown that even for low density plasmas where l-mixing effects are unimportant and coronal conditions can be assumed, the nl-resolved model is necessary for an accurate description of the gyro-motion effects to determine poloidal velocities. This solution shows good agreement when compared to three QH-mode shots on DIII-D, which contain a wide range of toroidal velocities and high ion temperatures where greater atomic corrections are needed. The velocities obtained from the model are compared to experimental velocities determined from co- and counter-injection of neutral beams on DIII-D.

  14. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  15. The use of atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples from uranium mill tailings sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbach, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) was established to support the environmental measurement needs of the various DOE remedial action programs. A laboratory intercomparison study conducted by the TMC, using soil and water samples from sites contaminated by uranium mill tailings, indicated large discrepancies in analytical results reported by participating laboratories for arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium. The present study was undertaken to investigate the most commonly used analytical techniques for measuring these four elements, ascertain routine and reliable quantification, and assess problems and successes of analysts. Based on a survey of the technical literature, the analytical technique of atomic absorption spectroscopy was selected for detailed study. The application of flame atomic absorption, graphite furnace atomic absorption, and hydride generation atomic absorption to the analysis of tailings-contaminated samples is discussed. Additionally, laboratory sample preparation methods for atomic absorption spectroscopy are presented. The conclusion of this report is that atomic absorption can be used effectively for the determination of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples if the analyst understands the measurement process and is aware of potential problems. The problem of accurate quantification of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil contaminated by waste products from uranium milling operations affects all DOE remedial action programs (Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP)), since all include sites where uranium was processed. 96 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, H; Beer, G; Bellotti, G; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Bosnar, D; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Butt, A D; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    In the exotic atoms where one atomic $1s$ electron is replaced by a $K^{-}$, the strong interaction between the $K^{-}$ and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z=1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the $1s$ state of $K^{-}p$ and the $2p$ state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  17. Determination of Elemental Ratio in an Atomic Column by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Hiroki

    2016-07-26

    Atomic-resolution quantification of the elemental ratio of Fe to Mn at the octahedral and tetrahedral sites in brownmillerite Ca2Fe1.07Mn0.93O5 was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The combined techniques revealed that oversampling of the spectral imaging data yielded a spatially resolved area that very nearly reflects atomic resolution (∼1.2 Å radius). The average experimental ratios of Fe to Mn within this region were 17.5:82.5 for the octahedral sites and 81.6:18.4 for the tetrahedral sites. The elemental ratio in an octahedral atomic column was successfully extracted by estimating the mixing of signals from nearest neighbor columns. The results indicated that the ratio of Fe to Mn was 13:87 at the octahedral site, which is in good agreement with the results of neutron diffraction analysis. In addition, the uncertainty of experimental results obtained by using an average 1.2 Å radius was less than 10% at octahedral sites, depending on the sample thickness. In contrast, the experimental error due to dechanneling of incident electrons was larger at the tetrahedral sites. This experimental procedure has wide application for determining the spatially resolved composition ratio of elements in perovskite-like compounds. PMID:27341006

  18. Evaluation on corrosively dissolved gold induced by alkanethiol monolayer with atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have monitored a gold corrosive dissolution behavior accompanied in n-alkanethiol like n-dodecanethiol assembled process with in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and then observed it with atomic force microscopy (AFM) which showed an evident image of corrosive defects or holes produced on gold substrate, corresponding to gold dissolution induced by the alkanethiol molecules in the presence of oxygen. For detection of the dissolved gold defects during alkanethiol assembled process, an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) has been carried out in this paper, and the detection limit for the dissolved gold could be evaluated to be 15.4 ng/mL. The amount of dissolved gold from the substrates of gold plates as functions of immersion time, acid media, solvents and thiol concentration has been examined in the oxygen saturated solutions. In comparison with in situ QCM method, the kinetics behavior of the long-term gold corrosion on the gold plates in 1.0 mmol/L of n-dodecanethiol solution determined with AAS method was a slow process, and its corrosion rate on gold dissolution could be evaluated to be about 4.4 x 10-5 ng.cm-2.s-1, corresponding to 1.3 x 108 Au atoms.cm-2.s-1, that was much smaller than that of initial rate monitored with in situ QCM. Both kinetics equations obtained with QCM and AAS showed a consistent corrosion behavior on gold surfaces.

  19. Study of quarkonium spectroscopy through the approximated variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of the qq sup(-) bound states in a non-relativistic approximation using a approximate variational method is studied. Because of its similarity to positronium, a wave function of the hidrogen atom, is used. The 'coulomb-logaritmic-linear' was the potential used to described it. The fitting is done, and relevant coupling constant due to a logaritmic piece is found. All states described in this way furnishes v2 3P are reasonably explained and it no occurs with the mass diference between psi and eta sub(c). (Author)

  20. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of a |M|=1 Rydberg barium atom in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Quan Wei; Shen Li; Yang Hai-Feng; Shi Ting-Yun; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We observe strong energy-dependent quantum defects in the scaled-energy Stark spectra for |M|=1 Rydberg states of barium atoms at three scaled energies: ε= -2.000, ε= -2.500 and ε=-3.000. In an attempt to explain the observations, theoretical calculations of closed orbit theory based on a model potential including core effect are performed for non-hydrogenic atoms. While such a potential has been uniformly successful for alkali atoms with a single valence electron, it fails to match experimental results for barium atoms in the 6snp Rydberg states with two valence electrons. Our study points out that this discrepancy is due to the strong perturbation from the 5d8p state, which voids the simple approximation for constant quantum defects of principle quantum number n.

  1. Probing Co/Si interface behaviour by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the Co-Si reaction, the Co growth mode at room temperature, diffusion behaviour as well as morphology evolution during annealing on both H-terminated and clean Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. From in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation, "Co-Si" reaction appears to occur on both H-terminated and clean surfaces at room temperature (RT) and the silicide crystallinity is improved upon annealing.Co growth mode on H-terminated Si surfaces occurs in a pseudo layer-by-layer manner while small close-packed island growth mode is observed on the clean Si surface. Upon annealing at different temperatures, Co atom concentration decreases versus annealing time, which in part is attributed to Co atoms inward diffusion. The diffusion behaviour on both types of surfaces demonstrates a similar trend. Morphology study using ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the islands formed on Si(001) surface after annealing at 700 ℃ are elongated with growth directions alternate between the two perpendicular [(-1)10] and [110] directions. Triangular islands are observed on Si(111) surface.

  2. Lattice Studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses of lattice QCD studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions are briefly reviewed. Some emphasis are given on a new proposal for a method, which enable us to calculate potentials between hadrons. As an example of the method, the extraction of nuclear potential in lattice QCD is discussed in detail.

  3. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  4. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.(KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, 3001, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-g...

  5. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  6. Photoassociation spectroscopy of cold alkaline earth atoms near the intercombination line

    CERN Document Server

    Ciurylo, R; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S

    2004-01-01

    The properties of photoassociation (PA) spectra near the intercombination line (the weak transition between $^{1}S_{0}$ and $^{3}P_{1}$ states) of group II atoms are theoretically investigated. As an example we have carried out a calculation for Calcium atoms colliding at ultra low temperatures of 1 mK, 1 $\\mu$K, and 1 nK. Unlike in most current photoassociation spectroscopy the Doppler effect can significantly affect the shape of the investigated lines. Spectra are obtained using Ca--Ca and Ca--Ca$^*$ short-range {\\it ab initio} potentials and long-range van der Waals and resonance dipole potentials. The similar van der Waals coefficients of ground $^{1}S_{0} + ^{1}S_{0}$ and excited $^{1}S_{0} + ^{3}P_{1}$ states cause the PA to differ greatly from those of strong, allowed transitions with resonant dipole interactions. The density of spectral lines is lower, the Condon points are at relatively short range, and the reflection approximation for the Franck-Condon factors is not applicable, and the spontaneous ...

  7. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christian P.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of mostly molecular species which are or may be observed in various astronomical sources (usually) by radio astronomical means. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxiliary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Separate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC, was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases. A dedicated infrastructure was developed to provide a common data format in the various databases enabling queries to a large variety of databases on atomic and molecular data at once. For CDMS, the incorporation in VAMDC was combined with several modifications on the generation of CDMS catalog entries. Here we introduce related changes to the data structure and the data content in the CDMS. The new data scheme allows us to incorporate all previous data entries but in addition allows us also to include entries based on new theoretical descriptions. Moreover, the CDMS entries have been transferred into a mySQL database format. These developments within the VAMDC framework have in part been driven by the needs of the astronomical community to be able to deal efficiently with large data sets obtained with the Herschel Space Telescope or, more recently, with the Atacama Large

  8. Evaluation of trace elements in chewing tobacco and snuff using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waheed, S.; Siddique, N.; Rahman, S. [Chemistry Div., Directorate of Science, Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Tech., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2009-07-01

    Nine samples of chewing tobacco, snuff, tobacco leaf and ash were analyzed using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff studied in this work contain substantial amounts of Mg, Mn, Na, K. V. Sc, Rb and Fe. Furthermore, varying amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co and Zn were also detected in all tobacco samples. Of the toxic elements which were determined using INAA. As, Sb and Hg were quantified in only few tobacco samples. However, other toxic elements, which were determined using AAS, such as Cu, Pb and Cd were detected in almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff. The concentration of majority of the detected elements is high in ash samples which imply that most elements in chewing tobacco and snuff may originate from the addition of ash. (orig.)

  9. Laser spectroscopy with nanometric gas cells distance dependence of atom-surface interaction and collisions under confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdi, I; Yarovitski, A; Dutier, G; Maurin, I; Saltiel, S; Li, Y; Lezama, A; Vartapetyan, T; Sarkisyan, D; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Bloch, D; Ducloy, M; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Todorov, Petko; Yarovitski, Alexander; Dutier, Gabriel; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Li, Yuanyuan; Lezama, Arturo; Varzhapetyan, Tigran; Sarkisyan, David; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    The high sensitivity of Laser Spectroscopy has made possible the exploration of atomic resonances in newly designed "nanometric" gas cells, whose local thickness varies from 20nm to more than 1000 nm. Following the initial observation of the optical analogous of the coherent Dicke microwave narrowing, the newest prospects include the exploration of long-range atom surface van der Waals interaction with spatial resolution in an unprecedented range of distances, modification of atom dielectric resonant coupling under the influence of the coupling between the two neighbouring dielectric media, and even the possible modification of interatomic collisions processes under the effect of confinement.

  10. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  11. XPS study of duplex stainless steel oxidized by oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donik, Crtomir [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: crtomir.donik@imt.si; Kocijan, Aleksandra [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton OH 45469-0051 (United States); Jenko, Monika [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drenik, Aleksander [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pihlar, Boris [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Askerceva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-04-15

    Surface oxidation of the duplex stainless steel DSS alloy 2205 was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and SEM imaging. The experiments were performed on the alloy after controlled oxidation with oxygen atoms created in an inductively coupled plasma. Experiments were performed at temperatures from room temperature up to 700 deg. C. Compositions of the modified oxidized surfaces were obtained from XPS survey scans, and the chemistries of selected elements from higher energy resolution scans of appropriate peaks. The morphologies of the surfaces were obtained using field emission scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications, up to 10,000x. Different Fe/Cr/Mn oxidized layers and different oxide thicknesses were observed and correlated with temperature.

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Spectroscopy Reveals a Hemifusion Intermediate during Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor-Attachment Protein Receptors-Mediated Membrane Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Bhalla, Akhil; Chapman, Edwin R.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs) on the fusion of egg L-α-phosphatidylcholine bilayers using atomic force microscope (AFM) spectroscopy. AFM measurements of the fusion force under compression were acquired to reveal the energy landscape of the fusion process. A single main energy barrier governing the fusion process was identified in the absence and presence of SNAREs in the bilayers. Under compression...

  13. Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy by detection of a metastable hydrogen atom for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kouchi, Noriyuki [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H, E-mail: joe@chem.titech.ac.j [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-11-01

    Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen has been newly developed, where a metastable hydrogen atom dissociating in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the electric vector of the linearly polarized incident light is detected.

  14. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  15. Ion-atom collisions for materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion process of silver in aluminium was studied in thin films as a function of temperature, the most important characteristics of dispersor atoms that technique permits us to study are the atomic mass and depth into the solid. This is possible because when a sample is bombarded with ions of a given energy, the ions are dispersed with different energies for different masses and depths, hence this technique is a useful instrument for research into the physical processes which ocurr in thin films up to depths of several microns, one of the results obtained after the bombardment of the target with protons having an energy of 650 KeV was that when the target reached a temperature of approximately 400C, 800C, 1100C and 1600C during 15 minutes and the spectra of heated and unheated targets were compared it was found that the aluminium peak, the valley, the silver peak and the peak over the silver peak change with the increase of temperature and tend to get mixed, that is to say that silver and the aluminium are diffusing themselves. The analysis is essentially qualitative with this technique we ca also measure the thickness of thin films, the silver thickness was measured (3320A). (author)

  16. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  17. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  18. Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, W C; Lindle, D W; Sant'Anna, M M; Savin, D W

    2014-01-01

    Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is so...

  19. Atomic signatures of local environment from core-level spectroscopy in β -Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Zschiesche, Hannes; Nabok, Dmitrii; Mogilatenko, Anna; Albrecht, Martin; Galazka, Zbigniew; Kirmse, Holm; Draxl, Claudia; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study on core-level excitations from the oxygen K edge of β -Ga2O3 . A detailed analysis of the electronic structure reveals the importance of O-Ga hybridization effects in the conduction region. The spectrum from O 1 s core electrons is dominated by excitonic effects, which overall redshift the absorption onset by 0.5 eV, and significantly redistribute the intensity to lower energies. Analysis of the spectra obtained within many-body perturbation theory reveals atomic fingerprints of the inequivalent O atoms. From the comparison of energy-loss near-edge fine-structure (ELNES) spectra computed with respect to different crystal planes, with measurements recorded under the corresponding diffraction conditions, we show how the spectral contributions of specific O atoms can be enhanced while quenching others. These results suggest ELNES, combined with ab initio many-body theory, as a very powerful technique to characterize complex systems, with sensitivity to individual atomic species and to their local environment.

  20. Compartmentalization of trace elements in guinea pig tissues by INAA [instrumental neutron activation analysis] and AAS [atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human scalp hair analysis has received considerable attention from a variety of disciplines over the last 20 yr or so. Trace element levels of hair have been used in environmental, epidemiological, forensic, nutritional, predictive, and preventive medicine studies. There still exist confusion, skepticism, and controversy, however, among the experts as well as lay persons in the interpretation of hair trace element data. Much of the criticism stems from the lack of quantitative and reliable data on the ability of hair to accurately reflect dose-response relationships. To better define the significance or hair trace element levels (under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency), the authors have undertaken a controlled set of animal experiments in which trace element levels in hair and other tissues have been measured after a mild state of systemic intoxication by chronic, low-does exposure to cadmium and selenium. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods have been developed for the determination of several elements with a high degree of precision and accuracy

  1. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of Ba24Ge100: electronic phase transition and Ba-atom rattling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachi, Takeshi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Guo, FangZhun; Nakano, Takehito; Ikemoto, Yuka; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2005-08-15

    The electronic states of Ba24Ge100 are studied by soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at a high-energy photon factory. A large reduction in the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level is clearly shown before and after the electronic phase transition at 200 K. The changes in the spectrum widths and the fine structures of the core-level Ba 4d spectra give a very reasonable indication of the Ba-atom rattlings in the clathrate polyhedra. On-resonance experiments using the excitation from Ba 3d to 4f levels display that the wave functions of Ba 5d and 6s orbitals give only a small contribution to make a Fermi surface through the hybridization with the Ge20 cluster orbitals. Importantly, reliable values of the DOS at the Fermi level NEF are successfully deduced, using two data sets of DOS obtained from high-resolution XPS and the total magnetic susceptibilities by a superconducting quantum interference device, to be 0.149 and 0.0427 states eV(-1) (Ge atom)(-1) for a high-temperature and for a low-temperature phase.

  2. Aging studies in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the studies of the effect of ionizing radiation on atomic bomb survivors have not produced any evidence of radiation-induced aging, there have been studies on experimental animals and man which suggest accelerated aging after exposure to ionizing radiation. To determine if certain physiologic functions could be related to exposure to ionizing radiation, a battery of age-related tests was given at the time of the physical examinations at ABCC. Some 11,351 persons were given these non-invasive age-related tests. The results were essentially negative. Until a satisfactory operational definition of biologic or physiologic age is developed, the administration of functional tests as a measure of aging does not seem justified. (author)

  3. Theoretical study on single-molecule spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Guang-cun; HUANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The photon-by-photon approach for single molecule spectroscopy experiments utilizes the information carried by each detected photon and allows the measurements of conformational fluctuation with time resolution on a vast range of time scales,where each photon represents a data point.Here,we theoretically simulate the photon emission dynamics of a single molecule spectroscopy using the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to understand the underlying complex photon dynamic process of a single molecule.In addition,by following the molecular process in real time,the mechanism of complex biochemical reactions can be revealed.We hope that this theoretical study will serve as an introduction and a guideline into this exciting new field.

  4. Applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy in cement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades Moessbauer spectrometer has been employed to investigate cement and its clinker. In this work some of these investigations are exhibited briefly hoping that this would facilitate further investigations. It has already been seen that Moessbauer spectroscopy gives good information about some vague points which were present before using this technique as a tool in cement studies such as clinker formation, iron solubility, the iron states in the different phases of clinker as well as the effect of hydration at different times on the states of iron cement pastes, methods for the quality control of the manufactured clinker, the evaluation of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength have been assessed. A concept about the Moessbauer spectroscopy is presented. (author)

  5. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 23Po,2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 23Po level of helium-like krypton

  6. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  7. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  8. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  9. A Study of Confined Helium Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The helium atom confined by a spherical parabolic potential well is studied employing the adiabatic hyperspherical approach method. Total energies of the ground and three low-excited states are obtained as a function of the confined potential radii. We find that the energies of a spherical parabolic potential well are in good agreement with those of an impenetrable spherical box for the larger confined potential radius. We find also that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-excited states and the inversion of the energy values. The results for the three-dimensional spherical potential well and the two-dimensional disc-like potential well are compared with each other. We find that the energy difference between states in a two-dimensional parabolic potential is also obviously larger than the corresponding levels for a spherical parabolic potential.

  10. Influence of atomic tip structure on the intensity of inelastic tunneling spectroscopy data analyzed by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy, force microscopy, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Gustafsson, Alexander; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-04-01

    Achieving a high intensity in inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is important for precise measurements. The intensity of the IETS signal can vary by up to a factor of 3 for various tips without an apparent reason accessible by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) alone. Here, we show that combining STM and IETS with atomic force microscopy enables carbon monoxide front-atom identification, revealing that high IETS intensities for CO/Cu(111) are obtained for single-atom tips, while the intensity drops sharply for multiatom tips. Adsorption of the CO molecule on a Cu adatom [CO/Cu/Cu(111)] such that the molecule is elevated over the substrate strongly diminishes the tip dependence of IETS intensity, showing that an elevated position channels most of the tunneling current through the CO molecule even for multiatom tips, while a large fraction of the tunneling current bypasses the CO molecule in the case of CO/Cu(111).

  11. Mass scaling and non-adiabatic effects in photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold strontium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S; Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, Brian J; Killian, T C

    2014-01-01

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold $^{86}$Sr atoms near the intercombination line and provide theoretical models to describe the obtained bound state energies. We show that using only the molecular states correlating with the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ asymptote is insufficient to provide a mass scaled theoretical model that would reproduce the bound state energies for all isotopes investigated to date: $^{84}$Sr, $^{86}$Sr and $^{88}$Sr. We attribute that to the recently discovered avoided crossing between the $^1S_0$$+$$^3P_1$ $0_u$ ($^3\\Pi^+_u$) and $^1S_0$$+$$^1D_2$ $0_u$ ($^1\\Sigma^+_u$) potential curves at short range and we build a mass scaled interaction model that quantitatively reproduces the available $0_u$ bound state energies for the three stable bosonic isotopes. We also provide a two-channel model that incorporates the rotational (Coriolis) mixing between the $0_u$ and $1_u$ curves which, while not mass scaled, is capable of quantitatively describing the vibrational splittings observed...

  12. A Pragmatic Smoothing Method for Improving the Quality of the Results in Atomic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bennun, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A new smoothing method for the improvement on the identification and quantification of spectral functions based on the previous knowledge of the signals that are expected to be quantified, is presented. These signals are used as weighted coefficients in the smoothing algorithm. This smoothing method was conceived to be applied in atomic and nuclear spectroscopies preferably to these techniques where net counts are proportional to acquisition time, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and other X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic methods, etc. This algorithm, when properly applied, does not distort the form nor the intensity of the signal, so it is well suited for all kind of spectroscopic techniques. This method is extremely effective at reducing high-frequency noise in the signal much more efficient than a single rectangular smooth of the same width. As all of smoothing techniques, the proposed method improves the precision of the results, but in this case we found also a systematic improvement on the...

  13. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the nanosecond range for matrix-isolated Cu atoms and dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.; Rotermund, H. H.; Schrittenlacher, W.; Schroeder, W.

    1985-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the single-bunch mode was employed to study time-resolved emission from Cu atoms and dimers isolated in a Ne matrix. The decay time of the matrix-related emission at 3.5 eV for Cu in Ne after excitation of the 4s → 4p resonance transition was determined as 6.9±0.3 ns, while excitation into higher-lying 3d → 4p transitions resulted in a much slower decay of the 3.5 eV emission. From analysis of rise and decay times, a detailed diagram for energy dissipation in matrix-isolated Cu atoms has been derived. The B → X (Σ u → Σ g) emission of Cu 2 in Ne has a first-order decay time of about 10 ns.

  15. Determination of metallic impurities in raw materials for radioisotope production by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic absorption spectrometry has been used for the determination of traces of calcium in scandium oxide, copper in zinc, iron in cobalt oxide, manganese In ferric oxide, nickel in copper and zinc in gallium oxide. The influences on the sensitivities arising from the hollow cathode currents, the gas pressures and the acid concentrations have been considered. A study of the interferences from the metallic matrices has also been performed, the interference due to the absorption of the manganese radiation by the atoms of iron being the most outstanding . In order to remove the interfering elements and increase sensitivity, pre-concentration methods have been tested. The addition methods has also been used. (Author) 14 refs

  16. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm−3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm−3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm−3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Study of the deuterated albumin by FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The albumin is a protein from the soluble or corpuscular protein class, which exists in cells, in dissolved state or in form of a hydrated gel. Proteins are essential constituents beside water, inorganic salts, lipids, carbon hydrates, vitamins, enzymes. The albumin is also a protein soluble in water and in diluted electrolyte solutions (acids, bases and salts). The investigation of the vibration isotopic effect has a great importance both for the diatomic molecules and for the polyatomic molecules. This paper is the first from a series of works which are intended to study the physico-chemical properties of the deuterated albumin and of the albumin solutions in heavy water by an isotopic exchange method. To put in evidence H-D exchange, the FT-IR spectroscopy is used when the deuterated albumin has different layer thickness. It is also of interest to elucidate the isotopic exchange between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in bovine serum albumin macromolecules. (authors)

  19. Spectroscopy Study of Ar + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor

    2006-10-01

    A spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 gas mix is presented. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. Very different plasmas are produced following the relative importance of CO2 in the gas mixture. At low CO2 concentration, the plasmas are similar to those obtained with pure Ar with weak CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+ bands. The usual blue plasma core associated with intense Ar II transitions is observed with however a significant white glow coming from the outer plasma regions. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and can be described as an intense white plasma column. Molecular dissociative processes associated with the production of strong C and O atomic lines are observed under specific plasma conditions. The atomic spectral lines are compared with ADAS modeling results. This study indicates the possible advantages of using a helicon source to control the CO2 plasma chemistry for industrial applications.

  20. Studies of the Atomic and Crystalline Characteristics of Ceramic Oxide Nano Powders after Bio field Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been known for their extraordinary electrical and magnetic properties. In the present study, some transition metal oxides (Zinc oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide) which are widely used in the fabrication of electronic devices were selected and subjected to biofield treatment. The atomic and crystal structures of TMOs were carefully studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. XRD analysis reveals that biof...

  1. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: light sidebands resonances in electromagnetically induced transparency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, H M; Theophilo, K; Nussenzveig, P; Martinelli, M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the non-zero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  2. The development of high-resolution spectroscopic methods and their use in atomic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis discusses work performed during the last nine years in the field of atomic spectroscopy. Several high-resolution techniques, ranging from quantum beats, level crossings, rf-laser double resonances to nonlinear field atom interactions, have been employed. In particular, these methods have been adopted and developed to deal with fast accelerated atomic or ionic beams, allowing studies of problems in atomic-structure theory. Fine- and hyperfine-structure determinations in the He I and Li I isoelectronic sequences, in 51V I, and in 235U I, II have permitted a detailed comparison with ab initio calculations, demonstrating the change in problems when going towards heavier elements or higher ionization stage. The last part of the thesis is concerned with the fundamental question of obtaining very high optical resolution in the interaction between a fast accelerated atom or ion beam and a laser field, this problem being the core in the continuing development of atomic spectroscopy necessary to challenge the more precise and sophisticated theories advanced. (Auth.)

  3. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to investigate the structure and electronic properties of carbon-atom wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Milani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures have shown potential as candidates for advanced technological applications due to the different coordination of carbon atoms and to the possibility of π-conjugation. In this context, atomic-scale wires comprised of sp-hybridized carbon atoms represent ideal 1D systems to potentially downscale devices to the atomic level. Carbon-atom wires (CAWs can be arranged in two possible structures: a sequence of double bonds (cumulenes, resulting in a 1D metal, or an alternating sequence of single–triple bonds (polyynes, expected to show semiconducting properties. The electronic and optical properties of CAWs can be finely tuned by controlling the wire length (i.e., the number of carbon atoms and the type of termination (e.g., atom, molecular group or nanostructure. Although linear, sp-hybridized carbon systems are still considered elusive and unstable materials, a number of nanostructures consisting of sp-carbon wires have been produced and characterized to date. In this short review, we present the main CAW synthesis techniques and stabilization strategies and we discuss the current status of the understanding of their structural, electronic and vibrational properties with particular attention to how these properties are related to one another. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to provide information on the structural and electronic properties of the system (e.g., determination of wire length. Moreover, by employing Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman scattering in combination with the support of first principles calculations, we show that a detailed understanding of the charge transfer between CAWs and metal nanoparticles may open the possibility to tune the electronic structure from alternating to equalized bonds.

  4. Photodissociation dynamics of dimethylnitrosamine studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenderink, Egbert; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-01-01

    The initial molecular dynamics in the dissociative S1 (n, pi*) state of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We find that photochemical N-N bond cleavage in DMN proceeds via a bent conformation around the amine N atom, which supports the outcome of ab initio

  5. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium \\|M\\|=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kips, Annemieke; Vassen, Wim; Hogervorst, Wim; Dando, Paul A.

    1998-10-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. \\|M\\|=1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 1S0 metastable state. Spectra were recorded for ɛ=-2.940(4), ɛ=-2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and ɛ=-1.760(4), above the saddle point. Closed-orbit theory was applied to interpret the spectra. A recent extension to closed-orbit theory, incorporating core effects, was used. This significantly improved agreement between experiment and theory.

  6. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-04-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level.

  7. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Manfred Lange; Dennis van Vörden; Rolf Möller

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between...

  8. Probing the interaction of individual amino acids with inorganic surfaces using atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvag, Yair; Gutkin, Vitaly; Reches, Meital

    2013-08-13

    This article describes single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements of the interaction between individual amino acid residues and inorganic surfaces in an aqueous solution. In each measurement, there is an amino acid residue, lysine, glutamate, phenylalanine, leucine, or glutamine, and each represents a class of amino acids (positively or negatively charged, aromatic, nonpolar, and polar). Force-distance curves measured the interaction of the individual amino acid bound to a silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with a silcon substrate, cut from a single-crystal wafer, or mica. Using this method, we were able to measure low adhesion forces (below 300 pN) and could clearly determine the strength of interactions between the individual amino acid residues and the inorganic substrate. In addition, we observed how changes in the pH and ionic strength of the solution affected the adsorption of the residues to the substrates. Our results pinpoint the important role of hydrophobic interactions among the amino acids and the substrate, where hydrophobic phenylalanine exhibited the strongest adhesion to a silicon substrate. Additionally, electrostatic interactions also contributed to the adsorption of amino acid residues to inorganic substrates. A change in the pH or ionic strength values of the buffer altered the strength of interactions among the amino acids and the substrate. We concluded that the interplay between the hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions will determine the strength of adsorption among the amino acids and the surface. Overall, these results contribute to our understanding of the interaction at the organic-inorganic interface. These results may have implications for our perception of the specificity of peptide binding to inorganic surfaces. Consequently, it would possibly lead to a better design of composite materials and devices.

  9. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  10. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  11. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  12. Study of niobium oxidation by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition of thin oxide layers, grown on clean niobium, in low oxygen pressure, was studied by a surface analysis method: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The purpose of this study was to find the best conditions for the building of Nb/Nb oxide/Pb Josephson junctions, and particularly to minimise the interface thickness during the formation of the insulator film (Nb2O5) on the metal (Nb). This interface is essentially formed by the monoxide (NbO) and dioxide (NbO2). Nb 3d XPS core level peak positions and area ratios (obtained by the signal decomposition) of the components of the total peak, were used to determine the presence of the different oxidation states II, IV and V, their relative abundance, oxide thicknesses and their depth distribution. All this information was extracted by a special numerical procedure

  13. First application of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, S; Curceanu, C; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Gard, J; Gustafsson, F P; Hashimoto, T; Hayano, R S; Hirenzaki, S; Hays-Wehle, J P; Hilton, G C; Ikeno, N; Iliescu, M; Ishimoto, S; Itahashi, K; Iwasaki, M; Koike, T; Kuwabara, K; Ma, Y; Marton, J; Noda, H; O'Neil, G C; Outa, H; Reintsema, C D; Sato, M; Schmidt, D R; Shi, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, T; Swetz, D S; Tatsuno, H; Uhlig, J; Ullom, J N; Widmann, E; Yamada, S; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Zmeskal, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution pionic-atom x-ray spectroscopy was performed with an x-ray spectrometer based on a 240-pixel array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters at the piM1 beam line of the Paul Scherrer Institute. X-rays emitted by pionic carbon via the 4f->3d transition and the parallel 4d->3p transition were observed with a full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 6.8 eV at 6.4 keV. Measured x-ray energies are consistent with calculated electromagnetic values which considered the strong-interaction effect assessed via the Seki-Masutani potential for the 3p energy level, and favor the electronic population of two filled 1s electrons in the K-shell. Absolute energy calibration with an uncertainty of 0.1 eV was demonstrated under a high-rate hadron beam condition of 1.45 MHz. This is the first application of a TES spectrometer to hadronic-atom x-ray spectroscopy and is an important milestone towards next-generation high-resolution kaonic-atom x-ray spectroscopy.

  14. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  16. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  17. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  18. Strength of integration of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in lipid bilayers as determined by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganchev, Dragomir N; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Snel, Margot M E; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-30

    In this study we address the stability of integration of proteins in membranes. Using dynamic atomic force spectroscopy, we measured the strength of incorporation of peptides in lipid bilayers. The peptides model the transmembrane parts of alpha-helical proteins and were studied in both ordered peptide-rich and unordered peptide-poor bilayers. Using gold-coated AFM tips and thiolated peptides, we were able to observe force events which are related to the removal of single peptide molecules out of the bilayer. The data demonstrate that the peptides are very stably integrated into the bilayer and that single barriers within the investigated region of loading rates resist their removal. The distance between the ground state and the barrier for peptide removal was found to be 0.75 +/- 0.15 nm in different systems. This distance falls within the thickness of the interfacial layer of the bilayer. We conclude that the bilayer interface region plays an important role in stably anchoring transmembrane proteins into membranes. PMID:15554706

  19. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickermann, Andreas

    2013-07-15

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  20. Rotational coherence spectroscopy at FLASH. Toward dynamic studies in nanosuperfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of molecular physics, which is focusing on molecular motion in the transition states of physical, chemical, and biological changes, is a wide-spread research area. It strives to reveal the structural and functional properties of molecules, the chemical bonds between atoms and the time evolution. Many processes occurring in nature upon electronic excitation proceed on the ultrafast femtosecond timescale and can be triggered by modern ultrashort femtosecond-laser sources under laboratory conditions. In the present thesis pump-probe studies were performed to follow molecular motion using ultrashort light pulses in the nanometer wavelength range provided by an XUV freeelectron laser (FEL). In detail, alignment of molecular species in space under field-free conditions was investigated. In the specific case of rotational wave packets in molecules the rotational dynamics shows characteristic temporal features, which contain a wealth of information on molecular structure and give insight into molecular coupling mechanisms, i.e. rotational constants and transition frequencies. Within this thesis, Rotational Coherence Spectroscopy (RCS) reveals wave-packet motion observed by subsequent Coulomb explosion of Raman excited carbon monoxide, which results in a time-dependent asymmetry of spatial fragmentation patterns. With the method presented here, the time resolution to elucidate the fast dynamics of strong couplings can be pushed toward a single rotational period even for the fastest rotors. This is due to large pump-probe delays with small subpicosecond step size. This kind of spectroscopy can also be expanded to molecular species, which are not accessible by other powerful spectroscopic methods, such as Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy (FTMW). Furthermore, it allows to measure weak molecular couplings on a long timescale (large pump-probe delays), e.g. couplings of molecules in a solution or molecules dissolved in quantum fluids. This is valuable to

  1. Atoms, molecules, and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons, spectroscopy and scattering physics; Atome, Molekuele und optische Physik 2. Molekuele und Photonen, Spektroskopie und Streuphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, C.P. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    These textbooks apply first of all to graduate students of physics and physical chemistry until the promotion. They want to a certain degree mediate the canonical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics and introduce to foundations of modern optica and quantum optics. In many selected partial fields they lead (together with a planned third volume) up to the actual status of research. So also the active scientist is addressed. By clearly structurated chapters the reader is - starting from the foundations of quantum physics, stepwise made familiar with the most important phenomena, models, and measuring methods. Thereby the focus lies on the experiment and its interpretation - the necessary theory is introduced from this point of view compactly and occasionally also something laxly. The first part is concentrated to the structure of the atoms and an introduction in modern methods of spectroscopy. In the present second part it deals with the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy as well as with scattering physics, which treats - complementarly to the bound molecular states - the continuum. Finally selected chapters of laser physics, modern optics, and quantum optics are treated. Thereby atomic, molecular, and optical physics is proved as a undiminishedly alive, highly productive branch of modern physics. It provides simultaneously for many further partial fields of physics and other natural-scientific disciplines indispensable foundations. [German] Diese Lehrbuecher wenden sich in erster Linie an fortgeschrittene Studierende der Physik und der Physikalischen Chemie bis hin zur Promotion. Sie wollen gewissermassen das kanonische Wissen der Atom- und Molekuelphysik vermitteln und in Grundlagen der modernen Optik und Quantenoptik einfuehren. In vielen ausgewaehlten Teilgebieten fuehren sie (zusammen mit einem geplanten dritten Band) bis hin zum aktuellen Stand der Forschung. So wird auch der aktive Wissenschaftler angesprochen. Durch klar strukturierte Kapitel

  2. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10{sup 8}. The atoms of several tens of {mu}K degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  3. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 108. The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  4. [Determination of trace elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn from different habitat by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xue, Yue-Qin; Gui, Ren-Yi; Sun, Su-Qin; Yin, Ming-Wen

    2010-03-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique was proposed to determine the content of Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, K, Ca, Mg, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Al, Se and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The RSD of the method was between 1.23% and 3.32%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method were between 95.8% and 104.20%. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method has the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity. It is suitable for the determination of the contents of metal elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn. The experimental results also indicated that different areas' Lophantherum gracile brongn had different trace elements content. The content of trace elements K, Mg, Ca, Fe and Mn beneficial to the human body was rich. The content of the heavy metal trace element Pb in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Hunan province was slightly high. The content of the heavy metal trace element Cu in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Guangdong province and Anhui province is also slightly higher. Beside, the contents of harmful trace heavy metal elements Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat are all lower than the limits of Chinese Pharmacopoeia and Green Trade Standard for Importing and Exporting Medicinal Plant and Preparation and National Food Sanitation Standard. These determination results provided the scientific data for further discussing the relationship between the content of trace elements in Lophantherum gracile brongn and the medicine efficacy.

  5. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Mehrnoush [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 {mu}L, a sampling temperature of 27 {sup o}C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n = 7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 {mu}g L{sup -1} were also studied.

  6. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  7. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  8. Estimation of lead, cadmium and nickel content by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in dry fruit bodies of some macromycetes growing in Poland. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of lead, cadmium, and nickel in dry fruit bodies of 34 species of macromyoetes collected in Poland from 72 natural babitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was estimated.

  9. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  10. Pump-probe spectroscopy in degenerate two-level atoms with arbitrarily strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigdon, T.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Friedmann, H.

    2007-03-01

    We review our previous work on pump-probe spectroscopy in realistic degenerate two-level systems and model systems. In particular, we discuss the role of transfer of coherence (TOC) between the ground and excited hyperfine states in producing electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIA) peaks in the probe spectrum, when an F g goes to F e = F g +1 transition in an alkali-metal atom interacts with a strong pump and weak probe that have perpendicular polarizations. When the pump is rho + polarized and the probe pi polarized, this system can be modelled by an N system. We also discuss the role of transfer of population (TOP) between the Zeeman levels of the ground hyperfine state in producing EIA peaks when the pump and probe have the same polarization. This system can be modelled using a double two-level system. The role of Doppler broadening and phase-changing collisions in modifying the EIA-TOC and EIA-TOP absorption and refraction spectra is also discussed. All these spectra were calculated using MATLAB programs that both construct and solve the relevant Bloch equations. In our recent work, we consider the effect of a strong probe on the pump absorption and refraction spectra when the pump and probe polarizations are linear and perpendicular. It is difficult to solve this problem numerically due to the large number frequencies involved. In order to simplify the problem, we considered two cases: (i) rho + polarized pump and pi polarized probe, and (ii) rho + polarized pump and rho - polarized probe, and investigated a series of transitions in both Rb and Cs, using modified versions of the MATLAB programs devised for the weakprobe case. A number of interesting differences from the weak-probe case were found. For example, when the probe is sufficiently strong, we found the pump and probe spectra to show complementary behavior. In addition, as the number of Zeeman levels increase, the EIA peaks become progressively sharper, and are accompanied by steeper dispersion.

  11. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  12. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy oflaser-ablated copper atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Andrejeva, Anna; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of laser-ablated copper atoms entrainedin a supersonic free jet expansion are reported. Depending on the ionization scheme employed, andthe conditions under which the copper atoms are produced, very different spectra are produced, whichare discussed. In some circumstances, high proportions of metastable atoms survive the ablation andexpansion process and are clearly seen in the spectra. The spectroscopic transitions for the observedlin...

  13. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    OpenAIRE

    Senami, Masato; Ikeda, Yuji; Fukushima, Akinori; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsive...

  14. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  15. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Li; Dong, Ri-Chang; Deng, Jian-Liao; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere under the influence of a diffuse laser field have been systematically investigated. A pronounced dispersionlike structure centered at the light-shifted pump frequency is observed with a subnatural linewidth. In particular, two clearly resolved absorption resonances on the 5 S1 /2(F =2 ) →5 P3 /2(F'=3 ) transitions occur with variable probe beam intensity, which is consistent with our proposed theoretical model. Based on the two absorption resonances,we measure the dependence of light shifts, from which we can directly extract the effective Rabi frequency in a diffuse laser field, on the probe laser intensity, pump laser intensity, and pump laser detuning. Our work helps to identify the physical mechanisms behind these spectral features and is beneficial for studying the corresponding effect in a cold sample.

  16. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H2 R reactions where RH is CH4, C2H6, or C3H8, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  17. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  18. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  19. Laser cooling of dense atomic gases by collisional redistribution of radiation and spectroscopy of molecular dimers in a dense buffer gas environment

    CERN Document Server

    Saß, Anne; Christopoulos, Stavros; Knicker, Katharina; Moroshkin, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We study laser cooling of atomic gases by collisional redistribution of fluorescence. In a high pressure buffer gas regime, frequent collisions perturb the energy levels of alkali atoms, which allows for the absorption of a far red detuned irradiated laser beam. Subsequent spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed resonance frequency, leading to a cooling of the dense gas mixture by redistribution of fluorescence. Thermal deflection spectroscopy indicates large relative temperature changes down to and even below room temperature starting from an initial cell temperature near 700 K. We are currently performing a detailed analysis of the temperature distribution in the cell. As we expect this cooling technique to work also for molecular-noble gas mixtures, we also present initial spectroscopic experiments on alkali-dimers in a dense buffer gas surrounding.

  20. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants; Spectroscopie atomique et mesures de grande precision: determination de constantes fonfamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, C

    2006-12-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm{sup -1}). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10{sup -9} began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is {alpha}{sub -1} = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10{sup -9}. The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  1. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  2. Authentication of organically grown plants - advantages and limitations of atomic spectroscopy for multi-element and stable isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjørring, Jan Kofod; Kelly, S.D.;

    2014-01-01

    Organic food products are believed to be healthier, safer and more environment-friendly than their conventional counterparts and are sold at premium prices. Consequently, adulteration of organic plants and fraudulent activities for economic profit are increasing. This has spurred the development...... of sophisticated analytical procedures for testing authenticity. We review the use of multi-element and stable-isotope analysis based on atomic spectroscopy for discriminating between organic and conventional plants. We conclude that inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, stable-isotope analysis of bulk...

  3. Evaluation of emery dust on the manufacture of abrasives by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is presented an evaluation on the degree of contamination by emery dust in a working area where abrasives are manufactured, in a factory located in the industrial area of Toluca City by neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected on Whatman filters and attacked with hot concentrated HCl. The elements founded were: Al, Si, V, Mg, Br, Mn, Ni, Zn, Fe, Cr, Ca and Pb. They are a risk for the health of the workers. (Author)

  4. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    OpenAIRE

    Woutersen, S.; Milan,, M; Lange; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoele...

  5. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  6. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Devenoges; André, Stefanov; Antoine, Jallageas; Jacques, Morel; Thomas, Südmeyer; Pierre, Thomann

    2016-01-01

    We report the evaluation of the second order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of the continuous operation and its geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountain are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. The pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to measure the Zeeman frequency with spatial resolution and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with an uncertainty smaller than 10E-16 in relative units.

  7. Studies on coherence and decoherence in Fast Atom Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few years ago, quantum effects were observed for the scattering of fast atoms from surfaces under a grazing angle of incidence. We discuss basic features of Fast Atom Diffraction (FAD) which adds a further powerful method to the established tools in ion beam analysis and surface science. Attractive features of FAD in studies on the structure of surfaces comprise negligible radiation damage, cost effective operation of the complete setup, no charging effects in studies with insulators, and an extreme sensitivity to the topmost layer of surface atoms. The observation of diffraction patterns is based on the quantum coherence which is preserved during the scattering process with the target surface. We will discuss basic features of the coherence phenomena and its role for the observation of quantum effects in the angular distributions for grazingly scattered atoms. In a comparison of data obtained for H and He atoms we demonstrate that two different mechanisms for decoherence are important

  8. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  9. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  10. Theoretical study of a cold atom beam splitter

    CERN Document Server

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Pruvost, L; Telmini, M; Charron, E; Gaaloul, Naceur; Suzor-Weiner, Annick; Pruvost, Laurence; Telmini, Mourad; Charron, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented for the study of the dynamics of a cold atomic cloud falling in the gravity field in the presence of two crossing dipole guides. The cloud is splitted between the two branches of the guide, and we compare experimental measurements of the splitting efficiency with semi-classical simulations. We then explore the possibilities of optimization of this beam splitter. Our numerical study also gives access to detailed informations, such as the atom temperature after the splitting. It finally sets the foundation for a study of the coherence properties of the guided atoms.

  11. He atom surface spectroscopy: Surface lattice dynamics of insulators, metals and metal overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    During the first three years of this grant (1985--1988) the effort was devoted to the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom scattering (HAS) instrument which would be capable of determining the structure and dynamics of metallic, semiconductor or insulator crystal surfaces. The second three year grant period (1988--1991) has been dedicated to measurements. The construction of the instrument went better than proposed; it was within budget, finished in the proposed time and of better sensitivity and resolution than originally planned. The same success has been carried over to the measurement phase where the concentration has been on studies of insulator surfaces, as discussed in this paper. The experiments of the past three years have focused primarily on the alkali halides with a more recent shift to metal oxide crystal surfaces. Both elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were carried out on LiF, NaI, NaCl, RbCl, KBr, RbBr, RbI, CsF, CsI and with some preliminary work on NiO and MgO.

  12. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Han Jae; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Jung, E. C.; Choe, A. S.; Lee, J. M

    1999-01-01

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few {mu}W c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions.

  13. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doppler-free saturation spectroscopy of Na atoms has been performed and the proper conditions for the frequency stabilization of narrow band cw dye lasers, which was used as laser sources for the laser cooling and trapping, have been obtained as follows : a) optimum pressure of a Na vapor cell: 10 mTorr b) intensity of a pump laser : a few μW c) intensity of a probe laser : 1/10 of that of a pump laser. EIT (Electromagnetically Induced Transparency) generated by coherent laser-atom interactions was investigated experimentally and analyzed theoretically. The absorption of a probe laser could be remarkably reduced more than 90 % due to EIT effect. The EIT spectrum as narrow as 6 MHz which is even narrower than the natural linewidth of an excited state could be obtained under proper conditions

  14. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  15. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of a natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the help of Moessbauer spectroscopy, it was established that iron in natural zeolites occupies positions in the aluminosilicate structure in place of aluminium; the positions of iron are octahedricals, and the valency is 3+; it was shown too, that the zeolite is geometrically stable to acid treatment, notwithstanding the formation of vacancies during acid treatments. (author)

  16. Measurement of Urinary Cadmium in Glazers Using Solid Phase Extraction Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Shahtaheri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Glazers are exposed to a variety of heavy metals in the ceramic industry, causing adverse effect on the body systems. Cadmium is one of the major raw materials for production of colored glazes. To evaluate occupational exposure to cadmium, spot urine samples were collected from 49 tile and pottery glazers in Yazd City in 2010 at the beginning and end of the work shift (98 samples. Totally, 55 office workers were also evaluated as control group. Samples were prepared using solid phase extraction followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. All the participants filled out a self administered questionnaire comprises questions about work shift, kind of job, use of mask, ventilation,work history, overtime work, age, weight, and height. The lung function tests were performed in a standing position according to the American Thoracic Society recommendation on both control andcadmium exposed individuals. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to evaluate the data. The mean values of cadmium levels before and after shift in study group was 3.88 and 10.85 μg/gcreatinine,respectively. The mean values of cadmium levels at the end of the work shift in the glazers urine samples was almost 3.53 times higher than the control group and 2.17 times higher than the ACGIHbiological exposure indices (5 μg/g creatinine. In addition the lung functions of glazers was significantly lower than the office workers (p<0.001. Exposure to cadmium in ceramic industry can lead to the reduction of respiratory capacity. Hygienic behaviors such as using protective mask and working in efficient ventilated workplaces can decrease the rate of occupational exposure to cadmium.

  17. [Determination of trace elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn from different habitat by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xue, Yue-Qin; Gui, Ren-Yi; Sun, Su-Qin; Yin, Ming-Wen

    2010-03-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique was proposed to determine the content of Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, K, Ca, Mg, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Al, Se and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The RSD of the method was between 1.23% and 3.32%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method were between 95.8% and 104.20%. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method has the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity. It is suitable for the determination of the contents of metal elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn. The experimental results also indicated that different areas' Lophantherum gracile brongn had different trace elements content. The content of trace elements K, Mg, Ca, Fe and Mn beneficial to the human body was rich. The content of the heavy metal trace element Pb in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Hunan province was slightly high. The content of the heavy metal trace element Cu in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Guangdong province and Anhui province is also slightly higher. Beside, the contents of harmful trace heavy metal elements Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat are all lower than the limits of Chinese Pharmacopoeia and Green Trade Standard for Importing and Exporting Medicinal Plant and Preparation and National Food Sanitation Standard. These determination results provided the scientific data for further discussing the relationship between the content of trace elements in Lophantherum gracile brongn and the medicine efficacy. PMID:20496714

  18. Atomic beam study of a superconductor's magnetic vortex lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an atomic beam technique for studying magnetic vortices and vortex lattices of superconductors. Atoms moving near a superconductor's surface see a fluctuating magnetic field as they pass vortices. This field may drive magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine states. Measuring the magnetic resonance transition probability as a function of atom velocity probes the vortex lattice autocorrelation function. We demonstrate this technique by studying the vortex lattice of a niobium film sample and measuring the sample's penetration depth. We also identify a systematic problem that we think thwarted an earlier attempt to experimentally realize this technique. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources they expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3-10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research. Widespread applications of noble gas detectors are due to the fact that small numbers of the chemically inert atoms can be recovered from very large targets of materials where they may be generated by rare events. In this lecture they show how lasers can be combined with mass spectrometers to detect a few noble gas atoms of one isotope in the presence of very large numbers of atoms of a neighboring isotope. This technique (which they have called Maxwell's demon because of the atom-sorting functions performed in the apparatus) is described and then followed with a brief discussion of two applications in weak interaction physics - double-beta decay and the solar neutrino problem

  20. Tunneling spectroscopy of a phosphorus impurity atom on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinov, S. V.; Oreshkin, A. I., E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.phys.msu.su, E-mail: oreshkin@spmlab.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, S. I. [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation); Haesendonck, C. van [Laboratorium voor Stoffysica en Magnetisme (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    We numerically model the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface electronic properties in the vicinity of a P donor impurity atom located near the surface. We find a notable increase in the surface local density of states (LDOS) around the surface dopant near the bottom of the empty surface state band π*, which we call a split state due to its limited spatial extent and energetic position inside the band gap. We show that despite the well-established bulk donor impurity energy level position at the very bottom of the conduction band, a surface donor impurity on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface might produce an energy level below the Fermi energy, depending on the impurity atom local environment. It is demonstrated that the impurity located in subsurface atomic layers is visible in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiment on the Ge(111)-(2 × 1) surface. The quasi-1D character of the impurity image, observed in STM experiments, is confirmed by our computer simulations with a note that a few π-bonded dimer rows may be affected by the presence of the impurity atom. We elaborate a model that allows classifying atoms on the experimental low-temperature STM image. We show the presence of spatial oscillations of the LDOS by the density-functional theory method.

  1. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  2. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  3. Studying the universality of field induced tunnel ionization times via high-order harmonic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soifer, Hadas; Negro, Matteo; Devetta, Michele; Faccialà, Davide; Vozzi, Caterina; de Silvestri, Sandro; Stagira, Salvatore; Dudovich, Nirit

    2014-01-01

    High-harmonics generation spectroscopy is a promising tool for resolving electron dynamics and structure in atomic and molecular systems. This scheme, commonly described by the strong field approximation, requires a deep insight into the basic mechanism that leads to the harmonics generation. Recently, we have demonstrated the ability to resolve the first stage of the process -- field induced tunnel ionization -- by adding a weak perturbation to the strong fundamental field. Here we generalize this approach and show that the assumptions behind the strong field approximation are valid over a wide range of tunnel ionization conditions. Performing a systematic study -- modifying the fundamental wavelength, intensity and atomic system -- we observed a good agreement with quantum path analysis over a range of Keldysh parameters. The generality of this scheme opens new perspectives in high harmonics spectroscopy, holding the potential of probing large, complex molecular systems.

  4. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  5. Interactions between osmium atoms dissolved in iron observed by the 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konieczny Robert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for binary iron-based solid solutions Fe1−xOsx, with x in the range 0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.05, were analyzed in terms of binding energy Eb between two Os atoms in the Fe-Os system. The extrapolated values of Eb for x = 0 were used for computation of enthalpy of solution of osmium in iron. The result was compared with that resulting from the cellular atomic model of alloys by Miedema. The comparison shows that our findings are in qualitative agreement with the Miedema's model predictions.

  6. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors.

  7. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  8. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  9. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  10. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  11. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  12. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  13. Nuclear moments and isotopic variation of the mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei by atomic beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structure and optical isotope shift measurements have been performed on a series of stable and radioactive strontium isotopes (A = 80 to 90), including two isomers 85m and 87m. The spectroscopy applied continuous wave dye laser induced fluorescence of free atoms at λ=293.2 nm in a well collimated atomic beam. The 293.2 nm ultraviolet light was generated by frequency doubling the output of a dye laser in either a temperature tuned Ammonium Dihydrogen Arsenate (ADA) crystal or an angle tuned Lithium Iodate crystal. A special radio frequency (rf) technique was used to tune the dye laser frequency with long term stability. Radioactive Sr isotopes were produced either by neutron capture of stable strontium or by (α,xn) reactions from krypton gas. The samples were purified by an electromagnetic mass separator and their sizes were of order 100 pg, which corresponds to 1011 atoms. The observed results of the hyperfine structure components are evaluated in terms of nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments. Changes in mean square charge radii of strontium nuclei which were extracted from the isotope shift measurements, exhibit a distinct shell effect at the neutron magic number N=50. The experimental data are analysed and compared with some theoretical nuclear model predictions. The strong increase of the nuclear charge radii with decreasing neutron number of isotopes below N=50 is in agreement with the variation of the mean square deformation extracted from measured B(E2) values. (orig.)

  14. Emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy of matrix isolated chromium and molybdenum atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Making use of a combination of time-resolved emission, optical--optical double resonance, and excited state absorption spectroscopy, it has been possible to assign virtually all spectral features with energies below the z7P0 state of matrix isolated Cr atoms. The a5S state located at 7593 cm-1 in the free gaseous Cr atom has lifetimes of 6.32 and 5.1 s in Ar and Kr matrices, respectively. Matrix perturbations on Cr emission lines are small (-1). The dependence of nonradiative decay rates on the local density of states is elucidated. The magnitude of matrix shifts for a particular transition is correlated with the electronic configurations of ground and excited states and it is pointed out that states having only ''s'' electrons in addition to ''d'' electrons maintain their gas phase energy relationships in the matrix environment. Direct fluorescence is observed from the z7P0 level of Mo to the 7s ground state. The spin-orbit splitting of the ''relaxed'' z7P0 state is 690 cm-1, slightly lower than the 707 cm-1 splitting of the free gaseous Mo atom

  15. Activities 2009-2011 at the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD USA centered in the last two years on two main subjects: First, the data center completed and issued a new, significantly improved version of its principal product, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD Version 4.0 in September 2010, with an update 4.1.0 in May 2011). These versions contain new data for a good number of additional spectra as well as new, better quality and more extensive data replacing the earlier material. They are also for the first time completely integrated with the two NIST bibliographies on atomic energy levels and spectra, and on atomic transition probabilities. The sources of the material selected in ASD for the various spectra and transitions are identified there by their numbers in the respective bibliographies, so that the original papers can be directly accessed by users if they desire more background material. Secondly, new tabulations of atomic energy levels and wavelengths were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H, D, T), for argon (Ar II through Ar XVIII), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), barium (Ba III through Ba LVI) and tungsten (W III through W LXXIV). Compilations of energy levels and spectral lines are in progress on neon (Ne IV), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII), and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII). Data assessments and compilations of atomic transition probabilities were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H,D,T), for helium(He I and He II), for lithium (Li I through Li III), beryllium (Be I through Be IV), boron (B I through B V), sulfur (S I through S XVI), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), and barium (Ba III through Ba LVI). Additional compilations for the higher fluorine and neon ions (F V through F IX, Ne VI through Ne X), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII) and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII) are in progress. As in all our earlier work, the NIST data tables are limited to reference data, i.e. data

  16. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  17. Lattice dynamic studies from {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katada, Motomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Hachioji (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-03-01

    New complexes {l_brace}(Eu(napy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3})(Fe(CN){sub 6})4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}, bpy({l_brace}(Eu(bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4})(Fe(CN){sub 6})1.5bpy4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub x}) and ({l_brace}(Eu(phen){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})(Fe(CN){sub 6})2phen{r_brace}{sub x}) etc were synthesized using phenanthroline and bipyridine. Lattice dynamic behaviors of Eu and Fe atom in the complexes were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. By {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectrum and parameters of new complexes, bpy complex showed the largest quadrupole splitting value, indicating bad symmetry of Eu ligand in the environment. Molecular structure of napy, bpy and phen complex were shown. These complexes are consisted of Eu atom coordinated with ligand and water molecule, of which (Fe(CN){sub 6}){sup 3-} ion formed one dimentional polymer chain and naphthyridines formed stacking structure. New complexes were observed by {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, too. The quadrupole splitting values were very different each other, indicating change of symmetry of Fe atom in the environment and three valence low spin state of Fe in the complex. (S.Y.)

  18. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-02-01

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry-Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny-Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  19. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY STRUCTURAL STUDY OF FIRED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŠÁRKA PEŠKOVÁ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopic structural analysis of concrete cementious matrix represents elegant method to determination of thermal history of highly exposed concrete. Experiments were carried out in furnace at 1200°C. On the surface of heated concrete mechanical cracks and the mixture of dicalcium silicate and gehlenite were found, while inside the cracks the development of gehlenite, pseudowollastonite, pseudobrookite and various iron oxides and spinels was observed. The products of chemical reactions analyzed by Raman spectroscopy can be used as markers for the identification and understanding the structural changes during a fire treatment.

  20. Fine-structure constant variability surprises for laboratory atomic spectroscopy and cosmological evolution of quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, J D

    2003-01-01

    Calculation of the Dirac hydrogen atom spectrum in the framework of dynamical fine structure constant (alpha) variability discloses a small departure in the laboratory from Sommerfeld's formula for the fine structure shifts, possibly measurable today. And for a distant object in the universe, the wavelength shift of a spectral line specifically ascribable to cosmological alpha variation is found to depend differently on the quantum numbers than in the conventional view. This last result clashes with the conventional wisdom that an atom's spectrum can change with cosmological time only through evolution of the alpha parameter in the energy eigenvalue formula, and thus impacts on the Webb group's analysis of fine structure intervals in quasar absorption lines (which has been claimed to disclose cosmological alpha evolution). In particular, analyzing together a mix of quasar absorption lines from different fine structure multiplets can bias estimates of cosmological alpha variability.

  1. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  2. High-Resolution Photoassociation Spectroscopy of Ultracold Ytterbium Atoms by Using the Intercombination Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0-3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested

  3. High-resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium atoms by using the intercombination transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Enomoto, Katsunari; Kato, Yutaka; Takasu, Yosuke; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2006-04-21

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0 - 3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested. PMID:16712155

  4. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, in the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre, VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Christian P; Schilke, Peter; Stutzki, Jürgen; Müller, Holger S P

    2016-01-01

    The CDMS was founded 1998 to provide in its catalog section line lists of molecular species which may be observed in various astronomical sources using radio astronomy. The line lists contain transition frequencies with qualified accuracies, intensities, quantum numbers, as well as further auxilary information. They have been generated from critically evaluated experimental line lists, mostly from laboratory experiments, employing established Hamiltonian models. Seperate entries exist for different isotopic species and usually also for different vibrational states. As of December 2015, the number of entries is 792. They are available online as ascii tables with additional files documenting information on the entries. The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre was founded more than 5 years ago as a common platform for atomic and molecular data. This platform facilitates exchange not only between spectroscopic databases related to astrophysics or astrochemistry, but also with collisional and kinetic databases...

  5. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology -Development of atomic spectroscopy technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, three principal techniques are developed. The laser photoionization spectrometry (LAPIS) is used for the ultrasensitive detection for heavy metals such as Pb and Cd. The Laser atomic fluorescence spectrometry is applied to the quantitative analysis of the lanthanide and actinide elements. And the DIAL remote sensing system is used for monitoring the ozone concentration and the atmospheric pollution. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high efficient atomic beam generator were designed and manufactured. Various spectroscopic parameters and optimum analytical condition were investigated. By using the laser fluorescence technique, U, Eu and Sm in solution were quantitatively analyzed. The basic researches for the direct analytical method of solid samples were also carried out. The DIAL system for ozone remote sensing was developed and ozone concentration above Taejon were obtained. (Author)

  6. Multi-channel atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography: a configuration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Begus, Samo; Xia, Hui; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Jazbinsek, Vojko; Trontelj, Zvonko; Romalis, Michael V

    2014-04-01

    Atomic magnetometers are emerging as an alternative to SQUID magnetometers for detection of biological magnetic fields. They have been used to measure both the magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. One of the virtues of the atomic magnetometers is their ability to operate as a multi-channel detector while using many common elements. Here we study two configurations of such a multi-channel atomic magnetometer optimized for MEG detection. We describe measurements of auditory evoked fields (AEF) from a human brain as well as localization of dipolar phantoms and auditory evoked fields. A clear N100m peak in AEF was observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of higher than 10 after averaging of 250 stimuli. Currently the intrinsic magnetic noise level is 4fTHz(-1/2) at 10Hz. We compare the performance of the two systems in regards to current source localization and discuss future development of atomic MEG systems.

  7. Computer programs in BASIC language for atomic absorption flame spectroscopy. Part 1. Operating instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These instructions describe how to use three BASIC language programs to process data from atomic absorption spectrophotometers operated in the flame mode. These programs will also control an automatic sampler if desired. The instructions cover loading the programs, responding to computer prompts, choosing among various options for processing the data, operating the automatic sampler, and producing reports. How the programs differ is also explained. Examples of computer/operator dialogue are presented for typical cases

  8. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  9. Analysis of the injection layer of PTCDA in OLEDs using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ou Gu-Ping; Song Zhen; Wu You-Yu; Chen Xiao-Qiang; Zhang Fu-Jia

    2006-01-01

    Through the investigation of the sample surface and interface of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride(PTCDA)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films using atomic force microscopy, it has been found that the surface is complanate, the growth is uniform and the defects cover basically the surface of ITO. Furthermore, the number of pinholes is small. The analysis of the sample surface and interface further verifies this result by using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. At the same time, PTCDA is found to have the ability of restraining the diffusion of chemical constituents from ITO to the hole transport layer, which is beneficial to the improvement of the performance and the useful lifetime of the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  10. Prospects for precision measurements of atomic helium using direct frequency comb spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyler, E.E.; Chieda, D.E. [Connecticut Univ., Physics Dept., Storrs, CT (United States); Stowe, M.C.; Thorpe, M.J.; Schibli, T.R.; Ye, J. [Colorado Univ., Dept. of Physics, JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We analyze several possibilities for precisely measuring electronic transitions in atomic helium by the direct use of phase-stabilized femtosecond frequency combs. Because the comb is self-calibrating and can be shifted into the ultraviolet spectral region via harmonic generation, it offers the prospect of greatly improved accuracy for UV and far-UV transitions. To take advantage of this accuracy an ultracold helium sample is needed. For measurements of the triplet spectrum a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be used to cool and trap metastable 2{sup 3}S state atoms. We analyze schemes for measuring the two-photon 2{sup 3}S {yields} 4{sup 3}S interval, and for resonant two-photon excitation to high Rydberg states, 2{sup 3}S {yields} 3{sup 3}P {yields} n{sup 3}S, D. We also analyze experiments on the singlet-state spectrum. To accomplish this we propose schemes for producing and trapping ultracold helium in the 1{sup 1}S or 2{sup 1}S state via intercombination transitions. A particularly intriguing scenario is the possibility of measuring the 1{sup 1}S {yields} 2{sup 1}S transition with extremely high accuracy by use of two-photon excitation in a magic wavelength trap that operates identically for both states. We predict a 'triple magic wavelength' at 412 nm that could facilitate numerous experiments on trapped helium atoms, because here the polarizabilities of the 1{sup 1}S, 2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S states are all similar, small, and positive. (authors)

  11. ATOM PROBE STUDY OF TITANIUM BASE ALLOYS : PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Menand, A.; Chambreland, S.; Martin, C

    1986-01-01

    Two different titanium base alloys, Ti46 Al54 and Ti88.8 Cu2.3, Al8.9, have been studied by atom probe microanalysis. A precipitate of Ti2 Al was analysed in the binary alloys. Micro-analysis of Ti Cu Al alloy revealed the presence of Copper enriched zones. The study has also exhibited a penetration of Hydrogen in the samples, probably due to preparation technique. The results demonstrate the feasibility of studies on titanium base alloys by mean of atom probe.

  12. Study of Cold Potassium Atom - Calcium Ion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egodapitiya, Kisra; Gang, Shu; Clark, Robert; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    We report on our progress towards constructing a hybrid system for studying reactions between cold Potassium (K) atoms and cold Calcium (Ca+) ions. Ca+ ions will be trapped and Doppler-cooled inside a linear quadrupole ion trap. Cold K atoms will be created inside a magneto optical trap, such that the ion and the atoms are in an overlapping volume. Trapping and re-pumping beams for the Potassium MOT are derived from the same laser with wavelength 766 nm using two acousto optic modulators. The reaction products will be detected using a time-of- flight mass spectrometer that is designed to detect radially ejected ions. The main objective of this experiment is to study the rate coefficients, and identification of reaction channels between cold K atoms and Ca+ ions. Subsequently this setup will be used to study reactions between cold K atoms and sympathetically cooled molecular ions such as CaO+, and to study internal state quenching of molecular ions.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  14. δ-electron spectroscopy and the atomic clock effect in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of strongly bound electrons in superheavy quasimolecular systems with combined nuclear charge numbers Z = ZP + ZT ≥ 110 are investigated. The emission of δ-electrons may serve as an atomic clock for nuclear reactions which is associated with the large overlap of the electron probability density with the nuclear interior. Excitation and emission rates of inner-shell electrons in collisions of very heavy ions with beam energies at or above the nuclear Coulomb barrier depend explicitly on details of the nuclear dynamics. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed. (orig.)

  15. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscetti I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Moscetti,1 Emanuela Teveroni,2,3 Fabiola Moretti,3 Anna Rita Bizzarri,1 Salvatore Cannistraro1 1Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Department DEB, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Università Cattolica di Roma, Roma, Italy; 3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR, Roma, Italy Abstract: Murine double minute 2 (MDM2 and 4 (MDM4 are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. Keywords: MDM2, MDM4, atomic force spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance

  16. Testing the distance-dependence of the van der Waals interaction between an atom and a surface through spectroscopy in a vapor nanocell

    CERN Document Server

    Laliotis, A; Todorov, P; Hamdi, I; Dutier, G; Yarovitski, A; Saltiel, S; Gorza, M P; Fichet, M; Ducloy, M; Bloch, D; Laliotis, Athanasdios; Maurin, Isabelle; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Dutier, Gabriel; Yarovitski, Alexander; Saltiel, Solomon; Gorza, Marie-Pascale; Fichet, Mich\\`{e}le; Ducloy, Martial; Bloch, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents our current measurements in a vapor nanocell aiming at a test of the distance-dependence of the atom-surface interaction, when simple asymptotic descriptions may turn to be not valid. A state-of-the-art of atom-surface interaction measurements is provided as an introduction, along with the comparison with the theory of the van der Waals (or Casimir-Polder) interaction; it is followed by a presentation of the most salient features of nanocell spectroscopy

  17. Local surrounding of vanadium atoms in CuCr1 - x V x S2: X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Yu. O.; Smolentsev, N. Yu.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Glatzel, P.; Korotaev, E. V.; Soldatov, A. V.; Mazalov, L. N.

    2013-03-01

    In the present work local surrounding of vanadium atoms in layered copper-chromium disulfides CuCr1 - x V x S2 is investigated using high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy above vanadium K-edge. Based on experimental and theoretically simulated spectra comparison it is shown that vanadium atoms replace chromium ones even at high concentrations of vanadium and that they are in 3+ oxidation state.

  18. Prospects for precision measurements of atomic helium using direct frequency comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eyler, E E; Stowe, Matthew C; Thorpe, Michael J; Schibli, T R; Ye, Jun

    2007-01-01

    We analyze several possibilities for precisely measuring electronic transitions in atomic helium by the direct use of phase-stabilized femtosecond frequency combs. Because the comb is self-calibrating and can be shifted into the ultraviolet spectral region via harmonic generation, it offers the prospect of greatly improved accuracy for UV and far-UV transitions. To take advantage of this accuracy an ultracold helium sample is needed. For measurements of the triplet spectrum a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be used to cool and trap metastable $2 ^3S$ state atoms. We analyze schemes for measuring the two-photon $2 ^3S \\to 4 ^3S$ interval, and for resonant two-photon excitation to high Rydberg states, $2 ^3S \\to 3 ^3P \\to n^3S,D$. We also analyze experiments on the singlet-state spectrum. To accomplish this we propose schemes for producing and trapping ultracold helium in the $1 ^1S$ or $2 ^1S$ state via intercombination transition. A particularly intriguing scenario is the possibility of direct singlet state sp...

  19. Review of atomic data needs for active charge-exchange spectroscopy on ITERa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, O.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Jaspers, R.; Reiter, D.

    2008-10-01

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1×1012-2×1012cm-3, which is significantly below the ITER density of 1014cm-3.

  20. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miccio, Luis A. [Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, P. M. de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain and Departamento de Física de Materiales UPV/EHU, Fac. de Química, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Schwartz, Gustavo A. [Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU, P. M. de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain and Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  1. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Lange

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements. When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111 √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  2. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred; van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force-distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  3. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  4. Relaxation of Cs atomic polarization at surface coatings characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kushida, K; Moriya, T; Shimizu, T; Meguro, K; Nakazawa, H; Hatakeyama, A

    2014-01-01

    Paraffin coatings on glass slides were investigated through both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spin relaxation measurement for cesium (Cs) vapor. The components of the glass substrate, such as silicon (Si) and oxygen (O), existed in the XPS spectra of the coated slides, indicating the imperfection of the prepared paraffin coatings. The substrate was not observed after the annealing of the coatings in Cs vapor, which is known as a `ripening' process for spin relaxation measurement. We found a general trend that effective anti-spin relaxation performance requires high paraffin and low Cs coverage on the surface. We also examined a type of diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, anticipating the effect of anti-spin relaxation; our attempts have failed to date.

  5. Polarization spectroscopy and laser-locking for excitation of ultracold potassium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Charles; Eberhart, Max; Adamson, Philip

    2016-05-01

    We report on the use of polarization spectroscopy to lock the frequency of an external-cavity diode laser to a the 4s - 4 p1/2 (770 nm), 4s - 4 p3/2 (767 nm) and 4s - 5 p1/2 and 4s - 5 p3/2 (405 nm) transitions in potassium. A rate equation model is in good agreement with the observed lineshapes and the D2 transition lineshapes agree with prior experiments. We have used the dispersion shaped lines to lock the frequency of lasers for probing a magneto-optical trap's density on the D1 line and for stepwise excitation of potassium Rydberg states using the 4s - 5 p3/2 transition. The technique has proven particularly helpful by enabling modulation-free locking of blue diode lasers. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1126599.

  6. A constraint on antigravity of antimatter from precision spectroscopy of simple atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshenboim, S. G.

    2009-10-01

    Consideration of antigravity for antiparticles is an attractive target for various experimental projects. There are a number of theoretical arguments against it but it is not quite clear what kind of experimental data and theoretical suggestions are involved. In this paper we present straightforward arguments against a possibility of antigravity based on a few simple theoretical suggestions and some experimental data. The data are: astrophysical data on rotation of the Solar System in respect to the center of our galaxy and precision spectroscopy data on hydrogen and positronium. The theoretical suggestions for the case of absence of the gravitational field are: equality of electron and positron mass and equality of proton and positron charge. We also assume that QED is correct at the level of accuracy where it is clearly confirmed experimentally.

  7. A constraint on antigravity of antimatter from precision spectroscopy of simple atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of antigravity for antiparticles is an attractive target for various experimental projects. There are a number of theoretical arguments against it but it is not quite clear what kind of experimental data and theoretical suggestions are involved. In this paper we present straightforward arguments against a possibility of antigravity based on a few simple theoretical suggestions and some experimental data. The data are: astrophysical data on rotation of the Solar System in respect to the center of our galaxy and precision spectroscopy data on hydrogen and positronium. The theoretical suggestions for the case of absence of the gravitational field are: equality of electron and positron mass and equality of proton and positron charge. We also assume that QED is correct at the level of accuracy where it is clearly confirmed experimentally.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  9. Mapping chemical disorder and ferroelectric distortions in the double perovskite compound Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6 by atomic resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biškup, Neven; Álvarez-Serrano, Inmaculada; Veiga, Maria; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Pennycook, Stephen J; Varela, Maria

    2014-06-01

    In this work we report a study of the chemical and structural order of the double perovskite compound Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6 for compositions x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1. A noticeable disorder at the B-site in the Mn and Ti sublattice is detected at the atomic scale by electron energy-loss spectroscopy for all x values, resulting in Mn-rich and Ti-rich regions. For x ≥ 0.75, the cubic unit cell doubles and lowers its symmetry because of structural rearrangements associated with a giant ferroelectric displacement of the perovskite B-site cation. We discuss this finding in the light of the large electroresistance observed in Sr 2-x Gd x MnTiO6, x ≥ 0.75.

  10. Time-resolved surface infrared spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition of TiO2 using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic layer deposition of titanium dioxide using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water vapor is studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) with a time resolution of 120 ms. At 190 °C and 240 °C, a decrease in the absorption from adsorbed TDMAT is observed without any evidence of an adsorbed product. Ex situ measurements indicate that this behavior is not associated with an increase in the impurity concentration or a dramatic change in the growth rate. A desorbing decomposition product is consistent with these observations. RAIRS also indicates that dehydroxylation of the growth surface occurs only among one type of surface hydroxyl groups. Molecular water is observed to remain on the surface and participates in reactions even at a relatively high temperature (110 °C) and with long purge times (30 s)

  11. Time-resolved surface infrared spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Brent A., E-mail: brent.sperling@nist.gov; Hoang, John; Kimes, William A.; Maslar, James E. [Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8320, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8320 (United States); Steffens, Kristen L. [Biomolecular Measurement Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8362, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8362 (United States); Nguyen, Nhan V. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8120, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Atomic layer deposition of titanium dioxide using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water vapor is studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) with a time resolution of 120 ms. At 190 °C and 240 °C, a decrease in the absorption from adsorbed TDMAT is observed without any evidence of an adsorbed product. Ex situ measurements indicate that this behavior is not associated with an increase in the impurity concentration or a dramatic change in the growth rate. A desorbing decomposition product is consistent with these observations. RAIRS also indicates that dehydroxylation of the growth surface occurs only among one type of surface hydroxyl groups. Molecular water is observed to remain on the surface and participates in reactions even at a relatively high temperature (110 °C) and with long purge times (30 s)

  12. A Review of MR Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, D.G.; Hellem, T.L.; Shi, X.-F.; Sung, Y.H.; Prescot, A.P.; Kim, T.S.; Huber, R.S.; Forrest, L.N.; Renshaw, P.F.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness whose pathophysiology is poorly understood and for which there is an urgent need for improved diagnosis and treatment. MR spectroscopy is a neuroimaging method capable of in vivo measurement of neurochemicals relevant to bipolar disorder neurobiology. MR spectroscopy studies of adult bipolar disorder provide consistent evidence for alterations in the glutamate system and mitochondrial function. In bipolar disorder, these 2 phenomena may be...

  13. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  14. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a5D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful

  15. A method for atomic spectroscopy of highly charged ions in the Pm isoelectronic sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to search for alkali-like spectra in the Promethium isoelectronic sequence. Pb22+ ions were produced by means of an ECR-ion source and accelerated towards a target of He gas. Colliding with He atoms the Pb22+ ions are likely to capture an electron, thus forming an excited Pm-like ion (Pb21+). A 2 m grazing-incidence spectrometer was used for recording the spectra arising as the accelerated ions impinge on the target. No lines were recorded throughout the wavelength region where the spectrometer is sensitive. Further experiments are needed to make clear if this is due to experimental errors or not. 14 refs, 8 figs

  16. Estimation of lead and cadmium in various food commodities by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of lead and cadmium was carried out in various types of food commodities including poultry farm chicken eggs, integrated diet of winter season for the inhabitants of Rawalpindi/Islamabad area and different brands of baby cereals, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique. The results showed that integrated diet contained the highest amount of lead whereas the maximum concentration of cadmium was observed in samples of baby cereals. The effect of mechanical food processing on the concentration levels of these elements was discussed. The results obtained were compared with the reported values for other countries. Intake values of these toxic elements through these food articles were calculated and compared with the tolerance levels of WHO. (author)

  17. Energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms: A time-resolved fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Schroeder, W.; Kolb, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    The fluorescence from optically excited Ag atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices has been investigated in a time-resolved synchrotron-radiation study. A detailed energy dissipation model could be established from a systematic analysis of rise and decay times of all the observed fluorescence bands after pulsed excitation into the Ag (4d105p)2P1/2,3/2 levels, and by setting time windows between the excitation pulses in emission and emission-yield spectroscopy. Although the overall wavelength dependence of the decay time follows the λ3 law, the decay time is independent of λ within a given emission band. Finally, the role of energy transfer between Ag atoms and dimers for the evaluation of decay times is briefly addressed.

  18. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  19. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium vertical bar M vertical bar=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kips, A.; Vassen, W.; Hogervorst, W.; Dando, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. /M/ = 1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 S-1(0) metastable state. Spectra were recorded for epsilon = -2.940(4), epsilon = -2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and epsilon = -1.760(4), above the saddl

  20. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-06-01

    Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. The temperature is obtained using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha– Boltzmann equation method. Both parameters are studied as a function of delay time with respect to the onset of the laser pulse. The results are discussed. The time window where the plasma is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), necessary for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of samples, is deduced from the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Cu I lines. It is found to be 700–1000 ns.

  1. Study on the Mathematical Model of Hydraulic Jump Atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 练继建; 刘昉

    2004-01-01

    An equation of atomization quantity from energy dissipation by hydraulic jump was derived from the dimensional analysis. By applying Gauss diffusion equation, the spray diffusion rule in valley was studied under the condition of continuous linear source and random wind direction.By considering the spray-rain switching process, coagulation, condensation and evaporation of droplets, the air temperature, air relative humidity, spray density and the rainfall intensity in the lower reaches of the linear source were calculated. The 3-D numerical simulation fitted well with prototype monitoring. Finally, the prediction of atomization influence on environments for Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station was conducted.

  2. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  3. Photons and (artificial) atoms: an overview of optical spectroscopy techniques on quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamivakas, A. N.; Atatüre, M.

    2010-01-01

    In most branches within experimental physics technical prowess lies at the heart of many seminal works. From the observation of the photoelectric effect and the ultraviolet catastrophe that led to the development of quantum mechanics to the first transistor that shaped the modern age of electronics, significant physical insight has been achieved on the shoulders of technical advances and progress. Research on self-assembled quantum dots may be a drop in the sea of physics, but it still is no exception to this trend, and more physical insight continues to be revealed as the tools of the trade get increasingly more complex and advanced. This article is written primarily for senior undergraduate students and first year graduate students of experimental physics involving optically active quantum dots. More often than not, we have seen students shuffling through journal articles trying to relate the reported physics to the used experimental techniques. What we want to cover here is not in any way the history or the recent progress in quantum dot research - there are an ample number of topical books and review articles for that - but rather to highlight a selection of optics-based measurement techniques that have led to significant progress in our understanding of quantum dot physics as well as their applications in the last two decades. We hope a basic survey of the relevant optical spectroscopy techniques will help the newcomers in connecting the dots between measurements and physics.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, Chris J; Pham, Van-Thai; Veen, Renske M van der; El Nahhas, Amal; Lima, Frederico; Vithanage, Dimali A; Chergui, Majed [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Gawelda, Wojciech [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC (Spain); Johnson, Steven L; Beaud, Paul; Ingold, Gerhard; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Kaiser, Maik; Abela, Rafael [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Benfatto, Maurizio [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN (Italy); Hauser, Andreas [Departement de Chimie Physique, Universite de Geneve (Switzerland); Bressler, Christian, E-mail: majed.chergui@epfl.c, E-mail: chris.milne@psi.c [European XFEL Project Team, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [Fe{sup II}(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 A. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  5. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [FeII(bpy)3]2+, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 A. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced χ2 goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atoms in Strong Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Charles; Nayfeh, Munir

    1990-01-01

    This book collects the lectures given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Atoms in Strong Fields", which took place on the island of Kos, Greece, during the two weeks of October 9-21,1988. The designation "strong field" applies here to an external electromagnetic field that is sufficiently strong to cause highly nonlinear alterations in atomic or molecular struc­ ture and dynamics. The specific topics treated in this volume fall into two general cater­ gories, which are those for which strong field effects can be studied in detail in terrestrial laboratories: the dynamics of excited states in static or quasi-static electric and magnetic fields; and the interaction of atoms and molecules with intense laser radiation. In both areas there exist promising opportunities for research of a fundamental nature. An electric field of even a few volts per centimeter can be very strong on the atom­ ic scale, if it acts upon a weakly bound state. The study of Rydberg states with high reso­ lution laser spectroscop...

  7. High-resolution Resonance Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition from a population difference grating in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Wang*, Hai; Li, Shujing; Zhang, Chunhong; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2009-01-01

    The laser spectroscopy with a narrow linewidth and high signal to noise ratio (S/N) is very important in the precise measurement of optical frequencies. Here, we present a novel high-resolution backward resonance Bragg-scattering (RBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG). The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field in thermal 87Rb vapor, which periodically modulates the space population distribution of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. A probe beam, having the identical frequency and the orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. Such Bragg-scattered light becomes stronger at an atomic resonance transition, which forms the RBS spectrum with a high S/N and sub-natural linewidth. Using the scheme of the coherent superposition of the individual Rayleigh-scattered light emitted from the atomic dipole oscillators on the PDG, the experimentally observed RBS spectroscopy is theoretically explained.

  8. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  9. Use of Atomic Absorption Technique in Environmental Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter consists of some points including the process of atomic absorption, historical hint, key basics, the atom ionization and formation of plasma, applications in the device of atomic absorption, quantum analysis with atomic absorption, components of the device of atomic absorption, standardization of this device, atomic absorption in the the graphite furnace, supervising the analytical interventions, spectral interventions, non-spectral interventions, the utmost electric energy for atomization, preparation of standards and samples, the system of acidic digestion, similar analytical techniques.

  10. Repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled Sr atoms using the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition

    CERN Document Server

    Mickelson, P G; Anzel, P; DeSalvo, B J; Nagel, S B; Traverso, A J; Yan, M; Killian, T C

    2009-01-01

    We describe repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled strontium (Sr) atoms using the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition. Atom number in a magneto-optical trap is enhanced by driving this transition because Sr atoms that have decayed into the (5s5p)3P2 dark state are repumped back into the (5s2)1S0 ground state. Spectroscopy of 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr improves the value of the (5s5p)3P2 - (5s4d)3D2 transition frequency for 88Sr and determines the isotope shifts for the transition.

  11. Repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled Sr atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Anzel, P.; De Salvo, B. J.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Yan, M.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    We describe repumping and spectroscopy of laser-cooled strontium (Sr) atoms using the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition. Atom number in a magneto-optical trap is enhanced by driving this transition because Sr atoms that have decayed into the (5s5p)3P2 dark state are repumped back into the (5s2)1S0 ground state. Spectroscopy of 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr and 88Sr improves the value of the (5s5p)3P2-(5s4d)3D2 transition frequency and determines the isotope shifts for the transition accurately enough to guide laser-cooling experiments with less abundant isotopes.

  12. Near relativistic study of bound levels in atoms. Application to alkaline atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, A.; Delgado-Barrio, G.; Villarreal, P. (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia)

    1985-01-01

    A model is described for the calculation of the atomic binding energies. The Pauli equation has been solved with a local potential. The results for alkaline atoms are reported here and compared with the perturbative calculation and experimental data.

  13. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  14. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy 2. Appendix A: Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1992: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, H.C.

    1992-07-01

    This work supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Services, Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy during the period July 1, 1989 to June 30, 1992, resulted in noteworthy scientific results in three categories which we shall discuss in turn: The spectroscopy of high-lying doubly-excited states of H{sup {minus}}, interactions with thin foils, and multiphoton processes. Radiological safety concerns and slow beam studies are also briefly discussed.

  15. Atomic force microscopic study on lipid bilayer nanoscale phase separation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Phase separation of copolymers or lipid membranes in nanoscale has attracted increasing interests for their applications in the synthesis of inorganic nanomaterial. The nanoscale phase separation of liquid bilayer as a supported membrane is systematically investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Moreover, the position of the fluorescence indicator, which is commonly used in the phase separation study in optical microscope, is also probed in this study to complete the knowledge of tradit...

  16. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinica...

  17. Measurements @ Sub-Mm Spectroscopy Laboratory of Bologna: Rotational Spectroscopy Applied to Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The physico-chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere has been one of the main subjects of studies over last years. In particular, the composition of the atmosphere is indeed very important to understand chemical processes linked to depletion of stratospheric ozone and greenhouse effect. The vertical concentration profiles of atmospheric gases can be provided by remote sensing measurements, but they require the accurate knowledge of the parameters involved: line positions, transition intensities, pressure-broadened half-widths, pressure-induced frequency shifts and their temperature dependence. In particular, the collisional broadening parameters have a crucial influence on the accuracy of spectra calculations and on reduction of remote sensing data. Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, by applying the source frequency modulation technique it has been found that rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having an high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations. A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the work carried out at the Laboratory of Millimeter/submillimeter-wave Spectroscopy of Bologna in the field of atmospheric studies.

  18. Atomic force microscope study of three-dimensional nanostructure sidewalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa [SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Gondran, Carolyn F H [Advanced Technology Development Facility, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States); Michelson, Diane K [International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78741 (United States)

    2007-08-22

    Next generation planar and non-planar complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) structures are three-dimensional nanostructures with multi-layer stacks that can contain films thinner than ten atomic layers. The high resolution of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is typically chosen for studying properties of these stacks such as film thickness, interface and interfacial roughness. However, TEM sample preparation is time-consuming and destructive, and TEM analysis is expensive and can provide problematic results for surface and interface roughness. Therefore, in this paper, we present the use of direct measurements of sidewall surface structures by conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an alternative or complementary method for studying multi-layer film stacks and as the preferred method for studying FinFET sidewall surface roughness. In addition to these semiconductor device applications, this AFM sidewall measurement technique could be used for other three-dimensional nanostructures.

  19. Studies of Atomic Free Radicals Stored in a Cryogenic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David M.; Hubbard, Dorthy (Technical Monitor); Alexander, Glen (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-Helium Solids are porous gel-like solids consisting of impurity atoms and molecules surrounded by thin layers of solid helium. They provide an ideal medium for matrix isolation of free radicals to prevent recombination and store chemical energy. In this work electron spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and ultrasound techniques have all been employed to study the properties of these substances. Detailed studies via electron spin resonance of exchange tunneling chemical reactions involving hydrogen and deuterium molecular and atomic impurities in these solids have been performed and compared with theory. Concentrations of hydrogen approaching the quantum solid criterion have been produced. Structured studies involving X ray diffraction, ultrasound, and electron spin resonance have shown that the impurities in impurity helium solids are predominantly contained in impurity clusters, with each cluster being surrounded by thin layers of solid helium.

  20. Study of humic substances by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Konecna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine main fluorophores of soil humic substances using 2D and 3D synchronous fluorescencespectroscopy (SFS. The measured synchronous spectra werecompared with standards IHSS. Differences between humic andfulvic acids as well as our and IHSS samples are discussed.

  1. Experimental studies of single-photon photodetachment of atomic anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Srividya S.

    Laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy (LPES) has been used to study the structure of the terbium anion. The data was analyzed assuming that the terbium anion forms in dysprosium-like states. Using this assumption, the electron affinity of Tb([Xe]4f96s 2 6 Ho15/2 ) equals 1.98 +/- 0.10 eV, and the ground state of the terbium anion is assigned to the Dy-like Tb-([Xe]4f 106s2 5I 8) electronic configuration. At lust two bound excited states of Tb - are also evident in the photoelectron kinetic energy spectra, with binding energies of 0.449 +/- 0.01 and 1.67 +/- 0.07 eV relative to the Tb(6 Ho15/2 ) ground state. The energy scale of each Tb- photoelectron spectrum way calibrated using reference photoelectron peaks from 12 C-, 16O- and 23Na-, which have well known binding energies [1]. Photoelectron angular distribution measurements following the single-photon photodetachment of the lanthanide anions Tb- and Lu - are also presented. The asymmetry parameters were determined from the non-linear least-square fits of the photoelectron yields as a function of the angle between the photon polarization vector and the photoelectron momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. The measurements indicated the single-photon photodetachment process hnu + Tb -([Xe]4f106s 2 5I8) → Tb([Xe]4 f96s2 6) Ho15/2 + e - has beta values of 1.51 +/- 0.08 and 1.35 +/- 0.08 at wavelengths of 514.5 and 488 nm, respectively. For Lu -, the fine-structure resolved photodetachment process hnu +Lu-([Xe]4f146s 26p5d 1D 2) → Lu([Xe]4f145 d6s2 2D 3/2) + e-, has been measured at wavelength of 532 nm yielding beta = 0.8 +/- 0.1, supporting the assertion that Lu - forms via the attachment of a 6p-electron to the neutral Lu atom [2]. Finally, photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photo-electrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the Fe - and Cu- have also been measured at discrete visible photon wavelengths. From the measured photodetachment cross sections, the

  2. Solid sample graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy for supporting arsenic determination in sediments following a sequential extraction procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid sample graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (SS-GFAAS) has been proposed since its appearance as a good alternative to wet methods of analysis in many matrices. Here, we examine the use of SS-GFAAS for total and leachable arsenic determination in sediments from distinct origins. Our direct analysis of seven selected sediments was not always free of spectral matrix interference, but the spectroscopic technique gave very good results for (a) direct arsenic measurement in solid residues from a range of leaching processes, (b) total arsenic determination (HNO3 leaching test) and (c) the evaluation of its potential remobilisation (modified BCR three-step sequential extraction scheme). For the optimised instrumental conditions, the analysis limit was 0.44 mg kg-1 and long-term reproducibility was between 10-15%. The sum of leachable arsenic in HNO3 65% and the residual fraction, gave recoveries from 72 to 118% of total arsenic content. These results are a good alternative to other cumbersome wet methods involving HF

  3. Fingerprinting of complex mixtures with the use of high performance liquid chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Yongnian [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China)], E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn; Peng Yunyan [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Kokot, Serge [Inorganic Materials Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2008-05-26

    The molecular and metal profile fingerprints were obtained from a complex substance, Atractylis chinensis DC-a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), with the use of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) techniques. This substance was used in this work as an example of a complex biological material, which has found application as a TCM. Such TCM samples are traditionally processed by the Bran, Cut, Fried and Swill methods, and were collected from five provinces in China. The data matrices obtained from the two types of analysis produced two principal component biplots, which showed that the HPLC fingerprint data were discriminated on the basis of the methods for processing the raw TCM, while the metal analysis grouped according to the geographical origin. When the two data matrices were combined into a one two-way matrix, the resulting biplot showed a clear separation on the basis of the HPLC fingerprints. Importantly, within each different grouping the objects separated according to their geographical origin, and they ranked approximately in the same order in each group. This result suggested that by using such an approach, it is possible to derive improved characterisation of the complex TCM materials on the basis of the two kinds of analytical data. In addition, two supervised pattern recognition methods, K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) method, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were successfully applied to the individual data matrices-thus, supporting the PCA approach.

  4. Elemental Content in Brown Rice by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Reveals the Evolution of Asian Cultivated Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yawen Zeng; Luxiang Wang; Juan Du; Jiafu Liu; Shuming Yang; Xiaoying Pu; Fenghui Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship for classification traits and eight mineral elements in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.) from Yunnan Province in China was carried out using microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and the analytical procedures were carefully controlled and validated. In general, the results show that the mean levels of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Cu in brown rice for 789 accessions of rice landraces was distinctly lower than that of improved cultivars. They further demonstrate that Ca plays an important role in the differentiation of subspecies indica-japonica, especially to enhance adaptation of cold stress, and that five mineral elements in brown rice enhance the eurytopicity from landrace to improved cultivar. Hierarchical cluster analysis, using average linkage from SPSS software based on eight mineral elements in brown rice, showed that Yunnan rice could be grouped into rice landrace and improved cultivar, with the rice landrace being further clustered into five subgroups, and that, interestingly, purple rice does not cluster with either of the groups. Our present data confirm that indica is the closest relative of late rice and white rice, and that they constitute rice landraces together, whereas japonica is the closest relatives of non-nuda, early-mid and glutinous rice. It is further shown that japonica, non-nuda, early-mid, glutinous, white and red rice might be more primitive than indica, nuda, late, non-glutinous and purple rice, respectively.

  5. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  6. Application of Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy for the screening of blood samples from patients with clinical variant and sporadic CJD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ironside James W

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD infection and reports of vCJD transmission through blood transfusion emphasise the need for blood screening assays to ensure the safety of blood and transplanted tissues. Most assays aim to detect abnormal prion protein (PrPSc, although achieving required sensitivity is a challenge. Methods We have used innovative Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy (ADRS, which determines dielectric properties of materials which are established by reflectivity and penetration of radio/micro waves, to analyse blood samples from patients and controls to identify characteristic ADR signatures unique to blood from vCJD and to sCJD patients. Initial sets of blood samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors were screened as training samples to determine group-specific ADR characteristics, and provided a basis for classification of blinded sets of samples. Results Blood sample groups from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors screened by ADRS were classified with 100% specificity and sensitivity, discriminating these by a co-variance expert analysis system. Conclusion ADRS appears capable of recognising and discriminating serum samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases, and normal healthy adults, and might be developed to provide a system for primary screening or confirmatory assay complementary to other screening systems.

  7. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  8. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C [Grupo de Fisica de Superfcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao/Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J S, E-mail: caio@ufba.br [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente-INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-280 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the {Gamma} point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  9. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the local atomic structure in Cu-Ni-Si alloy after severe plastic deformation and ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzeddine, H.; Harfouche, M.; Hennet, L.; Thiaudiere, D.; Kawasaki, M.; Bradai, D.; Langdon, T. G.

    2015-08-01

    The local atomic structure of Cu-Ni-Si alloy after severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing and the decomposition of supersaturated solid solution upon annealing were investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The coordination number and interatomic distances were obtained by analyzing experimental extend X-ray absorption fine structure data collected at the Ni K-edge. Results indicate that the environment of Ni atoms in Cu-Ni-Si alloy is strongly influenced by the deformation process. Moreover, ageing at 973 K affects strongly the atomic structure around the Ni atoms in Cu-Ni-Si deformed by equal channel angular pressing and high pressure torsion. This influence is discussed in terms of changes and decomposition features of the Cu-Ni-Si solid solution.

  10. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  11. Theoretical studies of x-ray and electron core edge spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the atomic architecture of matter is an essential prerequisite to a comprehension of almost any its physical and chemical properties. X-ray and electron core-edge spectroscopies are useful tools for probing both the geometric and electronic structure of matter. The full quantum mechanical multiple-scattering theory described in this dissertation is used for the interpretation of these spectroscopies, and local atomic structure determination. In this thesis, this theory is extended to treat the non-s core-state excitations. Through computer code vectorization and using proper algorithms, the multiple scattering method is capable for studying of complex systems. This method is applied to several different systems: The structure of acetylene adsorbed on Pd(111) surface, the reaction intermediate C4 H4 chemisorbed on Pd(111) surface, the Ba-doped Y2O3 catalyst, and the high temperature superconductor Bi2SrCa2Cu2O8, to investigate the effects of multiple scattering upon the absorption spectrum. The investigation on the conditions for the validity of open-quotes dipole approximationclose quotes in electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of atomic K-shell excitations on an analytic model is also presented in this thesis. A closed-form expression for the limiting magnitude qd of the momentum-transfer vector is derived. Matrix elements with many different values of q contribute to a typical EELS signal, but the dominant ones lie close to the minimum value qmin. The increase of qmin with the decrease of qd makes it easier to satisfy the conditions for the dipole approximation in the near edge rather than the extended-fine-structure region of the energy loss spectrum

  12. Optical spectroscopy study of Weyl Semimetal NbP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeremy; Jiang, Yuxuan; Dun, Zhiling; Zhou, Haidong; Smirnov, Dmitry; Jiang, Zhigang

    Weyl semimetals have attracted much interest lately because of its unique band structure, where conduction band and valence band touch at discrete points. Here, we report on optical spectroscopy study of Weyl semimetal NbP, seeking evidence for the existence of Weyl fermions. Specifically, using Raman spectroscopy we investigate the anisotropic response of Raman-active phonon modes in NbP and compare with Quantum Espresso simulations. Using magneto-infrared spectroscopy in a high magnetic field up to 17.5T, we observe several Landau level transitions and compare with the theoretical model of three-dimensional massless Dirac/Weyl fermions. By combining our data with low-temperature magneto-transport measurement, the magnetic field dispersion of Landau levels in NbP is obtained.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  14. Magnetic excitations studied with time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainford, B. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    An introduction to time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy is presented in the context of the study of magnetic materials. Examples are taken from the class of rare earth and actinide magnetic materials known as `strongly correlated electron` systems. (author) 11 figs., 24 refs.

  15. Surface oxidation of cobalt nanoparticles studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Charles, S.W.;

    1999-01-01

    The surface oxide formed on cobalt nanoparticles has been studied by Mossbauer emission spectroscopy. Exposure of the cobalt particles to oxygen at room temperature was found to result in the formation of a relatively well-ordered surface oxide with Mossbauer parameters similar to those of CoO....

  16. Precipitation Study in Inconel 625 Alloy by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Ahmad; W. Ahmad; M.A.Shaikh; Mahmud Ahmad; M.U. Rajput

    2003-01-01

    Precipitation in Inconel 625 alloy has been studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The observeddependence of annihilation characteristics on aging time is attributed to the change of the positron state due to the increaseand decrease of the density and size of the γ″ precipitates. Hardness measurements and lifetime measurements are in goodagreement.

  17. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Su

  18. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...... advantages of the use of PAS are pointed out. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  19. Social Perception in Infancy: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Blasi, Anna; Volein, Agnes; Everdell, Nick; Elwell, Claire E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to engage and communicate in a social world is one of the defining characteristics of the human species. While the network of regions that compose the social brain have been the subject of extensive research in adults, there are limited techniques available for monitoring young infants. This study used near infrared spectroscopy to…

  20. Determination of Cd and Pb in canned pineapple by atomic absorption spectroscopy using a graphite oven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the food susceptibility to be contaminated it is necessary to realize pursuit studies or frequent monitoring about the content of certain metals which represent health risks by its toxicological effects in the human being and another living organisms. In this work the cadmium and lead concentrations are determined in six national brands of canned pineapple analysing separately sugar sirup and the fruit. (Author)

  1. Study of Interplanetary Magnetic Field with Atomic Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Shangguan, Jinyi

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new way of studying interplanetary magnetic field -- atomic alignment. Instead of sending thousands of space probes, atomic alignment allows magnetic mapping with any ground telescope facilities equipped with spectro-polarimeter. The polarization of spectral lines that are pumped by the anisotropic radiation from the sun is influenced by the magnetic alignment, which happens for weak magnetic field (<1G). As a result, the line polarization becomes an excellent tracer of the embedded magnetic field. The method is illustrated by the specific cases of Io and comet Halley that we consider. Magnetometer data from the Galileo mission Io flyby (2002) were used in order to construct the topology of the magnetic field around Jupiter. So as to the data from the vega mission comet Halley flyby(1986). A uniform density distribution of Na was considered and polarization at each point was then constructed. Both spatial and temporal variations of turbulent magnetic field can be traced with this technique...

  2. Study of nanoscale damage evolution using embedded atom method potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Horstemeyer, Mark; Gullet, Phillip

    2004-03-01

    Damage evolution at nanoscale has been studied using embedded atom method (EAM) potentials based on molecular dynamics principles. The simulations were performed using WARP, a parallel computing atomistic stress simulator based on Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials for Aluminum. By varying the number of atoms from a few hundred to a few hundred thousands, we analyzed void nucleation, growth and coalescence at increasing material length scale. Rectangular specimens with and without voids were subjected to uniaxial tension up to a total strain of 50rates. Uniaxial stress-strain curves, void-volume fraction evolution and stress triaxiality were monitored. The results indicated that nucleation process is highly dependent on the material length scale, while the void growth and void coalescence mechanisms were almost indifferent to the increasing length scale. Material length scale mostly affects dislocation nucleation mechanisms that lead to void formation. Strain rate also significantly influences the stress-strain response during plastic deformation at various length scales.

  3. Study of atomic jumps in quasi-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terminology phason used in quasicrystals to refer to atomic jumps. The study of the hopping process is important for the understanding of many basic issues in quasi-crystallography: structure, stability, diffusion, phase transitions between quasicrystals and approximants, mechanical properties. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering allows to find the characteristics of each elementary jump: chemical species involves, relaxation times, activation energies, jump distances and orientations. We performed a series of experiments in the perfect icosahedral phases AlFeCu and AlMnPd, on both powders and single domain samples, using time-of-flight, backscattering and triple axis spectrometers. We evidenced the existence of very fast phason hopping, and studied about ten different atomic jumps. An unusual temperature dependence has been found systematically: each process is assisted by a thermally activated mechanism. The assistance process has to be determined case by case, but the more plausible explanation invokes assistance by phonons or phason clouds. Moreover, the dependence of the quasi elastic signal as a function of the momentum transfer shows that the jumps are local and do not give rise to any long-range diffusion. Phason hopping mainly corresponds to the atom moving forwards and backwards between two energetically equivalent sites. Finally, we have been able to show that the jumps occur along the various quasi-crystalline symmetry axes. (author)

  4. Unexpected temporal evolution of atomic spectral lines of aluminum in a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Rawad, E-mail: rawad.saad@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); L' Hermite, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lhermite@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bousquet, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.bousquet@u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the laser induced breakdown (LIBS) signal of a pure aluminum sample was studied under nitrogen and air atmospheres. In addition to the usual decrease of signal due to plasma cooling, unexpected temporal evolutions were observed for a spectral lines of aluminum, which revealed the existence of collisional energy transfer effects. Furthermore, molecular bands of AlN and AlO were observed in the LIBS spectra, indicating recombination of aluminum with the ambient gas. Within the experimental conditions reported in this study, both collisional energy transfer and recombination processes occurred around 1.5 μs after the laser shot. This highlights the possible influence of collisional and chemical effects inside the plasma that can play a role on LIBS signals. - Highlights: • Persistence of two Al I lines related to the 61,844 cm{sup −1} energy level only under nitrogen atmosphere. • Collisional energy transfer effect exists between aluminum and nitrogen. • Observation of molecular band of AlN (under nitrogen) and AlO (under air) after a delay time of 1.5 µs. • 20% of oxygen in air is sufficient to annihilate both the collisional energy transfer effect and the AlN molecular formation.

  5. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary examination of records relating to past Chalk River employees provides some reassurance that large numbers of cancer deaths that might be related to occupational radiation exposure do not exist in the groups of employees studied to the end of 1982. The lack of reliable information on deaths of ex-employees who left AECL for other employment prevented the inclusion of this group in this preliminary study. This information will presumably be obtained during the course of the more comprehensive Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. employee health study. 6 refs

  6. Determination of trace and minor elements in alloys by atomic-absorption spectroscopy using an induction-heated graphite-well furnace as atom source-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashy, M A; Headridge, J B; Sowerbutts, A

    1974-06-01

    Results are presented for the atomic-absorption spectrophotometric determination of zinc in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys, and aluminium, antimony and tin in steels, by means of solid samples dropped into an induction-heated graphite-well furnace to produce the atomic vapour. PMID:18961510

  7. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  8. Elastic recoil atomic spectroscopy of light elements with sub-nanometer depth resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the QQDS magnetic spectrometer that is used for high resolution ion beam analysis (IBA) of light elements at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is presented for the first time. In addition all parameters are investigated that influence the analysis. Methods and models are presented with which the effects can be minimised or calculated. There are five focal points of this thesis. The first point is the construction and commissioning of the QQDS magnetic spectrometer, the corresponding scattering chamber with all the peripherals and the detector, which is specially developed for high resolution elastic recoil detection. Both the reconstructed spectrometer and the detector were adapted to the specific experimental conditions needed for high-resolution Ion beam analysis of light elements and tested for routine practice. The detector consists of two components. At the back end of the detector a Bragg ionization chamber is mounted, which is used for the particle identification. At the front end, directly behind the entrance window a proportional counter is mounted. This proportional counter includes a highresistance anode. Thus, the position of the particles is determined in the detector. The following two points concern fundamental studies of ion-solid interaction. By using a magnetic spectrometer the charge state distribution of the particles scattered from the sample after a binary collision is both possible and necessary for the analysis. For this reason the charge states are measured and compared with existing models. In addition, a model is developed that takes into account the charge state dependent energy loss. It is shown that without the application of this model the depth profiles do not correspond with the quantitative measurements by conventional IBA methods and with the thickness obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The second fundamental ion-solid interaction is the damage and the modification of the sample that occurs during

  9. Molecular beam studies of oxide reduction by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphite and oxide internals of a CTR are susceptible to chemical corrosion as well as to physical degradation by high-energy particles. Reactions of thermal atomic hydrogen with oxides are being studied. The hydrogen used is at thermal energy (0.22 eV). Typical data are reported for the H/UO2 system. The reaction probability is plotted as a function of solid temperature at fixed beam intensity and moculation frequency. The reaction probability increases from low temperature to a high-temperature plateau at about 13000C. Here the reaction rate is limited solely by the sticking probability of H on the surface; about one in seven of the incident atoms is chemisorbed by the surface and ultimately returns to the gas phase as water vapor. A reaction model comprising sticking, recombination to H2, solution and diffusion of H in the bulk of the UO2, surface reaction of adsorbed H with lattice oxygen atoms to produce the hydroxyl radical, and production of water is constructed. The rate constants for the elementary steps in the mechanism are tabulated. 2 figures, 2 tables

  10. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess

  11. Production of heavy ion beams for atomic physics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory for research in atomic physics of ions has been set up around a 2 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator designed and built indegenously. Mass analysed negatively charged heavy ion beams from a directly extracted duoplasmatron ion source are injected through various ion-optical elements into the accelerating tube. A gas stripper at the high voltage dome changes the negative ions into positive ions which are subsequently accelerated. The high energy end of the accelerator consists of quadrupole focussing magnets and an analysing magnet. A pair of insulated tantalum slits provide corona feedback and stabilize the energy of the accelerator. A beam resolution of 5 keV at 1 MeV proton energy has been measured. A number of experiments are presently being planned to utilize the accelerator in the field of basic research in atomic physics. These include beam-foil spectroscopic measurements involving detection of decay photon/electrons, ion-induced X-ray emission, analytical applications and radiation damage studies. Electron spectrometers which are in the stage of testing include cylindrical mirror analyser and parallel plate analyser. On the accelerator front, efforts are underway to develop a new sputter ion source and computer automation for improving stability and reliability. The salient features of the accelerator and the instrumentation developed for carrying out experiments in atomic physics are reported. (author). 14 refs., 17 figs

  12. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess.

  13. Model study in chemisorption: atomic hydrogen on beryllium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauschlicher, C.W. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The interaction between atomic hydrogen and the (0001) surface of Be metal has been studied by ab initio electronic structure theory. Self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations have been performed using minimum, optimized minimum, double zeta and mixed basis sets for clusters as large as 22 Be atoms. The binding energy and equilibrium geometry (the distance to the surface) were determined for 4 sites. Both spatially restricted (the wavefunction was constrained to transform as one of the irreducible representations of the molecular point group) and unrestricted SCF calculations were performed. Using only the optimized minimum basis set, clusters containing as many as 22 beryllium atoms have been investigated. From a variety of considerations, this cluster is seen to be nearly converged within the model used, providing the most reliable results for chemisorption. The site dependence of the frequency is shown to be a geometrical effect depending on the number and angle of the bonds. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen through a perfect beryllium crystal is predicted to be energetically unfavorable. The cohesive energy, the ionization energy and the singlet-triplet separation were computed for the clusters without hydrogen. These quantities can be seen as a measure of the total amount of edge effects. The chemisorptive properties are not related to the total amount of edge effects, but rather the edge effects felt by the adsorbate bonding berylliums. This lack of correlation with the total edge effects illustrates the local nature of the bonding, further strengthening the cluster model for chemisorption. A detailed discussion of the bonding and electronic structure is included. The remaining edge effects for the Be/sub 22/ cluster are discussed.

  14. Quantitation of motexafin lutetium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Dale; Mody, Tarak D.; Hatcher, Lori I.; Fiene, John; Stiles, Mark; Patrick P. Lin; Lee, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) methods were developed and validated for the evaluation of motexafin lutetium (MLu, lutetium texaphyrin, PCI-0123) pharmacokinetics in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was specific for MLu, whereas the ICP-AES method measured total elemental lutetium. Both methods were fast, simple, precise, and accurate. For the LC-MS/MS method, a closely related analogue (PCI-0353...

  15. Study of molybdenum oxide by means of Perturbed Angular Correlations and Mossbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Among transition-metal oxides, the Molybdenum oxide compounds are particularly attractive due to the structural (2D) anisotropy and to the ability of the molybdenum ion to change its oxidation state, being such properties well adequate for applications on, e.g., chemical sensors, solar cells, catalytic and optoelectronic devices. At ISOLDE we aim studying the incorporation of selected dopants by ion implantation, using the nuclear techniques of Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). Both techniques make use of highly diluted radioactive probe nuclei, which interact – as atomic sized tips – with the host atoms and defects. The objectives of this project are to study at the atomic scale the probe’s local environment, its electronic configuration and polarization, the probe’s lattice sites, point defects and its recombination dynamics and, in the case of e-gamma PAC, the electron mobility on the host can be further studied, e.g., as a function of temperature.

  16. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  17. First-principles studies of atomic dynamics in tetrahedrite thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junchao; Zhu, Mengze; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Ke, Xianglin; Morelli, Donald T.; Lai, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Cu12Sb4S13-based tetrahedrites are high-performance thermoelectrics that contain earth-abundant and environmentally friendly elements. At present, the mechanistic understanding of their low lattice thermal conductivity (applies first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, along with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments, to study the incoherent and coherent atomic dynamics in Cu10.5NiZn0.5Sb4S13, in order to deepen our insight into mechanisms of anomalous dynamic behavior and low lattice thermal conductivity in tetrahedrites. Our study of incoherent dynamics reveals the anomalous "phonon softening upon cooling" behavior commonly observed in inelastic neutron scattering data. By examining the dynamic Cu-Sb distances inside the Sb[CuS3]Sb cage, we ascribe softening to the decreased anharmonic "rattling" of Cu in the cage. On the other hand, our study of coherent dynamics reveals that acoustic modes are confined in a small region of dynamic scattering space, which we hypothesize leads to a minimum phonon mean free path. By assuming a Debye model, we obtain a lattice minimum thermal conductivity value consistent with experiments. We believe this study furthers our understanding of the atomic dynamics of tetrahedrite thermoelectrics and will more generally help shed light on the origin of intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity in these and other structurally similar materials.

  18. Study of atomic and condensed atomic indices for reactive sites of molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kolandaivel; G Praveena; P Selvarengan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we have introduced the atomic descriptors () to determine the local reactive sites of the molecular systems during electrophilic, nucleophilic and radical attacks. The condensed Fukui function and the newly introduced condensed atomic descriptor have been calculated for six different systems, namely glycine, alanine, aniline, BH2Cl, trans-FC(O)OF and -anisidine. The individual atomic charges (gross charge) calculated by the MPA scheme have been used to calculate the condensed Fukui functions () and the newly derived condensed atomic descriptors ()$^{\\alpha}_{k}$ at B1-DZP level of theory. We carried out the calculation using the ``stockholders” charge partitioning technique (i.e., Hirshfeld population scheme). The newly derived quantity gives the same reactive sites as the condensed Fukui functions, and the complexities associated with the negative Fukui functions are removed.

  19. Theoretical study of core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy at graphene nanoribbon edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, N.; Hasnip, P. J.; Probert, M. I. J.; Yuan, J.

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study of simulated atomic-resolution electronic energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for different graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is presented. The results of ab initio studies of carbon 1s core-loss EELS on GNRs with different ribbon edge structures and different hydrogen terminations show that theoretical core-loss EELS can distinguish key structural features at the atomic scale. In addition, the combination of polarized core-loss EELS with symmetry resolved electronic partial density of states calculations can be used to identify the origins of all the primary features in the spectra. For example, the nature of the GNR edge structure (armchair, zigzag, etc) can be identified, along with the degree of hydrogenation. Hence it is possible to use the combination of ab initio calculations with high resolution, high energy transmission core-loss EELS experiments to determine the local atomic arrangement and chemical bonding states (i.e. a structural fingerprint) in GNRs, which is essential for future practical applications of graphene.

  20. Theoretical study of core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy at graphene nanoribbon edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, N; Hasnip, P J; Probert, M I J; Yuan, J

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study of simulated atomic-resolution electronic energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for different graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is presented. The results of ab initio studies of carbon [Formula: see text] core-loss EELS on GNRs with different ribbon edge structures and different hydrogen terminations show that theoretical core-loss EELS can distinguish key structural features at the atomic scale. In addition, the combination of polarized core-loss EELS with symmetry resolved electronic partial density of states calculations can be used to identify the origins of all the primary features in the spectra. For example, the nature of the GNR edge structure (armchair, zigzag, etc) can be identified, along with the degree of hydrogenation. Hence it is possible to use the combination of ab initio calculations with high resolution, high energy transmission core-loss EELS experiments to determine the local atomic arrangement and chemical bonding states (i.e. a structural fingerprint) in GNRs, which is essential for future practical applications of graphene.

  1. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-·CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ∼40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion

  2. Study of the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three aspects of the interactions of atoms with high intensity laser fields were treated. All three were motivated by experiment. The first investigation was prompted by a recent experiment (Kruit et al. 1983) involving multiphoton ionization of Xe. In this experiment it was found that the photoelectron energy spectrum contained peaks that corresponded to the absorption of more than the minimum number of photons required to ionize the atom. A model approximation here showed good qualitative agreement with experiment. An experiment (Grove et al. 1977) designed to test a theoretical calculation of the dynamical Stark effect stimulated the second part of this thesis, namely: a study of how an adiabatically and near-adiabatically changing field intensity affects the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a two-level atom. It was found that there is an asymmetry in the spectrum for off-resonance excitation produced because the field turn-on repopulates the dressed state that is depopulated by spontaneous emission. The third part of this thesis was based on an experiment (Granneman and Van der Wiel 1976) that attempted to verify a perturbation calculation of the two-photon ionization cross section of Cs. A discrepancy of four orders of magnitude near a minimum in the cross section was found between theory and experiment. To explain this discrepancy it was suggested (Armstrong and Beers 1977) that the effective order of nonlinearity (k) for this process varied significantly around the minimum. This study involves a perturbation calculation of k. It was found that k varies rapidly around the minimum, and that this variation should be experimentally observable for laser intensities of the order of tens of GW cm-2

  3. A computational study of an atomizing liquid sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Gurjar, Soumil R.; Trujillo, Mario F., E-mail: mtrujillo@wisc.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Linear instability predictions of liquid sheets injected into a gas medium are well established in the literature. These analyses are often used in Lagrangian-Eulerian spray simulations, a prominent simulation method, to model the dynamics occurring in the near-nozzle region. In the present work, these instability predictions are re-examined by first generalizing the treatment of interfacial conditions and related assumptions with a two-phase Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) system, and second, by employing highly resolved-Volume-of-Fluid (VoF) simulations. After presenting some validation exercises for both the VoF and OS solvers, the OS predictions are compared to earlier studies from the literature leading to reasonable agreement in the limit as the boundary layer thickness tends to zero. Results from VoF simulations of liquid sheet injection are used to characterize the range of scales of the liquid structures immediately before atomization. The mean value in this range is found to be approximately two to three orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding predictions from previous studies. A two-phase mixing layer under the same physical conditions is used to examine this disparity, revealing that within the linear regime, relatively good agreement exists between the VoF and OS predicted instability mechanisms. However, the most unstable mode in the linear regime is too small to cause a fracture or atomization of the liquid sheet and hence cannot be directly responsible for the atomization. The generation of a much larger mode, which emerges well beyond the linear regime, is the one causing breakup.

  4. A computational study of an atomizing liquid sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Gurjar, Soumil R.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2015-08-01

    Linear instability predictions of liquid sheets injected into a gas medium are well established in the literature. These analyses are often used in Lagrangian-Eulerian spray simulations, a prominent simulation method, to model the dynamics occurring in the near-nozzle region. In the present work, these instability predictions are re-examined by first generalizing the treatment of interfacial conditions and related assumptions with a two-phase Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) system, and second, by employing highly resolved-Volume-of-Fluid (VoF) simulations. After presenting some validation exercises for both the VoF and OS solvers, the OS predictions are compared to earlier studies from the literature leading to reasonable agreement in the limit as the boundary layer thickness tends to zero. Results from VoF simulations of liquid sheet injection are used to characterize the range of scales of the liquid structures immediately before atomization. The mean value in this range is found to be approximately two to three orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding predictions from previous studies. A two-phase mixing layer under the same physical conditions is used to examine this disparity, revealing that within the linear regime, relatively good agreement exists between the VoF and OS predicted instability mechanisms. However, the most unstable mode in the linear regime is too small to cause a fracture or atomization of the liquid sheet and hence cannot be directly responsible for the atomization. The generation of a much larger mode, which emerges well beyond the linear regime, is the one causing breakup.

  5. Study of porous silicon surface by mass spectroscopy methods

    OpenAIRE

    Берченко, Микола Миколайович; Єрохов, Валерій Юрійович; Нічкало, Степан Ігорович; Бережанський, Євген Іванович

    2014-01-01

    Silicon surfaces of multicrystalline substrates before and after the formation of porous silicon on them, used in the production of photovoltaic cells were studied by mass spectrometry methods. An analysis of the elemental surface composition by mass spectroscopy of secondary ions at various manufacturing stages, including before and after electrochemical etching to create a porous silicon layer was conducted in the research. Clean surfaces before etching in an electrolyte based on hydrofluor...

  6. Studies of nuclear fuel by means of nuclear spectroscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter

    2000-02-01

    This paper is a summary text of several works performed by the author regarding spectroscopic measurements on spent nuclear fuel. Methods for determining the decay heat of spent nuclear fuel by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy and for verifying the integrity of nuclear fuel by means of tomography is presented. A summary of work performed regarding gamma-ray detector technology for studies of fission gas release is presented.

  7. A theoretical study of the atomic and electronic structures of three prospective atomic scale wire systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevlin, S A

    2001-01-01

    transport properties of the line are also calculated. Finally we find which of the two models of the (4x1)-Si(111)-ln reconstruction is thermodynamically favoured in a supercell geometry. We use ab initio plane wave techniques in the Local-Density-Approximation, and calculate and compare the electronic structure of the two models with respect to the characteristic energies for electron dispersion along and across the chain structures. We also consider the effects of electronic structure on the in-plane transport properties of the indium lines. The structural and electronic properties of several candidate atomic scale wires are analysed. Three candidates are studied: the trans-polyacetylene molecule, the silicon line on the (001) face of cubic silicon carbide (the (nx2) series of reconstructions) and the indium chain on the (111) face of silicon carbide (the (4x1) reconstruction). We use the polyacetylene molecule as a test-bed for the techniques that we use to calculate transport properties in an empirically ...

  8. Mössbauer study of the iron atom state in modified chromium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarevskii, S. I.; Eremin, V. V.; Panchuk, V. V.; Semenov, V. G.; Osmolovsky, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Powders of modified chromium dioxide produced by the hydrothermal method were studied using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at a temperature of 298 K. The content of the modifier, i.e., 57Fe compound, was varied from 2 to 10 mmol/mol Cr at a Sb content of 2.2 and 10 mmol/mol Cr. It was shown that, independently of concentrations, Fe3+ ions are distributed between three magnetic solid solutions (sextets): based on CrO2 (bulk material and iron-enriched surface layer), based on Cr2O3, and surface β-CrOOH (doublet). In this case, chromium atoms were not substituted in the CrSbO4 nucleation (12 nm in size) phase with an accuracy up to the Mössbauer factor. It was assumed that the powder coercivity, in addition to the size factor, is controlled by the iron concentration in the CrO2 surface layer.

  9. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  10. Inner-shell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, W. C.; Jonauskas, V.; Lindle, D. W.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-02-01

    Inner-shell ionization of a 1s electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD), which results as the 1s-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for inner-shell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of 403-475 eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N+, {{{N}}}2+, and {{{N}}}3+, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to {{{N}}}2+ is somewhat reduced, that for N+ is greatly increased, and that to {{{N}}}3+, which was predicted to be zero, grows to ≈ 10% at the higher photon energies studied. This work demonstrates some of the shortcomings in the theoretical CSD data base for inner-shell ionization and points the way for the improvements needed to more reliably model the role of inner-shell ionization of cosmic plasmas.

  11. How to Study Intermediate Filaments in Atomic Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyatina, Anastasia A; Hess, John F; Guzenko, Dmytro; Voss, John C; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the intermediate filament (IF) structure are a prerequisite of understanding their function. In addition, the structural information is indispensable if one wishes to gain a mechanistic view on the disease-related mutations in the IFs. Over the years, considerable progress has been made on the atomic structure of the elementary building block of all IFs, the coiled-coil dimer. Here, we discuss the approaches, methods and practices that have contributed to this advance. With abundant genetic information on hand, bioinformatics approaches give important insights into the dimer structure, including the head and tail regions poorly assessable experimentally. At the same time, the most important contribution has been provided by X-ray crystallography. Following the "divide-and-conquer" approach, many fragments from several IF proteins could be crystallized and resolved to atomic resolution. We will systematically cover the main procedures of these crystallographic studies, suggest ways to maximize their efficiency, and also discuss the possible pitfalls and limitations. In addition, electron paramagnetic resonance with site-directed spin labeling was another method providing a major impact toward the understanding of the IF structure. Upon placing the spin labels into specific positions within the full-length protein, one can evaluate the proximity of the labels and their mobility. This makes it possible to make conclusions about the dimer structure in the coiled-coil region and beyond, as well as to explore the dimer-dimer contacts.

  12. Application of cold beam of atoms and molecules for studying luminescence of oxygen atoms stimulated by metastable helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a method for creating a high flux beam of cold atoms and molecules. By using this beam method, spectroscopic studies of the afterglow of oxygen-helium gas mixtures at cryogenic temperatures were performed. The cooling by helium vapor of a helium jet containing trace amounts of oxygen after passing through a radiofrequency discharge zone led to the observation of strong emissions from atomic oxygen. The effect results from the increased efficiency of energy transfer from metastable helium atoms and molecules to the atomic oxygen in the cold dense helium vapor. The effect might find application for the detection of small quantities of impurities in helium gas as well as possible laser action

  13. $\\beta$-decay studies using total-absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Algora, A; García-Borge, M J; Cano-Ott, D; Collatz, R; Courtin, S; Dessagne, P; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Gadea, A; Gelletly, W; Hellström, M; Janas, Z; Jungclaus, A; Kirchner, R; Karny, M; Le Scornet, G; Miehé, C; Maréchal, F; Moroz, F; Nacher, E; Poirier, E; Roeckl, E; Rubio, B; Rykaczewski, K; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O; Wittmann, V

    2004-01-01

    $\\beta$-decay experiments are a primary source of information for nuclear-structure studies and at the same time complementary to in- beam investigations of nuclei far from stability. Although both types of experiment are mainly based on $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy, they face different experimental problems. The so-called " Pandemonium effect " is a critical problem in $\\beta$-decay if we are to test theoretically calculated transition probabilities. In this contribution we will present a solution to this problem using total absorption spectroscopy methods. We will also present some examples of experiments carried out with the Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS) at GSI and describe a new device LUCRECIA recently installed at CERN.

  14. Children of the atomic bomb survivors: A genetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume represents the results of over 40 years of study of the latent health effects on the survivors of the atomic bomb blasts. Planning for this research began in 1946 and data collection has been ongoing since 1948. The work represents the efforts of both US and Japanese agencies and presents 13 papers which the editors believe represent the best scientific information related to the genetic effects of radiation exposure. In general, the results presented here indicate that radiation exposure effects on reproductive cells are less than previously thought. The paper contained here examine that question in light of effects on pregnancy outcome, sex ratio, congenital defects, and early mortality of children. The papers also present helpful comparison of these results with the results seen in experimental radiation studies with animals. For anyone interested in the risks associated with radiation studies, this book represents a vital collection of information

  15. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  16. Comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures in Al-Mg-Si(-Li) alloys by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshino, Yuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Kozuka, Masaya [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Hirosawa, Shoichi, E-mail: hirosawa@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Aruga, Yasuhiro [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Microalloying addition of Li enhances the age-hardening response of Al-Mg-Si alloys. • Size and number density of nanoclusters or precipitates are increased by Li addition. • Mg and Si contents within the aggregates are inversely decreased by Li addition. • Microalloying Li accelerates heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates. - Abstract: In this study, comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atom probe tomography (APT) has been performed for Al-0.55 wt%Mg-0.89 wt%Si(-0.043 wt%Li) alloys aged at 433 K for 1.2 ks (under aging) and 36 ks (peak aging). Quantitative estimation of nanometer-scale clusters (nanoclusters) and β″ precipitates by TEM and APT revealed that microalloying addition of Li increases the size and number density of these Mg-Si aggregates, resulting in the enhanced age-hardening response. Positive evidence by APT for the segregation of Li suggests that heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates with the aid of Li is attributed to the modified precipitate microstructures and thus improved mechanical strength of this alloy system.

  17. Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Todoshchenko, O.; Papula, S.; Haenninen, H. [Laboratory of Engineering Materials, School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels, namely AISI 310, AISI 301LN and AISI 201, are studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) after electrochemical potentiostatic hydrogen pre-charging. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen desorption for all studied steels manifest a complex main peak caused by hydrogen releasing from the steel lattice by diffusion. Depending on the steel and heating rate the peak is situated from 350 to 500 K and its shape reflects a specific of hydrogen diffusion in stainless steels, which are multicomponent alloys. Analysis of the TDS curves is based on the hydrogen diffusion model taking into account trapping of hydrogen atoms in the energetically deep interstitial positions in the steel crystal lattice. Diffusion coefficient of hydrogen and its total content after the same charging procedure are obtained from the TDS curves and compared for the studied steels. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Effects of atomic geometry and electronic structure of platinum surfaces on molecular adsorbates studied by gap-mode SERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Tanabe, Masahiro; Sato, Jun; Uosaki, Kohei; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi

    2014-07-23

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of organic monolayers were measured on various types of polycrystalline and single crystalline Pt substrates with nanometric or atomic surface features, including heteroepitaxial Pt monolayers, using sphere-plane type nanogap structures. Although atomic geometry and electronic structures of a metal surface significantly influence metal-molecule interactions, such effects are often hindered in conventional SERS measured on a roughened surface because of the spectral information averaging at various adsorption sites. In this study, the use of atomically defined Pt surfaces revealed detailed surface effects; the observed preferential adsorption geometry on each surface was well explained by atomic surface arrangements. The peak shift of the intramolecular vibration in the anchor group was in good agreement with the variation of the d-band center of Pt substrates. Moreover, in electrochemical SERS study the Stark shift of an extramolecular vibrational mode at around 400 cm(-1), which is not accessible in infrared absorption spectroscopy, was monitored on an atomically defined heteroepitaxial Pt monolayer electrode. PMID:24802029

  19. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  20. Environmental studies and clearance compliance of Kudankulam Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear industry has played a leading role in evolving proper and effective environmental management impact from development practices right form inception thus minimizing the environmental impact from developmental activities of man. In the engineering design of nuclear power plant, safety is further enhanced considerably by providing double back-upped engineered safety systems. Besides the engineered safety, the other factors considered for ensuring environmental impact minimization are siting criteria, conservative rad-waste management, effluent treatment, application of stringent environmental protection standards for limiting waste discharges, an elaborate environmental surveillance program and an on site and off site emergency preparedness plan. Recently, nuclear power industry has taken a drive to develop and implement Environmental Management System (EMS) to all its operating stations in line with ISO-14001 standards. For Kudankulam atomic power project, a number of studies specifically for environmental protection are carried out to meet the requirements of Russian Federation, new guidelines of Ministry of environment and Forests (MOEF) and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). In the present paper an attempt has been made to present the environmental management plan and clearance compliance status of the project

  1. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesh Kashyap; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha; B K Godwal

    2004-02-01

    X-ray holography is a new method of structure determination based on measurement of interference of a known reference wave with an unknown object wave (containing information on atomic sites scattering the reference wave) so that phase information is preserved. Unlike X-ray diffraction, it does not demand for translational periodicity in the material. It is based on the idea similar to that of optical holography and has been tested on crystals, quasicrystals, thin films and doped semiconductors for their structure determination. In order to analyse potentials and limitations of this technique, we have carried out theoretical simulation studies on simple structures. In this paper we describe the basic algorithm of hologram generation and reconstruction of atomic positions from generated data. We illustrate this technique using Fe (bcc) single crystal as sample case to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Simulations were carried out on the Cu (fcc) structure and on complex structure such as the Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal. Technical issues such as low signal to noise ratio, twin image problem etc have been discussed briefly to emphasize the need for high intensity X-ray source such as synchrotron for experiments and proper reconstruction algorithm. Finally the scope and potential of this technique have been discussed.

  2. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium (51Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  3. Study of PRIMAVERA steel samples by positron annihilation spectroscopy technique II – Lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article, a positron annihilation lifetime technique was used for the study of VVER-440/230 weld materials, manufactured in the frame of the international PRIMAVERA project on microstructural investigation of the irradiated WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steel. The present results complement our previous report of positron angular correlation experiments and provide in-depth characterization of vacancy type defects behavior under irradiation and thermal treatment. The results give new insight into the previously published atom probe tomography and angular correlation of annihilation radiation studies. The measurements do not show any association of phosphorus or its segregation to the open volume defects investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The embrittlement effects related to the phosphorus seem to be effectively annealed-out during 475 °C thermal treatment and the post annealing microstructure and mechanical properties of the material are consequently affected mostly by agglomerations of vacancy clusters coarsened during thermal treatment.

  4. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  5. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents

  6. Study of PRIMAVERA steel samples by positron annihilation spectroscopy technique II - Lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsjak, V.; Grafutin, V.; Ilyukhina, O.; Burcl, R.; Ballesteros, A.; Hähner, P.

    2012-02-01

    In the present article, a positron annihilation lifetime technique was used for the study of VVER-440/230 weld materials, manufactured in the frame of the international PRIMAVERA project on microstructural investigation of the irradiated WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steel. The present results complement our previous report of positron angular correlation experiments and provide in-depth characterization of vacancy type defects behavior under irradiation and thermal treatment. The results give new insight into the previously published atom probe tomography and angular correlation of annihilation radiation studies. The measurements do not show any association of phosphorus or its segregation to the open volume defects investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The embrittlement effects related to the phosphorus seem to be effectively annealed-out during 475 °C thermal treatment and the post annealing microstructure and mechanical properties of the material are consequently affected mostly by agglomerations of vacancy clusters coarsened during thermal treatment.

  7. Tethered bilayer lipid membranes studied by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Andreas; Bushby, Richard J.; Evans, Stephen D.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) from unilamelar vesicles of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EggPC) on mixed self–assembled monolayers (SAMs) from varying ratios of 6-mercaptohexanol and EO3Cholesteryl on gold has been monitored by simultaneous attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared (ATR–FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The influence of the lipid orientation (and hence the anisotropy) of lipids on a gold film on the dichroic ratio was studied by simulations of spectra with a matrix method for anisotropic layers. It is shown that for certain tilt angles of the dielectric tensor of the adsorbed anisotropic layer dispersive and negative absorption bands are possible. The experimental data indicates that the structure of the assemblies obtained varies with varying SAM composition. On SAMs with a high content of EO3Cholesteryl, tBLMs with reduced fluidity are formed. For SAMs with high content of 6-mercaptohexanol, the results are consistent with the adsorption of flattened vesicles, while spherical vesicles have been found in a small range of surface compositions. The kinetics of the adsorption process is consistent with the assumption of spherical vesicles as long–living intermediates for surfaces of high 6-mercaptohexanol content. No long–living spherical vesicles have been detected for surfaces with large fraction of EO3Cholesteryl tethers. The observed differences between the surfaces suggest that for the formation of tBLMs (unlike supported BLMs) no critical surface coverage of vesicles is needed prior to lipid bilayer formation. PMID:17388505

  8. Measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium $6p_{1/2}$ state using two-step atomic-beam spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Augenbraun, Benjamin L; Rupasinghe, P M; Majumder, P K

    2016-01-01

    We have completed a measurement of the Stark shift within the $^{115}$In $6s_{1/2} \\rightarrow 6p_{1/2}$ excited-state transition using two-step laser spectroscopy in an indium atomic beam. Combining this measurement with recent experimental results we determine the scalar polarizability, $\\alpha_{0}$, of the $6p_{1/2}$ state to be $7683 \\pm43 \\,a_{0}^{3}$ in atomic units, a result which agrees very well with recent theoretical calculations. In this experiment, one laser, stabilized to the $5p_{1/2} \\rightarrow 6s_{1/2}$ 410~nm transition, was directed transversely to the atomic beam, while a second, overlapping laser was scanned across the 1343~nm $6s_{1/2} \\rightarrow 6p_{1/2}$ transition. We utilized two-tone frequency-modulation spectroscopy of the infrared laser beam to measure the second-step absorption in the interaction region, where the optical depth is less than 10$^{-3}$. In the course of our experimental work we also determined the hyperfine splitting within the $6p_{1/2}$ state, improving upon th...

  9. Iron in Alzheimer's and Control Hippocampi - Moessbauer, Atomic Absorption and ELISA Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer disease is a neurodegenerative process of unknown mechanism taking place in a part of the brain - hippocampus. Oxidative stress and the role of iron in it is one of the suggested mechanisms of cells death. In this study several methods were used to assess iron and iron binding compounds in human hippocampus tissues. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used for identification of the iron binding compound and determination of total iron concentration in 12 control and one Alzheimer disease sample of hippocampus. Moessbauer parameters obtained for all samples suggest that most of the iron is ferritin-like iron. The average concentration of iron determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy in control hippocampus was 45 ± 10 ng/mg wet tissue. The average concentration of iron in 10 Alzheimer disease samples determined by atomic absorption was 66 ± 13 ng/mg wet tissue. The concentration of H and L chains of ferritin in 20 control and 10 AD hippocampi was assessed with enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay. The concentration of H and L ferritin was higher in Alzheimer disease compared to control (19.36 ± 1.51 vs. 5.84 ± 0.55 ng/μg protein for H, and 1.39 ± 0.25 vs. 0.55 ± 0.10 for L). This 3-fold increase of the concentration of ferritin is accompanied by a small increase of the total iron concentration. (authors)

  10. Ultrafast Strong-Field Vibrational Dynamics Studied by Femtosecond Extreme-Ultraviolet Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hosler, Erik Robert

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved extreme-ultraviolet core-level absorption spectroscopy has developed into a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics due to its sensitivity for detecting changes in electronic structure. By probing the core-levels of atoms and molecules, dynamics may be monitored with elemental specificity, as well as localized sensitivity to the oxidation state around the atomic absorber. Previous experiments with this technique demonstrated the capability to quantitatively...

  11. Modified "delta kick cooling" for studies of atomic tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Myrskog, S H; Moon, H S; Kim, H A; Kim, J B; Steinberg, A M

    1998-01-01

    We present progress towards a planned experiment on atomic tunneling of ultra-cold Rb atoms. As a first step in this experiment we present a realization of an improved form of "delta-kick cooling." By application of a pulsed magnetic field, laser-cooled Rb atoms are further cooled by a factor of 10 (in 1-D) over the temperature out of molasses. Temperatures below 700 nK are observed. The technique can be used not only to cool without fundamental limit (but conserving phase-space density), but also to focus atoms, and as a spin-dependent probe.

  12. Experimental study of bound and autoionizing Rydberg states of the europium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Dai, Chang-Jian; Qin, Wen-Jie

    2010-06-01

    An isolated-core-excitation (ICE) scheme and stepwise excitation are employed to study the highly excited states of the europium atom. The bound europium spectrum with odd parity in a region of 42400-43500 cm-1 is measured, from which spectral information on 38 transitions, such as level position and relative intensity, can be deduced. Combined with information about excitation calibration and the error estimation process, the selection rules enable us to determine the possible values of total angular momentum J for the observed states. The autoionization spectra of atomic europium, belonging to the 4f76pnl (l = 0, 2) configurations, are systematically investigated by using the three-step laser resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) approach. With the ICE scheme, all the experimental spectra of the autoionizing states have nearly symmetric profiles whose peak positions and widths can be easily obtained. A comparison between our results and those from the relevant literature shows that our work not only confirms many reported states, but also discovers 14 bound states and 16 autoionizing states.

  13. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals. PMID:26408897

  14. Advantage of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for the Study of Polyelectrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾鹏翔; 宫永宽; 王生勤; 赵江

    2012-01-01

    The advantage of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study single chain behavior of polyelectrolytes has been demonstrated by checking the coil-to-globule transition ofpoly 2-vinylpyridine with the change ofpH value in aqueous solution. The ultra-high sensitivity of FCS allows measurement at extreme dilution where the effect of electrostatic interaction between the chains is greatly suppressed. The results exposed first-order conformation tran- sition of P2VP as detected by FCS while inter-chain aggregation occurred in the experiments of dynamic light scat- tering.

  15. Studies of radioactivity produced by the Hiroshima atomic bomb, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three studies of fallout measurements were reviewed for the discussion of possible radioactivity intake from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. The first study discussed correlations between enriched 234U and 137Cs specific activities from the measurement of soil samples collected in the 'black rain' area. The second study measured 137Cs activity on the rock and roof tile samples collected in the hypocenter area immediately after the explosion. Some of the rock and roof tile samples collected near the hypocenter had a small but detectable amount of 137Cs activity. However, it has been determined that 137Cs exposure, for example, was negligible compared with DS86 dose estimates, since these activity levels were low. The third study detected 90Sr activity in some of the specimens of human bones exhumed on Ninoshima Island. This study compared the difference in activity between the bone head and shaft, with higher activities obtained in the bone head. This fact suggests a short intake period for this activity, however, the levels of 90Sr contamination were too low to allow a discussion of the exposure risks. (author)

  16. Prospects for Forbidden-Transition Spectroscopy and Parity Violation Measurements using a Beam of Cold Stable or Radioactive Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sanguinetti, S; Lintz, M; Jacquier, P; Wasan, A; Bouchiat, M A; Jacquier, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping offers the possibility of confining a sample of radioactive atoms in free space. Here, we address the question of how best to take advantage of cold atom properties to perform the observation of as highly forbidden a line as the 6S-7S Cs transition for achieving, in the longer term, Atomic Parity Violation measurements in radioactive alkali isotopes. Another point at issue is whether one might do better with stable, cold atoms than with thermal atoms. To compensate for the large drawback of the small number of atoms available in a trap, one must take advantage of their low velocity. To lengthen the time of interaction with the excitation laser, we suggest choosing a geometry where the laser beam exciting the transition is colinear to a slow, cold atomic beam, either extracted from a trap or prepared by Zeeman slowing. We also suggest a new observable physical quantity manifesting APV, which presents several advantages:specificity, efficiency of detection, possibility of direct calib...

  17. Shape coexistence in the lightest Tl isotopes studied by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Herfurth, F; Antalic, S; Darby, I G; Venhart, M; Flanagan, K; Veselsky, M; Blaum, K; Radulov, D P; Beck, D; Kowalska, M; Schwarz, S; Chapman, R; Diriken, J V J; Lane, J; Rosenbusch, M

    This proposal aims at atomic spectroscopy studies of the very neutron-deficient isotopes $^{178-187}$Tl, at and far beyond the region of the neutron mid-shell at N=104, in which shape coexistence phenomena were investigated so far by particle and $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy methods only. Our motivation for this proposal is as follows : \\\\\\\\ -These studies will provide direct data on magnetic dipole moment, spin, charge radii and deformations of these isotopes. The results will form a stringent test for our current understanding of the shape coexistence phenomena in the vicinity of the neutron mid-shell at N=104, where the relevant effects are expected to be the strongest (cf.shape staggering in the isotopes $^{181,183,185}$Hg). \\\\-The knowledge of the structure (configuration, spin, deformation) and whether one or two $\\beta$-decaying isomers are present in the parent isotopes $^{178,180,182}$Tl are crucial for understanding of the results of our recent studies of $\\beta$-delayed fission in the lightest thalli...

  18. Mössbauer spectroscopy study of surfactant sputtering induced Fe silicide formation on a Si surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, C.; Zhang, K.; Hofsäss, H.; Brüsewitz, C.; Vetter, U.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of Fe silicides in surface ripple patterns, generated by erosion of a Si surface with keV Ar and Xe ions and simultaneous co-deposition of Fe, was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For the dot and ripple patterns studied, we find an average Fe concentration in the irradiated layer between 6 and 25 at.%. The Mössbauer spectra clearly show evidence of the formation of Fe disilicides with Fe content close to 33 at.%, but very little evidence of the formation of metallic Fe particles. The results support the process of ion-induced phase separation toward an amorphous Fe disilicide phase as pattern generation mechanism. The observed amorphous phase is in agreement with thermodynamic calculations of amorphous Fe silicides.

  19. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of the metal hydride alloy/electrolyte junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaldi, Chokri [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: chokri.khaldi@esstt.rnu.tn; Mathlouthi, Hamadi; Lamloumi, Jilani [Laboratoire de Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes, ESSTT, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-06-24

    The behaviour of the LaNi{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.75} alloy, used as a negative electrode in the Ni-MH batteries, was studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measured at different potentials. The modeling of the EIS spectra allows us to model the interface electrolyte/Ni-MH electrode by a succession of interfaces electrolyte/corrosion film/alloy particles. The various processes and the physics parameters of each interface are discussed and evaluated. When the potential shifts to more negative values, two reactions are in competition: the hydrogen molecular evolution and the hydrogen atomic absorption. The hydrogen diffuses in the bulk of the alloy and the diffusion is not the limiting factor for the hydrogen absorption.

  20. Properties of Antiprotons and Antihydrogen, and the Study of Exotic Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Doser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of exotic atoms, of antiprotons and of antihydrogen atoms provides many windows into the investigation of fundamental symmetries, of interactions between particles and nuclei, of nuclear physics and of atomic physics. This field appeared at CERN simultaneously with the first accelerators, and has advanced over the decades in parallel with improvements and advances in its infrastructure.