WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic scale magnetometry

  1. Quantum Kalman filtering and the Heisenberg limit in atomic magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geremia, J M; Stockton, John K; Doherty, Andrew C; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 (United States)

    2003-12-19

    The shot-noise detection limit in current high-precision magnetometry [I. Kominis, T. Kornack, J. Allred, and M. Romalis, Nature (London) 422, 596 (2003)]10.1038/nature01484 is a manifestation of quantum fluctuations that scale as 1/{radical}(N) in an ensemble of N atoms. Here, we develop a procedure that combines continuous measurement and quantum Kalman filtering [V. Belavkin, Rep. Math. Phys. 43, 405 (1999)] to surpass this conventional limit by exploiting conditional spin squeezing to achieve 1/N field sensitivity. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of optimal estimation for high bandwidth precision magnetometry at the Heisenberg limit and also identifies an approximate estimator based on linear regression.

  2. Precision bounds for gradient magnetometry with atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellaniz, Iagoba; Urizar-Lanz, Iñigo; Zimborás, Zoltán; Hyllus, Philipp; Tóth, Géza

    2018-05-01

    We study gradient magnetometry with an ensemble of atoms with arbitrary spin. We calculate precision bounds for estimating the gradient of the magnetic field based on the quantum Fisher information. For quantum states that are invariant under homogeneous magnetic fields, we need to measure a single observable to estimate the gradient. On the other hand, for states that are sensitive to homogeneous fields, a simultaneous measurement is needed, as the homogeneous field must also be estimated. We prove that for the cases studied in this paper, such a measurement is feasible. We present a method to calculate precision bounds for gradient estimation with a chain of atoms or with two spatially separated atomic ensembles. We also consider a single atomic ensemble with an arbitrary density profile, where the atoms cannot be addressed individually, and which is a very relevant case for experiments. Our model can take into account even correlations between particle positions. While in most of the discussion we consider an ensemble of localized particles that are classical with respect to their spatial degree of freedom, we also discuss the case of gradient metrology with a single Bose-Einstein condensate.

  3. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  4. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  5. A quantitative study of particle size effects in the magnetorelaxometry of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgovskiy, V. [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Lebedev, V., E-mail: victor.lebedev@unifr.ch [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Colombo, S.; Weis, A. [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Michen, B.; Ackermann-Hirschi, L. [Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Petri-Fink, A. [Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Chemistry Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The discrimination of immobilised superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) against SPIONs in fluid environments via their magnetic relaxation behaviour is a powerful tool for bio-medical imaging. Here we demonstrate that a gradiometer of laser-pumped atomic magnetometers can be used to record accurate time series of the relaxing magnetic field produced by pre-polarised SPIONs. We have investigated dry in vitro maghemite nanoparticle samples with different size distributions (average radii ranging from 14 to 21 nm) and analysed their relaxation using the Néel–Brown formalism. Fitting our model function to the magnetorelaxation (MRX) data allows us to extract the anisotropy constant K and the saturation magnetisation M{sub S} of each sample. While the latter was found not to depend on the particle size, we observe that K is inversely proportional to the (time- and size-) averaged volume of the magnetised particle fraction. We have identified the range of SPION sizes that are best suited for MRX detection considering our specific experimental conditions and sample preparation technique. - Highlights: • We studied magnetorelaxation of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic magnetometers. • We show that atomic magnetometers yield high precision MRX data. • The observed magnetorelaxation is well described by the moment superposition model. • Model fits allow extraction of nanoparticle material parameters of six samples. • All samples exhibit an unexpected size-dependent anisotropy constant.

  6. Interaction of light with planar lattices of atoms: Reflection, transmission, and cooperative magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, G.; Ruostekoski, J.

    2018-02-01

    We study strong, light-mediated, resonant dipole-dipole interactions in two-dimensional planar lattices of cold atoms. We provide a detailed analysis for the description of the dipolar point emitter lattice plane as a "superatom" whose response is similar to electromagnetically induced transparency but which exhibits an ultranarrow collective size-dependent subradiant resonance linewidth. The superatom model provides intuitively simple descriptions for the spectral response of the array, including the complete reflection, full transmission, narrow Fano resonances, and asymptotic expressions for the resonance linewidths of the collective eigenmodes. We propose a protocol to transfer almost the entire radiative excitation to a single correlated subradiant eigenmode in a lattice and show that the medium obtained by stacked lattice arrays can form a cooperative magnetometer. Such a magnetometer utilizes similar principles as magnetometers based on the electromagnetically induced transparency. The accuracy of the cooperative magnetometer, however, is not limited by the single-atom resonance linewidth but the much narrower collective linewidth that results from the strong dipole-dipole interactions.

  7. Regional-Scale Surface Magnetic Fields and Proton Fluxes to Mercury's Surface from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    The application of a recently developed proton-reflection magnetometry technique to MESSENGER spacecraft observations at Mercury has yielded two significant findings. First, loss-cone observations directly confirm particle precipitation to Mercury's surface and indicate that solar wind plasma persistently bombards the planet not only in the magnetic cusp regions but over a large fraction of the southern hemisphere. Second, the inferred surface field strengths independently confirm the north-south asymmetry in Mercury's global magnetic field structure first documented from observations of magnetic equator crossings. Here we extend this work with 1.5 additional years of observations (i.e., to 2.5 years in all) to further probe Mercury's surface magnetic field and better resolve proton flux precipitation to the planet's surface. We map regions where proton loss cones are observed; these maps indicate regions where protons precipitate directly onto the surface. The augmentation of our data set over that used in our original study allows us to examine the proton loss cones in cells of dimension 10° latitude by 20° longitude in Mercury body-fixed coordinates. We observe a transition from double-sided to single-sided loss cones in the pitch-angle distributions; this transition marks the boundary between open and closed field lines. At the surface this boundary lies between 60° and 70°N. Our observations allow the estimation of surface magnetic field strengths in the northern cusp region and the calculation of incident proton fluxes to both hemispheres. In the northern cusp, our regional-scale observations are consistent with an offset dipole field and a dipole moment of 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, implying that any regional-scale variations in surface magnetic field strengths are either weak relative to the dipole field or occur at length scales smaller than the resolution of our observations (~300 km). From the global proton flux map (north of 40° S

  8. Copper atomic-scale transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fangqing; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen; Schimmel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 ) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and -170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes ( U bias ) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1 G 0 ( G 0 = 2e 2 /h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck's constant) or 2 G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  9. Visions of Atomic Scale Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, T.F.; Miller, Michael K.; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    A microscope, by definition, provides structural and analytical information about objects that are too small to see with the unaided eye. From the very first microscope, efforts to improve its capabilities and push them to ever-finer length scales have been pursued. In this context, it would seem that the concept of an ultimate microscope would have received much attention by now; but has it really ever been defined? Human knowledge extends to structures on a scale much finer than atoms, so it might seem that a proton-scale microscope or a quark-scale microscope would be the ultimate. However, we argue that an atomic-scale microscope is the ultimate for the following reason: the smallest building block for either synthetic structures or natural structures is the atom. Indeed, humans and nature both engineer structures with atoms, not quarks. So far as we know, all building blocks (atoms) of a given type are identical; it is the assembly of the building blocks that makes a useful structure. Thus, would a microscope that determines the position and identity of every atom in a structure with high precision and for large volumes be the ultimate microscope? We argue, yes. In this article, we consider how it could be built, and we ponder the answer to the equally important follow-on questions: who would care if it is built, and what could be achieved with it?

  10. Optical Magnetometry Using Multiphoton Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenkolb, Skyler M.

    Optical magnetometry plays a critical role in low-energy precision measurements and numerous other applications. In particular, permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) searches impose strict requirements on magnetic field sensitivity of the underlying atomic or molecular species. Other magnetometer properties - such as chemical reactivity, dielectric strength, and interaction cross-sections with other species - also impose limitations on experimental conditions. Here, we explore a novel approach to optical magnetometry, using multiphoton transitions of diamagnetic atoms to detect Larmor precession of polarized nuclei. Resonant probes are possible at moderate ultraviolet wavelengths, and hyperfine structure couples spin precession to fluorescence transitions with negligible backgrounds; paramagnetic rotation due to intensity-dependent dispersion may also be detectable. Nuclear spins and nonlinear optical excitation introduce new degrees of freedom, and evade limitations arising from rapid electronic decoherence. This dissertation reports progress towards two-photon optical magnetometry using ytterbium, rubidium, and xenon. We characterize the influence of probe polarization and magnetic fields on fluorescence spectra, for one- and two-photon continuous-wave (cw) excitation of ytterbium. Resolved hyperfine and isotope structure allow us to use spin-zero isotopes for diagnostics and normalization, and we develop analysis for overlapping two-photon resonances. We also report measurements of two-photon excitation in ytterbium and rubidium using picosecond laser pulses, and in xenon using a cw laser. Although hyperfine structure is unresolved, the rubidium measurements are sensitive to probe field polarization. Fluorescence spectra from two-photon excitation of ytterbium with femtosecond pulses show modulation when the repetition rate changes. Although techniques for polarizing noble gas nuclei are mature, existing cell designs are incompatible with two

  11. The Swarm Magnetometry Package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2008-01-01

    The Swarm mission under the ESA's Living Planet Programme is planned for launch in 2010 and consists of a constellation of three satellites at LEO. The prime objective of Swarm is to measure the geomagnetic field with unprecedented accuracy in space and time. The magnetometry package consists...

  12. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied....... Kinetic friction is observed to be caused by atomic-scale Stick and slip which occurs by nucleation and subsequent motion of dislocations preferably between close-packed {111} planes. Stick and slip seems ro occur in different situations. For single crystalline contacts without grain boundaries...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  13. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale - the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  14. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative

  15. Ultrasensitive and broadband magnetometry with cavity optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bei-Bei; Bulla, Douglas; Bilek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer.......We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer....

  16. Polarized atomic orbitals for linear scaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghold, Gerd; Parrinello, Michele; Hutter, Jürg

    2002-02-01

    We present a modified version of the polarized atomic orbital (PAO) method [M. S. Lee and M. Head-Gordon, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9085 (1997)] to construct minimal basis sets optimized in the molecular environment. The minimal basis set derives its flexibility from the fact that it is formed as a linear combination of a larger set of atomic orbitals. This approach significantly reduces the number of independent variables to be determined during a calculation, while retaining most of the essential chemistry resulting from the admixture of higher angular momentum functions. Furthermore, we combine the PAO method with linear scaling algorithms. We use the Chebyshev polynomial expansion method, the conjugate gradient density matrix search, and the canonical purification of the density matrix. The combined scheme overcomes one of the major drawbacks of standard approaches for large nonorthogonal basis sets, namely numerical instabilities resulting from ill-conditioned overlap matrices. We find that the condition number of the PAO overlap matrix is independent from the condition number of the underlying extended basis set, and consequently no numerical instabilities are encountered. Various applications are shown to confirm this conclusion and to compare the performance of the PAO method with extended basis-set calculations.

  17. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock - Recent Development Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    35th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 467 THE CHIP-SCALE ATOMIC CLOCK – RECENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRESS R. Lutwak ...1] R. Lutwak , et al., 2003, “The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock – Coherent Population Trapping vs. Conventional Interrogation,” in

  18. Atomic scale resolution with correlation holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1979-01-01

    For many atoms (including atoms of interest in biology) the elastic and inelastic photon scattering cross sections (denoted respectively by sigma/sub el/ and sigma/sub inel/) for photons in the wavelength region of interest, satisfy sigma/sub el/ << sigma/sub inel/. Therefore, the probability is high that when illuminated with photons, such an atom will decay before a holographic picture of it can be taken. On the other hand, if certain nonlinear phenomena: correlations between photons are taken into account, a hologram of such atoms can nevertheless be generated. Observation of small objects is compatible with the principles of quantum mechanics, even if the probability of disturbing the object as a result of observation is arbitrarily small

  19. Photonic and Quantum Interactions of Atomic-Scale Junctions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, the fundamental quantum and photonic interactions of bimetallic atomic-scale junctions (ASJs) will be explored, with three major space...

  20. Atomic scale characterization of mismatched graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of STM/STS of graphene with various degree of coupling. • Review of vertically twisted graphene with respect with each other. • Review of Landau levels in graphene layers weakly decoupled electronically. • Review of laterally twisted graphene forming grain boundaries. - Abstract: In the bourgeoning field of two dimensional layered materials and their atomically thin counterparts, it has been established that the electronic coupling between the layers of the material plays a key role in determining its properties [1,2]. We are just beginning to understand how each material is unique in that respect while working our way up to building new materials with functionalities enabled by interlayer interactions. In this review, we will focus on a system that despite its apparent simplicity possesses a wealth of intriguing physics: layers of graphene with various degree of coupling. The situations discussed here are graphene layers vertically twisted with respect with each other, weakly decoupled electronically and laterally twisted forming grain boundaries. We emphasize experiments that atomically resolve the electronic properties.

  1. Multiple atomic scale solid surface interconnects for atom circuits and molecule logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachim, C; Martrou, D; Gauthier, S; Rezeq, M; Troadec, C; Jie Deng; Chandrasekhar, N

    2010-01-01

    The scientific and technical challenges involved in building the planar electrical connection of an atomic scale circuit to N electrodes (N > 2) are discussed. The practical, laboratory scale approach explored today to assemble a multi-access atomic scale precision interconnection machine is presented. Depending on the surface electronic properties of the targeted substrates, two types of machines are considered: on moderate surface band gap materials, scanning tunneling microscopy can be combined with scanning electron microscopy to provide an efficient navigation system, while on wide surface band gap materials, atomic force microscopy can be used in conjunction with optical microscopy. The size of the planar part of the circuit should be minimized on moderate band gap surfaces to avoid current leakage, while this requirement does not apply to wide band gap surfaces. These constraints impose different methods of connection, which are thoroughly discussed, in particular regarding the recent progress in single atom and molecule manipulations on a surface.

  2. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range

  3. Cantilever torque magnetometry on coordination compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfetti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    compounds, such as quantum computation or information storage. This review enlightens that CTM offers a unique combination of accuracy and precision to disentangle noncollinear contributions inside Single Crystals as well as the sensitivity to detect molecular order of thin films. CTM can also detect......Cantilever Torque Magnetometry (CTM) is one of the leading techniques to deeply understand magnetic anisotropy of coordination compounds. The knowledge of magnetic anisotropy is a mandatory requirement before proceeding with any future application related to the magnetic properties of coordination...... quantum phenomena such as magnetization steps and molecular hysteresis curves. Moreover, it can also provide the energy levels splitting and avefunctions composition, especially if coupled with microwave radiation....

  4. Atomic-scale observation of hydrogen-induced crack growth by atom-probe FIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Y.; Pickering, H.W.; Sakurai, T.

    1980-01-01

    Formation and propagation of a microcrack due to hydrogen in a Fe-0.29 wt.% Ti alloy was observed at the atomic scale by field ion microscopy. A microcrack (-20 nm in length) formed and became noticeably large when the tip was heated at 950 0 C in the presence of about 1 torr of Hg. Propagation was reported several times by reheating, until a portion of the tip ruptured and became detached from the tip. Compositional analysis, performed in situ using a high performance atom-probe, identified atomic hydrogen in quantity and some hydrogen molecules and FEH in the crack, but not elsewhere on the surface

  5. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  6. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock - Prototype Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    39th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting THE CHIP-SCALE ATOMIC CLOCK – PROTOTYPE EVALUATION R. Lutwak *, A. Rashed...been supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Contract # NBCHC020050. REFERENCES [1] R. Lutwak , D. Emmons, W. Riley, and...D.C.), pp. 539-550. [2] R. Lutwak , D. Emmons, T. English, W. Riley, A. Duwel, M. Varghese, D. K. Serkland, and G. M. Peake, 2004, “The Chip-Scale

  7. Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of polyimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyulin, S.V.; Gurtovenko, A.A.; Larin, S.V.; Nazarychev, V.M.; Lyulin, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    We employ microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations to get insight into the structural and thermal properties of heat-resistant bulk polyimides. As electrostatic interactions are essential for the polyimides considered, we propose a two-step equilibration protocol that includes long

  8. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  9. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  10. Dynamic strain-induced transformation: An atomic scale investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Pradeep, K.G.; Mandal, S.; Ponge, D.; Springer, H.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformations provide the most versatile access to the design of complex nanostructured alloys in terms of grain size, morphology, local chemical constitution etc. Here we study a special case of deformation induced phase transformation. More specifically, we investigate the atomistic mechanisms associated with dynamic strain-induced transformation (DSIT) in a dual-phased multicomponent iron-based alloy at high temperatures. DSIT phenomena and the associated secondary phase nucleation were observed at atomic scale using atom probe tomography. The obtained local chemical composition was used for simulating the nucleation process which revealed that DSIT, occurring during load exertion, proceeds by a diffusion-controlled nucleation process

  11. Development of measurement protocols for quantum magnetometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Alexander

    and protocols to enhance the lifetime and the coherences of the NV center with the overall goal of enhancing the capabilities of this sensor in the field of magnetometry. In order to realize complex protocols, a sophisticated software control of the measurement setup is required. A general software framework......, is serving as rigorous framework to reduce the complexity of the setup configuration by a fundamental separation of tasks. As a consequence, the general idea of this framework is not limited to experiments with color centers in diamond, but can find application in any laboratory environment. The measurement...... of magnetic fields in the high-frequency GHz regimes is challenging. In this thesis, a continuous dynamical decoupling protocol is developed and implemented, which extends the capabilities of the NV sensor to probe GHz signals with a narrow bandwidth. Moreover, the protocol protects the system from noise...

  12. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-01

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  13. Atomic and close-to-atomic scale manufacturing—A trend in manufacturing development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fengzhou

    2016-12-01

    Manufacturing is the foundation of a nation's economy. It is the primary industry to promote economic and social development. To accelerate and upgrade China's manufacturing sector from "precision manufacturing" to "high-performance and high-quality manufacturing", a new breakthrough should be found in terms of achieving a "leap-frog development". Unlike conventional manufacturing, the fundamental theory of "Manufacturing 3.0" is beyond the scope of conventional theory; rather, it is based on new principles and theories at the atomic and/or closeto- atomic scale. Obtaining a dominant role at the international level is a strategic move for China's progress.

  14. Variable scaling method and Stark effect in hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, R.K.R.; Ghosh, B.

    1983-09-01

    By relating the Stark effect problem in hydrogen-like atoms to that of the spherical anharmonic oscillator we have found simple formulas for energy eigenvalues for the Stark effect. Matrix elements have been calculated using 0(2,1) algebra technique after Armstrong and then the variable scaling method has been used to find optimal solutions. Our numerical results are compared with those of Hioe and Yoo and also with the results obtained by Lanczos. (author)

  15. Simulating atomic-scale phenomena on surfaces of unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisel, Andreas; Andersen, Brian [Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Choubey, Peayush; Hirschfeld, Peter [Univ. of Florida (United States); Berlijn, Tom [CNMS and CSMD, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Interest in atomic scale effects in superconductors has increased because of two general developments: First, the discovery of new materials as the cuprate superconductors, heavy fermion and Fe-based superconductors where the coherence length of the cooper pairs is as small to be comparable to the lattice constant, rendering small scale effects important. Second, the experimental ability to image sub-atomic features using scanning-tunneling microscopy which allows to unravel numerous physical properties of the homogeneous system such as the quasi particle excitation spectra or various types of competing order as well as properties of local disorder. On the theoretical side, the available methods are based on lattice models restricting the spatial resolution of such calculations. In the present project we combine lattice calculations using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations describing the superconductor with wave function information containing sub-atomic resolution obtained from ab initio approaches. This allows us to calculate phenomena on surfaces of superconductors as directly measured in scanning tunneling experiments and therefore opens the possibility to identify underlying properties of these materials and explain observed features of disorder. It will be shown how this method applies to the cuprate material Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} and a Fe based superconductor.

  16. Probing Efimov discrete scaling in an atom-molecule collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalchi, M. A.; Yamashita, M. T.; Hadizadeh, M. R.; Garrido, E.; Tomio, Lauro; Frederico, T.

    2018-01-01

    The discrete Efimov scaling behavior, well known in the low-energy spectrum of three-body bound systems for large scattering lengths (unitary limit), is identified in the energy dependence of an atom-molecule elastic cross section in mass-imbalanced systems. That happens in the collision of a heavy atom with mass mH with a weakly bound dimer formed by the heavy atom and a lighter one with mass mL≪mH . Approaching the heavy-light unitary limit, the s -wave elastic cross section σ will present a sequence of zeros or minima at collision energies following closely the Efimov geometrical law. Our results, obtained with Faddeev calculations and supplemented by a Born-Oppenheimer analysis, open a perspective to detecting the discrete scaling behavior from low-energy scattering data, which is timely in view of the ongoing experiments with ultracold binary mixtures having strong mass asymmetries, such as lithium and cesium or lithium and ytterbium.

  17. The self-breaking mechanism of atomic scale Au nanocontacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazumi, Tomoka; Kiguchi, Manabu; Wada, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the self-breaking mechanism of atomic scale Au nanocontacts at room temperature in air. In the conductance traces, we frequently observed traces showing both a 1G 0 (2e 2 /h) and 3G 0 plateaux, or only a 2G 0 plateau in the conductance regime below 3G 0 . The statistical analysis showed a negative correlation between the appearance of 1G 0 and 2G 0 peaks, and a positive correlation between 1G 0 and 3G 0 peaks. This conductance behavior suggested that the symmetric triple atomic rows changed into a symmetric single row, while the asymmetric double rows broke without changing into a symmetric single row. The regular self-breaking process can be explained by the breaking of the thermodynamically stable Au nanocontacts which were formed during the self-breaking of the contacts. (paper)

  18. Gravitational theory in atomic scale units in Dirac cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The implication of Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) that there are two cosmological space-time metrics, gravitational (E) and atomic (A), is used to formulate the gravitational laws for a general mass system in atomic scale units within such a cosmology. The gravitational laws are illustrated in application to the case of a single spherical mass immersed in the smoothed out expanding universe. The condition is determined for such a metric to apply approximately just outside a typical member of a cosmic distribution of such masses. Conversely, the condition is given when the influence of the universe as a whole can be neglected outside such a mass. In the latter situation, which applies in particular to stars, a Schwarzschild-type metric is derived which incorporates variable G in accordance with the LNH. The dynamics of freely moving particles and photons in such a metric are examined according to the theory and observational tests are formulated. (author)

  19. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akrami, S M R; Nakayachi, H; Fukuma, T; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O 3 cleaning. We found that all the methods provide significant improvements in both the imaging and force measurements in spite of the tip transfer through the air. Among the methods, we found that the Si coating provides the best stability and reproducibility in the measurements. To understand the origin of the fouling resistance of the cleaned tip surface and the difference between the cleaning methods, we have investigated the tip surface properties by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that the contaminations adsorbed on the tip during the tip transfer through the air should desorb from the surface when it is immersed in aqueous solution due to the enhanced hydrophilicity by the tip treatments. The tip surface prepared by the Si coating is oxidized when it is immersed in aqueous solution. This creates local spots where stable hydration structures are formed. For the other methods, there is no active mechanism to create such local hydration sites. Thus, the hydration structure formed under the tip apex is not necessarily stable. These results reveal the desirable tip properties for atomic-scale AFM measurements in liquid, which should serve as a guideline for further improvements of the tip treatment methods. (paper)

  20. Atomic-scale dislocation dynamics in radiation damage environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Y.; Stoller, R.; Bacon, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The dynamics behavior of dislocations determines mechanical properties of crystalline materials. Long-range interactions between a moving dislocation and other defects can be treated within a continuum approach via interaction of their stress and strain fields. However, a vast contribution to mechanical properties depends on the direct interaction between dislocations and other defects and depends very much on the particular atomic scale structure of the both moving dislocation core and the obstacle. In this work we review recent progress in large-scale modeling of dislocation dynamics in metals at the atomic level by molecular dynamics and statics. We review the modem techniques used to simulate dynamics of dislocations in different lattice structures, the dependence on temperature, strain rate and obstacle size. Examples are given for bcc, fcc and hcp metals where edge and screw dislocations interact with vacancy (loops, voids, stacking fault tetrahedra, etc), self-interstitial clusters and secondary phase precipitates. Attention is paid to interpretation of atomistic results from the point of view of parameterization of continuum models. The latter is vitally necessary for further application in 3-dimensional dislocation dynamics within the multi-scale materials modeling approach. Research sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract DE-AC0S-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. (authors)

  1. Modelling atomic scale manipulation with the non-contact atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevethan, T; Watkins, M; Kantorovich, L N; Shluger, A L; Polesel-Maris, J; Gauthier, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of calculations performed to model the process of lateral manipulation of an oxygen vacancy in the MgO(001) surface using the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM). The potential energy surfaces for the manipulation as a function of tip position are determined from atomistic modelling of the MgO(001) surface interacting with a Mg terminated MgO tip. These energies are then used to model the dynamical evolution of the system as the tip oscillates and at a finite temperature using a kinetic Monte Carlo method. The manipulation process is strongly dependent on the lateral position of the tip and the system temperature. It is also found that the expectation value of the point at which the vacancy jumps depends on the trajectory of the oscillating cantilever as the surface is approached. The effect of the manipulation on the operation of the NC-AFM is modelled with a virtual dynamic AFM, which explicitly simulates the entire experimental instrumentation and control loops. We show how measurable experimental signals can result from a single controlled atomic scale event and suggest the most favourable conditions for achieving successful atomic scale manipulation experimentally

  2. Tuning magnetotransport in a compensated semimetal at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Barreteau, Céline; Ubrig, Nicolas; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2015-11-01

    Either in bulk form, or in atomically thin crystals, layered transition metal dichalcogenides continuously reveal new phenomena. The latest example is 1T'-WTe2, a semimetal found to exhibit the largest known magnetoresistance in the bulk, and predicted to become a topological insulator in strained monolayers. Here we show that reducing the thickness through exfoliation enables the electronic properties of WTe2 to be tuned, which allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed magnetotransport down to the atomic scale. The longitudinal resistance and the unconventional magnetic field dependence of the Hall resistance are reproduced quantitatively by a classical two-band model for crystals as thin as six monolayers, whereas a crossover to an Anderson insulator occurs for thinner crystals. Besides establishing the origin of the magnetoresistance of WTe2, our results represent a complete validation of the classical theory for two-band electron-hole transport, and indicate that atomically thin WTe2 layers remain gapless semimetals.

  3. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  4. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular...... dynamics simulations, complemented by extensive comparison to experimental data. The discussion is divided into four sections. The first part investigates the properties of one-component SM bilayers and compares them to bilayers with phosphatidylcholine (PC), the focus being on a detailed analysis...... examples of this issue. The third part concentrates on the specificity of intermolecular interactions in three-component mixtures of SM, PC and cholesterol (CHOL) under conditions where the concentrations of SM and CHOL are dilute with respect to that of PC. The results show how SM and CHOL favor one...

  5. RF Shot Noise Measurements in Au Atomic-scale Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyu

    Conduction electrons are responsible for many physical or chemical phenomena in condensed matter systems, and their behavior can be directly studied by electronic transport measurements. In conventional transport measurements, conductance or resistance is usually the focus. Such a measurement can be as simple as a quick two terminal DC check by a multi-meter, or a more sophisticated lock-in measurement of multiple higher harmonic signals synchronized to different frequencies. Conductance carries direct information about the quasi-particle density of states and the local electronic distributions, which are usually Fermi-Dirac distribution. Conductance is modified or dominated by scattering from defacts or interfaces, and could also reflect the spin-spin exchange interactions or inelastic couplings with phonons and photons. Naturally one can ask the question: is there anything else we can measure electronically, which carries extra information that a conductance measurement does not provide? One answer to this question is the electronic noise. While the conductance reflects the average charge conduction ability of a system, noise describes how the physical quantities fluctuate around their average values. Some of the fluctuations carry information about their physical origins. This thesis will focus on one particular type of the electronic noise shot noise, but other types of noise will also be introduced and discussed. We choose to measure the radio frequency component of shot noise, combining with a modulated lock-in detection technique, which provides a method to largely get rid of other unwanted low-frequency noise signals. Au atomic-scale junctions are the systems we studied here. Au is relatively well understood and will not generate too many complications, so it's ideal as the first platform for us to understand both shot noise itself and our RF technique. On the other hand, the atomic scale raises fundamental questions about electronic transport and local

  6. Development of indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer for producing metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.K.; Qasim, A.M.; Ahmed, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gas atomization is one of the methods for production of clean metal powders at relatively moderate cost. A laboratory scale gas atomizer was designed and fabricated indigenously to produce metal powders with a batch capacity of 500 g of copper (Cu). The design includes several features regarding fabrication and operation to provide optimum conditions for atomization. The inner diameter of atomizing chamber is 440 mm and its height is 1200 mm. The atomizing nozzle is of annular confined convergent type with an angle of 25 degree. Argon gas at desired pressure has been used for atomizing the metals to produce relatively clean powders. A provision has also been made to view the atomization process. The indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer was used to produce tin (Sn) and copper (Cu) powders with different atomizing gas pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. The particle size of different powders produced ranges from 40 to 400 im. (author)

  7. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  8. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  9. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  10. Atomic scale mass delivery driven by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Biao; Ding Jianning; Ling Zhiyong; Yuan Ningyi; Cheng Guanggui

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of atomic scale mass delivery by bend kink in single walled carbon nanotube was investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulation. By keeping the bending angle while moving the tube end, the encapsulated atomic scale mass such as atom, molecule and atom group were successfully delivered through the nanotube. The van der Waals interaction between the encapsulated mass and the tube wall provided the driving force for the delivery. There were no dramatic changes in the van der Waals interaction, and a smooth and steady delivery was achieved when constant loading rate was applied. The influence of temperature on the atom group delivery was also analyzed. It is found raising temperature is harmful to the smooth movement of the atom group. However, the delivery rate can be promoted under higher temperature when the atom group is situated before the kink during the delivery.

  11. Atomic-scale friction on stepped surfaces of ionic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Pascal; Gnecco, Enrico; Krok, Franciszek; Budzioch, Janusz; Walczak, Lukasz; Konior, Jerzy; Szymonski, Marek; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-05-06

    We report on high-resolution friction force microscopy on a stepped NaCl(001) surface in ultrahigh vacuum. The measurements were performed on single cleavage step edges. When blunt tips are used, friction is found to increase while scanning both up and down a step edge. With atomically sharp tips, friction still increases upwards, but it decreases and even changes sign downwards. Our observations extend previous results obtained without resolving atomic features and are associated with the competition between the Schwöbel barrier and the asymmetric potential well accompanying the step edges.

  12. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  13. Nanometer-scale optical traps using atomic state localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D. D.; Proite, N. A.; Green, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme where a laser beam forms an optical trap with a spatial size that is much smaller than the wavelength of light. The key idea is to combine a far-off-resonant dipole trap with a scheme that localizes an atomic excitation.

  14. Large-scale atomic calculations using variational methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Per

    1995-01-01

    Atomic properties, such as radiative lifetimes, hyperfine structures and isotope shift, have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Computer programs which calculate these properties from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) and configuration interaction (CI) wave functions have been developed and tested. To study relativistic effects, a program which calculates hyperfine structures from multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) wave functions has also been written. A new method of dealing with radial non-orthogonalities in transition matrix elements has been investigated. This method allows two separate orbital sets to be used for the initial and final states, respectively. It is shown that, once the usual orthogonality restrictions have been overcome, systematic MCHF calculations are able to predict oscillator strengths in light atoms with high accuracy. In connection with recent high-power laser experiments, time-dependent calculations of the atomic response to intense laser fields have been performed. Using the frozen-core approximation, where the atom is modeled as an active electron moving in the average field of the core electrons and the nucleus, the active electron has been propagated in time under the influence of the laser field. Radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of excited states in sodium and silver have been experimentally determined using time-resolved laser spectroscopy. By recording the fluorescence light decay following laser excitation in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region, the radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of the 7p{sup 2}P states in silver have been measured. The delayed-coincidence technique has been used to make very accurate measurements of the radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of the lowest 2P states in sodium and silver. 77 refs, 2 figs, 14 tabs.

  15. Large-scale atomic calculations using variational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, Per.

    1995-01-01

    Atomic properties, such as radiative lifetimes, hyperfine structures and isotope shift, have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Computer programs which calculate these properties from multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) and configuration interaction (CI) wave functions have been developed and tested. To study relativistic effects, a program which calculates hyperfine structures from multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) wave functions has also been written. A new method of dealing with radial non-orthogonalities in transition matrix elements has been investigated. This method allows two separate orbital sets to be used for the initial and final states, respectively. It is shown that, once the usual orthogonality restrictions have been overcome, systematic MCHF calculations are able to predict oscillator strengths in light atoms with high accuracy. In connection with recent high-power laser experiments, time-dependent calculations of the atomic response to intense laser fields have been performed. Using the frozen-core approximation, where the atom is modeled as an active electron moving in the average field of the core electrons and the nucleus, the active electron has been propagated in time under the influence of the laser field. Radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of excited states in sodium and silver have been experimentally determined using time-resolved laser spectroscopy. By recording the fluorescence light decay following laser excitation in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region, the radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of the 7p 2 P states in silver have been measured. The delayed-coincidence technique has been used to make very accurate measurements of the radiative lifetimes and hyperfine structures of the lowest 2P states in sodium and silver. 77 refs, 2 figs, 14 tabs

  16. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  17. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent works dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. Discussion presents advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:27146961

  18. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, D R

    2004-01-01

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  19. Energy loading effects in the scaling of atomic xenon lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwa, M.; Kushner, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The intrinsic power efficiency of the atomic xenon (5d → 6p) infrared (1.73--3.65 μm) laser is sensitive to the rate of pumping due to electron collision mixing of the laser levels. Long duration pumping at moderate power deposition may therefore result in higher energy efficiencies than pumping at higher powers. In this paper the authors examine the consequences of high energy deposition (100's J/1 atm) during long pumping pulses (100's μs) on the intrinsic power and energy efficiency and optimum power deposition of the atomic xenon laser. The dominant effect of high energy loading, gas heating, causes an increase in the electron density and therefore an increase in the electron collision mixing of the laser levels. The optimum power deposition for a given gas density therefore shifts to lower values with increasing gas temperature. For sufficiently long pumping pulses, nonuniform gas heating results in convection and rarification of highly pumped regions. The optimum power deposition therefore shifts to even lower values as the length of the pumping pulse increases. As a result, laser efficiency depends on the spatial distribution of power deposition as well as its magnitude

  20. Magnetometry of low-dimensional electron and hole systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, A [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Elliott, M [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.usher@exeter.ac.uk, E-mail: elliottm@cf.ac.uk

    2009-03-11

    The high-magnetic-field, low-temperature magnetic properties of low-dimensional electron and hole systems reveal a wealth of fundamental information. Quantum oscillations of the thermodynamic equilibrium magnetization yield the total density of states, a central quantity in understanding the quantum Hall effect in 2D systems. The magnetization arising from non-equilibrium circulating currents reveals details, not accessible with traditional measurements, of the vanishingly small longitudinal resistance in the quantum Hall regime. We review how the technique of magnetometry has been applied to these systems, the most important discoveries that have been made, and their theoretical significance. (topical review)

  1. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  2. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  3. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  4. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schumann, F.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  5. Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Takane; Akanuma, Yuki; Haruta, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Shogo; Ishihara, Kentaro; Okayasu, Takeshi; Chun, Wang-Jae; Takahashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-09-25

    Subnanometer noble metal clusters have enormous potential, mainly for catalytic applications. Because a difference of only one atom may cause significant changes in their reactivity, a preparation method with atomic-level precision is essential. Although such a precision with enough scalability has been achieved by gas-phase synthesis, large-scale preparation is still at the frontier, hampering practical applications. We now show the atom-precise and fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters on a milligram scale from tiara-like platinum complexes with various ring numbers (n = 5-13). Low-temperature calcination of the complexes on a carbon support under hydrogen stream affords monodispersed platinum clusters, whose atomicity is equivalent to that of the precursor complex. One of the clusters (Pt 10 ) exhibits high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of styrene compared to that of the other clusters. This method opens an avenue for the application of these clusters to preparative-scale catalysis.The catalytic activity of a noble metal nanocluster is tied to its atomicity. Here, the authors report an atom-precise, fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters from molecular ring precursors, and show that a variation of only one atom can dramatically change a cluster's reactivity.

  6. An atomic-scale model of fcc crystal-growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, B.W. van de (Technische Hogeschool Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    Nearly perfect fcc growth may be simulated by the application of a simple growth-algorithm - only sites that are at least 4-coordinated are occupied - to a selected seed. The seed is a 22-atom cluster, being the smallest close-packed structure with two crossing stacking-faults. The stacking-faults produce active surface-sites, that can not be exhausted by occupation; they are arranged in non-vanishing steps, similar to those produced by screw-dislocations. The algorithm prevents further stacking-faults, and ensures ABC-stacking of close-packed (111)-layers, characteristic of the fcc structure. The same algorithm would not produce further growth of perfect fcc clusters or of Mackay icosahedra. It is proposed that the ability to grow fast under near-equilibrium conditions is a better criterion to select clusters as precursors of the bulk-structure than their cohesive energy. The crystal structure problem of the rare gases - why fcc, not hcp - is discussed in connection with the apparent impossibility to simulate hcp growth by an analogous procedure. (orig.).

  7. The atomic-scale origins of grain boundary superconducting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Chisholm, M.F.; Buban, J.; Browning, N.D.; Prouteau, C.; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL; Nellist, P.D.

    1998-02-01

    Due to the extremely short coherence lengths of the high-T c superconductors, defects such as grain boundaries are obvious barriers to the flow of supercurrent. Within a few months of the discovery of these materials, it was shown how the critical current dropped four orders of magnitude as the grain boundary misorientation increased from zero to 45 degree. Even today, there is no quantitative understanding of this behavior. A qualitative understanding is however possible through atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and SrTiO 3 bicrystal grain boundaries, combined with bond-valence-sum analysis. The Z-contrast image of a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ low angle grain boundary shows the same kind of reconstructed dislocation cores as seen in SrTiO 3 , containing reconstructions on both the Cu and Y/Ba sublattices. An image of an asymmetric 30 degree boundary in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ shows the same units and unit sequence as expected for SrTiO 3 . YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ boundaries are wavy because of their non-equilibrium growth process, and therefore mostly asymmetric in nature, although small segments have the symmetric structure. It seems reasonable to assume that boundaries of other angles will also have similar structures in these two materials

  8. Influence of atomic force microscope tip-sample interaction on the study of scaling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aue, J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Images acquired with atomic force microscopy are based on tip-sample interaction. It is shown that using scanning probe techniques for determining scaling parameters of a surface leads to an underestimate of the actual scaling dimension, due to the dilation of tip and surface. How much we

  9. The l-mixing cross section of Rydberg states of atomic Rb and the scaling LAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong; Chen Aiqiu; Li Baiwen

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of impulse approximate method, a kind of analytical wavefunctions based on a potential model was used to calculate the l mixing cross section of thermal collision of Rydberg states of atomic Rb with rare gas (He, Ne). The results were compared with the experimental results and other theoretical values. These results show that there exists a kind of scaling law for the l mixing cross section of Rydberg alkali atoms

  10. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    that the main deformation mode is sliding in the grain boundaries through a large number of uncorrelated events, where a few atoms (or a few tens of atoms) slide with respect to each other. Little dislocation activity is seen in the grain interiors. The localization of the deformation to the grain boundaries......Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...

  11. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  12. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-01

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm 2 ) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO 2 and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been deeply involved in

  13. Physical essence of the multibody contact-sliding at atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    Investigation the multibody contact-sliding occurred at atomic discrete contact spot will play an important role in determine the origin of tribology behavior and evaluates the micro-mechanical property of nanomaterials and thus optimizing the design of surface texture. This paper carries out large scale parallel molecular dynamics simulation on contact-sliding at atomic scale to uncover the special physical essence. The research shows that some kind of force field exists between nanodot pair and the interaction can be expressed by the linear combination of exponential function while the effective interaction distance limited in 1 angstrom for nanodot with several tens of nanometer diameter. The variation tendency about the interaction force between nanodot array is almost the same between nanodot pairs and thus the interaction between two nanodot array can be characterized by parallel mechanical spring. Multibody effect which dominates the interaction between atoms or molecules will gradually diminish with the increasing of length scales.

  14. Torque magnetometry by use of capacitance type transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braught, M.C.; Pechan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Interfacial anisotropy in magnetic multilayered samples comprised of nanometer thick magnetic layers alternating with non-magnetic layers is investigated by torque magnetometry in the temperature regime of 4 to 300K. The design, construction and use of a capacitance type transducer wherein the sample is mounted directly on with the plate of the capacitor, will be described. As a result the sample and transducer spatially coexist at the sample temperature in an applied external field, eliminating mechanical coupling from the cryogenic region to a remote room temperature transducer. The capacitor measuring the torque of the sample is paired with a reference capacitor. The difference between torque influenced capacitance and the reference is then determined by a differential transimpedance amplifier. Since both capacitors are physically identical variables such as temperature, vibration, orientation and external devices are minimized. Torques up to 300 dyne-cm can be measured with a sensitivity of 0.010 dyne-cm

  15. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  16. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  17. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock - Low-Power Physics Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 339 THE CHIP-SCALE ATOMIC CLOCK – LOW-POWER PHYSICS PACKAGE R. Lutwak ...pdf/documents/ds-x72.pdf [2] R. Lutwak , D. Emmons, W. Riley, and R. M. Garvey, 2003, “The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock – Coherent Population Trapping vs...2002, Reston, Virginia, USA (U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, D.C.), pp. 539-550. [3] R. Lutwak , D. Emmons, T. English, and W. Riley, 2004

  18. Dye-sensitized solar cells: Atomic scale investigation of interface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wei; Zhang Fan; Meng Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) research is reviewed, focusing on atomic-scale investigations of the interface electronic structures and dynamical processes, including the structure of dye adsorption onto TiO 2 , ultrafast electron injection, hot-electron injection, multiple-exciton generation, and electron—hole recombination. Advanced experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are briefly summarized, and then progressive achievements in photovoltaic device optimization based on insights from atomic scale investigations are introduced. Finally, some challenges and opportunities for further improvement of dye solar cells are presented. (invited review — international conference on nanoscience and technology, china 2013)

  19. Recent advances in atomic-scale spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arthur R; Yang, Rong; Yang, Haiqiang; Dick, Alexey; Neugebauer, Joerg; Lambrecht, Walter R L

    2005-02-01

    The Mn3N2 (010) surface has been studied using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at the atomic scale. The principle objective of this work is to elucidate the properties and potential of this technique to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. The experimental approach involves the use of a combined molecular beam epitaxy/scanning tunneling microscopy system that allows the study of atomically clean magnetic surfaces. Several key findings have been obtained. First, both magnetic and non-magnetic atomic-scale information has been obtained in a single spin-polarized image. Magnetic modulation of the height profile having an antiferromagnetic super-period of c = 12.14 A (6 atomic rows) together with a non-magnetic superstructure having a period of c/2 = 6.07 A (3 atomic rows) was observed. Methods of separation of magnetic and non-magnetic profiles are presented. Second, bias voltage-dependent spin-polarized images show a reversal of the magnetic modulation at a particular voltage. This reversal is clearly due to a change in the sign of the magnetic term in the tunnel current. Since this term depends on both the tip's as well as the sample's magnetic local density of states, the reversal can be caused by either the sample or the tip. Third, the shape of the line profile was found to vary with the bias voltage, which is related to the energy-dependent spin contribution from the 2 chemically inequivalent Mn sites on the surface. Overall, the results shown here expand the application of the method of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Molecular dynamics modeling of bonding two materials by atomic scale friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko S., Iv.; Konovalenko, Ig. S.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics model of atomic scale friction stir welding has been developed. Formation of a butt joint between two crystallites was modeled by means of rotating rigid conical tool traveling along the butt joint line. The formed joint had an intermixed atomic structure composed of atoms initially belonged to the opposite mated piece of metal. Heat removal was modeled by adding the extra viscous force to peripheral atomic layers. This technique provides the temperature control in the tool-affected zone during welding. Auxiliary vibration action was added to the rotating tool. The model provides the variation of the tool's angular velocity, amplitude, frequency and direction of the auxiliary vibration action to provide modeling different welding modes.

  1. RF-Interrogated End-State Chip-Scale Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    coherent population trapping,” Electronics Letters 37, (24), 1449-1451. [2] R. Lutwak , P. Vlitas, M. Varghese, M. Mescher, D. K. Serkland, and G. M...367. [9] R. Lutwak , D. Emmons, T. English, W. Riley, A. Duwel, M. Varghese, D. K. Serland, and G. M. Peake, 2003, “Chip-Scale Atomic Clock, Recent

  2. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...

  3. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana

    2009-01-01

    , the exceptional nature of cardiolipins is characterized by their small charged head group connected to typically four hydrocarbon chains. In this work, we present atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the inner mitochondrial membrane modeled as a mixture of cardiolipins (CLs), phosphatidylcholines (PCs...

  4. Atomic-scale structure and electrostatics of anionic palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol lipid bilayers with Na+ counterions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, W.; Róg, T.; Gurtovenko, A.A.; Vattulainen, I.; Karttunen, M.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Anionic palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG) is one of the most abundant lipids in nature, yet its atomic-scale properties have not received significant attention. Here we report extensive 150-ns molecular dynamics simulations of a pure POPG lipid membrane with sodium counterions. It turns out

  5. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  6. Recurrence spectroscopy of atoms in electric fields: Failure of classical scaling laws near bifurcations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.A.; Robicheaux, F.

    1998-01-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of atoms in a static external electric field shows modulations from recurrences: electron waves that go out from and return to the vicinity of the atomic core. Closed-orbit theory predicts the amplitudes and phases of these modulations in terms of closed classical orbits. A classical scaling law relates the properties of a closed orbit at one energy and field strength to its properties at another energy and field strength at fixed scaled energy ε=EF -1/2 . The scaling law states that the recurrence strength of orbits along the electric field axis scale as F 1/4 . We show how this law fails near bifurcations when the effective Planck constant ℎ≡ℎF 1/4 increases with increasing field at fixed ε. The recurrences of orbits away from the axis scale as F 1/8 in accordance with the classical prediction. These deviations from the classical scaling law are important in interpreting the recurrence spectra of atoms in current experiments. This leads to an extension of the uniform approximation developed by Gao and Delos [Phys. Rev. A 56, 356 (1997)] to complex momenta. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  7. Implementation of exterior complex scaling in B-splines to solve atomic and molecular collision problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, C William; MartIn, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    B-spline methods are now well established as widely applicable tools for the evaluation of atomic and molecular continuum states. The mathematical technique of exterior complex scaling has been shown, in a variety of other implementations, to be a powerful method with which to solve atomic and molecular scattering problems, because it allows the correct imposition of continuum boundary conditions without their explicit analytic application. In this paper, an implementation of exterior complex scaling in B-splines is described that can bring the well-developed technology of B-splines to bear on new problems, including multiple ionization and breakup problems, in a straightforward way. The approach is demonstrated for examples involving the continuum motion of nuclei in diatomic molecules as well as electronic continua. For problems involving electrons, a method based on Poisson's equation is presented for computing two-electron integrals over B-splines under exterior complex scaling

  8. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  9. Comparison of void strengthening in fcc and bcc metals: Large-scale atomic-level modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Yu.N.; Bacon, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Strengthening due to voids can be a significant radiation effect in metals. Treatment of this by elasticity theory of dislocations is difficult when atomic structure of the obstacle and dislocation is influential. In this paper, we report results of large-scale atomic-level modelling of edge dislocation-void interaction in fcc (copper) and bcc (iron) metals. Voids of up to 5 nm diameter were studied over the temperature range from 0 to 600 K. We demonstrate that atomistic modelling is able to reveal important effects, which are beyond the continuum approach. Some arise from features of the dislocation core and crystal structure, others involve dislocation climb and temperature effects

  10. Effect of deposition rate on melting point of copper film catalyst substrate at atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimpul, Rinaldo; Syuhada, Ibnu; Rosikhin, Ahmad; Winata, Toto

    2018-03-01

    Annealing process of copper film catalyst substrate was studied by molcular dynamics simulation. This copper film catalyst substrate was produced using thermal evaporation method. The annealing process was limited in nanosecond order to observe the mechanism at atomic scale. We found that deposition rate parameter affected the melting point of catalyst substrate. The change of crystalline structure of copper atoms was observed before it had been already at melting point. The optimum annealing temperature was obtained to get the highest percentage of fcc structure on copper film catalyst substrate.

  11. Dislocations and elementary processes of plasticity in FCC metals: atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodney, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present atomic-scale simulations of two elementary processes of FCC crystal plasticity. The first study consists in the simulation by molecular dynamics, in a nickel crystal, of the interactions between an edge dislocation and glissile interstitial loops of the type that form under irradiation in displacement cascades. The simulations show various atomic-scale interaction processes leading to the absorption and drag of the loops by the dislocation. These reactions certainly contribute to the formation of the 'clear bands' observed in deformed irradiated materials. The simulations also allow to study quantitatively the role of the glissile loops in irradiation hardening. In particular, dislocation unpinning stresses for certain pinning mechanisms are evaluated from the simulations. The second study consists first in the generalization in three dimensions of the quasi-continuum method (QCM), a multi-scale simulation method which couples atomistic techniques and the finite element method. In the QCM, regions close to dislocation cores are simulated at the atomic-scale while the rest of the crystal is simulated with a lower resolution by means of a discretization of the displacement fields using the finite element method. The QCM is then tested on the simulation of the formation and breaking of dislocation junctions in an aluminum crystal. Comparison of the simulations with an elastic model of dislocation junctions shows that the structure and strength of the junctions are dominated by elastic line tension effects, as is assumed in classical theories. (author)

  12. Implementation of atomic layer etching of silicon: Scaling parameters, feasibility, and profile control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Alok, E-mail: alok.ranjan@us.tel.com; Wang, Mingmei; Sherpa, Sonam D.; Rastogi, Vinayak [TEL Technology Center, America LLC, 255 Fuller Road, Suite 214, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Koshiishi, Akira [Tokyo Electron Miyagi, Ltd., 1 Techno-Hills, Taiwa-cho, Kurokawa-gun, Miyagi, 9813629 (Japan); Ventzek, Peter L. G. [Tokyo Electron America, Inc., 2400 Grove Blvd., Austin, Texas 78741 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic or layer by layer etching of silicon exploits temporally segregated self-limiting adsorption and material removal steps to mitigate the problems associated with continuous or quasicontinuous (pulsed) plasma processes: selectivity loss, damage, and profile control. Successful implementation of atomic layer etching requires careful choice of the plasma parameters for adsorption and desorption steps. This paper illustrates how process parameters can be arrived at through basic scaling exercises, modeling and simulation, and fundamental experimental tests of their predictions. Using chlorine and argon plasma in a radial line slot antenna plasma source as a platform, the authors illustrate how cycle time, ion energy, and radical to ion ratio can be manipulated to manage the deviation from ideality when cycle times are shortened or purges are incomplete. Cell based Monte Carlo feature scale modeling is used to illustrate profile outcomes. Experimental results of atomic layer etching processes are illustrated on silicon line and space structures such that iso-dense bias and aspect ratio dependent free profiles are produced. Experimental results also illustrate the profile control margin as processes move from atomic layer to multilayer by layer etching. The consequence of not controlling contamination (e.g., oxygen) is shown to result in deposition and roughness generation.

  13. Sensing Noncollinear Magnetism at the Atomic Scale Combining Magnetic Exchange and Spin-Polarized Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Gerritsen, Jan W; Wegner, Daniel; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-09-13

    Storing and accessing information in atomic-scale magnets requires magnetic imaging techniques with single-atom resolution. Here, we show simultaneous detection of the spin-polarization and exchange force with or without the flow of current with a new method, which combines scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy. To demonstrate the application of this new method, we characterize the prototypical nanoskyrmion lattice formed on a monolayer of Fe/Ir(111). We resolve the square magnetic lattice by employing magnetic exchange force microscopy, demonstrating its applicability to noncollinear magnetic structures for the first time. Utilizing distance-dependent force and current spectroscopy, we quantify the exchange forces in comparison to the spin-polarization. For strongly spin-polarized tips, we distinguish different signs of the exchange force that we suggest arises from a change in exchange mechanisms between the probe and a skyrmion. This new approach may enable both nonperturbative readout combined with writing by current-driven reversal of atomic-scale magnets.

  14. Capillary condensation in atomic scale friction: how water acts like a glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh, K B; Frenken, J W M

    2006-04-28

    We present atomic-scale friction force measurements that strongly suggest that the capillary condensation of water between a tungsten tip and a graphite surface leads to the formation of ice at room temperature. This phenomenon increases the friction force, introduces a short-term memory in the form of an elastic response against shearing, and allows us to "write" a temporary line of ice on a hydrophobic surface. Rearrangements of the condensate are shown to take place on a surprisingly slow time scale of seconds.

  15. Quantifying the Hierarchical Order in Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Atomic to Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshot, Eric R; Zwissler, Darwin W; Bui, Ngoc; Kuykendall, Tevye R; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Wu, Kuang Jen J; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2017-06-27

    Fundamental understanding of structure-property relationships in hierarchically organized nanostructures is crucial for the development of new functionality, yet quantifying structure across multiple length scales is challenging. In this work, we used nondestructive X-ray scattering to quantitatively map the multiscale structure of hierarchically self-organized carbon nanotube (CNT) "forests" across 4 orders of magnitude in length scale, from 2.0 Å to 1.5 μm. Fully resolved structural features include the graphitic honeycomb lattice and interlayer walls (atomic), CNT diameter (nano), as well as the greater CNT ensemble (meso) and large corrugations (micro). Correlating orientational order across hierarchical levels revealed a cascading decrease as we probed finer structural feature sizes with enhanced sensitivity to small-scale disorder. Furthermore, we established qualitative relationships for single-, few-, and multiwall CNT forest characteristics, showing that multiscale orientational order is directly correlated with number density spanning 10 9 -10 12 cm -2 , yet order is inversely proportional to CNT diameter, number of walls, and atomic defects. Lastly, we captured and quantified ultralow-q meridional scattering features and built a phenomenological model of the large-scale CNT forest morphology, which predicted and confirmed that these features arise due to microscale corrugations along the vertical forest direction. Providing detailed structural information at multiple length scales is important for design and synthesis of CNT materials as well as other hierarchically organized nanostructures.

  16. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  17. Interaction of primary cascades with different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An atomic scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatami, F.; Feghhi, S.A.H., E-mail: a.feghhi@gmail.com; Arjhangmehr, A., E-mail: ms.arjangmehr@gmail.com; Esfandiarpour, A.

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we investigate interaction of primary cascades with grain boundaries (GBs) in α-Zr using the atomistic-scale simulations, and intend to study the influence of different GB structures on production and evolution of defects on picosecond timescale. We observe that, contrary to the previous results in cubic metals, GBs in α-Zr are not necessarily biased toward interstitials, and can preferentially absorb vacancies. Further, in terms of energetic and kinetic behavior, we find that GBs act as defect sinks due to the substantial reduction of defect formation energies and migration barriers in close vicinity of the GB center, with either a preference toward interstitials or vacancies which depends on the atomic structure of the boundaries. Finally, using continuous ion bombardment, we investigate the stability of GBs in sever irradiation environment. The results indicate that the sink strength and efficiency of boundaries varies with increasing accumulated defects in GB region. - Highlights: • GBs in hcp Zr are not necessarily biased toward interstitials. • Defect content within bulk depends on PKA energy, PKA distance, and GB texture. • Defect formation energies and diffusion barriers decrease in close vicinity of GBs. • GBs become locally unstable due to absorption of excess defects in ion bombardment.

  18. Evolution of the Contact Area with Normal Load for Rough Surfaces: from Atomic to Macroscopic Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiping

    2017-11-13

    The evolution of the contact area with normal load for rough surfaces has great fundamental and practical importance, ranging from earthquake dynamics to machine wear. This work bridges the gap between the atomic scale and the macroscopic scale for normal contact behavior. The real contact area, which is formed by a large ensemble of discrete contacts (clusters), is proven to be much smaller than the apparent surface area. The distribution of the discrete contact clusters and the interaction between them are key to revealing the mechanism of the contacting solids. To this end, Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) is used to study both how the contact cluster evolves from the atomic scale to the macroscopic scale and the interaction between clusters. It is found that the interaction between clusters has a strong effect on their formation. The formation and distribution of the contact clusters is far more complicated than that predicted by the asperity model. Ignorance of the interaction between them leads to overestimating the contacting force. In real contact, contacting clusters are smaller and more discrete due to the interaction between the asperities. Understanding the exact nature of the contact area with the normal load is essential to the following research on friction.

  19. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I.; Tekielak, M.; Schäfer, R.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented

  20. Evidence for atomic scale disorder in indium nitride from perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogra, R; Shrestha, S K; Byrne, A P; Ridgway, M C; Edge, A V J; Vianden, R; Penner, J; Timmers, H

    2005-01-01

    The crystal lattice of bulk grains and state-of-the-art films of indium nitride was investigated at the atomic scale with perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy using the 111 In/Cd radioisotope probe. The probe was introduced during sample synthesis, by diffusion and by ion implantation. The mean quadrupole interaction frequency ν Q = 28 MHz was observed at the indium probe site in all types of indium nitride samples with broad frequency distributions. The observed small, but non-zero, asymmetry parameter indicates broken symmetry around the probe atoms. Results have been compared with theoretical calculations based on the point charge model. The consistency of the experimental results and their independence of the preparation technique suggest that the origin of the broad frequency distribution is inherent to indium nitride, indicating a high degree of disorder at the atomic scale. Due to the low dissociation temperature of indium nitride, furnace and rapid thermal annealing at atmospheric pressure reduce the lattice disorder only marginally

  1. Implementation of highly parallel and large scale GW calculations within the OpenAtom software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    The need to describe electronic excitations with better accuracy than provided by band structures produced by Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a long-term enterprise for the computational condensed matter and materials theory communities. In some cases, appropriate theoretical frameworks have existed for some time but have been difficult to apply widely due to computational cost. For example, the GW approximation incorporates a great deal of important non-local and dynamical electronic interaction effects but has been too computationally expensive for routine use in large materials simulations. OpenAtom is an open source massively parallel ab initiodensity functional software package based on plane waves and pseudopotentials (http://charm.cs.uiuc.edu/OpenAtom/) that takes advantage of the Charm + + parallel framework. At present, it is developed via a three-way collaboration, funded by an NSF SI2-SSI grant (ACI-1339804), between Yale (Ismail-Beigi), IBM T. J. Watson (Glenn Martyna) and the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (Laxmikant Kale). We will describe the project and our current approach towards implementing large scale GW calculations with OpenAtom. Potential applications of large scale parallel GW software for problems involving electronic excitations in semiconductor and/or metal oxide systems will be also be pointed out.

  2. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  3. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  4. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with high-temperature viscoelastic relaxation data. An interesting information gained from MD is that sliding at grain boundaries is essentially controlled by the internal friction between the intergranular phase and the grain edges.

  5. Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic-scale modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Yu.N.; Stoller, R.E.; Matsukawa, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, ∼100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations

  6. Review of chip-scale atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Research on chip-scale atomic clocks (CSACs) based on coherent population trapping (CPT) is reviewed. The background and the inspiration for the research are described, including the important schemes proposed to improve the CPT signal quality, the selection of atoms and buffer gases, and the development of micro-cell fabrication. With regard to the reliability, stability, and service life of the CSACs, the research regarding the sensitivity of the CPT resonance to temperature and laser power changes is also reviewed, as well as the CPT resonance's collision and light of frequency shifts. The first generation CSACs have already been developed but its characters are still far from our expectations. Our conclusion is that miniaturization and power reduction are the most important aspects calling for further research. (review)

  7. Analysis of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties at Atomic Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at developing a mathematic model to characterize the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. The carbon-carbon (C–C bonds between two adjacent atoms are modeled as Euler beams. According to the relationship of Tersoff-Brenner force theory and potential energy acting on C–C bonds, material constants of beam element are determined at the atomic scale. Based on the elastic deformation energy and mechanical equilibrium of a unit in graphite sheet, simply form ED equations of calculating Young's modulus of armchair and zigzag graphite sheets are derived. Following with the geometrical relationship of SWCNTs in cylindrical coordinates and the structure mechanics approach, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of armchair and zigzag SWCNTs are also investigated. The results show that the approach to research mechanical properties of SWCNTs is a concise and valid method. We consider that it will be useful technique to progress on this type of investigation.

  8. Atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Time-resolved investigations of ultrafast electronic and molecular dynamics were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of these processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. The tremendous technological progress in recent years made it possible to generate ultrashort pulses, which can be used to trigger, to watch, and to control atomic and molecular motion. This tutorial focuses on experimental and theoretical advances which are used to study the dynamics of electrons and molecules in the presence of ultrashort pulses. In the first part, the rotational dynamics of molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales, is reviewed. Well-aligned molecules are particularly suitable for angle-dependent investigations like x-ray diffraction or strong-field ionization experiments. In the second part, the ionization dynamics of atoms is studied. The characteristic time scale lies, here, in the attosecond to few-femtosecond regime. Although a one-particle picture has been successfully applied to many processes, many-body effects do constantly occur. After a broad overview of the main mechanisms and the most common tools in attosecond physics, examples of many-body dynamics in the attosecond world (e.g., in high-harmonic generation and attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy) are discussed.

  9. Atomic-scale simulation of dust grain collisions: Surface chemistry and dissipation beyond existing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Doan, Baochi D.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2017-10-01

    The early stages of planet formation involve steps where submicron-sized dust particles collide to form aggregates. However, the mechanism through which millimeter-sized particles aggregate to kilometer-sized planetesimals is still not understood. Dust grain collision experiments carried out in the environment of the Earth lead to the prediction of a 'bouncing barrier' at millimeter-sizes. Theoretical models, e.g., Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov theories, lack two key features, namely the chemistry of dust grain surfaces, and a mechanism for atomic-scale dissipation of energy. Moreover, interaction strengths in these models are parameterized based on experiments done in the Earth's environment. To address these issues, we performed atomic-scale simulations of collisions between nonhydroxylated and hydroxylated amorphous silica nanoparticles. We used the ReaxFF approach which enables modeling chemical reactions using an empirical potential. We found that nonhydroxylated nanograins tend to adhere with much higher probability than suggested by existing theories. By contrast, hydroxylated nanograins exhibit a strong tendency to bounce. Also, the interaction between dust grains has the characteristics of a strong chemical force instead of weak van der Waals forces. This suggests that the formation of strong chemical bonds and dissipation via internal atomic vibration may result in aggregation beyond what is expected based on our current understanding. Our results also indicate that experiments should more carefully consider surface conditions to mimic the space environment. We also report results of simulations with molten silica nanoparticles. It is found that molten particles are more likely to adhere due to viscous dissipation, which supports theories that suggest aggregation to kilometer scales might require grains to be in a molten state.

  10. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barty, C.P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  11. Fundamental Challenges for Modeling Electrochemical Energy Storage Systems at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Axel

    2018-04-23

    There is a strong need to improve the efficiency of electrochemical energy storage, but progress is hampered by significant technological and scientific challenges. This review describes the potential contribution of atomic-scale modeling to the development of more efficient batteries, with a particular focus on first-principles electronic structure calculations. Numerical and theoretical obstacles are discussed, along with ways to overcome them, and some recent examples are presented illustrating the insights into electrochemical energy storage that can be gained from quantum chemical studies.

  12. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  13. General Atomic Reprocessing Pilot Plant: engineering-scale dissolution system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, H.H.

    1979-04-01

    In February 1978, a dissolver-centrifuge system was added to the cold reprocessing pilot plant at General Atomic Company, which completed the installation of an HTGR fuel head-end reprocessing pilot plant. This report describes the engineering-scale equipment in the pilot plant and summarizes the design features derived from development work performed in the last few years. The dissolver operating cycles for both thorium containing BISO and uranium containinng WAR fissile fuels are included. A continuous vertical centrifuge is used to clarify the resultant dissolver product solution. Process instrumentation and controls for the system reflect design philosophy suitable for remote operation

  14. Atomic-scale studies on the effect of boundary coherency on stability in twinned Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke, E-mail: han@magnet.fsu.edu; Su, Yi-Feng; Salters, Vincent J. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The stored energy and hardness of nanotwinned (NT) Cu are related to interaction between dislocations and (111)-twin boundaries (TBs) studied at atomic scales by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope. Lack of mobile dislocations at coherent TBs (CTBs) provides as-deposited NT Cu a rare combination of stability and hardness. The introduction of numerous incoherent TBs (ITBs) reduces both the stability and hardness. While storing more energy in their ITBs than in the CTBs, deformed NT Cu also exhibits high dislocation density and TB mobility and therefore has increased the driving force for recovery, coarsening, and recrystallization.

  15. Atomic-scale studies on the effect of boundary coherency on stability in twinned Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Rongmei; Han, Ke; Su, Yi-Feng; Salters, Vincent J.

    2014-01-01

    The stored energy and hardness of nanotwinned (NT) Cu are related to interaction between dislocations and {111}-twin boundaries (TBs) studied at atomic scales by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope. Lack of mobile dislocations at coherent TBs (CTBs) provides as-deposited NT Cu a rare combination of stability and hardness. The introduction of numerous incoherent TBs (ITBs) reduces both the stability and hardness. While storing more energy in their ITBs than in the CTBs, deformed NT Cu also exhibits high dislocation density and TB mobility and therefore has increased the driving force for recovery, coarsening, and recrystallization.

  16. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  17. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  18. Atomic Scale Imaging of Nucleation and Growth Trajectories of an Interfacial Bismuth Nanodroplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxuan; Bunes, Benjamin R; Zang, Ling; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-02-23

    Because of the lack of experimental evidence, much confusion still exists on the nucleation and growth dynamics of a nanostructure, particularly of metal. The situation is even worse for nanodroplets because it is more difficult to induce the formation of a nanodroplet while imaging the dynamic process with atomic resolution. Here, taking advantage of an electron beam to induce the growth of Bi nanodroplets on a SrBi2Ta2O9 platelet under a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), we directly observed the detailed growth pathways of Bi nanodroplets from the earliest stage of nucleation that were previously inaccessible. Atomic scale imaging reveals that the dynamics of nucleation involves a much more complex trajectory than previously predicted based on classical nucleation theory (CNT). The monatomic Bi layer was first formed in the nucleation process, which induced the formation of the prenucleated clusters. Following that, critical nuclei for the nanodroplets formed both directly from the addition of atoms to the prenucleated clusters by the classical growth process and indirectly through transformation of an intermediate liquid film based on the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, in which the liquid film was induced by the self-assembly of the prenucleated clusters. Finally, the growth of the Bi nanodroplets advanced through the classical pathway and sudden droplet coalescence. This study allows us to visualize the critical steps in the nucleation process of an interfacial nanodroplet, which suggests a revision of the perspective of CNT.

  19. Atomic-scale properties of Ni-based FCC ternary, and quaternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, Artur; Aabloo, Alvo; Klintenberg, Mattias; Stocks, Malcolm; Caro, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize some atomic-scale properties of Ni-based FCC multicomponent alloys. For this purpose, we use Monte Carlo method combined with density functional theory calculations to study short-range order (SRO), atomic displacements, electronic density of states, and magnetic moments in equimolar ternary NiCrCo, and quaternary NiCrCoFe alloys. According to our study, the salient features for the ternary alloy are a negative SRO parameter between Ni–Cr and a positive between Cr–Cr pairs as well as a weakly magnetic state. For the quaternary alloy we predict negative SRO parameter for Ni–Cr and Ni–Fe pairs and positive for Cr–Cr and Fe–Fe pairs. Atomic displacements for both ternary and quaternary alloys are negligible. In contrast to the ternary, the quaternary alloy shows a complex magnetic structure. The electronic structure of the ternary and quaternary alloys shows differences near the Fermi energy between a random solid solution and the predicted structure with SRO. Despite that, the calculated EXAFS spectra does not show enough contrast to discriminate between random and ordered structures. The predicted SRO has an impact on point-defect energetics, electron–phonon coupling and thermodynamic functions and thus, SRO should not be neglected when studying properties of these two alloys

  20. Atomic oxygen production scaling in a nanosecond-pulsed externally grounded dielectric barrier plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Brian; Schmidt, Jacob; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2014-10-01

    Atomic oxygen production is studied in a capillary dielectric barrier plasma jet that is externally grounded and driven with a 20-ns risetime positive unipolar pulsed voltage at pulse repetition rates up to 25 kHz. The power coupled to the discharge can be easily increased by increasing the pulse repetition rate. At a critical turnover frequency, determined by the net energy density coupled to the discharge, the plasma chemistry abruptly changes. This is indicated by increased plasma conductance and a transition in reactive oxygen species production from an ozone-dominated production regime below the turnover frequency to atomic-oxygen-dominated production at higher pulse rates. Here, we characterize atomic oxygen production scaling using spatially- and temporally-resolved two-photon absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (TALIF). Quantitative results are obtained via calibration with xenon using a similar laser excitation and collection system. These results are compared with quantitative ozone and discharge power measurements using a helium gas flow with oxygen admixtures up to 3%.

  1. Evolution of atomic-scale surface structures during ion bombardment: A fractal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.A.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Surfaces of interest in microelectronics have been shown to exhibit fractal topographies on the atomic scale. A model utilizing self-similar fractals to simulate surface roughness has been added to the ion bombardment code TRIM. The model has successfully predicted experimental sputtering yields of low energy (less then 1000 eV) Ar on Si and D on C using experimentally determined fractal dimensions. Under ion bombardment the fractal surface structures evolve as the atoms in the collision cascade are displaced or sputtered. These atoms have been tracked and the evolution of the surface in steps of one monolayer of flux has been determined. The Ar--Si system has been studied for incidence energies of 100 and 500 eV, and incidence angles of 0 degree, 30 degree, and 60 degree. As expected, normally incident ion bombardment tends to reduce the roughness of the surface, whereas large angle ion bombardment increases the degree of surface roughness. Of particular interest though, the surfaces are still locally self-similar fractals after ion bombardment and a steady state fractal dimension is reached, except at large angles of incidence

  2. Atomic-scale origin of dynamic viscoelastic response and creep in disordered solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkus, Rico; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Viscoelasticity has been described since the time of Maxwell as an interpolation of purely viscous and purely elastic response, but its microscopic atomic-level mechanism in solids has remained elusive. We studied three model disordered solids: a random lattice, the bond-depleted fcc lattice, and the fcc lattice with vacancies. Within the harmonic approximation for central-force lattices, we applied sum rules for viscoelastic response derived on the basis of nonaffine atomic motions. The latter motions are a direct result of local structural disorder, and in particular, of the lack of inversion symmetry in disordered lattices. By defining a suitable quantitative and general atomic-level measure of nonaffinity and inversion symmetry, we show that the viscoelastic responses of all three systems collapse onto a master curve upon normalizing by the overall strength of inversion-symmetry breaking in each system. Close to the isostatic point for central-force lattices, power-law creep G (t ) ˜t-1 /2 emerges as a consequence of the interplay between soft vibrational modes and nonaffine dynamics, and various analytical scalings, supported by numerical calculations, are predicted by the theory.

  3. Fabrication Of Atomic-scale Gold Junctions By Electrochemical Plating Technique Using A Common Medical Disinfectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeno, Akinori; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-01

    Iodine tincture, a medical liquid familiar as a disinfectant, was introduced as an etching/deposition electrolyte for the fabrication of nanometer-separated gold electrodes. In the gold dissolved iodine tincture, the gold electrodes were grown or eroded slowly in atomic scale, enough to form quantum point contacts. The resistance evolution during the electrochemical deposition showed plateaus at integer multiples of the resistance quantum, (2e2/h)-1, at the room temperature. The iodine tincture is a commercially available common material, which makes the fabrication process to be the simple and cost effective. Moreover, in contrast to the conventional electrochemical approaches, this method is free from highly toxic cyanide compounds or extraordinary strong acid. We expect this method to be a useful interface between single-molecular-scale structures and macroscopic opto-electronic devices.

  4. Max Auwaerter symposium: spin mapping and spin manipulation on the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesendanger, R.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A fundamental understanding of magnetic and spin-dependent phenomena requires the determination of spin structures and spin excitations down to the atomic scale. The direct visualization of atomic-scale spin structures has first been accomplished for magnetic metals by combining the atomic resolution capability of Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) with spin sensitivity, based on vacuum tunnelling of spin-polarized electrons. The resulting technique, Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (SP-STM), nowadays provides unprecedented insight into collinear and non-collinear spin structures at surfaces of magnetic nanostructures and has already led to the discovery of new types of magnetic order at the nanoscale. More recently, the development of subkelvin SP-STM has allowed studies of ground-state magnetic properties of individual magnetic adatoms on non-magnetic substrates as well as the magnetic interactions between them. Based on SP-STM experiments performed at temperatures of 300 mK, indirect magnetic exchange interactions at the sub-milli-electronvolt energy scale between individual paramagnetic adatoms as well as between adatoms and nearby magnetic nanostructures could directly be revealed in real space up to distances of several nanometers. In both cases we have observed an oscillatory behavior of the magnetic exchange coupling, alternating between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic, as a function of distance. Moreover, the detection of spin-dependent exchange and correlation forces has allowed a first direct real-space observation of spin structures at surfaces of antiferromagnetic insulators. This new type of scanning probe microscopy, called Magnetic Exchange Force Microscopy (MExFM), offers a powerful new tool to investigate different types of spin-spin interactions based on direct-, super-, or RKKY-type exchange down to the atomic level. By combining MExFM with high-precision measurements of damping forces, localized or confined spin

  5. Atomic scale 0-π transition and pairing symmetry in a Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, S.; Kashiwaya, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, A. A.; Asano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A superconducting ring with a π-junction made from superconductor (S) / ferromagnetic- metal (FM) / superconductor (S) exhibits a spontaneous current without an external magnetic field and the corresponding magnetic flux is half a flux quantum in the ground state. Such a π-ring provides so-called 'quiet qubit' that can be efficiently decoupled from the fluctuation of the external field. However, the usage of FM gives rise to strong Ohmic dissipation. Therefore, the realization of π-junctions without FM is highly desired for qubit applications. We theoretically consider the possibility of the π-junction formation in the mesoscopic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic insulators (FI) by taking into account the band structure of such materials explicitly. In the case of the fully polarized FIs, e.g., La 2 BaCuO 5 (LBCO) and K 2 CuF 4 , we found the formation of a π-junction and a novel atomic-scale 0-π transition induced by increasing the FI thickness LF. In this talk, I will discuss a thermal stability and material-parameter dependences of the atomic-scale 0-π transition as well as possibility of the odd-frequency pairing in such systems. (author)

  6. Quantitative atomic resolution elemental mapping via absolute-scale energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Sang, X.; Xu, W.; Dycus, J.H.; LeBeau, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); D' Alfonso, A.J.; Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    Quantitative agreement on an absolute scale is demonstrated between experiment and simulation for two-dimensional, atomic-resolution elemental mapping via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This requires all experimental parameters to be carefully characterized. The agreement is good, but some discrepancies remain. The most likely contributing factors are identified and discussed. Previous predictions that increasing the probe forming aperture helps to suppress the channelling enhancement in the average signal are confirmed experimentally. It is emphasized that simple column-by-column analysis requires a choice of sample thickness that compromises between being thick enough to yield a good signal-to-noise ratio while being thin enough that the overwhelming majority of the EDX signal derives from the column on which the probe is placed, despite strong electron scattering effects. - Highlights: • Absolute scale quantification of 2D atomic-resolution EDX maps is demonstrated. • Factors contributing to remaining small quantitative discrepancies are identified. • Experiment confirms large probe-forming apertures suppress channelling enhancement. • The thickness range suitable for reliable column-by-column analysis is discussed.

  7. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut TM technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  8. Comparative Criticality Analysis of Two Monte Carlo Codes on Centrifugal Atomizer: MCNPS and SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H-S; Jang, M-S; Kim, S-R; Park, J-M; Kim, K-N

    2015-01-01

    There are two well-known Monte Carlo codes for criticality analysis, MCNP5 and SCALE. MCNP5 is a general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code that can be used for neutron, photon, electron or coupled neutron / photon / electron transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical system as a main analysis code. SCALE provides a comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly tool set for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, radioactive source term characterization, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. SCALE was conceived and funded by US NRC to perform standardized computer analysis for licensing evaluation and is used widely in the world. We performed a validation test of MCNP5 and a comparative analysis of Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5 and SCALE, in terms of the critical analysis of centrifugal atomizer. In the criticality analysis using MCNP5 code, we obtained the statistically reliable results by using a large number of source histories per cycle and performing of uncertainty analysis

  9. Comparative Criticality Analysis of Two Monte Carlo Codes on Centrifugal Atomizer: MCNPS and SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H-S; Jang, M-S; Kim, S-R [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, J-M; Kim, K-N [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are two well-known Monte Carlo codes for criticality analysis, MCNP5 and SCALE. MCNP5 is a general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code that can be used for neutron, photon, electron or coupled neutron / photon / electron transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical system as a main analysis code. SCALE provides a comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly tool set for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, radioactive source term characterization, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. SCALE was conceived and funded by US NRC to perform standardized computer analysis for licensing evaluation and is used widely in the world. We performed a validation test of MCNP5 and a comparative analysis of Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5 and SCALE, in terms of the critical analysis of centrifugal atomizer. In the criticality analysis using MCNP5 code, we obtained the statistically reliable results by using a large number of source histories per cycle and performing of uncertainty analysis.

  10. Tetragonal fcc-Fe induced by κ -carbide precipitates: Atomic scale insights from correlative electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Christian H.; Yao, Mengji; Dey, Poulumi; Lipińska-Chwalek, Marta; Berkels, Benjamin; Gault, Baptiste; Hickel, Tilmann; Herbig, Michael; Mayer, Joachim; Neugebauer, Jörg; Raabe, Dierk; Dehm, Gerhard; Scheu, Christina

    2018-02-01

    Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory calculations resolve the correlation between elastic strain fields and local impurity concentrations on the atomic scale. The correlative approach is applied to coherent interfaces in a κ -carbide strengthened low-density steel and establishes a tetragonal distortion of fcc-Fe. An interfacial roughness of ˜1 nm and a localized carbon concentration gradient extending over ˜2 -3 nm is revealed, which originates from the mechano-chemical coupling between local strain and composition.

  11. Calculations of recombination rates for cold 4He atoms from atom-dimer phase shifts and determination of universal scaling functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination rates for cold 4 He are calculated with a method which exploits the simple relationship between the imaginary part of the atom-dimer elastic scattering phase shift and the S-matrix for recombination. The elastic phase shifts are computed above breakup threshold by solving a three-body Faddeev equation in momentum space with inputs based on a variety of modern atom-atom potentials. Recombination coefficients for the HFD-B3-FCII potential agree very well with the only previously published results. Since the elastic scattering and recombination processes for 4 He are governed by 'Efimov physics', they depend on universal functions of a scaling variable. The computed recombination coefficients for potentials other than HFD-B3-FCII make it possible to determine these universal functions

  12. Fabrication of all diamond scanning probes for nanoscale magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Appel Patrick; Neu Elke; Ganzhorn Marc; Barfuss Arne; Batzer Marietta; Gratz Micha; Tschoepe Andreas; Maletinsky Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The electronic spin of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond forms an atomically sized, highly sensitive sensor for magnetic fields. To harness the full potential of individual NV centers for sensing with high sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution, NV centers have to be incorporated into scanning probe structures enabling controlled scanning in close proximity to the sample surface. Here, we present an optimized procedure to fabricate single-crystal, all-diamond scanning probes s...

  13. ARECIBO MULTI-EPOCH H I ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS AGAINST PULSARS: TINY-SCALE ATOMIC STRUCTURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanimirovic, S.; Weisberg, J. M.; Pei, Z.; Tuttle, K.; Green, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from multi-epoch neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption observations of six bright pulsars with the Arecibo telescope. Moving through the interstellar medium (ISM) with transverse velocities of 10-150 AU yr -1 , these pulsars have swept across 1-200 AU over the course of our experiment, allowing us to probe the existence and properties of the tiny-scale atomic structure (TSAS) in the cold neutral medium (CNM). While most of the observed pulsars show no significant change in their H I absorption spectra, we have identified at least two clear TSAS-induced opacity variations in the direction of B1929+10. These observations require strong spatial inhomogeneities in either the TSAS clouds' physical properties themselves or else in the clouds' galactic distribution. While TSAS is occasionally detected on spatial scales down to 10 AU, it is too rare to be characterized by a spectrum of turbulent CNM fluctuations on scales of 10 1 -10 3 AU, as previously suggested by some work. In the direction of B1929+10, an apparent correlation between TSAS and interstellar clouds inside the warm Local Bubble (LB) indicates that TSAS may be tracing the fragmentation of the LB wall via hydrodynamic instabilities. While similar fragmentation events occur frequently throughout the ISM, the warm medium surrounding these cold cloudlets induces a natural selection effect wherein small TSAS clouds evaporate quickly and are rare, while large clouds survive longer and become a general property of the ISM.

  14. Two-dimensional nanowires on homoepitaxial interfaces: Atomic-scale mechanism of breakdown and disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailov, Michail; Ranguelov, Bogdan

    2018-03-01

    We present a model for hole-mediated spontaneous breakdown of ahomoepitaxial two-dimensional (2D) flat nanowire based exclusively on random, thermally-activated motion of atoms. The model suggests a consecutive three-step mechanism driving the rupture and complete disintegration of the nanowire on a crystalline surface. The breakdown scenario includes: (i) local narrowing of a part of the stripe to a monatomic chain, (ii) formation of a recoverable single vacancy or a 2D vacancy cluster that causes temporary nanowire rupture, (iii) formation of a non-recoverable 2D hole leading to permanent nanowire breakdown. These successive events in the temporal evolution of the nanowire morphology bring the nanowire stripe into an irreversible unstable state, leading to a dramatic change in its peculiar physical properties and conductivity. The atomistic simulations also reveal a strong increase of the nanowire lifetime with an enlargement of its width and open up a way for a fine atomic-scale control of the nanowire lifetime and structural, morphological and thermodynamic stability.

  15. Atomic-scale origin of piezoelectricity in wurtzite ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Sungjin; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2015-03-28

    ZnO has been extensively studied by virtue of its remarkably high piezoelectric responses, especially in nanowire forms. Currently, the high piezoelectricity of wurtzite ZnO is understood in terms of the covalent-bonding interaction between Zn 3d and O 2p orbitals. However, the Zn 3d orbitals are not capable of forming hybridized orbitals with the O 2pz orbitals since the Zn ion is characterized by fully filled non-interacting 3d orbitals. To resolve this puzzling problem, we have investigated the atomic-scale origin of piezoelectricity by exploiting density-functional theory calculations. On the basis of the computed orbital-resolved density of states and the band structure over the Γ-M first Brillouin zone, we propose an intriguing bonding mechanism that accounts for the observed high piezoelectricity - intra-atomic 3dz(2)-4pz orbital self-mixing of Zn, followed by asymmetric hybridization between the Zn 3dz(2)-4pz self-mixed orbital and the O 2pz orbital along the polar c-axis of the wurtzite ZnO.

  16. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocombette, J.P.

    2005-12-01

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  17. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  18. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-31

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  19. Micro-Hall magnetometry on a Co-organic chain compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, L.; Simonet, V.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Bogani, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2004-01-01

    The static and dynamical properties of Co-organic chains, with strong magnetic anisotropy, are studied by micro-Hall magnetometry. The low-temperature hysteresis cycles are discussed with respect to the helical structure of the chains. Thermally activated relaxation of the magnetization is observed, compatible with the Glauber model for a 1D Ising system

  20. Micro-Hall magnetometry on a Co-organic chain compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, L.; Simonet, V. E-mail: simonet@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Wernsdorfer, W.; Bogani, L.; Sessoli, R

    2004-05-01

    The static and dynamical properties of Co-organic chains, with strong magnetic anisotropy, are studied by micro-Hall magnetometry. The low-temperature hysteresis cycles are discussed with respect to the helical structure of the chains. Thermally activated relaxation of the magnetization is observed, compatible with the Glauber model for a 1D Ising system.

  1. Atomic Scale Modulation of Self-Rectifying Resistive Switching by Interfacial Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xing; Yu, Kaihao; Cha, Dong Kyu; Bosman, Michel; Raghavan, Nagarajan; Zhang, Xixiang; Li, Kun; Liu, Qi; Sun, Litao; Pey, Kinleong

    2018-01-01

    Higher memory density and faster computational performance of resistive switching cells require reliable array‐accessible architecture. However, selecting a designated cell within a crossbar array without interference from sneak path currents through neighboring cells is a general problem. Here, a highly doped n++ Si as the bottom electrode with Ni‐electrode/HfOx/SiO2 asymmetric self‐rectifying resistive switching device is fabricated. The interfacial defects in the HfOx/SiO2 junction and n++ Si substrate result in the reproducible rectifying behavior. In situ transmission electron microscopy is used to quantitatively study the properties of the morphology, chemistry, and dynamic nucleation–dissolution evolution of the chains of defects at the atomic scale. The spatial and temporal correlation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and Ni‐rich conductive filament modifies the resistive switching effect. This study has important implications at the array‐level performance of high density resistive switching memories.

  2. Atomic Scale Modulation of Self-Rectifying Resistive Switching by Interfacial Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xing

    2018-04-14

    Higher memory density and faster computational performance of resistive switching cells require reliable array‐accessible architecture. However, selecting a designated cell within a crossbar array without interference from sneak path currents through neighboring cells is a general problem. Here, a highly doped n++ Si as the bottom electrode with Ni‐electrode/HfOx/SiO2 asymmetric self‐rectifying resistive switching device is fabricated. The interfacial defects in the HfOx/SiO2 junction and n++ Si substrate result in the reproducible rectifying behavior. In situ transmission electron microscopy is used to quantitatively study the properties of the morphology, chemistry, and dynamic nucleation–dissolution evolution of the chains of defects at the atomic scale. The spatial and temporal correlation between the concentration of oxygen vacancies and Ni‐rich conductive filament modifies the resistive switching effect. This study has important implications at the array‐level performance of high density resistive switching memories.

  3. Fabrication of atomic-scale gold junctions by electrochemical plating using a common medical liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeno, A.; Hirakawa, K.

    2005-04-01

    Fabrication of nanometer-separated gold junctions has been performed using "iodine tincture," a medical liquid known as a disinfectant, as an etching/deposition electrolyte. In the gold-dissolved iodine tincture, gold electrodes were grown or eroded slowly enough to form quantum point contacts in an atomic scale. The resistance evolution during the electrochemical deposition showed plateaus at integer multiples of the resistance quantum, (2e2/h)-1, at room temperature (e: the elementary charge, h: the Planck constant). Iodine tincture is a commercially available common material, which makes the fabrication process to be simple and cost effective. Moreover, in contrast to the conventional electrochemical approaches, this method is free from highly toxic cyanide compounds or extraordinarily strong acids.

  4. Atomic Scale Picture of the Ion Conduction Mechanism in Tetrahedral Network of Lanthanum Barium Gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalarvo, Niina H [ORNL; Gourdon, Olivier [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Gout, Delphine J [ORNL; Ohl, Michael E [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Combined experimental study of impedance spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering was performed to shed light into the atomic scale ion migration processes in proton and oxide ion conductor; La0.8Ba1.2GaO3.9 . This material consist of tetrahedral GaO4 units, which are rather flexible and rocking motion of these units promotes the ionic migration process. The oxide ion (vacancy) conduction takes place on channels along c axis, involving a single elementary step, which occurs between adjacent tetrahedron (inter-tetrahedron jump). The proton conduction mechanism consists of intra-tetrahedron and inter-tetrahedron elementary processes. The intra-tetrahedron proton transport is the rate-limiting process, with activation energy of 0.44 eV. The rocking motion of the GaO4 tetrahedron aids the inter-tetrahedral proton transport, which has the activation energy of 0.068 eV.

  5. Atomic-Scale Simulation of Electrochemical Processes at Electrode/Water Interfaces under Referenced Bias Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Assil; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2018-04-19

    Based on constant Fermi-level molecular dynamics and a proper alignment scheme, we perform simulations of the Pt(111)/water interface under variable bias potential referenced to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). Our scheme yields a potential of zero charge μ pzc of ∼0.22 eV relative to the SHE and a double layer capacitance C dl of ≃19 μF cm -2 , in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In addition, we study the structural reorganization of the electrical double layer for bias potentials ranging from -0.92 eV to +0.44 eV and find that O down configurations, which are dominant at potentials above the pzc, reorient to favor H down configurations as the measured potential becomes negative. Our modeling scheme allows one to not only access atomic-scale processes at metal/water interfaces, but also to quantitatively estimate macroscopic electrochemical quantities.

  6. Atomic-scale Ge diffusion in strained Si revealed by quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Favre, L.; Couillard, M.; Amiard, G.; Berbezier, I.; Botton, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to investigate the local chemistry in the vicinity of a Si0.8Ge0.2/Si interface grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark field contrast reveals the presence of a nonuniform diffusion of Ge from the substrate into the strained Si thin film. On the basis of multislice calculations, a model is proposed to quantify the experimental contrast, showing that the Ge concentration in the thin film reaches about 4% at the interface and decreases monotonically on a typical length scale of 10 nm. Diffusion occurring during the growth process itself therefore appears as a major factor limiting the abruptness of interfaces in the Si-Ge system.

  7. High frequency measurements of shot noise suppression in atomic-scale metal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Patrick J.; Evans, Kenneth; Russom, Jeffrey; King, Nicholas; Natelson, Douglas

    2009-03-01

    Shot noise provides a means of assessing the number and transmission coefficients of transmitting channels in atomic- and molecular-scale junctions. Previous experiments at low temperatures in metal and semiconductor point contacts have demonstrated the expected suppression of shot noise when junction conductance is near an integer multiple of the conductance quantum, G0≡2e^2/h. Using high frequency techniques, we demonstrate the high speed acquisition of such data at room temperature in mechanical break junctions. In clean Au contacts conductance histograms with clear peaks at G0, 2G0, and 3G0 are acquired within hours, and histograms of simultaneous measurements of the shot noise show clear suppression at those conductance values. We describe the dependence of the noise on bias voltage and analyze the noise vs. conductance histograms in terms of a model that averages over transmission coefficients.

  8. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  9. Atomic Scale Structure-Chemistry Relationships at Oxide Catalyst Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E.

    Oxide catalysts are integral to chemical production, fuel refining, and the removal of environmental pollutants. However, the atomic-scale phenomena which lead to the useful reactive properties of catalyst materials are not sufficiently understood. In this work, the tools of surface and interface science and electronic structure theory are applied to investigate the structure and chemical properties of catalytically active particles and ultrathin films supported on oxide single crystals. These studies focus on structure-property relationships in vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and mixed V-W oxides on the surfaces of alpha-Al2O3 and alpha-Fe2O 3 (0001)-oriented single crystal substrates, two materials with nearly identical crystal structures but drastically different chemical properties. In situ synchrotron X-ray standing wave (XSW) measurements are sensitive to changes in the atomic-scale geometry of single crystal model catalyst surfaces through chemical reaction cycles, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals corresponding chemical changes. Experimental results agree with theoretical calculations of surface structures, allowing for detailed electronic structure investigations and predictions of surface chemical phenomena. The surface configurations and oxidation states of V and W are found to depend on the coverage of each, and reversible structural shifts accompany chemical state changes through reduction-oxidation cycles. Substrate-dependent effects suggest how the choice of oxide support material may affect catalytic behavior. Additionally, the structure and chemistry of W deposited on alpha-Fe 2O3 nanopowders is studied using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in an attempt to bridge single crystal surface studies with real catalysts. These investigations of catalytically active material surfaces can inform the rational design of new catalysts for more efficient and sustainable chemistry.

  10. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure

  11. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  12. The softness of an atom in a molecule and a functional group softness definition; an LCAO scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de; Pires, J.M.; Pitanga, P.

    1987-01-01

    We introduce a scale for the softness of an atom in different molecules and we similarly define a functional group softness. These definitions, unlike previous ones, are not tied to the finite difference approximation neither, hence, to valence state ionization potentials and electron affinities; they result from the LCAO calculation itself. We conclude that a) the softness of an atom in a molecule shows wide variations; b) the geometric average of the softnesses of the atoms in the molecule gives the most consistent results for the molecular softnesses; c) the functional group softness is transferable within a homologous series. (Author) [pt

  13. Modern radio-optical methods in quantum magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, Evgenii B; Vershovskii, Anton K

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an extension of a part of the talk delivered under the more general title 'Narrow spectral lines in fundamental metrology: state of the art, prospects, and problems' at the session of the 90th anniversary of Physics-Uspekhi. The talk reviewed past developments and the current status of the metrology of length, frequency/time, and magnetic fields. The measurement of these quantities currently relies on the high stability of energies of standard transitions between metastable atomic states. Because of space restrictions in the journal, all metrology topics other than the title one were omitted in the present review. (oral issue of the journal 'uspekhi fizicheskikh nauk')

  14. Towards the atomic-scale characterization of isolated iron sites confined in a nitrogen-doped graphene matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingfei; Liu, Yun; Li, Haobo [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Li, Lulu [College of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116023 (China); Deng, Dehui [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Yang, Fan, E-mail: fyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Bao, Xinhe, E-mail: xhbao@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Local atomic and electronic structure of the Fe-N-C catalyst characterized by STM and STS. • The combination of air-AFM, UHV-STM and DFT calculations for the characterization of powder catalysts. • The selection of solvent is vital to the homogeneous dispersion of powder catalyst on a planar support. - Abstract: Atomic scale characterization of the surface structure of powder catalysts is essential to the identification of active sites, but remains a major challenge in catalysis research. We described here a procedure that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM), operated in air, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), operated in UHV, to obtain the atomic structure and local electronic properties of powder catalysts. The atomically dispersed Fe-N-C catalyst was used as an example, which was synthesized by low temperature ball milling methods. We discussed the effect of solvents in the dispersion of powder catalysts on a planar support, which is key to the subsequent atomic characterization. From the morphology, atomic structure and local electronic properties of the Fe-N-C catalyst, our combined measurements also provide an insight for the effect of ball milling in the preparation of atomically dispersed metal catalysts.

  15. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  16. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  17. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  18. Consequences of atomic layer etching on wafer scale uniformity in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Chad M.; Lanham, Steven J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) typically divides the etching process into two self-limited reactions. One reaction passivates a single layer of material while the second preferentially removes the passivated layer. As such, under ideal conditions the wafer scale uniformity of ALE should be independent of the uniformity of the reactant fluxes onto the wafers, provided all surface reactions are saturated. The passivation and etch steps should individually asymptotically saturate after a characteristic fluence of reactants has been delivered to each site. In this paper, results from a computational investigation are discussed regarding the uniformity of ALE of Si in Cl2 containing inductively coupled plasmas when the reactant fluxes are both non-uniform and non-ideal. In the parameter space investigated for inductively coupled plasmas, the local etch rate for continuous processing was proportional to the ion flux. When operated with saturated conditions (that is, both ALE steps are allowed to self-terminate), the ALE process is less sensitive to non-uniformities in the incoming ion flux than continuous etching. Operating ALE in a sub-saturation regime resulted in less uniform etching. It was also found that ALE processing with saturated steps requires a larger total ion fluence than continuous etching to achieve the same etch depth. This condition may result in increased resist erosion and/or damage to stopping layers using ALE. While these results demonstrate that ALE provides increased etch depth uniformity, they do not show an improved critical dimension uniformity in all cases. These possible limitations to ALE processing, as well as increased processing time, will be part of the process optimization that includes the benefits of atomic resolution and improved uniformity.

  19. Determination of Krypton Diffusion Coefficients in Uranium Dioxide Using Atomic Scale Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vathonne, Emerson; Andersson, David A; Freyss, Michel; Perriot, Romain; Cooper, Michael W D; Stanek, Christopher R; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2017-01-03

    We present a study of the diffusion of krypton in UO 2 using atomic scale calculations combined with diffusion models adapted to the system studied. The migration barriers of the elementary mechanisms for interstitial or vacancy assisted migration are calculated in the DFT+U framework using the nudged elastic band method. The attempt frequencies are obtained from the phonon modes of the defect at the initial and saddle points using empirical potential methods. The diffusion coefficients of Kr in UO 2 are then calculated by combining this data with diffusion models accounting for the concentration of vacancies and the interaction of vacancies with Kr atoms. We determined the preferred mechanism for Kr migration and the corresponding diffusion coefficient as a function of the oxygen chemical potential μ O or nonstoichiometry. For very hypostoichiometric (or U-rich) conditions, the most favorable mechanism is interstitial migration. For hypostoichiometric UO 2 , migration is assisted by the bound Schottky defect and the charged uranium vacancy, V U 4- . Around stoichiometry, migration assisted by the charged uranium-oxygen divacancy (V UO 2- ) and V U 4- is the favored mechanism. Finally, for hyperstoichiometric or O-rich conditions, the migration assisted by two V U 4- dominates. Kr migration is enhanced at higher μ O , and in this regime, the activation energy will be between 4.09 and 0.73 eV depending on nonstoichiometry. The experimental values available are in the latter interval. Since it is very probable that these values were obtained for at least slightly hyperstoichiometric samples, our activation energies are consistent with the experimental data, even if further experiments with precisely controlled stoichiometry are needed to confirm these results. The mechanisms and trends with nonstoichiometry established for Kr are similar to those found in previous studies of Xe.

  20. Quantitative atom probe analysis of nanostructure containing clusters and precipitates with multiple length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marceau, R.K.W.; Stephenson, L.T.; Hutchinson, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    A model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered in this study. It has recently been shown that the addition of the GP zones to such microstructures can lead to significant increases in strength without a decrease in the uniform elongation. In this study, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis has clearly shown strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones, which is supported by the current APT data with additional spatial information. There is significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation. A new approach for cluster finding in APT data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features in the solid solution solute as a function of applied strain. -- Research highlights: → A new approach for cluster finding in atom probe tomography (APT) data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features with multiple length scales. → In this study, a model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered. → APT has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. → It is clearly shown that there is strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones with significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation.

  1. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngayam Happy, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  2. Nanometer-scale isotope analysis of bulk diamond by atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, R.; Raatz, N.; Meijer, J.; Markham, M.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) combines field emission of atoms with mass spectrometry to reconstruct three-dimensional tomograms of materials with atomic resolution and isotope specificity. Despite significant recent progress in APT technology, application to wide-bandgap materials with strong

  3. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  4. Magnetometry with Ensembles of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Bulk Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-23

    the ESR curve. Any frequency components of the photodetector signal which are not close to the reference frequency, are filtered out. This mitigates ...indicating that we have not yet run up against thermal or flicker noise for these time scales. 5.3 Details of frequency modulation circuit In order

  5. Detecting Magnetic Monopoles in Spin Ice with NV-magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Felix; Kirschner, Franziska; Yao, Norman; Blundell, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic monopoles, isolated north and south poles, appear not to exist as fundamental particles in our universe. Nevertheless, it has been proposed that they may emerge as quasiparticles in certain materials: the geometrically-frustrated `spin ice' pyrochlores dysprosium and holmium titanate. Despite a great deal of experimental and theoretical work, the smoking gun signature of magnetic monopoles in spin ice remains to be discovered. A promising candidate for the detection of individual magnetic monopoles comes in the form of Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) defects in diamond, which act as very sensitive probes of vector magnetic fields on the nanometre scale. We present the result of Monte Carlo modeling for the precise signals one would expect to see with nanometre-scale probes such as NV-magnetometers or muon spin rotation.

  6. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale

  7. Atomic-scale structure of self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum rings in GaAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Wolter, J.H.; Granados, D.; Garcia, J.M.; Fomin, V.; Gladilin, V.N.; Devreese, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    We present an atomic-scale analysis of the indium distribution of self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum rings (QRs) which are formed from InAs quantum dots by capping with a thin layer of GaAs and subsequent annealing. We find that the size and shape of QRs as observed by cross-sectional scanning

  8. The geopotential value W 0 for specifying the relativistic atomic time scale and a global vertical reference system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burša, Milan; Kenyon, S.; Kouba, J.; Šíma, Zdislav; Vatrt, V.; Vítek, V.; Vojtíšková, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2007), s. 103-110 ISSN 0949-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : geopotential * vertical datum unification * relativistic atomic time scale Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.636, year: 2007

  9. Approximate symmetries in atomic nuclei from a large-scale shell-model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launey, K. D.; Draayer, J. P.; Dytrych, T.; Sun, G.-H.; Dong, S.-H.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we review recent developments that aim to achieve further understanding of the structure of atomic nuclei, by capitalizing on exact symmetries as well as approximate symmetries found to dominate low-lying nuclear states. The findings confirm the essential role played by the Sp(3, ℝ) symplectic symmetry to inform the interaction and the relevant model spaces in nuclear modeling. The significance of the Sp(3, ℝ) symmetry for a description of a quantum system of strongly interacting particles naturally emerges from the physical relevance of its generators, which directly relate to particle momentum and position coordinates, and represent important observables, such as, the many-particle kinetic energy, the monopole operator, the quadrupole moment and the angular momentum. We show that it is imperative that shell-model spaces be expanded well beyond the current limits to accommodate particle excitations that appear critical to enhanced collectivity in heavier systems and to highly-deformed spatial structures, exemplified by the second 0+ state in 12C (the challenging Hoyle state) and 8Be. While such states are presently inaccessible by large-scale no-core shell models, symmetry-based considerations are found to be essential.

  10. Universal scaling relations for the energies of many-electron Hooke atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriazola, A.; Solanpää, J.; Kylänpää, I.; González, A.; Räsänen, E.

    2017-04-01

    A three-dimensional harmonic oscillator consisting of N ≥2 Coulomb-interacting charged particles, often called a (many-electron) Hooke atom, is a popular model in computational physics for, e.g., semiconductor quantum dots and ultracold ions. Starting from Thomas-Fermi theory, we show that the ground-state energy of such a system satisfies a nontrivial relation: Eg s=ω N4 /3fg s(β N1 /2) , where ω is the oscillator strength, β is the ratio between Coulomb and oscillator characteristic energies, and fg s is a universal function. We perform extensive numerical calculations to verify the applicability of the relation. In addition, we show that the chemical potentials and addition energies also satisfy approximate scaling relations. In all cases, analytic expressions for the universal functions are provided. The results have predictive power in estimating the key ground-state properties of the system in the large-N limit, and can be used in the development of approximative methods in electronic structure theory.

  11. Direct imaging of atomic-scale ripples in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei L; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David C; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-05-09

    Graphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range.

  12. Quantized edge modes in atomic-scale point contacts in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinikar, Amogh; Phanindra Sai, T.; Bhattacharyya, Semonti; Agarwala, Adhip; Biswas, Tathagata; Sarker, Sanjoy K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Jain, Manish; Shenoy, Vijay B.; Ghosh, Arindam

    2017-07-01

    The zigzag edges of single- or few-layer graphene are perfect one-dimensional conductors owing to a set of gapless states that are topologically protected against backscattering. Direct experimental evidence of these states has been limited so far to their local thermodynamic and magnetic properties, determined by the competing effects of edge topology and electron-electron interaction. However, experimental signatures of edge-bound electrical conduction have remained elusive, primarily due to the lack of graphitic nanostructures with low structural and/or chemical edge disorder. Here, we report the experimental detection of edge-mode electrical transport in suspended atomic-scale constrictions of single and multilayer graphene created during nanomechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The edge-mode transport leads to the observed quantization of conductance close to multiples of G0 = 2e2/h. At the same time, conductance plateaux at G0/2 and a split zero-bias anomaly in non-equilibrium transport suggest conduction via spin-polarized states in the presence of an electron-electron interaction.

  13. A SQUID magnetometry system for a cryogenic neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S., E-mail: s.henry@physics.ox.ac.uk; Clarke, C.; Cottle, A.; Lynch, A.; Pipe, M.

    2014-11-01

    Precision magnetometry is an essential component of any neutron electric dipole moment experiment in order to correct shifts in the neutron precession frequency due to changes in the magnetic field. We have developed a magnetometry system using 12 SQUID sensors, designed to operate in 0.5 K superfluid helium. The pick-up loops located near the neutron cell are connected to the SQUID sensors by ∼2 m twisted wire pairs. The SQUID readout cables are run via an intermediate stage at 4.2 K. The system has been installed and tested in the cryoEDM apparatus at the ILL, Grenoble, and used to characterise the magnetic environment. Further tests in a suitable low noise environment confirm it meets our requirements.

  14. Mikro-Hall-Magnetometrie an ferromagnetischen Nanostrukturen im Vortex- und Single-Domain-Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Diese Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Untersuchung des Ummagnetisierungsverhaltens ferromagnetischer Permalloy-Kreisscheiben. Im Gegensatz zu integralen Methoden, die über eine Vielzahl nominell identischer Strukturen mitteln, wird das individuelle Schaltverhalten einzelner Strukturen analysiert. Die Untersuchungen erfolgten dabei mit Hilfe der Mikro-Hall-Magnetometrie und der Lorentz-Transmissions-Elektronen-Mikroskopie und werden mit mikromagnetischen Simulationen verglichen. Für die Hall-M...

  15. Probing condensed matter physics with magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic fields generated by spins and currents provide a unique window into the physics of correlated-electron materials and devices. First proposed only a decade ago, magnetometry based on the electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond is emerging as a platform that is excellently suited for probing condensed matter systems; it can be operated from cryogenic temperatures to above room temperature, has a dynamic range spanning from direct current to gigahertz and allows sensor-sample distances as small as a few nanometres. As such, NV magnetometry provides access to static and dynamic magnetic and electronic phenomena with nanoscale spatial resolution. Pioneering work has focused on proof-of-principle demonstrations of its nanoscale imaging resolution and magnetic field sensitivity. Now, experiments are starting to probe the correlated-electron physics of magnets and superconductors and to explore the current distributions in low-dimensional materials. In this Review, we discuss the application of NV magnetometry to the exploration of condensed matter physics, focusing on its use to study static and dynamic magnetic textures and static and dynamic current distributions.

  16. STM studies of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghun; Daughton, David; Gupta, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Electric-field control of spin-spin interactions at the atomic level is desirable for the realization of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the realization of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy on the GaAs(110) surface[1]. We can position these vacancies with atomic precision using the tip of a home-built, low temperature STM. Tunneling spectroscopy of single Mn acceptors is used to quantify the electrostatic field as a function of distance from the vacancy. Single Mn acceptors are formed by substituting Mn adatoms for Ga atoms in the first layer of the p-GaAs(110) surface[2]. Depending on the distance, the in-gap resonance of single Mn acceptors can shift as much as 200meV. Our data indicate that the electrostatic field decays according to a screened Coulomb potential. The charge state of the vacancy can be switched to neutral, as evidenced by the Mn resonance returning to its unperturbed position. Reversible control of the local electric field as well as charged states of defects in semiconductors can open new insights such as realizing an atomic-scale gate control and studying spin-spin interactions in semiconductors. http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/sim jgupta [1] D. Lee and J.A. Gupta (in preparation) [2] D. Kitchen et al., Nature 442, 436-439 (2006)

  17. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  18. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakur Shahabi, Hamed [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Photon Science DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  19. Dielectric discontinuity at interfaces in the atomic-scale limit: permittivity of ultrathin oxide films on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Feliciano; Umari, Paolo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2003-12-31

    Using a density-functional approach, we study the dielectric permittivity across interfaces at the atomic scale. Focusing on the static and high-frequency permittivities of SiO2 films on silicon, for oxide thicknesses from 12 A down to the atomic scale, we find a departure from bulk values in accord with experiment. A classical three-layer model accounts for the calculated permittivities and is supported by the microscopic polarization profile across the interface. The local screening varies on length scales corresponding to first-neighbor distances, indicating that the dielectric transition is governed by the chemical grading. Silicon-induced gap states are shown to play a minor role.

  20. Visualisation and orbital-free parametrisation of the large-Z scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Antonio C.; Redd, Jeremy J.

    2017-03-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large Z, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of integrated energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualise the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models for the kinetic energy to describe these features, with some success, but the effects of quantum oscillations in the inner shells of atoms make a complete parametrisation difficult. We discuss implications for improved orbital-free description of molecular properties.

  1. Atom probe characterization of nano-scaled features in irradiated Eurofer and ODS Eurofer steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogozkin, S.; Aleev, A.; Nikitin, A.; Zaluzhnyi, A.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.

    2009-01-01

    Outstanding performance of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels at high temperatures and up to high doses allowed to consider them as potential candidates for fusion and fission power plants. At the same time their mechanical parameters strongly correlate with number density of oxide particles and their size. It is believed that fine particles are formed at the last stage of sophisticated production procedures and play a crucial role in higher heat- and radiation resistance in comparison with conventional materials. However, due to their small size - only few nanometers, characterization of such objects requires considerable efforts. Recent study of ODS steel by tomographic atom probe, the most appropriate technique in this case, shown considerable stability of these particles under high temperatures and ion-irradiation. However, these results were obtained for 12/14% Cr with addition of 0.3% Y 2 O 3 and titanium which is inappropriate in case of ODS Eurofer 97 and possibility to substitute neutron by ion irradiation is still under consideration. In this work effect of neutron irradiation on nanostructure behaviour of ODS Eurofer are investigated. Irradiation was performed on research reactor BOR-60 in SSC RF RIAR (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) up to 30 dpa at 280 deg. C and 580 deg. C. Recent investigation of unirradiated state revealed high number density of nano-scaled features (nano-clusters) even without addition of Ti in steel. It was shown that vanadium played significant role in nucleation process and core of nano-clusters was considerably enriched with it. In irradiated samples solution of vanadium in matrix was observed while the size of particles stayed practically unchanged. Also no nitrogen was detected in these particles in comparison with unirradiated state where bond energy of N with V was considered to be high as VN 2+ ions were detected on mass-spectra. (author)

  2. Magnetometry and transport studies of 2D systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, J.P

    1999-06-01

    This thesis presents measurements of the magnetisation and magnetotransport of two-dimensional electron and hole systems, at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. When the magnetic field is swept through a resistivity minimum associated with the quantum Hall effect, circulating 'eddy' currents are induced in the 2D electron system. These currents may be large enough to cause breakdown of the quantum Hall effect. Breakdown has been examined in high-mobility electron and hole samples, by recording the magnetic moments associated with these eddy currents, and the results have been compared to breakdown models. Eddy currents observed at fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) filling factors have been used to determine the FQHE gap energy. The measured value is far closer to theoretical predictions than the results of conventional measurements: this is thought to be because breakdown arises through inter-Landau-level tunnelling, which is local on the scale of the disorder. A series of quantum Hall effect measurements have been performed on a low density sample. Depopulating the Landau levels by applying an increasing gate voltage allowed the numbers of localised and extended states to be counted at each magnetic field. The number of extended states may the be plotted as a function of reducing magnetic field. In certain circumstances, the number of extended states drops to zero before the magnetic field is zero: the system is entirely localised for a range of small fields, consistent with the theories of levitation of extended states. The idea that each Landau level contains only one extended state is also challenged. Measurements of the equilibrium magnetisation of a 2DES may be used to give insight into the shape of the electron density of states. Results are presented of the de Haas - van Alphen oscillations of a very high mobility, low density sample, in which magnetisation oscillations are observed at odd as well as even integer filling factors. The

  3. Atomic scale study of grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation in Ni–Cr–Fe Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: huili@shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xia, Shuang [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu, Wenqing [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Tingguang; Zhou, Bangxin [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Impurities segregated at grain boundaries were observed by atom probe tomography. • The comparison of segregation features in two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys was studied by APT. • C and Cr atoms co-segregated at grain boundaries before carbide precipitation. -- Abstract: Three dimensional chemical information concerning grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation was characterized by atom probe tomography in two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys which were aged at 500 °C for 0.5 h after homogenizing treatment. B, C and Si atoms segregation at grain boundary in Alloy 690 was observed. B, C, N and P atoms segregation at grain boundary in 304 austenitic stainless steel was observed. C atoms co-segregation with Cr atoms at the grain boundaries both in Alloy 690 and 304 austenitic stainless steel was found, and its effect on the carbide nucleation was discussed. The amount of each segregated element at grain boundaries in the two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys were analyzed quantitatively. Comparison of the grain boundary segregation features of the two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys were carried out based on the experimental results.

  4. Microstructural investigation of Sr-modified Al-15 wt%Si alloys in the range from micrometer to atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpel, M; Wanderka, N; Vinod Kumar, G S; Banhart, J

    2011-05-01

    Strontium-modified Al-15 wt%Si casting alloys were investigated after 5 and 60 min of melt holding. The eutectic microstructures were studied using complementary methods at different length scales: focused ion beam-energy selective backscattered tomography, transmission electron microscopy and 3D atom probe. Whereas the samples after 5 min of melt holding show that the structure of eutectic Si changes into a fine fibrous morphology, the increase of prolonged melt holding (60 min) leads to the loss of Sr within the alloy with an evolution of an unmodified eutectic microstructure displaying coarse interconnected Si plates. Strontium was found at the Al/Si eutectic interfaces on the side of the eutectic Al region, measured by 3D atom probe. The new results obtained using 3D atom probe shed light on the location of Sr within the Al-Si eutectic microstructure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Laboratory studies on tropospheric iodine chemistry: bridging the atomic, molecular and particle scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Martin, J.; Saunders, R. W.; Blitz, M. A.; Mahajan, A. S.; Plane, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    High mixing ratios of the iodine oxides IO and OIO have been observed in the polar, mid-latitude and tropical marine boundary layer (MBL). The impact of the iodine chemistry on the oxidizing capacity of the MBL is well documented. Moreover, there is evidence showing that the bursts of new particles measured in coastal regions are produced by the biogenic emission of iodine containing precursors, followed by the photochemical production and condensation of iodine oxide vapours. Airborne measurements of particle growth rates show that these particles can reach significant sizes where they can contribute to the regional aerosol loading, thus suggesting a potential impact on climate on a regional or global scale. Within the frame of the INSPECT project (INorganic Secondary Particle Evolution, Chemistry and Transport) we wish to understand at a fundamental level the tendency for the iodine oxides formed from IO and OIO recombination to condense into particles. Elemental analysis of iodine oxide particles (IOP) made in the laboratory shows that they have the empirical formula I2O5. The major question is how this happens: through formation of I2O5 in the gas phase, followed by polymerization, or by condensation of various IxOy to form amorphous iodine oxides, which subsequently rearrange to I2O5. We are studying the gas phase photochemistry leading to nucleation of IOP, their growth kinetics, aspects of their heterogeneous chemistry, and their properties as ice condensation nuclei. In order to bridge the molecular and the particle scales, a wide variety of techniques are being used, including CRDS, ARAS, LIF, UV-VIS spectroscopy, PI-TOF-MS and mobility particle size scanning. The results obtained so far provide new and interesting insights to the problem. From the gas phase point of view, a unit iodine atom quantum yield from OIO photolysis has been now established across its strong visible spectral bands. This result implies a short lifetime of OIO and explains why in

  6. Quantum interference between two phonon paths and reduced heat transport in diamond lattice with atomic-scale planar defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    Destructive quantum interference between the waves propagating through laterally inhomogeneous layer can result in their total reflection, which in turn reduces energy flux carried by these waves. We consider the systems of Ge atoms, which fully or partly, in the chequer-wise order, fill a crystal plane in diamond-like Si lattice. We have revealed that a single type of the atomic defects, which are placed in identical positions in different unit cells in the defect crystal plane, can result in double transmission antiresonances of phonon wave packets. This new effect we relate with the complex structure of the diamond-like unit cell, which comprises two atoms in different positions and results in two distinct vibration resonances in two interfering phonon paths. We also consider the propagation of phonon wave packets in the superlatticies made of the defect planes, half-filled in the chequer-wise order with Ge atoms. We have revealed relatively broad phonon stop bands with center frequencies at the transmission antiresonances. We elaborate the equivalent analytical quasi-1D lattice model of the two phonon paths through the complex planar defect in the diamond-like lattice and describe the reduction of phonon heat transfer through the atomic-scale planar defects.

  7. Atomic scale study of grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Liu, Wenqing; Liu, Tingguang; Zhou, Bangxin

    2013-08-01

    Three dimensional chemical information concerning grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation was characterized by atom probe tomography in two Ni-Cr-Fe alloys which were aged at 500 °C for 0.5 h after homogenizing treatment. B, C and Si atoms segregation at grain boundary in Alloy 690 was observed. B, C, N and P atoms segregation at grain boundary in 304 austenitic stainless steel was observed. C atoms co-segregation with Cr atoms at the grain boundaries both in Alloy 690 and 304 austenitic stainless steel was found, and its effect on the carbide nucleation was discussed. The amount of each segregated element at grain boundaries in the two Ni-Cr-Fe alloys were analyzed quantitatively. Comparison of the grain boundary segregation features of the two Ni-Cr-Fe alloys were carried out based on the experimental results. The impurity and solute atoms segregate inhomogeneously in the same grain boundary both in 304 SS and Alloy 690. The grain boundary segregation tendencies (Sav) are B (11.8 ± 1.4) > P (5.4 ± 1.4) > N (4.7 ± 0.3) > C (3.7 ± 0.4) in 304 SS, and B (6.9 ± 0.9) > C (6.7 ± 0.4) > Si (1.5 ± 0.2) in Alloy 690. Cr atoms may co-segregate with C atoms at grain boundaries before carbide nucleation at the grain boundaries both in 304 SS and Alloy 690. Ni atoms generally deplete at grain boundary both in 304 SS and Alloy 690. The literature shows that the Ni atoms may co-segregate with P atoms at grain boundaries [28], but the P atoms segregation do not leads to Ni segregation in the current study. In the current study, Fe atoms may segregate or deplete at grain boundary in Alloy 690. But Fe atoms generally deplete at grain boundary in 304 SS. B atoms have the strongest grain boundary segregation tendency both in 304 SS and Alloy 690. The grain boundary segregation tendency and Gibbs free energy of B in 304 SS is higher than in Alloy 690. C atoms are easy to segregate at grain boundaries both in 304 SS and Alloy 690. The grain boundary segregation

  8. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-01

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO 2 is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  9. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  10. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    materials to applications such as vibrating joints1,2, contacting and sliding surfaces in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems for sensors and...Friction and Wear. R.W. Carpick, Midwest Mechanics 2014/2015 Invited Speaker , Iowa State University, Feb. 2015. 4. Invited. Atomic-Scale Processes...in Single Asperity Friction and Wear. R.W. Carpick, Midwest Mechanics 2014/2015 Invited Speaker , University of Minnesota, Feb. 2015. 5. Invited

  11. Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-09

    Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene Report Term: 0-Other Email ...Principal: Y Name: Jay A Gupta Email : gupta.208@osu.edu Name: Roland K Kawakami Email : kawakami.15@osu.edu RPPR Final Report as of 13-Nov-2017...studies on films and devices. Optimization of the Cr tip will be the next important step to establish this technique. We are writing up these early

  12. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  13. Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2003-01-01

    In a previous computer simulation experiment, the accumulation of damage in SiC from the overlap of 10 keV Si displacement cascades at 200 K was investigated, and the damage states produced following each cascade were archived for further analysis. In the present study, interstitial clustering, system energy, and volume changes are investigated as the damage states evolve due to cascade overlap. An amorphous state is achieved at a damage energy density of 27.5 eV/atom (0.28 displacements per atom). At low dose levels, most defects are produced as isolated Frenkel pairs, with a small number of defect clusters involving only 4 to 6 atoms; however, after the overlap of 5 cascades (0.0125 displacements per atom), the size and number of interstitial clusters increases with increasing dose. The average energy per atom increases linearly with increasing short-range (or chemical) disorder. The volume change exhibits two regimes of linear dependence on system energy and increases more rapidly with dose than either the energy or the disorder, which indicate a significant contribution to swelling of isolated interstitials and anti-site defects. The saturation volume change for the cascade-amorphized state in these simulations is 8.2%, which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental value of 10.8% in neutron-irradiated SiC

  14. Prospects on the application of HTS SQUID magnetometry to nondestructive evaluation (NDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, H.

    1993-04-01

    In light of recent advances in the fabrication of low-noise HTS SQUIDs, a review is presented on the use of LTS SQUID magnetometry for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Examples are given on applications relating to defects in steel, subsurface cracks in aircraft frames, and voids in non-metallic structures. HTS SQUIDs may make a significant difference in the acceptance of these applications because sensing coils will be closer to a sample under test, there will be greater instrument portability and the problem of bringing liquid helium to remote locations will be eliminated.

  15. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    of magnetometers is demonstrated, confirming the high performance of these instruments. The results presented here, including the characterisation of a Sun-driven disturbance field, form the basis of the correction of the magnetic vector measurements from Swarm which is applied to the Swarm Level 1b magnetic data.......We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs...

  16. Josephson current at atomic scale: Tunneling and nanocontacts using a STM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, J.G.; Crespo, V.; Vieira, S.

    2006-01-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope, STM, with a superconducting tip, we have measured the Josephson current in atomic size tunnel junctions and contacts with a small number of quantum channels of conduction. We analyze our results in terms of the Ivanchenko and Zil'berman model for phase diffusion. The effect of the thermal energy and the electromagnetic environment on the Josephson current is discussed in terms of the transmissions of the individual quantum channels. These results suppose an initial step to the control of Scanning Josephson Spectroscopy at atomic level

  17. Atomic-scale processes revealing dynamic twin boundary strengthening mechanisms in face-centered cubic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.Q.; Chisholm, M.F.; He, L.L.; Pennycook, S.J.; Ye, H.Q.

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental investigations on interactions/reactions between dislocations and twin boundaries in Al. The absorption of screw dislocations via cross-slip and the production of stair-rods via reactions with non-screw dislocations were verified by atomic resolution imaging. Importantly, the resulting partial dislocations moving along twin boundaries can produce secondary sessile defects. These immobile defects act as obstacles to other dislocations and also serve to pin the twin boundaries. These findings show the atomic-level dynamics of the dislocation–twin boundary processes and the unique strengthening mechanism of twin boundaries in face-centered cubic metals.

  18. Assessment of the Scales of Gilthead Seabream (Sparus aurata L. by Image Analysis and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Casado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the protective role of fish skin is critical to improving the development of aquaculture, since skin is the main surface that separates the animal from its always hazardous environment. Many techniques have been used for its study, but certain structural characteristics of fish skin still remain not clearly understood. That is the case with scales, which have always been attributed a mere protective role, but which are proving to have more functions than it was traditionally thought. To acquire a deeper knowledge, scales from six different regions of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L. were studied and measured by image analysis. Results prove that scales from the base of the dorsal fin are larger than those in other parts of the fish body while scales from the peduncle are the smallest of the skin. Furthermore, a technique relatively new in this field, known as atomic force microscopy (AFM, was used to obtain representations of the ultrastructure of the scales and measure certain features such as the circuli and the lines in the basal layer. The data obtained allowed us to compare the height of circuli among the different scales, showing that they were higher in scales from the dorsum and the operculum. The present results introduce a nanostructural model of the scales of gilthead seabream that might serve as a useful guideline for future studies.

  19. Rubidium distribution at atomic scale in high efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Raghuwanshi, Mohit; Duguay, Sébastien; Castro, Celia; Cadel, Emmanuel; Pareige, Philippe; Jackson, Philip; Wuerz, Roland; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Witte, Wolfram

    2018-03-01

    The introduction of a rubidium fluoride post deposition treatment (RbF-PDT) for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers has led to a record efficiency up to 22.6% for thin-film solar cell technology. In the present work, high efficiency CIGS samples with RbF-PDT have been investigated by atom probe tomography (APT) to reveal the atomic distribution of all alkali elements present in CIGS layers and compared with non-treated samples. A Scanning Electron Microscopy Dual beam station (Focused Ion Beam-Gas Injection System) as well as Transmission Kikuchi diffraction is used for atom probe sample preparation and localization of the grain boundaries (GBs) in the area of interest. The analysis of the 3D atomic scale APT reconstructions of CIGS samples with RbF-PDT shows that inside grains, Rb is under the detection limit, but the Na concentration is enhanced as compared to the reference sample without Rb. At the GBs, a high concentration of Rb reaching 1.5 at. % was found, and Na and K (diffusing from the glass substrate) are also segregated at GBs but at lower concentrations as compared to Rb. The intentional introduction of Rb leads to significant changes in the chemical composition of CIGS matrix and at GBs, which might contribute to improve device efficiency.

  20. Predicting scattering properties of ultracold atoms : Adiabatic accumulated phase method and mass scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, B.J.; Kempen, van E.G.M.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2009-01-01

    Ultracold atoms are increasingly used for high-precision experiments that can be utilized to extract accurate scattering properties. This results in a stronger need to improve on the accuracy of interatomic potentials, and in particular the usually rather inaccurate inner-range potentials. A

  1. Atomic scale study of intrinsic and Mn doped quantum dots in III-V semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozkurt, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a Cross Sectional Scanning Tunneling Microscope (X-STM) is used to investigate nanostructures in IIIV semiconductors and single Mn impurities in bulk GaAs. The atomic resolution which can be achieved with X-STM makes it possible to link structural properties of nanostructures to

  2. Finite Bias Calculations to Model Interface Dipoles in Electrochemical Cells at the Atomic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure...

  3. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  4. Bending strain study of Bi-2223/Ag tapes using Hall sensor magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, M.; Paasi, J.; Sarkaniemi, J.; Han, Z.; Freltoft, T.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of room temperature bending on critical current (I c ) of Bi-2223/Ag tapes is studied by Hall sensor magnetometry, four-point method and scanning electron microscopy. Hall sensor magnetometry allows one to assess tape homogeneity and the amount of mechanical damage caused by bending. The microstructure of the Bi-2223 ceramic is found to strongly affect the tape behavior under bending strain. In a tape with moderate I c = 6.1 A at 77 K and a porous ceramic core, crack propagation took place normal to the Ag-ceramic interface, whereas in tapes with dense core, I c above 10 A at 77 K, cracks propagated in the tape plane. In monofilamentary tapes core homogeneity correlated with good bending strain performance. In multifilamentary tapes crack propagation between filaments was prohibited by the Ag matrix, thus leading to enhanced strain tolerance. In the high I c tapes studied, bending to 25 mm radius resulted in 1%--2% I c degradation

  5. Vector magnetometry of Fe/Cr/Fe trilayers with biquadratic coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansell, R; Petit, D; Fernández-Pacheco, A; Lee, J H; Chin, S-L; Lavrijsen, R; Cowburn, R P

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic reversal of epitaxial Fe/Cr/Fe trilayer samples grown on GaAs is studied. In wedged samples both long and short period coupling oscillations associated with Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida (RKKY) coupling in Cr are seen in the easy axis saturation fields. By using vector vibrating sample magnetometry and both longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry we are able to determine the exact reversal path of both the magnetic layers. Changes in the reversal behavior are seen with sub-monolayer changes of the thickness of the Cr interlayer. The two main reversal paths are described in terms of whether the reversal is dominated by bilinear RKKY coupling, which leads to an antiparallel state at remanence or by biquadratic coupling which leads to a 90 degree alignment of layers at remanence. The changing reversal behaviour is discussed with respect to the possibility of using such systems for multilayer memory applications and, in particular, the limits on the required accuracy of the sample growth. (letter)

  6. Atomic-scale nanoindentation: detection and identification of single glide events in three dimensions by force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egberts, P; Bennewitz, R

    2011-01-01

    Indentation experiments on the nanometre scale have been performed by means of atomic force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum on KBr(100) surfaces. The surfaces yield in the form of discrete surface displacements with a typical length scale of 1 A. These surface displacements are detected in both normal and lateral directions. Measurement of the lateral tip displacement requires a load-dependent calibration due to the load dependence of the effective lateral compliance. Correlation of the lateral and normal displacements for each glide event allow identification of the activated slip system. The results are discussed in terms of the resolved shear stress in indentation experiments and of typical results in atomistic simulations of nanometre-scale indentation.

  7. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations, the simulati......The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations......, the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width...

  8. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    Program summaryTitle of program: GRASP92 Catalogue identifier: ADCU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCU_v1_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: no Programming language used: Fortran Computer: IBM POWERstation 320H Operating system: IBM AIX 3.2.5+ RAM: 64M words No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 65 224 No of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 409 198 Distribution format: tar.gz Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADCU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic spectra—atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative decay rates—using a 'fully relativistic' approach. Solution method: Atomic orbitals are assumed to be four-component spinor eigenstates of the angular momentum operator, j=l+s, and the parity operator Π=βπ. Configuration state functions (CSFs) are linear combinations of Slater determinants of atomic orbitals, and are simultaneous eigenfunctions of the atomic electronic angular momentum operator, J, and the atomic parity operator, P. Lists of CSFs are either explicitly prescribed by the user or generated from a set of reference CSFs, a set of subshells, and rules for deriving other CSFs from these. Approximate atomic state functions (ASFs) are linear combinations of CSFs. A variational functional may be constructed by combining expressions for the energies of one or more ASFs. Average level (AL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of all possible ASFs that may be constructed from a set of CSFs; the number of ASFs is then the same as the number, n, of CSFs. Optimal level (OL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of some subset of ASFs; the GRASP92 package is optimized for this latter class of functionals. The composition of an ASF in terms

  9. Atomic scale study of the chemistry of oxygen, hydrogen and water at SiC surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy, Fabrice

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the achievable degree of homogeneity and the effect of surface structure on semiconductor surface chemistry is both academically challenging and of great practical interest to enable fabrication of future generations of devices. In that respect, silicon terminated SiC surfaces such as the cubic 3C-SiC(1 0 0) 3 x 2 and the hexagonal 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) 3 x 3 are of special interest since they give a unique opportunity to investigate the role of surface morphology on oxygen or hydrogen incorporation into the surface. In contrast to silicon, the subsurface structure plays a major role in the reactivity, leading to unexpected consequences such as the initial oxidation starting several atomic planes below the top surface or the surface metallization by atomic hydrogen. (review article)

  10. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    OpenAIRE

    T. L. Martin; C. Coe; P. A. J. Bagot; P. Morrall; G. D. W Smith; T. Scott; M. P. Moody

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (∼5 nm) interfacia...

  11. Atomic scale imaging of structural changes in solid electrolyte lanthanum lithium niobate upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaobing; Fisher, Craig A.J.; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Hoshikawa, Keigo; Moriwake, Hiroki; Kohama, Keiichi; Iba, Hideki; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    La (1-x)/3 Li x NbO 3 (LLNbO) is a promising electrolyte material for solid-state lithium-ion batteries because it is stable in contact with Li metal and contains a high concentration of intrinsic Li-ion vacancies. One strategy for improving its ionic conductivity and making it more competitive with other solid-state Li-ion electrolytes is to disorder the Li-ion vacancies by appropriate post-synthesis heat treatment, e.g., annealing. In this study, we examine the effects of annealing on single crystals of LLNbO with Li contents x = 0.07 and 0.13 based on simultaneous atomic resolution high angle annular dark field and annular bright field imaging methods using state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes. It is found that La modulation within A1 layers of the cation-deficient layered perovskite structure becomes more diffuse after annealing. In addition, some La atoms move to A-site positions and O4 window positions in the nominally vacant A2 layer, while O atom columns in this layer become rumpled in the [001] p direction, indicating that the NbO 6 octahedra are more heavily distorted after annealing. The observed crystal structure differences between as-prepared and annealed single crystals explain the drop in Li-ion conductivities of LLNbO single crystals after heat treatment.

  12. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  13. Atomic-Scale Characterization and Manipulation of Freestanding Graphene Using Adapted Capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Steven

    Graphene was the first two-dimensional material ever discovered, and it exhibits many unusual phenomena important to both pure and applied physics. To ensure the purest electronic structure, or to study graphene's elastic properties, it is often suspended over holes or trenches in a substrate. The aim of the research presented in this dissertation was to develop methods for characterizing and manipulating freestanding graphene on the atomic scale using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Conventional microscopy and spectroscopy techniques must be carefully reconsidered to account for movement of the extremely flexible sample. First, the acquisition of atomic-scale images of freestanding graphene using the STM and the ability to pull the graphene perpendicular to its plane by applying an electrostatic force with the STM tip are demonstrated. The atomic-scale images contained surprisingly large corrugations due to the electrostatic attractive force varying in registry with the local density of states. Meanwhile, a large range of control over the graphene height at a point was obtained by varying the tip bias voltage, and the application to strain engineering of graphene's so-called pseudomagnetic field is examined. Next, the effect of the tunneling current was investigated. With increasing current, the graphene sample moves away from the tip rather than toward it. It was determined that this must be due to local heating by the electric current, causing the graphene to contract because it has a negative coefficient of thermal expansion. Finally, by imaging a very small area, the STM can monitor the height of one location over long time intervals. Results sometimes exhibit periodic behavior, with a frequency and amplitude that depend on the tunneling current. These fluctuations are interpreted as low-frequency flexural phonon modes within elasticity theory. All of these findings set the foundation for employing a STM in the study of freestanding graphene.

  14. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  15. Atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning in severely deformed Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, X. H.; Cao, Y.; Liao, X. Z.; Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F.; Kawasaki, M.; Ringer, S. P.; Langdon, T. G.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    We report an atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning behaviour in Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites. Profuse twinning activities in Ag supply partial dislocations to directly transmit across the Ag-Cu lamellar interface that promotes deformation twinning in the neighbouring Cu lamellae although the interface is severely deformed. The trans-interface twin bands change the local structure at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the orientation relationship and interfacial structure between neighbouring Ag-Cu lamellae play a crucial role in such special interface-facilitated twinning behaviour

  16. Atomic-scale insight into the origin of pyridine inhibition of MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temel, Burcin; Tuxen, Anders K.; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    in earlier IR experiments on high surface alumina-supported MoS2 catalyst. The adsorption sites appear to be very similar to the brim sites involved in hydrogenation reactions in HDS. Thus, the combined STM and DFT results provide new atomic-scale insight into the inhibition effect of basic N......-compounds in HDS and the first direct observation of the adsorption mode of basic N-compounds on the catalytically active MoS2 edges. Our results lend further support to previously reported correlations between inhibiting strength and proton affinity for the N-containing compounds....

  17. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a f...

  18. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  19. Direct characterization of spin-transfer switching of nano-scale magnetic tunnel junctions using a conductive atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jia-Mou; Yang, Dong-Chin; Lee, Ching-Ming; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho; Lee, Yen-Chi; Wu, Jong-Ching

    2013-01-01

    We present an alternative method of spin-transfer-induced magnetization switching for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using a conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) with pulsed current. The nominal MTJ cells' dimensions were 200 × 400 nm 2 . The AFM probes were coated with a Pt layer via sputtering to withstand up to several milliamperes. The pulsed current measurements, with pulse duration varying from 5 to 300 ms, revealed a magnetoresistance ratio of up to 120%, and an estimated intrinsic switching current density, based on the thermal activation model, of 3.94 MA cm −2 . This method demonstrates the potential skill to characterize nanometre-scale magnetic devices. (paper)

  20. Molecular dynamics modeling of bonding two materials by atomic scale friction stir welding at different process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko S., Iv.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Using the molecular dynamics method, we simulated the atomic scale butt friction stir welding on two crystallites and varied the onset FSW tool plunge depth. The effects of the plunge depth value on the thermomechanical evolution of nanosized crystallites and mass transfer in the course of FSW have been studied. The increase of plunge depth values resulted in more intense heating and reducing the plasticized metal resistance to the tool movement. The mass transfer intensity was hardly dependent on the plunge depth value. The plunge depth was recommended to be used as a FSW process control parameter in addition to the commonly used ones.

  1. Atomic-scale simulation study of some bulk and interfacial properties of iron aluminium ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Remy

    1997-01-01

    A semi-empirical potential was designed for B 2 and DO 3 iron aluminides and used to study point defects and grain boundaries in these compounds. At low temperature, departure from B 2 stoichiometry is accommodated with antisite defects; when T increases, iron vacancies appear and defects have a trend to form clusters, the structure of which is very sensitive to this departure. Our calculations, relying on T = 0 K formation energies, predict the nature of major defects, but lead to underestimated quantitative results, which may point out the essential role of atomic vibrations. In the stoichiometric B 2 compound, the diffusion of both species is induced by four-jump cycles involving iron vacancies. Although the agreement between our calculated activation energies and other experiments is good, the calculated diffusion coefficients are below the experimental ones. Here again, this discrepancy may be put down to the overlooking of phonon contributions. The second application concerns the atomic structures of the [001] (310) symmetric tilt grain boundary in the B 2 and DO 3 compounds. At low temperature, in the stoichiometric B 2 compound, we obtain an iron-rich single stable structure (pseudo-symmetric), whose structure is strongly influenced by the bulk composition (with intergranular segregation of the major element). In the stoichiometric DO 3 compound, many energetically equivalent structures exist, all being systematically aluminium-rich. The study of the B 2 grain boundary structure at high temperature shows a phase transition favouring a symmetric structure. Its high excess energy at low temperature emphasizes the influence of atomic vibrations in the interfacial properties of B 2 Fe-Al compounds. (author) [fr

  2. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  3. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quasiparticle Interference on a Type-II Weyl Semimetal Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Bian, Guang; Chang, Guoqing; Lu, Hong; Xu, Su-Yang; Wang, Guangqiang; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhang, Songtian; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel S; Song, Fengqi; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-12-23

    We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mo_{x}W_{1-x}Te_{2} for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo_{0.66}W_{0.34}Te_{2}. In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.

  4. Plasticity analysis of nano-grain-sized NiAl alloy in an atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingyang; Wang Xiaowei; Rifkin, J.; Li Douxing

    2001-12-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to simulate a uniaxial tensile deformation of 3.8nm nano-NiAl alloy with curved amorphous-like interfaces at 0K. Plastic deformation behaviour is studied by examining the strain-stress relationship and the microstructural evolution characteristic. Atomic level analysis showed that the micro-strain is essentially heterogeneous in simulated nano-phase samples. The plastic deformation is not only attributed to the plasticity of interfaces, but also accompanied with the plastic shear strain mechanism inside lattice distortion regions and grains. (author)

  5. Neutral-helium-atom diffraction from a micron-scale periodic structure: Photonic-crystal-membrane characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Torstein; Eder, Sabrina D.; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Grepstad, Jon Olav; Simonsen, Ingve; Holst, Bodil

    2017-06-01

    Surface scattering of neutral helium beams created by supersonic expansion is an established technique for measuring structural and dynamical properties of surfaces on the atomic scale. Helium beams have also been used in Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction experiments. Due to the short wavelength of the atom beams of typically 0.1 nm or less, Fraunhofer diffraction experiments in transmission have so far been limited to grating structures with a period (pitch) of up to 200 nm. However, larger periods are of interest for several applications, for example, for the characterization of photonic-crystal-membrane structures, where the period is typically in the micron to high submicron range. Here we present helium atom diffraction measurements of a photonic-crystal-membrane structure with a two-dimensional square lattice of 100 ×100 circular holes. The nominal period and the hole radius were 490 and 100 nm, respectively. To our knowledge this is the largest period that has been measured with helium diffraction. The helium diffraction measurements are interpreted using a model based on the helium beam characteristics. It is demonstrated how to successfully extract values from the experimental data for the average period of the grating, the hole diameter, and the width of the virtual source used to model the helium beam.

  6. Atomic scale Monte Carlo simulations of BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Magna, Antonino; Fisicaro, Giuseppe; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Spiegel, Yohann; Torregrosa, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical model aimed to accurately simulate the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process in micro and nano-patterned Si samples. The code, based on the Monte Carlo approach, is designed to reproduce all the relevant physical phenomena involved in the process. The particle based simulation technique is fundamental to efficiently compute the material modifications promoted by the plasma implantation at the atomic resolution. The accuracy in the description of the process kinetic is achieved linking (one to one) each virtual Monte Carlo event to each possible atomic phenomenon (e.g. ion penetration, neutral absorption, ion induced surface modification, etc.). The code is designed to be coupled with a generic plasma status, characterized by the particle types (ions and neutrals), their flow rates and their energy/angle distributions. The coupling with a Poisson solver allows the simulation of the correct trajectories of charged particles in the void regions of the micro-structures. The implemented model is able to predict the implantation 2D profiles and significantly support the process design. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  8. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000's of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in αFe during irradiation at 600 K

  9. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  10. Magnetometry and Ground-Penetrating Radar Studies in the Sihuas Valley, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnicki, E.; Papadimitrios, K.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Quillcapampa la Antigua site in Peru's Sihuas Valley is a settlement from Peru's Middle Horizon (600-100 A.D.). Archaeological interest in the area stems from the question of whether ancient civilizations were able to have extensive state control of distant groups, or whether state influence occurred through less direct ties (e.g., marriage, religion, or trade). Our geophysical surveys are preliminary to archaeological digging in the area. Ground-penetrating radar and magnetometry attempt to locate areas of interest for focused archaeological excavation, characterize the design of architectural remains and burial mounds in the area, and allow archaeologists to interpret the amount of influence the Wari civilization had on the local residents.

  11. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, C., E-mail: C.Morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T. [School of Computer Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Anh Nguyen, T. N. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Spintronics Research Group, Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT), VNU-HCM, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  12. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces

  13. Low dimensional magnetism and nanograined materials - magnetometry, magnetooptics and laser-ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenn, H.; Paltauf, G.; Rumpf, K.; Granitzer, P.; Kozhushko, V.; Nadeem, K.; Hofmayer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The working group 'Magnetometry and Photonics' headed by H. Krenn has directed its research focus on magnetic phenomena and properties of nanoscaled materials which are random or self assembled (principal investigators: K. Rumpf and P. Granitzer). Another activity is concerned with optoacoustics investigating the propagation and damping of ultrasound waves in non-magnetic (severely deformed) as well as bulk-nanostructured magnetic materials (principal investigators: G. Paltauf and V. Kozhusko). The gap between self assembled (1-dim) and randomly dense (bulk 3-dim) nanomagnets is bridged by preparation of ferrite-(0-dim) nanoparticles (PhD: K. Nadeem) dispersed in a SiO 2 or polymer matrix. As a template for magnetic nanowires and nanodots porous silicon is prepared by electrochemical methods. Remarkable magnetic effects beyond conventional spin-magnetism are experimentally observed by SQUID-magnetometry at high magnetic fields (7 T) and by spectroscopic magnetooptics from the infrared to VIS. The main purposes and aims of this hybrid system are experimental efforts to detect the spin injection and electronic transport from a ferromagnetic metal into silicon, and the possible development of direction dependent magnetic-field-sensors due to the strong magnetic anisotropy of the nanocomposite at high magnetic fields (> 2 T). By co-precipitation and sol-gel methods (Ni,Co)Fe 2 O 4 superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles (d < 20 nm) are produced. Both systems have a potential for drug delivery using magnetic carriers, but also for magnetic targeting of tumors where the former Si-based system is promising because of the biodegradability and biocompatibility of porous silicon. On the other hand steel samples offer nanoscopic grain refinement under severe plastic deformation and highly deformed magnetic materials show a softening of the magnetization, reflected in modified Barkhausen noise spectrum and ultrasound (magnetoacoustic) phenomena. Electric tunability

  14. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Liyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Li, Qianqian; Dong, Cezhou; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hongtao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Klie, Robert F.; Yassar, Reza Shahbazian

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Revealing the correlation between real-space structure and chiral magnetic order at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Dupé, Melanie; Hung, Tzu-Chao; Lemmens, Alexander K.; Wegner, Daniel; Dupé, Bertrand; Khajetoorians, Alexander A.

    2018-03-01

    We image simultaneously the geometric, the electronic, and the magnetic structures of a buckled iron bilayer film that exhibits chiral magnetic order. We achieve this by combining spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and magnetic exchange force microscopy (SPEX) to independently characterize the geometric as well as the electronic and magnetic structures of nonflat surfaces. This new SPEX imaging technique reveals the geometric height corrugation of the reconstruction lines resulting from strong strain relaxation in the bilayer, enabling the decomposition of the real-space from the electronic structure at the atomic level and the correlation with the resultant spin-spiral ground state. By additionally utilizing adatom manipulation, we reveal the chiral magnetic ground state of portions of the unit cell that were not previously imaged with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy alone. Using density functional theory, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the reconstructed bilayer and identify the favorable stoichiometry regime in agreement with our experimental result.

  16. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Atomic Scale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Ceramic Oxide Heterostructure Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R. K.

    2003-04-16

    The research plan was divided into three tasks: (a) growth of oxide heterostructures for interface engineering using standard thin film deposition techniques, (b) atomic level characterization of oxide heterostructure using such techniques as STEM-2 combined with AFM/STM and conventional high-resolution microscopy (HRTEM), and (c) property measurements of aspects important to oxide heterostructures using standard characterization methods, including dielectric properties and dynamic cathodoluminescence measurements. Each of these topics were further classified on the basis of type of oxide heterostructure. Type I oxide heterostructures consisted of active dielectric layers, including the materials Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST), Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}. Type II heterostructures consisted of ferroelectric active layers such as lanthanum manganate and Type III heterostructures consist of phosphor oxide active layers such as Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  18. Atomic-scale structure and formation of self-assembled In(Ga)As quantum rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, P.; Koenraad, P.M.; Wolter, J.H.; Granados, D.; Garcia, J.M.; Fomin, V.; Gladilin, V.N.; Devreese, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors present an at.-scale anal. of the In distribution of self-assembled (In,Ga)As quantum rings (QRs), which are formed from InAs quantum dots by capping with a thin layer of GaAs and subsequent annealing. The size and shape of QRs as obsd. by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

  19. Atomic-scale Visualization of Electronic Nematicity and Cooper Pairing in Iron-based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Milan P.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in the relatively novel iron-based high-Tc superconductors is unresolved, both in terms of how the phases evolve with doping, and in terms of the actual Cooper pairing process. To explore these issues, we used spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy to study the electronic structure of CaFe2As2 in the antiferromagnetic-orthorhombic `parent' state from which the superconductivity emerges. We discovered and visualized the now widely studied electronic `nematicity' of this phase, whose suppression is associated with the emergence of superconductivity (Science 327, 181, 2010). As subsequent transport experiments discovered a related anisotropic conductance which increases with dopant concentration, the interplay between the electronic structure surrounding each dopant atom, quasiparticle scattering therefrom, and the transport nematicity has become a pivotal focus of research. We find that substituting Co for Fe atoms in underdoped Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 generates a dense population of identical and strongly anisotropic impurity states that are distributed randomly but aligned with the antiferromagnetic a-axis. We also demonstrate, by imaging their surrounding interference patterns, that these impurity states scatter quasiparticles and thus influence transport in a highly anisotropic manner (M.P. Allan et al., 2013). Next, we studied the momentum dependence of the energy gaps of iron-based superconductivity, now focusing on LiFeAs. If strong electron-electron interactions mediate the Cooper pairing, then momentum-space anisotropic superconducting energy gaps Δi (k) were predicted by multiple techniques to appear on the different electronic bands i. We introduced intraband Bogoliubov quasiparticle scattering interference (QPI) techniques for the determination of anisotropic energy gaps to test these hypotheses and discovered the anisotropy, magnitude, and relative orientations of the energy gaps on multiple

  20. Atomic scale simulations of arsenic ion implantation and annealing in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Jaraiz, M.

    1995-01-01

    We present results of multiple-time-scale simulations of 5, 10 and 15 keV low temperature ion implantation of arsenic on silicon (100), followed by high temperature anneals. The simulations start with a molecular dynamics (MD) calculation of the primary state of damage after 10ps. The results are then coupled to a kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of bulk defect diffusion and clustering. Dose accumulation is achieved considering that at low temperatures the damage produced in the lattice is stable. After the desired dose is accumulated, the system is annealed at 800 degrees C for several seconds. The results provide information on the evolution for the damage microstructure over macroscopic length and time scales and affords direct comparison to experimental results. We discuss the database of inputs to the MC model and how it affects the diffusion process

  1. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  2. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  3. Visualizing pair formation on the atomic scale in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathy, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Unlike traditional superconductors, the density of states (DOS) of the high-T c superconductor Bi-2212 shows large nanoscale variations that have been detected using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Such variations are seen in the low temperature superconducting gap and in features associated with the coupling of pairs to boson modes. In order to understand these variations in the spectra, we perform atomic resolution STM measurements of Bi-2212 as a function of temperature. Using newly developed experimental techniques, we measure the evolution of the DOS from low temperature (T c ) to temperatures where all gaps in the spectrum have disappeared (T>T*). Such measurements show that the pairing gap nucleates in nanoscale regions at temperatures between T c and T*. By normalizing the low temperature DOS (T c ) to the DOS at high temperature, we are able to fit the superconducting DOS to the d-wave BCS form. We find that the experimental spectrum deviations from a simple d-wave fit indicating a strong coupling between electrons and bosonic modes. We will discuss the temperature evolution of these as well as other features in the DOS and correlate such measurements with the inhomogeneity seen in the gap magnitude at low temperature

  4. Site-specific atomic-scale characterisation of retained austenite in a strip cast TRIP steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Z.P.; Saleh, A.A.; Marceau, R.K.W.; Taylor, A.S.; Stanford, N.E.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; Pereloma, E.V.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of carbon content in retained austenite (RA) with different neighbouring phases is essential to understand the chemical stability of RA, which is useful for microstructure tuning of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. The present study investigates different morphologies and chemical compositions of RA by correlating electron backscattering diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The effect of neighbouring phases, such as polygonal ferrite, bainitic ferrite lath, ferrite in granular bainite and carbides, on the carbon content in the RA is investigated. The results reveal that the film RA morphology does not always have a higher carbon content than the blocky RA; as coarse RA sometimes displays a higher carbon content than the fine RA films or islands depending on the neighbouring phases. The diffusion of carbon and manganese between austenite and ferrite in bainitic ferrite/granular bainite has been explained according to either diffusionless and/or diffusional mechanism of bainitic ferrite formation followed by tempering. -- Highlights: •The effect of neighbouring phases on retained austenite (RA) features was investigated. •A lower carbon content in fine/film RA compared to coarse/blocky RA was experimentally demonstrated. •At least locally controlled diffusion of substitutional solutes across the RA/bainitic ferrite lath interface was suggested.

  5. Ultrafast atomic-scale visualization of acoustic phonons generated by optically excited quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Vanacore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of atomic vibrations confined in quasi-zero dimensional systems is crucial from both a fundamental point-of-view and a technological perspective. Using ultrafast electron diffraction, we monitored the lattice dynamics of GaAs quantum dots—grown by Droplet Epitaxy on AlGaAs—with sub-picosecond and sub-picometer resolutions. An ultrafast laser pulse nearly resonantly excites a confined exciton, which efficiently couples to high-energy acoustic phonons through the deformation potential mechanism. The transient behavior of the measured diffraction pattern reveals the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics both within the dots and in the region surrounding them. The experimental results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of a non-Markovian decoherence, according to which the optical excitation creates a localized polaron within the dot and a travelling phonon wavepacket that leaves the dot at the speed of sound. These findings indicate that integration of a phononic emitter in opto-electronic devices based on quantum dots for controlled communication processes can be fundamentally feasible.

  6. Cometary dust at the smallest scale - latest results of the MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid

    2015-04-01

    The MIDAS instrument onboard the Rosetta orbit is a unique combination of a dust collection and handling system and a high resolution Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). By building three-dimensional images of the dust particle topography, MIDAS addresses a range of fundamental questions in Solar System and cometary science. The first few months of dust collection and scanning revealed a deficit of smaller (micron and below) particles but eventually several 10 µm-class grains were discovered. In fact these were unexpectedly large and close to the limit of what is observable with MIDAS. As a result the sharp tip used by the AFM struck the particles from the side, causing particle breakage and distortion. Analyses so far suggest that the collected particles are fluffy aggregates of smaller sub-units, although determination of the size of these sub-units and high resolution re-imaging remains to be done. The latest findings will be presented here, including a description of the particles collected and the implications of these observations for cometary science and the Rosetta mission at comet 67P.

  7. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  8. Elemental and Isotopic Tomography at Single-Atom-Scale in 4.0 and 2.4 Ga Zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, J. W.; Reinhard, D. A.; Snoeyenbos, D.; Lawrence, D.; Martin, I.; Kelly, T. F.; Ushikubo, T.; Strickland, A.; Cavosie, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Atom probe tomography can determine identity (mass/charge ratio) and 3-D position of individual atoms in minerals such as zircon. These data provide unique information for understanding the thermal history and mechanisms of mineral reaction and exchange, including radiation damage. Nine needle-shaped specimens ~100 nm in diameter (at the apex) were sampled from 2 zircons by FIB and analyzed with a local-electrode atom probe (LEAP), CAMECA LEAP 4000X HR. The LEAP uses pulsed-laser heating to field evaporate the tip of a zircon needle and accelerates the ions into a position-sensitive TOF-MS. With due care for complex isobaric interferences (molecules, multiple ionizations) and background correction, it is possible to individually identify up to 10E8 atoms/needle (36% detection efficiency) by mass/charge (MRP ~ 1000@ m/n=16Da) and position (X-Y-Z coordinates on 0.2 nm scale) (Kelly & Larson 2012). The 3-D distribution of Pb and Y differ at atom-scale in the 2 zircons. Zircon #1 (4007 Ma, Jack Hills, W. Australia, Cavosie 2005, Ushikubo et al. 2008, Bouvier et al. 2011) is homogeneous in Pb and Y. In contrast, incompatible elements, including Pb and Y, are concentrated in equant 5-10 nm dia. domains, spaced ~50 nm apart in zircon #2 (2438 Ma, Albion-Raft R-Grouse Ck core complex, Utah, Strickland et al. 2011). U is homogeneously distributed in both zircons. The analyzed domains suffered 4-8 x 10E15 α-decay events/mg due to U and Th decay and yet both zircons yield >97% concordant U-Pb ages by SIMS, suggesting annealing of radiation damage during the life of the zircons. The 207-Pb/206-Pb ratios for these nm-scale domains, as measured by LEAP, average 0.17 for the 2.4 Ga Zrc2 (3 needles) and 0.43 for the 4.0 Ga Zrc1 (5 needles). These ratios are less precise (±40% 2σ) due to ultra-small sample size, but are in excellent agreement with values measured by SIMS, 0.1684 and 0.4269, respectively. Thus Pb in both zircons is radiogenic. The Pb-Y-rich domains and lack of

  9. Phonon interference control of atomic-scale metamirrors, meta-absorbers, and heat transfer through crystal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Potyomina, L. G.; Darinskii, A. N.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper theoretically studies the possibility of using the effects of phonon interference between paths through different interatomic bonds for the control of phonon heat transfer through internal crystal interfaces and for the design of phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers. These metamirrors and meta-absorbers are considered to be defect nanolayers of atomic-scale thicknesses embedded in a crystal. Several analytically solvable three-dimensional lattice-dynamics models of the phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers at the internal crystal planes are described. It is shown that due to destructive interference in the two or more phonon paths, the internal crystal planes, fully or partially filled with weakly bound or heavy-isotope defect atoms, can completely reflect or completely absorb phonons at the transmission antiresonances, whose wavelengths are larger than the effective thickness of the metamirror or meta-absorber. Due to cooperative superradiant effect, the spectral widths of the two-path interference antiresonances for the plane waves are given by the square of partial filling fraction in the defect crystal plane. Our analysis reveals that the presence of two or more phonon paths plays the dominant role in the emergence of the transmission antiresonances in phonon scattering at the defect crystal planes and in reduction of the thermal interface conductance in comparison with the Fano-resonance concept. We study analytically phonon transmission through internal crystal plane in a model cubic lattice of Si-like atoms, partially filled with Ge-like defect atoms. Such a plane can serve as interference phonon metamirror with the transmission antiresonances in the vicinities of eigenmode frequencies of Ge-like defect atoms in the terahertz frequency range. We predict the extraordinary phonon transmission induced by the two-path constructive interference of the lattice waves in resonance with the vibrations of rare host atoms, periodically distributed in the

  10. Atomic scale numerical simulation study of elementary mechanisms of plasticity in aluminium and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanides, Antoine

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with elementary mechanisms of plasticity, such as the dissociation of a perfect edge dislocation into Shockley partials, the annihilation of dislocation dipoles and the interaction between a dislocation and an interface (free surface and grain boundary). Dislocation core effects are expected to influence crucially these interactions. A deeper understanding of these situations is thus achieved by resorting to an atomistic numerical approach, the application of the elastic theory of dislocations being no longer justified. Two FCC metals are considered: aluminium and copper, with respectively a small and a large dissociation width. An empirical potential for aluminium was designed to study the perfect as well as the dissociated states of the dislocation. The results are compared to the ones obtained with the interaction model for copper, for both the edge and the screw characters. The obtained core radius value ensures the continuity between the atomic and the elastic treatments. The calculations concerning edge dislocation dipole configurations show that there exists a critical distance between the glide planes of the two constitutive dislocations under which a spontaneous recombination occurs. We then compute the variation of the excess energy associated to the gradual approach of an edge dislocation toward the free surface of a crystal. An estimation of the energy required for the introduction of a dislocation in a thin film is obtained. The study of the interaction between a dislocation and a tilt grain boundary shows that the dislocation is absorbed in the interface, the stress required for its extraction being rather large. Finally, by proceeding to the simulation of a tensile test, we demonstrate that the surface steps constitute favoured sites for the nucleation of the dislocations. (author) [fr

  11. Atomic scale observation of phase transformation in long term thermally aged duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novy, St.

    2009-01-01

    Embrittlement study of duplex stainless steels is a very important in order to predict the lifetime of primary circuits of nuclear power plant. Ferrite steels aged over 20 years, on-site, in laboratory and at different temperatures was analyzed by tomographic probe atom to assess the trend of aging of these materials with very long times. A more prospective work was also carried out, the aim was to model the decomposition of ferrite from austenitic-ferritic steels. The simulation of the decomposition of these steels are very complex, we initiated preliminary work in modelling the Fe-Cr alloys, because the decomposition of Fe and Cr in these steels is the main cause of their fragility. To validate the parameters used in simulation, an experimental study of the decomposition of an alloy Fe-20% at. Cr aged at 500 C was performed. This experimental study has shown that a non-classical germination (NCG) is involved in this alloy. The performed simulations on the same alloy at the same temperature, did not reproduce the progressive enrichment of precipitated phase a' (characteristic of NCG). The study of steels, aged over 20 years, has confirmed that the steel aged in laboratory are representative to steel aged in site ( T ≤350 C). Moreover, it has been shown that the G-phase (intermetallic precipitation at the interface a/a' phases) does not influence the embrittlement of the ferrite and the difference of thermo-mechanical treatment is not determinant of the variance decomposition observed in these steels. (author)

  12. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years\\' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing; Taylor, Rae; Bae, Sungchul; Herná ndez-Cruz, Daniel; Kilcoyne, David A.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Probing and Manipulating the Interfacial Defects of InGaAs Dual-Layer Metal Oxides at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Luo, Chen; Hao, Peng; Sun, Tao; Wang, Runsheng; Wang, Chaolun; Hu, Zhigao; Li, Yawei; Zhang, Jian; Bersuker, Gennadi; Sun, Litao; Pey, Kinleong

    2018-01-01

    The interface between III-V and metal-oxide-semiconductor materials plays a central role in the operation of high-speed electronic devices, such as transistors and light-emitting diodes. The high-speed property gives the light-emitting diodes a high response speed and low dark current, and they are widely used in communications, infrared remote sensing, optical detection, and other fields. The rational design of high-performance devices requires a detailed understanding of the electronic structure at this interface; however, this understanding remains a challenge, given the complex nature of surface interactions and the dynamic relationship between the morphology evolution and electronic structures. Herein, in situ transmission electron microscopy is used to probe and manipulate the structural and electrical properties of ZrO 2 films on Al 2 O 3 and InGaAs substrate at the atomic scale. Interfacial defects resulting from the spillover of the oxygen-atom conduction-band wavefunctions are resolved. This study unearths the fundamental defect-driven interfacial electric structure of III-V semiconductor materials and paves the way to future high-speed and high-reliability devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Detection and control of broken symmetries with Andreev bound state tunneling spectroscopy: effects of atomic-scale disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.H.; Hentges, P.J.; Aubin, H.; Aprili, M.; Badica, E.; Covington, M.; Pafford, M.M.; Westwood, G.; Klemperer, W.G.; Jian, Sha; Hinks, D.G.

    2004-01-01

    Quasiparticle planar tunneling spectroscopy is used to study unconventional superconductivity in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) thin films and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (BSCCO) single crystals. Tunneling conductances are obtained as a function of crystallographic orientation, applied magnetic field (magnitude and orientation), atomic substitution and surface damage. Our systematic studies confirm that the observed zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP), a measure of the near-surface quasiparticle (QP) density of states (DoS), is comprised of Andreev bound states (ABS) resulting directly from the sign change of the d-wave order parameter (OP) at the Fermi surface. Our data, plus a literature search, reveals a consistency in the observation of the splitting of the ZBCP in optimally-doped materials. We note that the splitting of the ZBCP observed in applied field, and the spontaneous splitting observed at lower temperatures in zero field, occur concomitantly in a given junction, and that observation of this splitting is dependent upon two parameters: (1) the magnitude of the tunneling cone and (2) the degree of atomic-scale disorder at the interface

  16. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Guoqing; Taylor, Rae; Bae, Sungchul; Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Kilcoyne, David A.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C–S–H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5–2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29 Si NMR shows 47.9% Q 1 and 52.1% Q 2 , with a mean SiO 4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C 3 S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L 3,2 -edge indicates that Ca 2+ in C–S–H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO 4 4− tetrahedron chain.

  17. Modeling the effects of cohesive energy for single particle on the material removal in chemical mechanical polishing at atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongguang; Zhao Yongwu; An Wei; Wang Jun

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical model for chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) based on interface solid physical and chemical theory in addition to energy equilibrium knowledge. And the effects of oxidation concentration and particle size on the material removal in CMP are investigated. It is shown that the mechanical energy and removal cohesive energy couple with the particle size, and being a cause of the non-linear size-removal rate relation. Furthermore, it also shows a nonlinear dependence of removal rate on removal cohesive energy. The model predictions are in good qualitative agreement with the published experimental data. The current study provides an important starting point for delineating the micro-removal mechanism in the CMP process at atomic scale

  18. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Ångstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glownia, J. M.; Natan, A.; Cryan, J. P.; Hartsock, R.; Kozina, M.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with a temporal and spatial resolution of 30 fs and 0.3 Å. This high fidelity is due to interference between the nonstationary excitation and the stationary initial charge distribution. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on ångstrom and femtosecond scales. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. In conclusion, coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  19. Assessment of current atomic scale modelling methods for the investigation of nuclear fuels under irradiation: Example of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.; Freyss, M.; Krack, M.; Devanathan, R.

    2015-01-01

    We focus here on the assessment of the description of interatomic interactions in uranium dioxide using, on the one hand, electronic structure methods, in particular in the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework, and on the other hand, empirical potential methods. These two types of methods are complementary, the former enabling results to be obtained from a minimal amount of input data and further insight into the electronic and magnetic properties to be achieved, while the latter are irreplaceable for studies where a large number of atoms need to be considered. We consider basic properties as well as specific ones, which are important for the description of nuclear fuel under irradiation. These are especially energies, which are the main data passed on to higher scale models. For this exercise, we limit ourselves to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) because of the extensive amount of studies available on this system. (authors)

  20. Interlayer Exchange Coupling: A General Scheme Turning Chiral Magnets into Magnetic Multilayers Carrying Atomic-Scale Skyrmions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Ashis Kumar; Kiselev, Nikolai S; Blügel, Stefan

    2016-04-29

    We report on a general principle using interlayer exchange coupling to extend the regime of chiral magnetic films in which stable or metastable magnetic Skyrmions can appear at a zero magnetic field. We verify this concept on the basis of a first-principles model for a Mn monolayer on a W(001) substrate, a prototype chiral magnet for which the atomic-scale magnetic texture is determined by the frustration of exchange interactions, impossible to unwind by laboratory magnetic fields. By means of ab initio calculations for the Mn/W_{m}/Co_{n}/Pt/W(001) multilayer system we show that for certain thicknesses m of the W spacer and n of the Co reference layer, the effective field of the reference layer fully substitutes the required magnetic field for Skyrmion formation.

  1. Hybrid optical pumping of K and Rb atoms in a paraffin coated vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Peng, Xiang; Budker, Dmitry; Wickenbrock, Arne; Pang, Bo; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic hybrid optical pumping effects with a radio-frequency-field-driven nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (RF NMOR) scheme are studied in a dual-species paraffin coated vapor cell. By pumping K atoms and probing $^{87}$Rb atoms, we achieve an intrinsic magnetic resonance linewidth of 3 Hz and the observed resonance is immune to power broadening and light-shift effects. Such operation scheme shows favorable prospects for atomic magnetometry applications.

  2. Atomic scale study of vacancies in Earth's inner core: effect of pressure and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterbex, S.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic observations of the Earth's inner core [1] remain ambiguously related to mineral physics studies of the inner core stable crystalline iron phase [2,3,4,5]. This makes it difficult to clarify the role of plastic deformation as one of the primary candidates responsible for the observed seismic anisotropy of Earth's inner core. Nonetheless, atomic self-diffusion mechanisms provide a direct link between plastic deformation and the mechanical properties of Earth's inner core stable iron phase(s). Using first-principles density functional based calculation techniques, we have studied the conjugate effect of pressure and chemistry on vacancy diffusion in HCP-, BCC- and FCC-iron by taking into account potential light alloying elements as hydrogen, silicon and sulfur. Our results show that inner core pressure highly inhibits the rate of intrinsic self-diffusion by suppressing defect concentration rather than by effecting the mobility of the defects. Moreover, we found light elements to be able to affect metallic bonding which allows for extrinsic diffusion mechanisms in iron under inner core conditions. The latter clearly enables to enhance defect concentration and hence to enhance the rate of plastic deformation. This suggests that inner core chemistry affects the rheological properties (e.g.viscosity) of iron alloys which finally should match with seismic observations. references: [1] Deuss, A., 2014. Heterogeneity and Anisotropy of Earth's inner core. An. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 42, 103-126. [2] Anzellini, S., Dewaele, A., Mezouar, M., Loubeyre, P., Morard, G., 2013. Melting of iron at Earth's inner core boundary based on fast X-ray diffraction. Science 340, 464-466. [3] Godwal, B.K., Gonzales-Cataldo, F., Verma, A.K., Stixrude, L., Jeanloz, R., 2015. Stability of iron crystal structures at 0.3-1.5 TPa. [4] Vocadlo, L., 2007. Ab initio calculations of the elasticity of iron and iron alloys at inner core conditions: evidence for a partially molten inner core

  3. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  4. Atomic scale engineering of HfO2-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO 2 thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO 2 (BaHfO 3 ) films and Ti-added BaHfO 3 (BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 ) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO 3 (k∝38) and BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 (k∝90) with respect to monoclinic HfO 2 (k∝19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO 3 and ∝0.8 nm for BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 with respect to HfO 2 (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf 4+ ions substitution in BaHfO 3 by Ti 4+ ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO 3 to 700 C for BaHf 0.5 Ti 0.5 O 3 . Future studies need to focus on the use of appropriate metal electrodes (high work function) and on film deposition process (homogeneity) for better current leakage control. (orig.)

  5. Atomic scale engineering of HfO{sub 2}-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-02-14

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO{sub 2} (BaHfO{sub 3}) films and Ti-added BaHfO{sub 3} (BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}38) and BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}90) with respect to monoclinic HfO{sub 2} (k{proportional_to}19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO{sub 3} and {proportional_to}0.8 nm for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} with respect to HfO{sub 2} (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf{sup 4+} ions substitution in BaHfO{sub 3} by Ti{sup 4+} ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO{sub 3} to 700 C for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Future studies need to focus

  6. Atomic-scale details of dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedra interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetsky, Yu. N.; Stoller, R.E.; Rodney, D.; Bacon, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of f.c.c. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. Key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally

  7. Ultrastrong Carbon Thin Films from Diamond to Graphene under Extreme Conditions: Probing Atomic Scale Interfacial Mechanisms to Achieve Ultralow Friction and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    tribological behavior of hard carbon materials during initial sliding contact, in order to understand what controls and enables the transition from high to...publication. Our goal is to characterize and understand the atomic-scale mechanisms governing the tribological behavior (friction and wear) of hard carbon...affecting the sliding behavior of these materials, including: rehybridization from sp3 to sp2-bonding of the C atoms20, formation of bonds across the

  8. Effects of rock wool on the lungs evaluated by magnetometry and biopersistence test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Masayuki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asbestos has been reported to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and its use has been banned all over the world. The related industries are facing an urgent need to develop a safer fibrous substance. Rock wool (RW, a kind of asbestos substitute, is widely used in the construction industry. In order to evaluate the safety of RW, we performed a nose-only inhalation exposure study in rats. After one-month observation period, the potential of RW fibers to cause pulmonary toxicity was evaluated based on lung magnetometry findings, pulmonary biopersistence, and pneumopathology. Methods Using the nose-only inhalation exposure system, 6 male Fischer 344 rats (6 to 10 weeks old were exposed to RW fibers at a target fiber concentration of 100 fibers/cm3 (length [L] > 20 μm for 6 hours daily, for 5 consecutive days. As a magnetometric indicator, 3 mg of triiron tetraoxide suspended in 0.2 mL of physiological saline was intratracheally administered after RW exposure to these rats and 6 unexposed rats (controls. During one second magnetization in 50 mT external magnetic field, all magnetic particles were aligned, and immediately afterwards the strength of their remanent magnetic field in the rat lungs was measured in both groups. Magnetization and measurement of the decay (relaxation of this remanent magnetic field was performed over 40 minutes on 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after RW exposure, and reflected cytoskeleton dependent intracellular transport within macrophages in the lung. Similarly, 24 and 12 male Fisher 344-rats were used for biopersistence test and pathologic evaluation, respectively. Results In the lung magnetometric evaluation, biopersistence test and pathological evaluation, the arithmetic mean value of the total fiber concentration was 650.2, 344.7 and 390.7 fibers/cm3, respectively, and 156.6, 93.1 and 95.0 fibers/cm3 for fibers with L > 20 μm, respectively. The lung magnetometric evaluation revealed that impaired relaxation

  9. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  10. Communication: An effective linear-scaling atomic-orbital reformulation of the random-phase approximation using a contracted double-Laplace transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurkus, Henry F.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An atomic-orbital (AO) reformulation of the random-phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy is presented allowing to reduce the steep computational scaling to linear, so that large systems can be studied on simple desktop computers with fully numerically controlled accuracy. Our AO-RPA formulation introduces a contracted double-Laplace transform and employs the overlap-metric resolution-of-the-identity. First timings of our pilot code illustrate the reduced scaling with systems comprising up to 1262 atoms and 10 090 basis functions. 

  11. Volumetric localization of somatosensory cortex in children using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Jing; Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester; Sharma, Rohit; Hunjan, Amrita; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic signal from the human brain can be measured noninvasively by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). This study was designed to localize and reconstruct the neuromagnetic activity in the somatosensory cortex in children Twenty children were studied using a 151-channel MEG system with electrical stimulation applied to median nerves. Data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). A clear deflection (M1) was clearly identified in 18 children (90%, 18/20). Two frequency bands, 30-60 Hz and 60-120 Hz, were found to be related to somatosensory cortex. Magnetic activity was localized in the posterior bank of the central sulcus in 16 children. The extent of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity of the left hemisphere was significantly larger than that of the right hemisphere (P<0.01). Somatosensory cortex was accurately localized by using SAM. The extent of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity suggested that the left hemisphere was the dominant side in the somatosensory system in children. We postulate that the volumetric characteristics of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity are able to indicate the functionality of the brain. (orig.)

  12. Volumetric localization of epileptic activities in tuberous sclerosis using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zheng [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Xiang, Jing [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hunjan, Amrita; Sharma, Rohit; Otsubo, Hiroshi [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a novel noninvasive technique for localizing epileptic zones. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is often associated with medically refractory epilepsy with multiple epileptic zones. Surgical treatment of TSC requires accurate localization of epileptogenic tubers. The objective of this study was to introduce a new MEG technique, synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM), to volumetrically localize irritable zones and clarify the correlations between SAM, dipole modeling and anatomical tubers. Eight pediatric patients with TSC confirmed by clinical and neuroimaging findings were retrospectively studied. MEG data were recorded using a whole-cortex CTF OMEGA system. Sleep deprivation was employed to provoke epileptiform activity. Irritable zones were localized using both dipole modeling and SAM. MRI detected 42 tubers in the eight patients. Dipole modeling localized 28 irritable zones, and 19 out of the 28 zones were near tubers (19/42, 45%). SAM found 51 irritable zones, and 31 out of the 51 zones were near tubers (31/42, 74%). Among the 51 irritable zones determined by SAM, thirty-five zones were in 1-35 Hz, nine zones were in 35-60 Hz, and seven zones were in 60-120 Hz. The new method, SAM, yielded very plausible equivalent sources for patients who showed anatomical tubers on MRI. Compared to conventional dipole modeling, SAM appeared to offer increased detection of irritable zones and beneficial volumetric and frequency descriptions. (orig.)

  13. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen–vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maclaurin, D; Hall, L T; Martin, A M; Hollenberg, L C L

    2013-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen–vacancy centre in diamond—a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen–vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen–vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational behaviour, beyond continuous optically detected magnetic resonance monitoring, in parallel with operation as a fluorescent biomarker. (paper)

  14. Ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry of geological samples using magnetic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eduardo A.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2016-09-01

    Useful paleomagnetic information is expected to be recorded by samples with moments up to three orders of magnitude below the detection limit of standard superconducting rock magnetometers. Such samples are now detectable using recently developed magnetic microscopes, which map the magnetic fields above room-temperature samples with unprecedented spatial resolutions and field sensitivities. However, realizing this potential requires the development of techniques for retrieving sample moments from magnetic microscopy data. With this goal, we developed a technique for uniquely obtaining the net magnetic moment of geological samples from magnetic microscopy maps of unresolved or nearly unresolved magnetization. This technique is particularly powerful for analyzing small, weakly magnetized samples such as meteoritic chondrules and terrestrial silicate crystals like zircons. We validated this technique by applying it to field maps generated from synthetic sources and also to field maps measured using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope above geological samples with moments down to 10-15 Am2. For the most magnetic rock samples, the net moments estimated from the SQUID microscope data are within error of independent moment measurements acquired using lower sensitivity standard rock magnetometers. In addition to its superior moment sensitivity, SQUID microscope net moment magnetometry also enables the identification and isolation of magnetic contamination and background sources, which is critical for improving accuracy in paleomagnetic studies of weakly magnetic samples.

  15. SQUID magnetometry and magneto-optics of epitaxial EuS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, K.; Granitzer, P.; Krenn, H.; Kellner, W.; Pascher, H.; Kirchschlager, R.; Janecek, S.

    2004-01-01

    The complicated (H,T)-magnetic phase diagram of EuS is caused by the critical balance between nearest and next nearest neighbour exchange interaction (J NN = 0.119 K and J NNN =-0.1209 K) and leads to various spin arrangements NNSS..., NSN..., NNS, NNN... [NS denotes opposite ferromagnetic order in adjacent (111) planes]. Beside the subtle local exchange of 5d-t 2g electrons and localized holes with neighbouring Eu-4f spins, obviously also the strain status influences the occurrence of these different phases. We investigate the magnetic ordering phenomenon in a strained 2.5 μm EuS film on BaF 2 substrate by SQUID magnetometry and magneto-optics like spectral Faraday- and Kerr-effect measurements for temperatures from 2 K up to 200 K and for magnetic field up to 5 T. The magneto-optical probe monitors the local environment of the photoexcited electron-hole pair, called magnetic exciton, located within a ferromagnetic surrounding (photoinduced magnetic polaron), whereas the integral magnetization measured by SQUID is most sensitive to long-range magnetic ordering. In spite of the dissimilarity of measurement techniques we find an influence of the long-range magnetic order (e.g. of the NNS- or NNN-matrix) on the non-resonant Kerr reflection. The complementarity of SQUID and magneto-optical methods is stringent only in the (resonant) spectral range, where magnetic polarons are formed. (author)

  16. A visualized investigation at the atomic scale of the antitumor effect of magnetic nanomedicine on gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokang; Deng, Xia; Li, Xinghua; Xue, Desheng; Zhang, Haoli; Liu, Tao; Liu, Qingfang; Mellors, Nigel J; Li, Yumin; Peng, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Discovering which anticancer drugs attack which organelle(s) of cancer cells is essential and significant, not only for understanding their therapeutic and adverse effects, but also to enable the development of new-generation therapeutics. Here, we show that novel Fe3O4-carboxymethyl cellulose-5-fluorouracil (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU) nanomedicine can apparently enhance the antitumor effect on gastric cancer cells, and its mechanism of killing the SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells can be directly observed at the atomic scale. The novel nanomedicine was prepared using the traditional antitumor drug 5FU to chemically bond onto the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine), and then was fed into SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to track the distribution and antitumor effect of the nanomedicine within individual SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. Atomic-level observation and tracking the elemental distribution inside individual cells proved that the magnetic nanomedicine killed the gastric cells mainly by attacking their mitochondria. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy derives from the localized high concentration and poor mobility of the aggregated Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine in the cytoplasm. A brand new mechanism of Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine killing SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells by attacking their mitochondria was discovered, which is different from the classical mechanism utilized by traditional medicine 5FU, which kills gastric cancer cells by damaging their DNA. Our work might provide a partial solution in nanomedicines or even modern anticancer medicine for the visualized investigation of their antitumor effect.

  17. Hydrogenation of FeCoZr-Al2O3 nanocomposites studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, A.; Kasiuk, J.; Fedotova, J.; Szilagyi, E.; Przewoznik, J.; Kapusta, Cz.; Marszalek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenation effects on crystalline and magnetic structure of nanocomposites (FeCoZr) x (Al 2 O 3 ) 100-x , 38 ≤ x ≤ 63 at.% are studied by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry. Variations of local structure, blocking temperature and mean FeCoZr nanoparticles' volume are discussed with respect to (i) composition and (ii) two competing processes-H 2 incorporation and annealing-occurred during treatment in H 2 plasma.

  18. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-01-01

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks

  19. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions : Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Schlathölter, T.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH+) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections

  20. Structural atomic-scale analysis of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires and quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy on a (311)A substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, J.G.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Noda, T.; Sakoda, K.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural analysis at the atomic scale of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires and quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy on a (311)A-oriented substrate. The shape, interfaces, and composition of these nanostructures and their surrounding matrix are investigated. We show that quantum wires can be

  1. Atomic Scale Simulation on the Anti-Pressure and Friction Reduction Mechanisms of MoS2 Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 nanosheets can be used as solid lubricants or additives of lubricating oils to reduce friction and resist wear. However, the atomic scale mechanism still needs to be illustrated. Herein, molecular simulations on the indentation and scratching process of MoS2 monolayer supported by Pt(111 surface were conducted to study the anti-pressure and friction reduction mechanisms of the MoS2 monolayer. Three deformation stages of Pt-supported MoS2 monolayer were found during the indentation process: elastic deformation, plastic deformation and finally, complete rupture. The MoS2 monolayer showed an excellent friction reduction effect at the first two stages, as a result of enhanced load bearing capacity and reduced deformation degree of the substrate. Unlike graphene, rupture of the Pt-supported MoS2 monolayer was related primarily to out-of-plane compression of the monolayer. These results provide a new insight into the relationship between the mechanical properties and lubrication properties of 2D materials.

  2. The atomic-scale nucleation mechanism of NiTi metallic glasses upon isothermal annealing studied via molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, JiaHao; Liu, BaiXin

    2015-10-28

    Nucleation is one of the most essential transformation paths in phase transition and exerts a significant influence on the crystallization process. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the atomic-scale nucleation mechanisms of NiTi metallic glasses upon devitrification at various temperatures (700 K, 750 K, 800 K, and 850 K). Our simulations reveal that at 700 K and 750 K, nucleation is polynuclear with high nucleation density, while at 800 K it is mononuclear. The underlying nucleation mechanisms have been clarified, manifesting that nucleation can be induced either by the initial ordered clusters (IOCs) or by the other precursors of nuclei evolved directly from the supercooled liquid. IOCs and other precursors stem from the thermal fluctuations of bond orientational order in supercooled liquids during the quenching process and during the annealing process, respectively. The simulation results not only elucidate the underlying nucleation mechanisms varied with temperature, but also unveil the origin of nucleation. These discoveries offer new insights into the devitrification mechanism of metallic glasses.

  3. Atomic-scale study of the adsorption of calcium fluoride on Si(100) at low-coverage regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaravalloti, Franco; Dujardin, Gerald; Riedel, Damien; Pinto, Henry P.; Foster, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the initial stage of the formation of Ca/Si and Si/F structures that occurs during the adsorption of CaF 2 molecules onto a bare Si(100) surface heated to 1000 K in a low-coverage regime (0.3 monolayer). A low-temperature (5 K) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is used to observe the topographies and the electronic properties of the exposed silicon surfaces. Our atomic-scale study reveals that several chemical reactions arise during CaF 2 deposition, such as dissociation of the CaF 2 molecules and etching of the surface silicon dimers. The experimental and calculated STM topographies are compared using the density functional theory, and this comparison enables us to identify two types of reacted structures on the Si(100) surface. The first type of observed complex surface structure consists of large islands formed with a semiperiodic sequence of 3 x 2 unit cells. The second one is made of isolated Ca adatoms adsorbed at specific sites on the Si(100)-2 x 1 surface.

  4. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a function of the number of layers in the Ni inverse opal-like structure. The average lateral size of mesoscopic domains is found to be independent of the number of layers. 3D reconstruction of the reciprocal space for the inverse opal crystals with different thickness provided an indirect study of original opal templates in a depth-resolved way. The microstructure and thermal response of the framework of the porous inverse opal crystal was examined using wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction. This artificial porous structure is built from nickel crystallites possessing stacking faults and dislocations peculiar for the nickel thin films.

  5. Atomic-scale structure of irradiated GaN compared to amorphised GaP and GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Everett, S.E.; Glover, C.J.; Kluth, S.M.; Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Hussain, Z.S.; Llewellyn, D.J.; Foran, G.J.; Azevedo, G. de M.

    2006-01-01

    We have compared the atomic-scale structure of ion irradiated GaN to that of amorphised GaP and GaAs. While continuous and homogenous amorphised layers were easily achieved in GaP and GaAs, ion irradiation of GaN yielded both structural and chemical inhomogeneities. Transmission electron microscopy revealed GaN crystallites and N 2 bubbles were interspersed within an amorphous GaN matrix. The crystallite orientation was random relative to the unirradiated epitaxial structure, suggesting their formation was irradiation-induced, while the crystallite fraction was approximately constant for all ion fluences beyond the amorphisation threshold, consistent with a balance between amorphisation and recrystallisation processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the Ga K-edge showed short-range order was retained in the amorphous phase for all three binary compounds. For ion irradiated GaN, the stoichiometric imbalance due to N 2 bubble formation was not accommodated by Ga-Ga bonding in the amorphous phase or precipitation of metallic Ga but instead by a greater reduction in Ga coordination number

  6. Atomic-scale observation of structural and electronic orders in the layered compound α-RuCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W.; Cao, H. B.; Yan, J.-Q.; Bridges, C. A.; Mandrus, D. G.; Nagler, S. E.; Baddorf, A. P.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    A pseudospin-1/2 Mott phase on a honeycomb lattice is proposed to host the celebrated two-dimensional Kitaev model which has an elusive quantum spin liquid ground state, and fascinating physics relevant to the development of future templates towards topological quantum bits. Here we report a comprehensive, atomically resolved real-space study by scanning transmission electron and scanning tunnelling microscopies on a novel layered material displaying Kitaev physics, α-RuCl3. Our local crystallography analysis reveals considerable variations in the geometry of the ligand sublattice in thin films of α-RuCl3 that opens a way to realization of a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic ground state at the nanometre length scale. Using scanning tunnelling techniques, we observe the electronic energy gap of ~0.25 eV and intra-unit cell symmetry breaking of charge distribution in individual α-RuCl3 surface layer. The corresponding charge-ordered pattern has a fine structure associated with two different types of charge disproportionation at Cl-terminated surface.

  7. Atomic scale modeling of twinning in hexagonal metals: germination and migration of disconnections in zirconium, titanium and magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackain, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We perform an atomic scale study of twinning in three hexagonal close packed metals: zirconium, titanium and magnesium. For that, we use two energetic models, an empirical potential suited for the study of zirconium and ab initio calculations in order to compare the three metals. The study of perfect twin boundaries shows that their surface energies are not relevant to predict which twin system is going to activate experimentally. We study nucleation and then migration of disconnections, that is to say interfacial dislocations whose glide along twin plane leads to twin thickening. We show that disconnections nucleation, rather than their migration, is the rate limiting step of twin thickening. In particular, by developing a coupling with elastic theory, we extract the core energies of each disconnection. With this method we prove that for a given twin system, the disconnection with the lowest formation energy is always the one compatible with twin mode observed experimentally, even if its elastic energy is higher. Finally, we construct the preliminary elements of a model considering the effect of stress on nucleation of disconnection. (author) [fr

  8. Lorentz-Symmetry Test at Planck-Scale Suppression With a Spin-Polarized 133Cs Cold Atom Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan-Le Bars, H; Guerlin, C; Lasseri, R-D; Ebran, J-P; Bailey, Q G; Bize, S; Khan, E; Wolf, P

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of a local Lorentz invariance (LLI) test performed with the 133 Cs cold atom clock FO2, hosted at SYRTE. Such a test, relating the frequency shift between 133 Cs hyperfine Zeeman substates with the Lorentz violating coefficients of the standard model extension (SME), has already been realized by Wolf et al. and led to state-of-the-art constraints on several SME proton coefficients. In this second analysis, we used an improved model, based on a second-order Lorentz transformation and a self-consistent relativistic mean field nuclear model, which enables us to extend the scope of the analysis from purely proton to both proton and neutron coefficients. We have also become sensitive to the isotropic coefficient , another SME coefficient that was not constrained by Wolf et al. The resulting limits on SME coefficients improve by up to 13 orders of magnitude the present maximal sensitivities for laboratory tests and reach the generally expected suppression scales at which signatures of Lorentz violation could appear.

  9. Atomic-scale microstructures of Zr2Al3C4 and Zr3Al3C5 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.J.; Zhuo, M.J.; He, L.F.; Zhou, Y.C.; Li, M.S.; Wang, J.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructures of bulk Zr 2 Al 3 C 4 and Zr 3 Al 3 C 5 ceramics have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. These two carbides were determined to have a point group 6/mmm and a space group P6 3 /mmc using selected-area electron diffraction and convergent beam electron diffraction. The atomic-scale microstructures of Zr 2 Al 3 C 4 and Zr 3 Al 3 C 5 were investigated through high-resolution imaging and Z-contrast imaging. Furthermore, intergrowth between Zr 2 Al 3 C 4 and Zr 3 Al 3 C 5 was identified. Stacking faults in Zr 3 Al 3 C 5 were found to result from the insertion of an additional Zr-C layer. Cubic ZrC was occasionally identified to be incorporated in elongated Zr 3 Al 3 C 5 grains. In addition, Al may induce a twinned ZrC structure and lead to the formation of ternary zirconium aluminum carbides

  10. High-field torque magnetometry for investigating magnetic anisotropy in Mn12-acetate nanomagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornia, Andrea; Affronte, Marco; Gatteschi, Dante; Jansen, Aloysius G.M.; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2001-01-01

    The single-molecule superparamagnet [Mn 12 O 12 (OAc) 16 (H 2 O) 4 ]·2AcOH·4H 2 O (Mn 12 -acetate) has attracted considerable attention because it shows exceedingly slow paramagnetic relaxation at low temperature. The cluster has S 4 symmetry in the solid state and comprises four Mn(IV) ions (S=((3)/(2))) and eight Mn(III) ions (S=2) which are magnetically coupled to give an S=10 ground state. The ground manifold is largely split in zero magnetic field and many efforts have been spent to determine the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters α, β and γ appearing in the fourth-order spin-Hamiltonian H=αS z 2 +βS z 4 +γ(S + 4 +S - 4 )+μ B B·g·S. These are of paramount importance for defining the magnetic anisotropy of the cluster, which in turn determines the slow relaxation of the magnetization and quantum tunneling effects at low temperatures. We want to show that cantilever torque magnetometry in high fields is a suitable technique for determining second- and fourth-order anisotropic contributions in high-spin molecules, such as Mn 12 -acetate. The main advantage of the method lies in its high sensitivity which allows to use very small single crystals. Torque curves have been recorded at 4.2 K by applying the magnetic field (0-28 T) very close to the ab-plane of the tetragonal unit cell. The zfs parameters obtained by this procedure [α=-0.389(5) cm -1 and β=-8.4(5)x10 -4 cm -1 ] are in excellent agreement with those determined by spectroscopic techniques, such as high-frequency EPR and inelastic neutron scattering

  11. Towards high-energy and durable lithium-ion batteries via atomic layer deposition: elegantly atomic-scale material design and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xiangbo

    2015-01-01

    Targeted at fueling future transportation and sustaining smart grids, lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are undergoing intensive investigation for improved durability and energy density. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling uniform and conformal nanofilms, has recently made possible many new advances for superior LIBs. The progress was summarized by Liu and Sun in their latest review [1], offering many insightful views, covering the design of nanostructured battery components (i.e., electrodes and solid electrolytes), and nanoscale modification of electrode/electrolyte interfaces. This work well informs peers of interesting research conducted and it will also further help boost the applications of ALD in next-generation LIBs and other advanced battery technologies. (viewpoint)

  12. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Quantum manifestations of closed orbits in the photoexcitation scaled spectrum of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jianguo; Delande, D.; Taylor, K. T.

    2001-06-01

    The scaled photoexcitation spectrum of the hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields has been obtained by means of accurate quantum mechanical calculation using a new algorithm. Closed orbits in the corresponding classical system have also been obtained, using a new, efficient and practical searching procedure. Two new classes of closed orbit have been identified. Fourier transforming each photoexcitation quantum spectrum to yield a plot against scaled action has allowed direct comparison between peaks in such plots and the scaled action values of closed orbits. Excellent agreement has been found with all peaks assigned.

  13. Atomic-scale investigation of ε and θ precipitates in bainite in 100Cr6 bearing steel by atom probe tomography and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, W.; Appen, J. von; Choi, P.; Dronskowski, R.; Raabe, D.; Bleck, W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbide precipitation during upper and lower bainite formation in high-carbon bearing steel 100Cr6 is characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The results reveal that both ε and θ carbides precipitate in lower bainite isothermally held at 260 °C and only θ precipitates form in upper bainite isothermally held at 500 °C. ε and θ precipitate under paraequilibrium condition at 260 °C in lower bainite and θ precipitates under negligible partitioning local equilibrium condition in upper bainite at 500 °C. In order to theoretically study ε and θ precipitation and the ε → θ transition in bainite, thermodynamic calculations have been carried out using ab initio techniques. We find that ε and θ carbides in ferrite have almost identical thermodynamic stability, and hence have similar formation probability. In austenite, however, cementite formation is clearly preferred: it is favored by 5 kJ mol −1 at room temperature and still by 4 kJ mol −1 at 500 °C. Hence, the thermodynamic predictions agree well with the atom probe tomography results

  14. On the thermodynamic efficiency of a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator: From bulk to atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.m.sandoval@gmail.com; Sepulveda, Abdon E., E-mail: abdon.sepulveda@gmail.com; Keller, Scott M., E-mail: smkeller@ucla.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    A model is developed to correlate the effects of size on the thermodynamic efficiency for a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator device. Three existing models are combined in order to estimate this correlation, they are (1) thermodynamic efficiency relations, (2) a model of ferromagnetic transition behavior, and (3) the bond-order length strength correlation. At the smallest size considered, a monolayer of nickel atoms shows a reduction in Curie temperature from its bulk value of T{sub c,Bulk}=630 K to T{sub c,ML}=240 K. This difference is analytically shown to affect the thermodynamic efficiency values when compared to bulk. Various nickel nanofilms are considered as a working body, such that the combined model predicts relative efficiency values that are comparable to the bulk scale, but operating closer to room-temperature when compared to bulk form. This result is unexpected since the absolute efficiency is shown to increase as a function of decreasing size, this discrepancy is explained as a consequence of Curie point suppression. The combined model is also applied to a hypothetical composite made of separated layers of nickel with distinct thicknesses. This composite material is predicted to spread the ferromagnetic transition across a much larger temperature range as compared to bulk nickel, such that this material may be better suited for different applications; for example, as a sensor or thermal switch. Moreover, this combined model is also shown to give a lower-bound estimate for thermodynamic efficiency, since the actual performance depends on material characterizations that have yet to be determined.

  15. Evidencing `Tight Bound States' in the Hydrogen Atom:. Empirical Manipulation of Large-Scale XD in Violation of QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Richard L.; Vigier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    In this work we extend Vigier's recent theory of `tight bound state' (TBS) physics and propose empirical protocols to test not only for their putative existence, but also that their existence if demonstrated provides the 1st empirical evidence of string theory because it occurs in the context of large-scale extra dimensionality (LSXD) cast in a unique M-Theoretic vacuum corresponding to the new Holographic Anthropic Multiverse (HAM) cosmological paradigm. Physicists generally consider spacetime as a stochastic foam containing a zero-point field (ZPF) from which virtual particles restricted by the quantum uncertainty principle (to the Planck time) wink in and out of existence. According to the extended de Broglie-Bohm-Vigier causal stochastic interpretation of quantum theory spacetime and the matter embedded within it is created annihilated and recreated as a virtual locus of reality with a continuous quantum evolution (de Broglie matter waves) governed by a pilot wave - a `super quantum potential' extended in HAM cosmology to be synonymous with the a `force of coherence' inherent in the Unified Field, UF. We consider this backcloth to be a covariant polarized vacuum of the (generally ignored by contemporary physicists) Dirac type. We discuss open questions of the physics of point particles (fermionic nilpotent singularities). We propose a new set of experiments to test for TBS in a Dirac covariant polarized vacuum LSXD hyperspace suggestive of a recently tested special case of the Lorentz Transformation put forth by Kowalski and Vigier. These protocols reach far beyond the recent battery of atomic spectral violations of QED performed through NIST.

  16. High-field torque magnetometry for investigating magnetic anisotropy in Mn{sub 12}-acetate nanomagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornia, Andrea E-mail: acornia@unimo.it; Affronte, Marco; Gatteschi, Dante; Jansen, Aloysius G.M.; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2001-05-01

    The single-molecule superparamagnet [Mn{sub 12}O{sub 12}(OAc){sub 16}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}2AcOH{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (Mn{sub 12}-acetate) has attracted considerable attention because it shows exceedingly slow paramagnetic relaxation at low temperature. The cluster has S{sub 4} symmetry in the solid state and comprises four Mn(IV) ions (S=((3)/(2))) and eight Mn(III) ions (S=2) which are magnetically coupled to give an S=10 ground state. The ground manifold is largely split in zero magnetic field and many efforts have been spent to determine the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} appearing in the fourth-order spin-Hamiltonian H={alpha}S{sub z}{sup 2}+{beta}S{sub z}{sup 4}+{gamma}(S{sub +}{sup 4}+S{sub -}{sup 4})+{mu}{sub B}B{center_dot}g{center_dot}S. These are of paramount importance for defining the magnetic anisotropy of the cluster, which in turn determines the slow relaxation of the magnetization and quantum tunneling effects at low temperatures. We want to show that cantilever torque magnetometry in high fields is a suitable technique for determining second- and fourth-order anisotropic contributions in high-spin molecules, such as Mn{sub 12}-acetate. The main advantage of the method lies in its high sensitivity which allows to use very small single crystals. Torque curves have been recorded at 4.2 K by applying the magnetic field (0-28 T) very close to the ab-plane of the tetragonal unit cell. The zfs parameters obtained by this procedure [{alpha}=-0.389(5) cm{sup -1} and {beta}=-8.4(5)x10{sup -4} cm{sup -1}] are in excellent agreement with those determined by spectroscopic techniques, such as high-frequency EPR and inelastic neutron scattering.

  17. Hydrogenation of FeCoZr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, A. [Al-Balqa Applied University, Appl. Science Department (Jordan); Kasiuk, J.; Fedotova, J., E-mail: Julia@hep.by [NC PHEP BSU (Belarus); Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Przewoznik, J.; Kapusta, Cz. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science (Poland); Marszalek, M. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN (Poland)

    2009-02-15

    Hydrogenation effects on crystalline and magnetic structure of nanocomposites (FeCoZr){sub x}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 100-x}, 38 {<=} x {<=} 63 at.% are studied by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry. Variations of local structure, blocking temperature and mean FeCoZr nanoparticles' volume are discussed with respect to (i) composition and (ii) two competing processes-H{sub 2} incorporation and annealing-occurred during treatment in H{sub 2} plasma.

  18. Tutorial: Magnetic resonance with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond—microwave engineering, materials science, and magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Eisuke; Sasaki, Kento

    2018-04-01

    This tutorial article provides a concise and pedagogical overview on negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. The research on the NV centers has attracted enormous attention for its application to quantum sensing, encompassing the areas of not only physics and applied physics but also chemistry, biology, and life sciences. Nonetheless, its key technical aspects can be understood from the viewpoint of magnetic resonance. We focus on three facets of this ever-expanding research field, to which our viewpoint is especially relevant: microwave engineering, materials science, and magnetometry. In explaining these aspects, we provide a technical basis and up-to-date technologies for research on the NV centers.

  19. xGASS: total cold gas scaling relations and molecular-to-atomic gas ratios of galaxies in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, Barbara; Saintonge, Amélie; Janowiecki, Steven; Cortese, Luca; Davé, Romeel; Lemonias, Jenna J.; Cooper, Andrew P.; Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron B.; Fabello, Silvia; Geréb, Katinka; Kilborn, Virginia; Wang, Jing

    2018-05-01

    We present the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (xGASS), a gas fraction-limited census of the atomic hydrogen (H I) gas content of 1179 galaxies selected only by stellar mass (M⋆ = 109-1011.5 M⊙) and redshift (0.01 new Arecibo observations of 208 galaxies, for which we release catalogues and H I spectra. In addition to extending the GASS H I scaling relations by one decade in stellar mass, we quantify total (atomic+molecular) cold gas fractions and molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios, Rmol, for the subset of 477 galaxies observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that atomic gas fractions keep increasing with decreasing stellar mass, with no sign of a plateau down to log M⋆/M⊙ = 9. Total gas reservoirs remain H I-dominated across our full stellar mass range, hence total gas fraction scaling relations closely resemble atomic ones, but with a scatter that strongly correlates with Rmol, especially at fixed specific star formation rate. On average, Rmol weakly increases with stellar mass and stellar surface density μ⋆, but individual values vary by almost two orders of magnitude at fixed M⋆ or μ⋆. We show that, for galaxies on the star-forming sequence, variations of Rmol are mostly driven by changes of the H I reservoirs, with a clear dependence on μ⋆. Establishing if galaxy mass or structure plays the most important role in regulating the cold gas content of galaxies requires an accurate separation of bulge and disc components for the study of gas scaling relations.

  20. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  1. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  2. Molecular-scale noncontact atomic force microscopy contrasts in topography and energy dissipation on c(4x2) superlattice structures of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Ichii, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2004-01-01

    Alkanethiol self-assembledmonolayers formed on Au(111) surfaces were investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Dodecanethiol monolayers prepared at 78 °C were imaged by NC-AFM, which revealed that the film is composed predominantly of two different phases of c(4×2)superlattice structures. The obtained molecular-scale NC-AFM contrasts are discussed in comparison with previously reported scanning tunneling microscopy images. We found that the energy dissipation image exhibits...

  3. Combined short scale roughness and surface dielectric function gradient effects on the determination of tip-sample force in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusso, André, E-mail: gusso@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Departamento de Ciências Exatas-EEIMVR, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Volta Redonda, RJ 27255-125 (Brazil)

    2013-11-11

    The contribution of tip roughness to the van der Waals force between an atomic force microscopy probe tip and the sample is calculated using the multilayer effective medium model, which allows us to consider the relevant case of roughness characterized by correlation length and amplitude in the nanometer scale. The effect of the surface dielectric function gradient is incorporated in the tip-sample force model. It is concluded that for rms roughness in the few nanometers range the effect of short scale tip roughness is quite significant.

  4. Integrated evaluation of the geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, southernmost Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Leo A.; Savian, Jairo F., E-mail: leo.hartmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Lopes, William R. [Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Gerencia de Geologia e Mineracao

    2016-03-15

    An integrated evaluation of geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield is permitted by the advanced stage of understanding of the geology and geochronology of the southern Brazilian Shield and a 2010 airborne geophysical survey. Gamma rays are registered from the rocks near the surface and thus describe the distribution of major units in the shield, such as the Pelotas batholith, the juvenile São Gabriel terrane, the granulite-amphibolite facies Taquarembo terrane and the numerous granite intrusions in the foreland. Major structures are also observed, e.g., the Dorsal de Cangucu shear. Magnetic signals register near surface crustal compositions (analytic signal) and total crust composition (total magnetic signal), so their variation as measured indicates either shallow or whole crustal structures. The Cacapava shear is outstanding on the images as is the magnetic low along the N-S central portion of the shield. These integrated observations lead to the deepening of the understanding of the largest and even detailed structures of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, some to be correlated to field geology in future studies. Most significant is the presence of different provinces and their limits depending on the method used for data acquisition - geology, aero gamma spectrometry or aero magnetometry. (author)

  5. Basic Equations Interrelate Atomic and Nuclear Properties to Patterns at the Size Scales of the Cosmos, Extended Clusters of Galaxies, Galaxies, and Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rob

    2016-09-01

    Structures within molecules and nuclei have relationships to astronomical patterns. The COBE cosmic scale plots, and large scale surveys of galaxy clusters have patterns also repeating and well known at atomic scales. The Induction, Strong Force, and Nuclear Binding Energy Periods within the Big Bang are revealed to have played roles in the formation of these large scale distributions. Equations related to the enormous patterns also model chemical bonds and likely nucleus and nucleon substructures. ratios of the forces that include gravity are accurately calculated from the distributions and shapes. In addition, particle masses and a great many physical constants can be derived with precision and accuracy from astrophysical shapes. A few very basic numbers can do modelling from nucleon internals to molecules to super novae, and up to the Visible Universe. Equations are also provided along with possible structural configurations for some Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy.

  6. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ∼10 20  cm −3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed

  7. Atomic Scale coexistence of Periodic and quasiperiodic order in a2-fold A1-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Young; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Ribeiro,R.A.; Canfield, P.C.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.

    2005-11-14

    Decagonal quasicrystals are made of pairs of atomic planes with pentagonal symmetry periodically stacked along a 10-fold axis. We have investigated the atomic structure of the 2-fold surface of a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The surface consists of terraces separated by steps of heights 1.9, 4.7, 7.8, and 12.6{angstrom} containing rows of atoms parallel to the 10-fold direction with an internal periodicity of 4{angstrom}. The rows are arranged aperiodically, with separations that follow a Fibonacci sequence and inflation symmetry. The results indicate that the surfaces are preferentially Al-terminated and in general agreement with bulk models.

  8. Precise atomic-scale investigations of material sputtering process by light gas ions in pre-threshold energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, A L

    2002-01-01

    Foundation and prospects of the new original technique of the sputtering yield determination of electro-conducting materials and sub-atomic layers on their surface by light gas ions the pre-threshold energy region (from 10 to 500 eV) are considered. The technique allows to identify individual surface vacancies, i.e., to count individual sputtered atoms directly. A short review of the original results obtained by using the developed techniques is given. Data are presented and analyzed concerning energy thresholds of the sputtering onset and energy dependences of sputtering yield in the threshold energy region for beryllium, tungsten, tungsten oxide, alternating tungsten-carbon layers, three carbon materials as well as for sub-atomic carbon layers on surface of certain metals at their bombardment by hydrogen, deuterium and/or helium ions

  9. Angular dependence of the disorder crossover in the vortex lattice of Bi2.15Sr1.85CaCu2O8+δ by muon spin rotation and torque magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aegerter, C.M.; Hofer, J.; Savic, I.M.; Keller, H.; Lee, S.L.; Ager, C.; Lloyd, S.H.; Forgan, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Using the techniques of muon spin rotation and torque magnetometry, we investigate the crossover field B cr in Bi 2.15 Sr 1.85 Ca 1 Cu 2 O 8+δ at which the vortex lattice becomes disordered along the field direction. It is found that B cr scales as the projection of the applied field along the perpendicular to the superconducting planes. This has the implication that a field large enough to give a disordered lattice when applied perpendicular to the planes, can give a well-ordered vortex-line lattice for angles of the field to the c axis greater than a critical value. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Atomic scale simulations of pyrochlore oxides with a tight-binding variable-charge model: implications for radiation tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattonnay, G; Tétot, R

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with new interatomic potentials derived from a tight-binding variable-charge model were performed in order to investigate the lattice properties and the defect formation energies in Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 pyrochlores. The main objective was to determine the role played by the defect stability on the radiation tolerance of these compounds. Calculations show that the titanate has a more covalent character than the zirconate. Moreover, the properties of oxygen Frenkel pairs, cation antisite defects and cation Frenkel pairs were studied. In Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 the cation antisite defect and the Ti-Frenkel pair are not stable: they evolve towards more stable defect configurations during the atomic relaxation process. This phenomenon is driven by a decrease of the Ti coordination number down to five which leads to a local atomic reorganization and strong structural distortions around the defects. These kinds of atomic rearrangements are not observed around defects in Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 . Therefore, the defect stability in A 2 B 2 O 7 depends on the ability of B atoms to accommodate high coordination number (higher than six seems impossible for Ti). The accumulation of structural distortions around Ti-defects due to this phenomenon could drive the Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 amorphization induced by irradiation. (paper)

  11. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  12. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H., E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, Y. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, F-14032 Caen (France); Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Schlathölter, T. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  13. First-principles studies on vacancy-modified interstitial diffusion mechanism of oxygen in nickel, associated with large-scale atomic simulation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, H. Z.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.; Alfonso, D.; Alman, D. E.; Shin, Y. K.; Zou, C. Y.; Duin, A. C. T. van; Lei, Y. K.; Wang, G. F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the prediction of oxygen diffusivities in fcc nickel from first-principles calculations and large-scale atomic simulations. Considering only the interstitial octahedral to tetrahedral to octahedral minimum energy pathway for oxygen diffusion in fcc lattice, greatly underestimates the migration barrier and overestimates the diffusivities by several orders of magnitude. The results indicate that vacancies in the Ni-lattice significantly impact the migration barrier of oxygen in nickel. Incorporation of the effect of vacancies results in predicted diffusivities consistent with available experimental data. First-principles calculations show that at high temperatures the vacancy concentration is comparable to the oxygen solubility, and there is a strong binding energy and a redistribution of charge density between the oxygen atom and vacancy. Consequently, there is a strong attraction between the oxygen and vacancy in the Ni lattice, which impacts diffusion

  14. The atomic scale structure of CXV carbon: wide-angle x-ray scattering and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, J C; Honkimaki, V; Burian, A

    2013-11-13

    The disordered structure of commercially available CXV activated carbon produced from finely powdered wood-based carbon has been studied using the wide-angle x-ray scattering technique, molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations. The x-ray scattering data has been converted to the real space representation in the form of the pair correlation function via the Fourier transform. Geometry optimizations using classical molecular dynamics based on the reactive empirical bond order potential and density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31g* level have been performed to generate nanoscale models of CXV carbon consistent with the experimental data. The final model of the structure comprises four chain-like and buckled graphitic layers containing a small percentage of four-fold coordinated atoms (sp(3) defects) in each layer. The presence of non-hexagonal rings in the atomic arrangement has been also considered.

  15. Atomic-Scale Observations of (010) LiFePO4 Surfaces Before and After Chemical Delithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Fisher, Craig A J; Kato, Takeharu; Ukyo, Yoshio; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-14

    The ability to view directly the surface structures of battery materials with atomic resolution promises to dramatically improve our understanding of lithium (de)intercalation and related processes. Here we report the use of state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques to probe the (010) surface of commercially important material LiFePO4 and compare the results with theoretical models. The surface structure is noticeably different depending on whether Li ions are present in the topmost surface layer or not. Li ions are also found to migrate back to surface regions from within the crystal relatively quickly after partial delithiation, demonstrating the facile nature of Li transport in the [010] direction. The results are consistent with phase transformation models involving metastable phase formation and relaxation, providing atomic-level insights into these fundamental processes.

  16. Atomic-scale observation of structural and electronic orders in the layered compound ?-RuCl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W.; Cao, H. B.; Yan, J.-Q.; Bridges, C. A.; Mandrus, D. G.; Nagler, S. E.; Baddorf, A. P.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    A pseudospin-1/2 Mott phase on a honeycomb lattice is proposed to host the celebrated two-dimensional Kitaev model which has an elusive quantum spin liquid ground state, and fascinating physics relevant to the development of future templates towards topological quantum bits. Here we report a comprehensive, atomically resolved real-space study by scanning transmission electron and scanning tunnelling microscopies on a novel layered material displaying Kitaev physics, ?-RuCl3. Our local crystal...

  17. Atomic Scale Investigation of Structural Properties and Glass Forming Ability of Ti100- x Al x Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, M.; Hasnaoui, A.; Sbiaai, K.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study Ti-Al metallic glasses (MGs) using the embedded atom method (EAM) potential to model the atomic interaction with different compositions. The results showed evidence of the metallic glass formation induced by the split occurring in the second peak of the radial distribution function (RDF) curves implying both Ti and Al atoms. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) method confirmed the presence of the icosahedral clusters with a maximum amount observed for an alloy with 75 pct of Al. Analysis of coordination numbers (CNs) indicated that the total CNs are nearly unchanged in these systems. Finally, Voronoi tessellation analyses (VTA) showed a higher value of the number of icosahedral units at Ti25Al75 composition. This specific composition represents a nearby peritectic point localized at a low melting point in the Ti-Al binary phase diagram. The glass forming ability (GFA) becomes important when the fraction of Al increases by forming and connecting "icosahedral-like" clusters (12-coordinated and 13-coordinated ) and by playing a main role in the structure stability of the Ti-Al MGs.

  18. Atomic Scale Investigation of Structural Properties and Glass Forming Ability of Ti100-x Al x Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, M.; Hasnaoui, A.; Sbiaai, K.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study Ti-Al metallic glasses (MGs) using the embedded atom method (EAM) potential to model the atomic interaction with different compositions. The results showed evidence of the metallic glass formation induced by the split occurring in the second peak of the radial distribution function (RDF) curves implying both Ti and Al atoms. The common neighbor analysis (CNA) method confirmed the presence of the icosahedral clusters with a maximum amount observed for an alloy with 75 pct of Al. Analysis of coordination numbers (CNs) indicated that the total CNs are nearly unchanged in these systems. Finally, Voronoi tessellation analyses (VTA) showed a higher value of the number of icosahedral units at Ti25Al75 composition. This specific composition represents a nearby peritectic point localized at a low melting point in the Ti-Al binary phase diagram. The glass forming ability (GFA) becomes important when the fraction of Al increases by forming and connecting "icosahedral-like" clusters (12-coordinated and 13-coordinated ) and by playing a main role in the structure stability of the Ti-Al MGs.

  19. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  20. Fiber-Optic Magnetometry and Thermometry Using Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance With Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Sean Michael

    Nitrogen--vacancy diamond (NVD) quantum sensors are an emerging technology that has shown great promise in areas like high-resolution thermometry and magnetometry. Optical fibers provide attractive new application paradigms for NVD technology. A detailed description of the fabrication processes associated with the development of novel fiber-optic NVD probes are presented in this work. The demonstrated probes are tested on paradigmatic model systems designed to ascertain their suitability for use in challenging biological environments. Methods employing optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) are used to accurately measure and map temperature distributions of small objects and to demonstrate emergent temperature-dependent phenomena in genetically modified living organisms. These methods are also used to create detailed high resolution spatial maps of both magnetic scalar and magnetic vector field distributions of spatially localized weak field features in the presence of a noisy, high-field background.

  1. Atomic-scale structure of GeSe2 glass revisited: a continuous or broken network of Ge-(Se1/2)4 tetrahedra?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, V; Le Messurier, D

    2010-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of germanium diselenide (GeSe 2 ) glass has been revisited using a combination of high-energy x-ray diffraction and constrained reverse Monte Carlo simulations. The study shows that the glass structure may be very well described in terms of a continuous network of corner- and edge-sharing Ge-Se 4 tetrahedra. The result is in contrast to other recent studies asserting that the chemical order and, hence, network integrity in GeSe 2 glass are intrinsically broken. It is suggested that more elaborate studies are necessary to resolve the controversy.

  2. A perfect wetting of Mg monolayer on Ag(111) under atomic scale investigation: First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migaou, Amani; Guiltat, Mathilde; Payen, Kevin; Landa, Georges; Hémeryck, Anne, E-mail: anne.hemeryck@laas.fr [LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, Toulouse (France); Sarpi, Brice; Daineche, Rachid; Vizzini, Sébastien [Aix Marseille University, IM2NP, Fac Sci St. Jérôme, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-21

    First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy experiments of the adsorption of Mg on Ag(111) substrate are conducted. This detailed study reveals that an atomic scale controlled deposition of a metallic Mg monolayer perfectly wets the silver substrate without any alloy formation at the interface at room temperature. A liquid-like behavior of the Mg species on the Ag substrate is highlighted as no dot formation is observed when coverage increases. Finally a layer-by-layer growth mode of Mg on Ag(111) can be predicted, thanks to density functional theory calculations as observed experimentally.

  3. Ageing effects on polymeric track detectors: studies of etched tracks at nano size scale using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Fragoso, R.; Vazquez L, C.; Saad, A. F.; El-Namrouty, A. A.; Fujii, M.

    2012-01-01

    Among several different techniques to analyze material surface, the use of Atomic Force Microscope is one of the finest method. As we know, the sensitivity to detect energetic ions is extremely affected during the storage time and conditions of the polymeric material used as a nuclear track detector. On the basis of the surface analysis of several track detector materials, we examined the detection sensitivity of these detectors exposed to alpha particles. The preliminary results revealed that the ageing effect on its sensitivity is very strong, that need to be considered on the routine applications or research experiments. The results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature. (Author)

  4. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  5. Atomic scale studies of La/Sr ordering in La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Roldan, Manuel

    2016-12-21

    Many fascinating properties of materials depend strongly on the local chemical environment. This is the case for many complex oxides, such as materials with colossal magnetoresistance, where small variations of composition at the atomic scale can affect drastically the macroscopic properties. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the local chemical composition with atomic resolution and to find out if any underlying chemical order is in any way connected to the magnetic properties of double perovskite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (LSMO) manganite oxides. For these compounds, charge and orbital ordering are observed for some doping values near x = 0.50 [1, 2]. For this purpose, we have use aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements and also theoretical simulations. We have compared different compositions within three distinct magnetic regions of the phase diagram: a ferromagnetic metallic sample with x=0.36, an insulating, antiferromagnetic (AF) x=0.56 and an additional AF x=0.50 sample which also exhibits charge ordering. High angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images, also known as Z-contrast, confirm that our single crystals exhibit high crystal quality. No secondary phases or defects are observed. Figure 1 displays an atomic resolution image obtained with the c-axis perpendicular to the electron beam of a x=0.50 sample. The perovskite (P)-like planes and the rock salt (R)-like planes are clearly observed, highlighted in green and red, respectively, on the image. The P-like planes exhibit a slightly high contrast, suggesting a possible La enrichment. EELS atomic resolution maps (inset) support a high degree of La segregation on those planes, while R-like planes are Sr rich. However, due to dechanneling of the beam, detailed image simulations are essential to accurately quantify the local chemical composition in an atomic column-by-atomic column fashion. For all our

  6. Very large-scale structures in sintered silica aerogels as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Marliere, C; Etienne, P; Woignier, T; Dieudonné, P; Phalippou, J

    2001-01-01

    During the last few years the bulk structure of silica aerogels has been extensively studied mainly by scattering techniques (neutrons, X-rays, light). It has been shown that small silica particles aggregate to constitute a fractal network. Its spatial extension and fractal dimension are strongly dependent on the synthesis conditions (e.g., pH of gelifying solutions). These typical lengths range from 1 to 10 nm. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments have been carried out on aerogels at different steps of densification. The results presented in this paper reveal the existence of a spatial arrangement of the solid part at a very large length scale. The evolution of this very large-scale structure during the densification process has been studied and reveals a contraction of this macro-structure made of aggregates of clusters. (16 refs).

  7. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  8. Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Examples of disorders that ...

  9. In-situ observation of Cu-Pt core-shell nanoparticles in the atomic scale by XAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xusheng; Liu, Shoujie; Chen, Xing; Cheng, Jie; Ye, Qing; Pan, Zhiyun; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, Augosto

    2013-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles play an important role in potential industrial applications, such as catalysis, optoelectronics, information storage and biological labeling. Herein, homogeneous Cu-Pt core-shell nanoparticles with the averaged size of 8 nm have been synthesized by chemical methods. Cu atoms diffusion process, which motivated by heating, was observed in-situ by using temperature-dependent x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Results show that Cu diffuse gradually from Cu core to Pt shell in these nanoparticles with increasing temperature. We also found the surface ligand (O) bonded Pt at the room temperature and were removed gradually by heating the sample. The analysis of the diffusion process in bimetallic nanoparticles will provide important guideline for their designing and tuning.

  10. Precipitation in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy during isothermal aging: Atomic-scale HAADF-STEM investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xuesong; Zheng, Jingxu; Li, Zhi; Luo, Ruichun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Frontier Research Center for Materials Structure, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: steelboy@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Frontier Research Center for Materials Structure, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China)

    2017-04-13

    The present study, using advanced Cs-corrected high-angle annular dark field – scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), reports on a comprehensive investigation into the precipitate structures in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy aged at 150 ℃, including GP zones, η’ and η precipitates. In the nucleation stage, Zn atoms enrich on the {111}{sub Al}-planes abutting spherical Mg clusters that are approximately 3–6 nm in diameter. In the subsequent growth, the as-nucleated structures extend with an increasing diameter and a constant width along [111]{sub Al} and grow into platelet precipitates. η’ is proved to be a group of metastable structures existing in the transition from FCC Al to HCP MgZn{sub 2} (η). Some metastable structures are assembled by local-ordered rhombohedral units and orthorhombic units as building blocks. Subsequently, the precipitates evolve into η phases with stacking faults.

  11. Dislocation glide in Ni-Al solid solutions from the atomic scale up: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodary, E.

    2003-01-01

    The glide of an edge dislocation in solid solutions is studied by molecular dynamics, at fixed temperature and imposed external stress. We have optimized an EAM potential for Ni(1 a 8% A1): it well reproduces the lattice expansion, local atomic order, stacking fault energy as a function of composition, as well as the elastic properties of the γ' phase with L1 2 structure. On increasing the stress, the dislocation is first immobile, then glides with a velocity proportional to the stress and the velocity saturates on reaching the transverse sound velocity. However, only beyond a static threshold stress, σ s , does the dislocation glide a distance large enough to allow macroscopic shear; the linear part of the velocity-stress curve extrapolates to zero at a dynamical threshold stress, σ d , The friction coefficient, and the threshold stresses (σ s and σ d ), increase with the A1 concentration and decrease with temperature (300 and 500 K). Close to the critical shear stress, σ s , the dislocation glide is analysed with a 'stop and go' model. The latter yields the flight velocity between obstacles, the mean obstacle density and the distribution of the waiting time on each obstacle as a function of stress, composition and temperature. The obstacle to the glide is proposed to be the strong repulsion between Al atoms brought into nearest neighbour position by the glide process, and not the dislocation-solute interaction. The microscopic parameters so defined are introduced into a micro-mechanical model, which well reproduces the known behaviour of nickel base solid solutions. (author)

  12. Atomic-scale investigation of point defects and hydrogen-solute atmospheres on the edge dislocation mobility in alpha iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, M. A.; Solanki, K. N., E-mail: kiran.solanki@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Groh, S. [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg 09556 (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    In this study, we present atomistic mechanisms of 1/2 [111](11{sup ¯}0) edge dislocation interactions with point defects (hydrogen and vacancies) and hydrogen solute atmospheres in body centered cubic (bcc) iron. In metals such as iron, increases in hydrogen concentration can increase dislocation mobility and/or cleavage-type decohesion. Here, we first investigate the dislocation mobility in the presence of various point defects, i.e., change in the frictional stress as the edge dislocation interacts with (a) vacancy, (b) substitutional hydrogen, (c) one substitutional and one interstitial hydrogen, (d) interstitial hydrogen, (e) vacancy and interstitial hydrogen, and (f) two interstitial hydrogen. Second, we examine the role of a hydrogen-solute atmosphere on the rate of local dislocation velocity. The edge dislocation simulation with a vacancy in the compression side of the dislocation and an interstitial hydrogen atom at the tension side exhibit the strongest mechanical response, suggesting a higher potential barrier and hence, the higher frictional stress (i.e., ∼83% higher than the pure iron Peierls stress). In the case of a dislocation interacting with a vacancy on the compressive side, the vacancy binds with the edge dislocation, resulting in an increase in the friction stress of about 28% when compared with the Peierls stress of an edge dislocation in pure iron. Furthermore, as the applied strain increases, the vacancy migrates through a dislocation transportation mechanism by attaining a velocity of the same order as the dislocation velocity. For the case of the edge dislocation interacting with interstitial hydrogen on the tension side, the hydrogen atom jumps through one layer perpendicular to the glide plane during the pinning-unpinning process. Finally, our simulation of dislocation interactions with hydrogen show first an increase in the local dislocation velocity followed by a pinning of the dislocation core in the atmosphere, resulting in

  13. Atomic-Scale Structure of Al2O3-ZrO2 Mixed Oxides Prepared by Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiuchun; Dubiel, M.; Hofmeister, H.; Riehemann, W.

    2007-01-01

    By means of x-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, the phase composition and atomic structure of laser evaporated ZrO2 and ZrO2-Al2O3 nanopowders have been studied. The results indicate that pure ZrO2 exists in the form of tetragonal structure, Al2O3 doped ZrO2 nanoparticles, however, have cubic structure. Compared to bulk tetragonal ZrO2, pure tetragonal ZrO2 nanoparticles have a shorter Zr-O- and Zr-Zr shell, indicating that the lattice contracts with decreasing particle size. For Al2O3 doped ZrO2 solid solution, the distances of first Zr-O and Zr-Zr (Al) coordination decrease with increasing solid solubility. The disorder degree of the ZrO2 lattice increases with increasing solid solubility. The coevaporated ZrO2-Al2O3 is quickly solidified into amorphous phase when it is ablated in a higher pressure. The amorphous phase contains Zr-O-Zr (Al) clusters and has shorter Zr-O distance and tower Zr-O coordination number

  14. Atomic scale insight into the amorphous structure of Cu doped GeTe phase-change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Linchuan; Sa, Baisheng; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Zhimei; Song, Zhitang

    2014-01-01

    GeTe shows promising application as a recording material for phase-change nonvolatile memory due to its fast crystallization speed and extraordinary amorphous stability. To further improve the performance of GeTe, various transition metals, such as copper, have been doped in GeTe in recent works. However, the effect of the doped transition metals on the stability of amorphous GeTe is not known. Here, we shed light on this problem for the system of Cu doped GeTe by means of ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Our results show that the doped Cu atoms tend to agglomerate in amorphous GeTe. Further, base on analyzing the pair correlation functions, coordination numbers and bond angle distributions, remarkable changes in the local structure of amorphous GeTe induced by Cu are obviously seen. The present work may provide some clues for understanding the effect of early transition metals on the local structure of amorphous phase-change compounds, and hence should be helpful for optimizing the structure and performance of phase-change materials by doping transition metals.

  15. Atomic scale characterization of white etching area and its adjacent matrix in a martensitic 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.J., E-mail: y.li@mpie.de [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany); Center for Interface-Dominated High Performance Materials, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Herbig, M.; Goto, S. [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, Düsseldorf D-40237 (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Atom probe tomography was employed to characterize the microstructure and C distribution in the white etching area (WEA) of a martensitic 100Cr6 bearing steel subjected to rolling contact fatigue. Different from its surrounding matrix where a plate-like martensitic structure prevails, the WEA exhibits equiaxed grains with a uniform grain size of about 10 nm. Significant C grain boundary enrichment (>7.5at.%) and an overall higher C concentration than the nominal value are observed in the WEA. These results suggest that the formation of WEA results from severe local plastic deformation that causes dissolution of carbides and the redistribution of C. - Highlights: •APT has been applied to characterize the microstructure of white etching area (WEA). •Quantitative analyses of C distribution indicate that carbides are dissolved on the WEA. •WEA contains equiaxed grains with a uniform grain size of 10 nm. •C segregation at grain boundaries stabilizes the nanosized grain structure. •Formation of WEA is explained by severe local plastic deformation introduced by cyclic contact loading.

  16. Atom-scale covalent electrochemical modification of single-layer graphene on SiC substrates by diaryliodonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mueller, Kory M.; Veneman, Peter A.; Holliday, Bradley J.; Chan, Calvin K.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high conductivity, graphene holds promise as an electrode for energy devices such as batteries and photovoltaics. However, to this end, the work function and doping levels in graphene need to be precisely tuned. One promising route for modifying graphene's electronic properties is via controlled covalent electrochemical grafting of molecules. We show that by employing diaryliodonium salts instead of the commonly used diazonium salts, spontaneous functionalization is avoided. This then allows for precise tuning of the grafting density. Moreover, by employing bis(4-nitrophenyl)iodonium(III) tetrafluoroborate (DNP) salt calibration curves, the surface functionalization density (coverage) of glassy carbon was controlled using cyclic voltammetry in varying salt concentrations. These electro-grafting conditions and calibration curves translated directly over to modifying single layer epitaxial graphene substrates (grown on insulating 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1)). In addition to quantifying the functionalization densities using electrochemical methods, samples with low grafting densities were characterized by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). We show that the use of buffer-layer free graphene substrates is required for clear observation of the nitrophenyl modifications. Furthermore, atomically-resolved STM images of single site modifications were obtained, showing no preferential grafting at defect sites or SiC step edges as supposed previously in the literature. Most of the grafts exhibit threefold symmetry, but occasional extended modifications (larger than 4 nm) were observed as well

  17. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  18. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Genghong; Zhu, Jia; Jiang, Gelei; Sheng, Qiang; Zheng, Yue, E-mail: zhengy35@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro& Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Weijin [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Micro& Nano Physics and Mechanics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Wang, Biao, E-mail: wangbiao@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge) and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop) with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs) emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field) pointing from right to left (from left to right) are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  19. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  20. Being affected by large-scale projects - considerations on the protection of rights in Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, W.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final part of an article published in Bay. (VBL 1982, 257). The author comes to the following conclusions: Proposals for reducing the protection of rights frames against a certain background of interests and partly taken over in practice by administrative courts meet with a variety of dogmatic and political considerations relating to these rights. This does not only hold for the attempt to restrict the rights of all those under public and substantive law who are affected by construction and operation, but also for making it harder for the complainants to pursue their rights, and especially for efforts intended to further limit the fact-finding of courts in case of large-scale projects. The judicature is called to review the individual licences issued for large-scale projects, especially because of the inherent symptomatic collisions of basic rights. The judge has a confidence-building advantage; i.e. his independence, which is gaining in importance in the struggle between hardened fronts and economic interests. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Application of SQUIDs to low temperature and high magnetic field measurements—Ultra low noise torque magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F.; Naumann, M.; Lühmann, Th.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Hassinger, E.

    2018-02-01

    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque resolving powers in excess of 104 are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers via Wheatstone-type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 200 mK. By using a two-stage superconducting-quantum interference device as a null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of Δm = 4 × 10-15 J/T at maximal field and 700 mK, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO2, was used to show the superior performance of our setup.

  2. Magnetometry of buried layers—Linear magnetic dichroism and spin detection in angular resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloskovskii, Andrei; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia; Thiess, Sebastian; Schulz-Ritter, Heiko; Drube, Wolfgang; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Newly commissioned HAXPES instrument at P09 beamline of the PETRA III ring at DESY. ► We report HAXPES studies on buried magnetic nanolayers in a multi-layer sample. ► Linear magnetic dichroism of photoelectrons from buried CoFe–Ir 78 Mn 22 layers. ► Spin-resolved HAXPES measurements on buried magnetic multilayers using Mott detector. - Abstract: The electronic properties of buried magnetic nano-layers were studied using the linear magnetic dichroism in the angular distribution of photoemitted Fe, Co, and Mn 2p electrons from a CoFe–Ir 78 Mn 22 multi-layered sample. The buried layers were probed using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, HAXPES, at the undulator beamline P09 of the 3rd generation storage ring PETRA III. The results demonstrate that this magnetometry technique can be used as a sensitive element specific probe for magnetic properties suitable for application to buried ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic magnetic materials and multilayered spintronics devices. Using the same instrument, spin-resolved Fe 2p HAXPES spectra were obtained from the buried layer with good signal quality.

  3. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  4. Chemical inhomogeneity in InxGa1-xN and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In x Ga 1-x N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In x Ga 1-x N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  5. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS{sub 2} films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Gene; Venkata Subbaiah, Y. P.; Prestgard, Megan C.; Tiwari, Ashutosh, E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns) was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001) substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10{sup −6} Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ablation of the MoS{sub 2} target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}) was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS{sub 2} as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} peaks were observed at 404.6 cm{sup −1} and 384.5 cm{sup −1} with a spacing of 20.1 cm{sup −1}, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV) and 615 nm (2.02 eV), with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS{sub 2} exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n) in the MoS{sub 2} films increases, the spacing between the A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} Raman peaks (Δf) increases following an empirical relation, Δf=26.45−(15.42)/(1+1.44 n{sup 0.9}) cm{sup −1}.

  6. Tuning of Magnetic Anisotropy in Hexairon(III) Rings by Host-Guest Interactions: An Investigation by High-Field Torque Magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia; Affronte; Jansen; Abbati; Gatteschi

    1999-08-01

    Full chemical control of magnetic anisotropy in hexairon(III) rings can be achieved by varying the size of the guest alkali metal ion. Dramatically different anisotropies characterize the Li(I) and Na(I) complexes of [Fe(6)(OMe)(12)(L)(6)] (L=1,3-propanedione derivatives; a schematic representation of the Li(I) complex is shown), as revealed by high-field torque magnetometry-Iron: (g), oxygen: o, carbon: o, Li(+): plus sign in circle.

  7. Joule heating and spin-transfer torque investigated on the atomic scale using a spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S; Herzog, G; Schlenhoff, A; Sonntag, A; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-10-28

    The influence of a high spin-polarized tunnel current onto the switching behavior of a superparamagnetic nanoisland on a nonmagnetic substrate is investigated by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. A detailed lifetime analysis allows for a quantification of the effective temperature rise of the nanoisland and the modification of the activation energy barrier for magnetization reversal, thereby using the nanoisland as a local thermometer and spin-transfer torque analyzer. Both the Joule heating and spin-transfer torque are found to scale linearly with the tunnel current. The results are compared to experiments performed on lithographically fabricated magneto-tunnel junctions, revealing a very high spin-transfer torque switching efficiency in our experiments.

  8. Finite element analysis of a 1:4 scale PCCV model - Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong-pyo; Choun, Young-sun

    2005-01-01

    This report covers phase 2 of the International Standard Problem 48 (ISP48) benchmark on containment integrity. It describes the finite element (FE) analysis results of a 1:4 scale model of a pre-stressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model. The objective of the present FE analysis is to evaluate the ultimate internal pressure capacity of the PCCV as well as its failure mechanism when the PCCV model is subjected to a monotonous internal pressure beyond its design pressure. The FE analysis used two concrete failure criteria with the commercial code ABAQUS. One is axisymmetric model with modified Drucker-Prager failure criteria and the other is 3-dimensional model with damaged plasticity model. Finally, the FE analysis results on the ultimate pressure and failure modes have a good agreement with experimental data

  9. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    measurements. The results provide a platform for further development of microkinetic models of FTS on Fe and a basis for more precise modeling of FTS activity of Fe catalysts. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on various realistic models of industrial, Fe-based FTS catalysts. Close-packed, most stable Fe(110) facet was analyzed and subsequently carbide formation was found to be facile leading to the choice of the FeC(110) model representing a Fe facet with a sub-surface C atom. The Pt adatom (Fe{sup Pt}(110)) was found to be the most stable model for our studies into Pt promotion and finally the role of steps was elucidated by recourse to the defected Fe(211) facet. Binding Energies(BEs), preferred adsorption sites and geometries for all FTS relevant stable species and intermediates were evaluated on each model catalyst facet. A mechanistic model (comprising of 32 elementary steps involving 19 species) was constructed and each elementary step therein was fully characterized with respect to its thermochemistry and kinetics. Kinetic calculations involved evaluation of the Minimum Energy Pathways (MEPs) and activation energies (barriers) for each step. Vibrational frequencies were evaluated for the preferred adsorption configuration of each species with the aim of evaluating entropy-changes, pre exponential factors and serving as a useful connection with experimental surface science techniques. Comparative analysis among these four facets revealed important trends in their relative behavior and roles in FTS catalysis. Overall the First Principles Calculations afforded us a new insight into FTS catalysis on Fe and modified-Fe catalysts.

  10. Atomic-Scale Structure of the Tin DX Center and Other Related Defects in Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Semiconductors Using Moessbauer Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Luigi Alessandro

    The DX center in III-V alloys has limited the use of these materials for electronic devices since the defect acts as an electron trap. To be able to control or eliminate the DX center, its atomic scale structure should be understood. Mossbauer spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable technique in probing the atomic-scale structure of certain atomic species. The dopant studied here is ^{119}Sn. The thermal diffusion of Sn in Al_ {rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x }As using different temperatures, times, sample geometries and As_4 overpressures in evacuated and sealed fused silica ampoules was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD), secondary ion mass spectroscopy and electrochemical capacitance versus voltage measurements. The AlGaAs surfaces decomposed into various Sn, Si, Ga and As oxides when an As_4 overpressure was introduced during annealing. However, annealing under ambient As_4 and furnace cooling eliminated surface decomposition although the Sn diffusion depth was less than that for a 0.5 atm As_4 overpressure. SiO_{rm x} and Si_{rm x }N_{rm y} RF-sputtered thin film capping layers deposited on AlGaAs were studied by XRD and Auger electron spectroscopy. For the annealed SiO_{rm x} films the AlGaAs surface was preserved, independent of the cooling technique used. Mossbauer spectroscopy was conducted on ^{rm 119m} Sn-implanted Al_ {rm x } Ga_{rm 1-x} As (x = 0.22 and 0.25) used for the source experiments and ^{119}Sn-doped Al _{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As (x = 0.15, N _{rm Sn} ~2 times 10 ^{18} cm^{ -3}) for the absorber experiment. The source samples were capped with 120 nm of SiO_ {rm x} to preserve the surface during the systematic study of annealing temperature versus site occupation and electrical activation via Mossbauer spectroscopy at 76 K and 4 K in the dark and in the light (to observe persistent photoconductivity (PPC) due to the DX center). For all of the annealing conditions used the x = 0.22 sample showed little evidence of PPC possibly due to compensating defects and

  11. Nano-scale Biophysical and Structural Investigations on Intact and Neuropathic Nerve Fibers by Simultaneous Combination of Atomic Force and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Rosso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The links between neuropathies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, and impaired biomechanical and structural integrity of PNS nerves remain poorly understood despite the medical urgency. Here, we present a protocol describing simultaneous structural and biomechanical integrity investigations on isolated nerve fibers, the building blocks of nerves. Nerve fibers are prepared from nerves harvested from wild-type and exemplary PNS neuropathy mouse models. The basic principle of the designed experimental approach is based on the simultaneous combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM and confocal microscopy. AFM is used to visualize the surface structure of nerve fibers at nano-scale resolution. The simultaneous combination of AFM and confocal microscopy is used to perform biomechanical, structural, and functional integrity measurements at nano- to micro-scale. Isolation of sciatic nerves and subsequent teasing of nerve fibers take ~45 min. Teased fibers can be maintained at 37°C in a culture medium and kept viable for up to 6 h allowing considerable time for all measurements which require 3–4 h. The approach is designed to be widely applicable for nerve fibers from mice of any PNS neuropathy. It can be extended to human nerve biopsies.

  12. The molecular-scale arrangement and mechanical strength of phospholipid/cholesterol mixed bilayers investigated by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterols play key roles in controlling molecular fluidity in a biological membrane, yet little is known about their molecular-scale arrangements in real space. In this study, we have directly imaged lipid-cholesterol complexes in a model biological membrane consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterols by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in phosphate buffer solution. FM-AFM images of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer in the liquid-ordered phase showed higher energy dissipation values compared to those measured on a nanoscale DPPC domain in the gel phase, reflecting the increased molecular fluidity due to the insertion of cholesterols. Molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer revealed the existence of a rhombic molecular arrangement (lattice constants: a = 0.46 nm, b = 0.71 nm) consisting of alternating rows of DPPC and cholesterols as well as the increased defect density and reduced molecular ordering. The mechanical strength of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer was quantitatively evaluated by measuring a loading force required to penetrate the membrane with an AFM tip. The result revealed the significant decrease of mechanical strength upon insertion of cholesterols. Based on the molecular-scale arrangement found in this study, we propose a model to explain the reduced mechanical strength in relation to the formation of lipid-ion networks.

  13. The molecular-scale arrangement and mechanical strength of phospholipid/cholesterol mixed bilayers investigated by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, 920-1192 Kanazawa (Japan)], E-mail: hi_asa@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fukuma@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-01

    Cholesterols play key roles in controlling molecular fluidity in a biological membrane, yet little is known about their molecular-scale arrangements in real space. In this study, we have directly imaged lipid-cholesterol complexes in a model biological membrane consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterols by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in phosphate buffer solution. FM-AFM images of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer in the liquid-ordered phase showed higher energy dissipation values compared to those measured on a nanoscale DPPC domain in the gel phase, reflecting the increased molecular fluidity due to the insertion of cholesterols. Molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer revealed the existence of a rhombic molecular arrangement (lattice constants: a = 0.46 nm, b = 0.71 nm) consisting of alternating rows of DPPC and cholesterols as well as the increased defect density and reduced molecular ordering. The mechanical strength of a DPPC/cholesterol bilayer was quantitatively evaluated by measuring a loading force required to penetrate the membrane with an AFM tip. The result revealed the significant decrease of mechanical strength upon insertion of cholesterols. Based on the molecular-scale arrangement found in this study, we propose a model to explain the reduced mechanical strength in relation to the formation of lipid-ion networks.

  14. Aerial gamma spectrometry and aerial magnetometry of the occidental tract from Paulista Precambrian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, F.J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This work includes processing and interpretation of airborne spectrometric and magnetometric data of a 20.000 km 2 area between the cities of Sao Paulo and Pirassununga (Sao Paulo State, Brazil). Spectrometric maps were produced and interpreted, showing isorad curves for K, U and Th channels, U/Th, K/U and K/Th ratios, and F = K.U/Th. Main results are the following ones: a comparison between spectrometric and geological data at scale 1:50.000 Itu, Sorocaba, Sao Francisco and Morungaba granitoids showed satisfactory individualization of the bodies, discrimination of different sectors and/or mapping units and relations between facies zonality patterns and distribution of radioactivity levels of K, U and Th channels; airborne spectrometric and magnetometric data compared with geological data generally suggests classification for granitoid rocks following main current proposals of international literature; on the basis of magnetometric features of outcropping Precambrian terrains and with the help of filtered maps, it was possible to induce the tectonic framework of the basement complex covered by sediments and lavas of Parana Basin, with the help of filtered maps. Another interesting aspect was the definition of the tectonic border of this basin inside the studied area, which not only controlled the localization of Itu belt granitoids, but also may have affected the sedimentation in the basin by reactivation processes; finally it was shown that used methods are important mapping tools, which may contribute for the knowledge of the granitoids and the tectonic framework and for the study of metallogenic potential. (author)

  15. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  16. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang; Zhu, Xinhua; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2014-01-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric constants of

  17. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  18. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  19. PdRu alloy nanoparticles of solid solution in atomic scale: outperformance towards formic acid electro-oxidation in acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Kanghua; Luo, Yun; Zou, Jiasui; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Fengqi; Huang, Lin; Huang, Jie; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2017-01-01

    Developing catalyst of high performance and low cost toward the electro-oxidation of formic acid on the anode of fuel cell is critical for the commercialization of direct formic acid fuel cells. Here we reported the synthesis of Pd x Ru 10-x (x = 1,3,5,7,9) nanoparticles (NPs) by concurrent reduction of Pd 2+ and Ru 2+ in polyol solution at 200 °C. The particle size of the obtained NPs was confined at 5–15 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure for Pd x Ru 10-x (x = 3,5,7,9), with the lattice parameter proportional to the Pd content. The formation of the solid solution in atomic scale was confirmed for the alloy nanoparticles by XRD and the elemental mapping. Williamson-Hall method revealed that the stacking fault was dependent on the alloying extent of the alloy nanoparticles and reached the minimum for Pd 5 Ru 5 , which exhibited the highest activity towards formic acid oxidation among all these prepared samples, with mass activity of 12.6 times higher than that of commercial Pd/C. It was observed that the highest catalytic activity was in agreement with the minimum of the stacking fault of the alloy nanoparticles.

  20. Atomic scale insights into electrochemical versus gas phase oxidation of HCl over RuO2-based catalysts: A comparative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    In this article our current understanding of the electro-catalyzed chlorine evolution reaction (CER) in comparison with that of the heterogeneously-catalyzed gas phase oxidation of HCl (Deacon process: heterogeneous catalysis) over RuO 2 -based catalysts will be reviewed. Both types of harsh reactions are chemically similar: The main concern is catalyst stability, and in both cases the best catalyst contains RuO 2 as the catalytically active component so that a critical comparison may provide new insights into the underlying physicochemical processes. It is the primary scope of this review addresses atomic scale information on the RuO 2 -catalyzed HCl oxidation reaction either in electrochemical or in gas phase environment. In particular, the involved reaction mechanisms and the reason for the extraordinary stability of RuO 2 under such harsh reaction conditions will be discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences in the Deacon process and the CER and what can be learnt from this comparison. The distinct properties of RuO 2 , which are responsible for its extraordinary catalytic performance in both the CER and the Deacon process, are highlighted

  1. Disordered Nanohole Patterns in Metal-Insulator Multilayer for Ultra-broadband Light Absorption: Atomic Layer Deposition for Lithography Free Highly repeatable Large Scale Multilayer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Amir; Hajian, Hodjat; Dereshgi, Sina Abedini; Bozok, Berkay; Butun, Bayram; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2017-11-08

    In this paper, we demonstrate a facile, lithography free, and large scale compatible fabrication route to synthesize an ultra-broadband wide angle perfect absorber based on metal-insulator-metal-insulator (MIMI) stack design. We first conduct a simulation and theoretical modeling approach to study the impact of different geometries in overall stack absorption. Then, a Pt-Al 2 O 3 multilayer is fabricated using a single atomic layer deposition (ALD) step that offers high repeatability and simplicity in the fabrication step. In the best case, we get an absorption bandwidth (BW) of 600 nm covering a range of 400 nm-1000 nm. A substantial improvement in the absorption BW is attained by incorporating a plasmonic design into the middle Pt layer. Our characterization results demonstrate that the best configuration can have absorption over 0.9 covering a wavelength span of 400 nm-1490 nm with a BW that is 1.8 times broader compared to that of planar design. On the other side, the proposed structure retains its absorption high at angles as wide as 70°. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced multilayer designs where a simple fabrication step can boost the overall device response without changing its overall thickness and fabrication simplicity.

  2. Photocatalytic mechanism of high-activity anatase TiO2 with exposed (001) facets from molecular-atomic scale: HRTEM and Raman studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Shi, Chentian; Zhang, Yupeng; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2017-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 with a variant percentage of exposed (001) facets was prepared under hydrothermal processes by adjusting the volume of HF, and the photocatalytic mechanism was studied from atomic-molecular scale by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy. It was revealed that: 1) From HRTEM observations, the surface of original TiO2 with exposed (001) facets was clean without impurity, and the crystal lattice was clear and completed; however, when mixed with methylene blue (MB) solution, there were many 1 nm molecular absorbed at the surface of TiO2; after the photocatalytic experiment, MB molecules disappeared and the TiO2 lattice image became fuzzy. 2) The broken path of the MB chemical bond was obtained by Raman spectroscopy, i.e., after the irradiation of the light, the vibrational mode of C-N-C disappeared due to the chemical bond breakage, and the groups containing C-N bond and carbon rings were gradually decomposed. Accordingly, we propose that the driving force for breaking the chemical bond and the disappearance of groups is from the surface lattice distortion of TiO2 during photocatalyzation.

  3. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  4. Atomic-scale features of phase boundaries in hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodcock, T.G.; Ramasse, Q.M.; Hrkac, G.; Shoji, T.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2014-01-01

    Hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets were infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid, resulting in a 71% increase in coercivity to μ 0 H c = 2.4 T without the use of Dy, and a 22% decrease in remanence, attributed to the dilution effect. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy have been used to reveal the structure and chemical composition of phase boundaries in the magnets on the atomic scale. The results showed that the Nd–Cu liquid penetrated the ≈1 nm thick intergranular regions. The coercivity increase following infiltration was therefore attributed to improved volume fraction and distribution of the intergranular phases. Co enrichment in the outermost 1–2 unit cells at several {0 0 1} and {1 1 0} surfaces of the Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B crystals was shown for the infiltrated sample. The as-deformed sample did not appear to show this Co enrichment. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the distorted layer at an {0 0 1} surface of a Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B grain was significantly thicker with higher Co surface enrichment. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy may be reduced in such distorted regions, which could have a detrimental effect on coercivity. Such features may therefore play a role in limiting coercivity to a fraction of the anisotropy field. Interfacial segregation of Cu between Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B and the Nd-rich intergranular phase occurred in the infiltrated sample. Step defects in Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B {0 0 1} surfaces, a half or a whole unit cell in height, were also observed

  5. Role of W and Mn for reliable 1X nanometer-node ultra-large-scale integration Cu interconnects proved by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, K.; Shimizu, H.; Momose, T.; Shimogaki, Y. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tu, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    We used atom probe tomography (APT) to study the use of a Cu(Mn) as a seed layer of Cu, and a Co(W) single-layer as reliable Cu diffusion barriers for future interconnects in ultra-large-scale integration. The use of Co(W) layer enhances adhesion of Cu to prevent electromigration and stress-induced voiding failures. The use of Cu(Mn) as seed layer may enhance the diffusion barrier performance of Co(W) by stuffing the Cu diffusion pass with Mn. APT was used to visualize the distribution of W and Mn in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution. W was found to segregate at the grain boundaries of Co, which prevents diffusion of Cu via the grain boundaries. Mn was found to diffuse from the Cu(Mn) layer to Co(W) layer and selectively segregate at the Co(W) grain boundaries with W, reinforcing the barrier properties of Co(W) layer. Hence, a Co(W) barrier coupled with a Cu(Mn) seed layer can form a sufficient diffusion barrier with film that is less than 2.0-nm-thick. The diffusion barrier behavior was preserved following a 1-h annealing at 400 °C. The underlayer of the Cu interconnects requires a large adhesion strength with the Cu, as well as low electrical resistivity. The use of Co(W) has previously been shown to satisfy these requirements, and addition of Mn is not expected to deteriorate these properties.

  6. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  7. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  8. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  9. Dislocations and elementary processes of plasticity in FCC metals: atomic scale simulations; Dislocations et processus elementaires de la plasticite dans les metaux CFC: apports des simulations a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney, D

    2000-07-01

    We present atomic-scale simulations of two elementary processes of FCC crystal plasticity. The first study consists in the simulation by molecular dynamics, in a nickel crystal, of the interactions between an edge dislocation and glissile interstitial loops of the type that form under irradiation in displacement cascades. The simulations show various atomic-scale interaction processes leading to the absorption and drag of the loops by the dislocation. These reactions certainly contribute to the formation of the 'clear bands' observed in deformed irradiated materials. The simulations also allow to study quantitatively the role of the glissile loops in irradiation hardening. In particular, dislocation unpinning stresses for certain pinning mechanisms are evaluated from the simulations. The second study consists first in the generalization in three dimensions of the quasi-continuum method (QCM), a multi-scale simulation method which couples atomistic techniques and the finite element method. In the QCM, regions close to dislocation cores are simulated at the atomic-scale while the rest of the crystal is simulated with a lower resolution by means of a discretization of the displacement fields using the finite element method. The QCM is then tested on the simulation of the formation and breaking of dislocation junctions in an aluminum crystal. Comparison of the simulations with an elastic model of dislocation junctions shows that the structure and strength of the junctions are dominated by elastic line tension effects, as is assumed in classical theories. (author)

  10. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  11. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  12. Electron - atom bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.

    1986-01-01

    Features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas are studied. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point-Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. Results agree with exact quantum-mechanical partial-wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point-Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential, the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. The scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses were also studied. It was found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T 1 /Z 2 . This scaling is exact in the case of the point-Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. Bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas were also studied describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas-Fermi mode. Gaunt factors were obtained with the relativistic partial-wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures

  13. Atomic-Scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings Held in Boston, Massachusetts on November 30-December 2, 1992. Volume 295

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    ofrindi idual siruxtural ui.inix cn. hoes er, be atitntcdiru Aith current comnputer hardwa~e A firsit oi Xr Model for the detect structure max be...02115 ABSTRACT Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image the surface atomic structure of hydroxyapatite lCaI0(PO4 )6 (Oll)2 1, HA. and...The structure and chemical nature of the minerals hydroxyapatite and brushite have been studied extensively in biological researchf-t0 HA is found

  14. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  15. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  16. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  17. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  18. Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) and a ``Twist'' on Nonlinear Magneto-optical Rotation (NMOR) with Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Within the class of nonlinear optical effects that exhibit sub-natural linewidth features, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) stand out as having made dramatic impacts on various applications including atomic clocks, magnetometry, and single photon storage. A related effect, known as electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), has received less attention in the literature. Here, we report on the first observation of EIA in cold atoms using the Hanle configuration, where a single laser beam is used to both pump and probe the atoms while sweeping a magnetic field through zero along the beam direction. We find that, associated with the EIA peak, a ``twist'' appears in the corresponding NMOR signal. A similar twist has been previously noted by Budker et al., in the context of warm vapor optical magnetometry, and was ascribed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels. By studying this feature through numerical simulations and cold atom experiments, thus rendering the hyperfine levels well resolved, we enhance the understanding of the optical pumping mechanism behind it, and elucidate its relation to EIA. Finally, we demonstrate a useful application of these studies through a simple and rapid method for nulling background magnetic fields within our atom chip apparatus.

  19. Towards atomic scale engineering of rare-earth-doped SiAlON ceramics through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurdakul, Hilmi; Idrobo, Juan C.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Turan, Servet

    2011-01-01

    Direct visualization of rare earths in α- and β-SiAlON unit-cells is performed through Z-contrast imaging technique in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. The preferential occupation of Yb and Ce atoms in different interstitial locations of β-SiAlON lattice is demonstrated, yielding higher solubility for Yb than Ce. The triangular-like host sites in α-SiAlON unit cell accommodate more Ce atoms than hexagonal sites in β-SiAlON. We think that our results will be applicable as guidelines for many kinds of rare-earth-doped materials.

  20. Atomic-scale luminescence measurement and theoretical analysis unveiling electron energy dissipation at a p-type GaAs(110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Jung, Jaehoon; Shimizu, Tomoko K; Kim, Yousoo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence of p-type GaAs was induced by electron injection from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope into a GaAs(110) surface. Atomically-resolved photon maps revealed a significant reduction in luminescence intensity at surface electronic states localized near Ga atoms. Theoretical analysis based on first principles calculations and a rate equation approach was performed to describe the perspective of electron energy dissipation at the surface. Our study reveals that non-radiative recombination through the surface states (SS) is a dominant process for the electron energy dissipation at the surface, which is suggestive of the fast scattering of injected electrons into the SS. (paper)

  1. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  2. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  3. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  4. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  5. Thickness and angular dependent magnetic anisotropy of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films by Vectorial Magneto Optical Kerr Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaluvadi, S. K.; Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Camarero, J.; Pautrat, A.; Flament, S.; Méchin, L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the in-plane magnetic anisotropy in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 (001) substrate using angular dependent room temperature Vectorial Magneto-Optical Kerr Magnetometry. The experimental data reveals that the magnetic anisotropy symmetry landscape significantly changes depending upon the strain and thickness. At low film thickness (12 and 25 nm) the dominant uniaxial anisotropy is due to interface effects, step edges due to mis-cut angle of SrTiO3 substrate. At intermediate thickness, the magnetic anisotropy presents a competition between magnetocrystalline (biaxial) and substrate step induced (uniaxial) anisotropy. Depending upon their relative strengths, a profound biaxial or uniaxial or mixed anisotropy is favoured. Above the critical thickness, magnetocrystalline anisotropy dominates all other effects and shows a biaxial anisotropy.

  6. Atomic scale studies of La/Sr ordering in La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Roldan, Manuel; Oxley, Mark; Li, Qiang; Gray, Kenneth; Mitchell, John; Pennycook, Stephen; Varela, Maria

    2016-01-01

    quality. No secondary phases or defects are observed. Figure 1 displays an atomic resolution image obtained with the c-axis perpendicular to the electron beam of a x=0.50 sample. The perovskite (P)-like planes and the rock salt (R)-like planes are clearly

  7. Studies of x-ray localization and thickness dependence in atomic-scale elemental mapping by STEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using single-frame scanning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Moya, Jaime M; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2018-03-01

    The delocalization of x-ray signals limits the spatial resolution in atomic-scale elemental mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In this study, using a SrTiO 3 [001] single crystal, we show that the x-ray localization to atomic columns is strongly dependent on crystal thickness, and a thin crystal is critical for improving the spatial resolution in atomic-scale EDS mapping. A single-frame scanning technique is used in this study instead of the multiple-frame technique to avoid peak broadening due to tracking error. The strong thickness dependence is realized by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) as well as the peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio of the EDS profiles for Ti K and Sr K + L, obtained at several crystal thicknesses. A FWHM of about 0.16 nm and a P/V ratio of greater than 7.0 are obtained for Ti K for a crystal thickness of less than 20 nm. With increasing crystal thickness, the FWHM and P/V ratio increases and decreases, respectively, indicating the advantage of using a thin crystal for high-resolution EDS mapping. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Directed Atom-by-Atom Assembly of Dopants in Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Bethany M; Song, Jiaming; Sims, Hunter; Troparevsky, M Claudia; Humble, Travis S; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Snijders, Paul C; Lupini, Andrew R

    2018-05-17

    The ability to controllably position single atoms inside materials is key for the ultimate fabrication of devices with functionalities governed by atomic-scale properties. Single bismuth dopant atoms in silicon provide an ideal case study in view of proposals for single-dopant quantum bits. However, bismuth is the least soluble pnictogen in silicon, meaning that the dopant atoms tend to migrate out of position during sample growth. Here, we demonstrate epitaxial growth of thin silicon films doped with bismuth. We use atomic-resolution aberration-corrected imaging to view the as-grown dopant distribution and then to controllably position single dopants inside the film. Atomic-scale quantum-mechanical calculations corroborate the experimental findings. These results indicate that the scanning transmission electron microscope is of particular interest for assembling functional materials atom-by-atom because it offers both real-time monitoring and atom manipulation. We envision electron-beam manipulation of atoms inside materials as an achievable route to controllable assembly of structures of individual dopants.

  9. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  10. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  11. Cold atoms in singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, J. P.

    1998-09-01

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the interaction between cold Li atoms from a magnetic-optical trap (MOT) and a charged or current-carrying wire. With this system, we were able to realize 1/r 2 and 1/r potentials in two dimensions and to observe the motion of cold atoms in both potentials. For an atom in an attractive 1/r 2 potential, there exist no stable trajectories, instead there is a characteristic class of trajectories for which atoms fall into the singularity. We were able to observe this falling of atoms into the center of the potential. Moreover, by probing the singular 1/r 2 potential with atomic clouds of varying size and temperature we extracted scaling properties of the atom-wire interaction. For very cold atoms, and very thin wires the motion of the atoms must be treated quantum mechanically. Here we predict that the absorption cross section for the 1/r 2 potential should exhibit quantum steps. These quantum steps are a manifestation of the quantum mechanical decomposition of plane waves into partial waves. For the second part of this work, we realized a two dimensional 1/r potential for cold atoms. If the potential is attractive, the atoms can be bound and follow Kepler-like orbits around the wire. The motion in the third dimension along the wire is free. We were able to exploit this property and constructed a novel cold atom guide, the 'Kepler guide'. We also demonstrated another type of atom guide (the 'side guide'), by combining the magnetic field of the wire with a homogeneous offset magnetic field. In this case, the atoms are held in a potential 'tube' on the side of the wire. The versatility, simplicity, and scaling properties of this guide make it an interesting technique. (author)

  12. Atomic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation λ = h/(mv), where λ is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  13. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toofanny, Rudesh D; Simms, Andrew M; Beck, David A C; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-08-10

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns) simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster). For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns) spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster). Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36%) was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery problems. The speed up enables on-the-fly calculation

  14. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toofanny Rudesh D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Results Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster. For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster. Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36% was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. Conclusions The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery

  15. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  16. Section of Atomic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.; Biri, S.; Gulyas, L.; Juhasz, Z.; Kover, A.; Orban, A.; Palinkas, J.; Papp, T.; Racz, R.; Ricz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Section of Atomic Collisions is a research unit with extended activity in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Starting from the study of atomic processes at the beamlines of nuclear physics accelerators in the seventies, our research community became one of the centers of fundamental research in Atomki. We also have a strong connection to materials sciences especially along the line of electron and ion spectroscopy methods. Our present activity covers a wide range of topics from atomic collision mechanisms of fundamental interest, to the complex interactions of electrons, ions, photons and antiparticles with atoms, molecules, surfaces, and specific nanostructures. In the last few years, an increasing fraction of our present topics has become relevant for applications, e.g., molecular collision studies for the radiation therapy methods of tumors, or ion-nanostructure interactions for the future construction of small ion-focusing elements. Our section belongs to the Division of Atomic Physics. The other unit of the Division is the Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Sciences. There are traditionally good connections and a strong collaboration between the groups of the two sections in many fields. From the very beginning of our research work in atomic collisions, external collaborations were of vital importance for us. We regularly organize international workshops in the field of fast ion-atom collisions and related small conferences in Debrecen from 1981. Recently, we organized the Conference on Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM 2008, Debrecen), and coorganized the Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS 2008, Cluj). We have access to several large scale facilities in Europe within the framework of formal and informal collaborations. The next themes are in this article: Forward electron emission from energetic atomic collisions; Positron-atom collisions; Photon-atom interactions; Interference effects in electron

  17. Atomic secrecy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.

    1979-01-01

    An article, The H-Bomb Secret: How We Got It, Why We're Telling It, by Howard Morland was to be published in The Progressive magazine in February, 1979. The government, after learning of the author's and the editors' intention to publish the article and failing to persuade them to voluntarily delete about 20% of the text and all of the diagrams showing how an H-bomb works, requested a court injunction against publication. Acting under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, US District Court Judge Robert W. Warren granted the government's request on March 26. Events dealing with the case are discussed in this publication. Section 1, Progressive Hydrogen Bomb Case, is discussed under the following: Court Order Blocking Magazine Report; Origins of the Howard Morland Article; Author's Motives, Defense of Publication; and Government Arguments Against Disclosure. Section 2, Access to Atomic Data Since 1939, contains information on need for secrecy during World War II; 1946 Atomic Energy Act and its effects; Soviet A-Bomb and the US H-Bomb; and consequences of 1954 Atomic Energy Act. Section 3, Disputed Need for Atomic Secrecy, contains papers entitled: Lack of Studies on H-Bomb Proliferation; Administration's Position on H-Bombs; and National Security Needs vs Free Press

  18. Microwave Digestion and Furnace Atomic Absorption Method for the Quantification of Nano-scale TiO2 in Aqueous Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many nanomaterials posses physical, and potentially biological, activity that is unique relative to their macro-scaled or soluble forms. One such property is surface plasmon resonance; a phenomenon that can generate or facilitate photoreactivity. Optimization of these properties ...

  19. Antimatter atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    In january 1996, CERN broadcasted the information of the creation of nine anti-hydrogen atoms, observed through disintegration products. The experimental facility was CERN LEAR ring. An antiproton beam scattered a xenon jet, and the resulting antimatter was first selected by its insensitivity to beam bending magnets. Their disintegration was detected in thin NaI detectors, in which the anti-atoms are at once deprived from their positron. Then, magnetic and time-of-flight spectrometers are used. (D.L.)

  20. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  1. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  2. Atoms stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.; Bordry, M.

    1988-01-01

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  3. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  4. Nano-scale study of phase separation in ferrite of long term thermally aged Mo-bearing duplex stainless steels - Atom probe tomography and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, C.; Emo, J.; Pareige, P.; Saillet, S.; Domain, C.

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS), used in primary circuit of Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), are prone to thermal ageing at service temperature, typically between 286 and 323 C. degrees. This ageing is due to the ferrite decomposition via two kinds of phase transformations: spinodal decomposition into Fe rich α zones and Cr rich α' zones and precipitation of G-phase enriched in Ni, Si, Mn and Mo. It has been shown by atom probe tomography (APT) that the G-phase particles form at the interface between α and α' regions thereby demonstrating that α-α' decomposition and G-phase precipitation are highly dependent. The synergy between the two decomposition processes should be related to both the thermodynamics of the system and the diffusion mechanisms active during ageing. This can be studied by atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) with a model that can reproduce the phase transformations which take place in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. This paper presents the first simulations of the kinetics of spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation occurring in ferrite of duplex stainless steels. The kinetics was simulated using a simple but effective atomic kinetic Monte Carlo model in a ternary alloy. The simulations reproduced the α/α' spinodal structure with precipitates at the α/α' interface. The comparison of simulated results with experiments shows that the simulations quantitatively reproduce the kinetics of phase transformation and the synergy observed experimentally between the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation: the time evolution of the wavelength of the spinodal decomposition and the radius of G-phase precipitates were quantitatively reproduced. The simulations endorse the assumption that G-phase precipitation mainly results from the rejection of G-formers from α and α' domains. By following the vacancy pathway during simulation, we show that coarsening of the G-phase precipitates must proceed via

  5. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2008-01-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10 m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with ba...

  6. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalff, Floris; Rebergen, Marnix; Fahrenfort, Nora; Girovsky, Jan; Toskovic, Ranko; Lado, Jose; FernáNdez-Rossier, JoaquíN.; Otte, Sander

    The ability to manipulate individual atoms by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) opens op opportunities for storage of digital data on the atomic scale. Recent achievements in this direction include data storage based on bits encoded in the charge state, the magnetic state, or the local presence of single atoms or atomic assemblies. However, a key challenge at this stage is the extension of such technologies into large-scale rewritable bit arrays. We demonstrate a digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine terminated Cu(100) surface. The chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K. The memory, crafted using scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperature, can be read and re-written automatically by means of atomic-scale markers, and offers an areal density of 502 Terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude.

  7. Observation of Structure of Surfaces and Interfaces by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction: Atomic-Scale Imaging and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Voegeli, Wolfgang; Takahashi, Toshio

    2018-06-01

    The recent developments in synchrotron optics, X-ray detectors, and data analysis algorithms have enhanced the capability of the surface X-ray diffraction technique. This technique has been used to clarify the atomic arrangement around surfaces in a non-contact and nondestructive manner. An overview of surface X-ray diffraction, from the historical development to recent topics, is presented. In the early stage of this technique, surface reconstructions of simple semiconductors or metals were studied. Currently, the surface or interface structures of complicated functional materials are examined with sub-Å resolution. As examples, the surface structure determination of organic semiconductors and of a one-dimensional structure on silicon are presented. A new frontier is time-resolved interfacial structure analysis. A recent observation of the structure and dynamics of the electric double layer of ionic liquids, and an investigation of the structural evolution in the wettability transition on a TiO2 surface that utilizes a newly designed time-resolved surface diffractometer, are presented.

  8. Atomic-Scale Origin of the Quasi-One-Dimensional Metallic Conductivity in Strontium Niobates with Perovskite-Related Layered Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Yin, Deqiang; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Lichtenberg, Frank; Ma, Xiuliang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Bednorz, Johannes Georg

    2017-12-26

    The quasi-one-dimensional (1D) metallic conductivity of the perovskite-related Sr n Nb n O 3n+2 compounds is of continuing fundamental physical interest as well as being important for developing advanced electronic devices. The Sr n Nb n O 3n+2 compounds can be derived by introducing additional oxygen into the SrNbO 3 perovskite. However, the physical origin for the transition of electrical properties from the three-dimensional (3D) isotropic conductivity in SrNbO 3 to the quasi-1D metallic conductivity in Sr n Nb n O 3n+2 requires more in-depth clarification. Here we combine advanced transmission electron microscopy with atomistic first-principles calculations to unambiguously determine the atomic and electronic structures of the Sr n Nb n O 3n+2 compounds and reveal the underlying mechanism for their quasi-1D metallic conductivity. We demonstrate that the local electrical conductivity in the Sr n Nb n O 3n+2 compounds directly depends on the configuration of the NbO 6 octahedra in local regions. These findings will shed light on the realization of two-dimensional (2D) electrical conductivity from a bulk material, namely by segmenting a 3D conductor into a stack of 2D conducting thin layers.

  9. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  10. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  11. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  12. Atomic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss, M.

    2015-01-01

    As presented in the first chapter of this book, atomic transport properties govern a large panel of nuclear fuel properties, from its microstructure after fabrication to its behaviour under irradiation: grain growth, oxidation, fission product release, gas bubble nucleation. The modelling of the atomic transport properties is therefore the key to understanding and predicting the material behaviour under irradiation or in storage conditions. In particular, it is noteworthy that many modelling techniques within the so-called multi-scale modelling scheme of materials make use of atomic transport data as input parameters: activation energies of diffusion, diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, all of which are then required to be known accurately. Modelling approaches that are readily used or which could be used to determine atomic transport properties of nuclear materials are reviewed here. They comprise, on the one hand, static atomistic calculations, in which the migration mechanism is fixed and the corresponding migration energy barrier is calculated, and, on the other hand, molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations, for which the time evolution of the system is explicitly calculated. (author)

  13. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to learn more about the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation

  14. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use...

  15. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiu-Qin; Liu Ni; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. (paper)

  16. Charge ordering in Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}: ESR and magnetometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, D.M.; Tovstolytkin, A.I. [Institute of Magnetism of NASU, 36b Vernadsky Boulevard, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Fertman, E.L.; Desnenko, V.A.; Kravchyna, O. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of NASU, 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine); Khalyavin, D.D. [ISIS Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Salak, A.N. [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering/CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193 (Portugal); Anders, A.G. [V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody sq., Kharkiv 61000 (Ukraine); Feher, A. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University in Košice, Park Angelinum 9, Košice 04154 (Slovakia)

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of magnetic and electric properties of the narrow-band manganite Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} was studied by the electron-spin resonance (ESR), static magnetic field (dc) and resistivity techniques in the temperature range of 100–380 K. It was found that below the charge ordering temperature, T{sub CO}≈212 K, the compound is a mixture of the charge ordered and charge disordered phases in varying proportions depending on the temperature. The exchange phase process, when the amount of the charge ordered phase increases under cooling, while the amount of the charge disordered phase decreases is the most intense between ∼220 K and 180 K. At low temperatures, T<160 K, the charge ordered to the charge disordered phase ratio is about 4:1, which is in excellent agreement with previous neutron diffraction data. Both a sharp decrease of the magnetic susceptibility and a huge resistivity increase are evident of the weakening of ferromagnetic correlations and suppression of the double exchange interaction across the charge ordering due to the localization of the charge carriers. - Highlights: • The electron spin resonance and magnetometry study of Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} compound has been done. • Phase segregated state of the compound below the charge ordering temperature was revealed. • Charge ordered and charge disordered phases in varying proportions depending on the temperature are coexistent. • The exchange phase process is the most intense between ~220 K and 180 K. • At low temperatures the charge ordered to the charge disordered phase ratio is about 4:1.

  17. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  18. Growth of transition metal oxides in 2D layers : probing and tuning the properties of matter at the atomic-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermüller, T.

    2015-01-01

    In surface science, accurate controlling and detailed characterization of metal supported ultrathin film growth of transition metal oxides (TMO) is a central requirement for collecting reliable empirical data which in turn can be used to improve and extend the existing theoretical models and approaches, such as density functional theory (DFT). In this work, the controlled growth of TMOs on the Ag(100) surface is investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in conjunction with various other surface science techniques. In addition, a novel promising experimental approach to effectively affect and control the growth of TMOs by high electric fields is presented. The investigations concerned the TMO systems MnxOy and WOx on the Ag(100) surface. The strikingly anisotropic growth of the (2x1)-MnO/Ag(100) system is characterized by long and narrow stripes which form a complex 2D surface network of MnO islands. The growth mechanism of this system has been rationalized by first-principle DFT calculations. The (WO3)3 clusters deposited at room temperature form ramified fractal islands. Above a threshold temperature of 700 K, a fully intact 2D WOx wetting layer emerges at the surface. On top of this layer, beginning 3D growth in form of sharp needles is observed. Since the area of the wetting layer exceeds the nanometer-scale (up to 1 µm), also low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) has been employed to study the growth kinetics of the WOx/Ag(100) system. Strong electric field experiments (1-2 V/nm) have been performed on both systems by employing a custom-designed UHV apparatus. Significant field-induces surface modifications have been observed in all experiments, and have been characterized by STM and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) [de

  19. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  20. Atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanna, R.

    1978-01-01

    Development of nuclear science in India, particularly the research and development work at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is described. Among the wide range of materials developed for specific functions under rigorous conditions are nuclear pure grade uranium, zirconium and beryllium, and conventional materials like aluminium, carbon steel and stainless steels. Radioisotopes are produced and used for tracer studies in various fields. Various types of nuclear gauges and nuclear instruments are produced. Radiations have been used to develop new high yielding groundnut mutants with large kernals. The sterile male technique for pest control and radiosterilization technique to process potatoes, onions and marine foods for storage are ready for exploitation. Processes and equipment have been developed for production of electrolytic hydrogen, electrothermal phosphorus and desalinated water. Indigenously manufactured components and materials are now being used for the nuclear energy programme. Indian nuclear power programme strategy is to build heavy water reactors and to utilise their byproduct plutonium and depleted uranium to feed fast breeder reactors which will produce more fissile material than burnt. Finally a special mention has been made of the manpower development programme of the BARC. BARC has established a training school in 1957 giving advanced training in physics, chemistry and various branches of engineering and metallurgy

  1. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  2. Atomic weight versus atomic mass controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    A problem for the Atomic Weights Commission for the past decade has been the controversial battle over the names ''atomic weight'' and ''atomic mass''. The Commission has considered the arguments on both sides over the years and it appears that this meeting will see more of the same discussion taking place. In this paper, I review the situation and offer some alternatives

  3. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to the present understanding of this material and leading to some possible future work.

  4. Lithiation-induced shuffling of atomic stacks

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin; Cheng, Yingchun; Zhu, Yihan; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Han, Yu; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Klie, Robert F.; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, understanding the atomic-scale mechanism of Li-induced structural evolution occurring at the host electrode materials provides essential knowledge for design of new high performance electrodes. Here, we report

  5. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  6. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  7. Code ATOM for calculation of atomic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    In applying atomic physics to problems of plasma diagnostics, it is necessary to determine some atomic characteristics, including energies and transition probabilities, for very many atoms and ions. Development of general codes for calculation of many types of atomic characteristics has been based on general but comparatively simple approximate methods. The program ATOM represents an attempt at effective use of such a general code. This report gives a brief description of the methods used, and the possibilities of and limitations to the code are discussed. Characteristics of the following processes can be calculated by ATOM: radiative transitions between discrete levels, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, collisional excitation and ionization by point heavy particle (Born approximation only), dielectronic recombination, and autoionization. ATOM explores Born (for z=1) or Coulomb-Born (for z>1) approximations. In both cases exchange and normalization can be included. (N.K.)

  8. Clarifying atomic weights: A 2016 four-figure table of standard and conventional atomic weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Meyers, Fabienne; Holden, Norman E.

    2017-01-01

    To indicate that atomic weights of many elements are not constants of nature, in 2009 and 2011 the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) replaced single-value standard atomic weight values with atomic weight intervals for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium); for example, the standard atomic weight of nitrogen became the interval [14.00643, 14.00728]. CIAAW recognized that some users of atomic weight data only need representative values for these 12 elements, such as for trade and commerce. For this purpose, CIAAW provided conventional atomic weight values, such as 14.007 for nitrogen, and these values can serve in education when a single representative value is needed, such as for molecular weight calculations. Because atomic weight values abridged to four figures are preferred by many educational users and are no longer provided by CIAAW as of 2015, we provide a table containing both standard atomic weight values and conventional atomic weight values abridged to four figures for the chemical elements. A retrospective review of changes in four-digit atomic weights since 1961 indicates that changes in these values are due to more accurate measurements over time or to the recognition of the impact of natural isotopic fractionation in normal terrestrial materials upon atomic weight values of many elements. Use of the unit “u” (unified atomic mass unit on the carbon mass scale) with atomic weight is incorrect because the quantity atomic weight is dimensionless, and the unit “amu” (atomic mass unit on the oxygen scale) is an obsolete term: Both should be avoided.

  9. WMO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    The growing interest of WMO in atomic energy was reflected in the decision of the Executive Committee in 1956 to establish a panel of experts to study the meteorological aspects of the nuclear energy. One of the major achievements of the panel, which has held two meetings since its inception, has been the preparation of a technical note treating fully the various meteorological problems resulting from the applications of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Over the past four years, steady progress has also been made both in adapting nuclear techniques to meteorological uses and in providing advice and assistance. Much time and thought are now being devoted to the study of large-scale air mass movements, turbulent diffusion and the other meteorological processes on which the transport and gradual fall-out of radioactive debris depend. The safe location of nuclear plants and the disposal of radioactive waste are related problems in which WMO has also taken a very active interest. Another aspect of the help which WMO as an organization can provide is to help for the collection and analysis of radioactive material in the biosphere. Advances in nuclear physics have also opened up great possibilities for the use of radioactive isotopes in making meteorological and hydrometeorological measurements

  10. Atomic fountain and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the development of working of MOT along with the basic principle of laser atom cooling and trapping is given. A technique to separate the cooled and trapped atoms from the MOT using atomic fountain technique will also be covered. The widely used technique for atomic fountain is, first to cool and trap the neutral atoms in MOT and then launch them in the vertical direction, using moving molasses technique. Using 133 Cs atomic fountain clock, time improvement of 2 to 3 order of magnitude over a conventional 133 Cs atomic clock has been observed

  11. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmcke, J.; Riehle, F.; Witte, A.; Kisters, T.

    1992-01-01

    Physics and experimental results of atom interferometry are reviewed and several realizations of atom interferometers are summarized. As a typical example of an atom interferometer utilizing the internal degrees of freedom of the atom, we discuss the separated field excitation of a calcium atomic beam using four traveling laser fields and demonstrate the Sagnac effect in a rotating interferometer. The sensitivity of this interferometer can be largely increased by use of slow atoms with narrow velocity distribution. We therefore furthermore report on the preparation of a laser cooled and deflected calcium atomic beam. (orig.)

  12. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhu, Xinhua; Zhou, Shunhua; Zhu, Jianmin; Liu, Zhiguo; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  13. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-12-24

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  14. Atoms in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper covers some aspects of the theory of atomic processes in dense plasmas. Because the topic is very broad, a few general rules which give useful guidance about the typical behavior of dense plasmas have been selected. These rules are illustrated by semiclassical estimates, scaling laws and appeals to more elaborate calculations. Included in the paper are several previously unpublished results including a new mechanism for electron-ion heat exchange (section II), and an approximate expression for oscillator-strengths of highly charged ions (section V). However the main emphasis is not upon practical formulas but rather on questions of fundamental theory, the structural ingredients which must be used in building a model for plasma events. What are the density effects and how does one represent them? Which are most important? How does one identify an incorrect theory? The general rules help to answer these questions. 106 references, 23 figures, 2 tables

  15. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.M.; City Coll., New York; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous-whose rates are related by a non-constant function βsub(a)-is demonstrated. The cosmological character of βsub(a) is also discussed. (author)

  16. Atoms against the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, J.; Raul Vera, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Woody Allen's masterpiece Annie Hall the main character is worried about the expansion of the universe. Indeed, during a childhood visit to his psychiatrist, his mother admonishes him: ''You're here in Brooklyn! Brooklyn is not expanding!''. But is that really true? Relativists have attacked this naive question many times and have arrived at different answers. New light has now been thrown on the subject by William Bonnor from Queen Mary and Westfield College in London by considering the influence of the expanding universe on the size of the hydrogen atom (Class. Quantum Grav. 1999 16 1313). According to Bonner's calculations we can conclude that the cosmic expansion does not affect human-scale objects like laboratories and our bodies. In this article the authors explain the reasoning behind this research and its thought provoking consequences. (UK)

  17. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  18. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  19. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Lasers, light-atom interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnac, B.; Faroux, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This book has a double purpose: first to explain in a way as simple as possible the interaction processes occurring between atoms and light waves, and secondly to help any scientist that needs further information to improve his knowledge of lasers. The content of this book has been parted into 3 more or less independent sections: 1) effect of an electromagnetic field on a 2-quantum state system, 2) operating mode of lasers in the framework of transition probabilities, and 3) calculation of the emitted wave. Einstein's phenomenological hypothesis has led to probability equations called rate equations, these equations do not give a true representation of the interaction process at the scale of the atom but this representation appears to be true on an average over a large population of atoms. Only quantum mechanics can describe accurately the light-atom interaction but at the cost of a far higher complexity. In the first part of the book quantum mechanics is introduced and applied under 2 simplifying hypothesis: -) the atom system has only 2 non-degenerate states and -) the intensity of the light wave is high enough to involve a large population of photons. Under these hypothesis, Rabi oscillations, Ramsey pattern and the splitting of Autler-Townes levels are explained. The second part is dedicated to the phenomenological model of Einstein that gives good results collectively. In the third part of the book, Maxwell equations are used to compute field spatial distribution that are currently found in experiments involving lasers. (A.C.)

  1. ‘Which-way’ collective atomic spin excitation among atomic ensembles by photon indistinguishability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowan; Bian Chenglin; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang Weiping

    2012-01-01

    In spontaneous Raman scattering in an atomic ensemble, a collective atomic spin wave is created in correlation with the Stokes field. When the Stokes photons from two or more such atomic ensembles are made indistinguishable, a ‘which-way’ collective atomic spin excitation is generated among the independent atomic ensembles. We demonstrate this phenomenon experimentally by reading out the atomic spin excitations and observing interference between the read-out beams. When a single-photon projective measurement is made on the indistinguishable Stokes photons, this simple scheme can be used to entangle independent atomic ensembles. Compared to other currently used methods, this scheme can be easily scaled up and has greater efficiency. (paper)

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  3. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  4. Progress in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.J.; Kleinpoppen, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents reviews by leading experts in the field covering areas of research at the forefront of atomic spectroscopy. Topics considered include the k ordering of atomic structure, multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations for complex atoms, new methods in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, resonance ionization spectroscopy (inert atom detection), trapped ion spectroscopy, high-magnetic-field atomic physics, the effects of magnetic and electric fields on highly excited atoms, x rays from superheavy collision systems, recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions, investigations of superheavy quasi-atoms via spectroscopy of electron rays and positrons, impact ionization by fast projectiles, and amplitudes and state parameters from ion- and atom-atom excitation processes

  5. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, A.; Sen, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the Thomas-Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gaspar provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gaspar's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number

  6. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  7. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterns of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom—surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy, the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields. (atomic and molecular physics)

  8. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the Sheriff RMS and E-911 map rolls. Cover is painstakingly maintained interactively by GIS staff. All atom boundaries are snapped to the road centerline cover, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset current as of 2008. Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the...

  9. A Single Atom Antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinter, Florian; Williams, Joshua B; Weller, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Pitzer, Martin; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Schober, Carl; Kastirke, Gregor; Müller, Christian; Goihl, Christoph; Burzynski, Phillip; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Kalinin, Anton; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Schöffler, Markus S; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Gokhberg, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the smallest possible implementation of an antenna-receiver complex which consists of a single (helium) atom acting as the antenna and a second (neon) atom acting as a receiver. (paper)

  10. Atom chips: mesoscopic physics with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Wildermuth, S.; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.; GAllego Garcia, D.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold neutral atoms can be controlled and manipulated in microscopic potentials near surfaces of atom chips. These integrated micro-devices combine the known techniques of atom optics with the capabilities of well established micro- and nanofabrication technology. In analogy to electronic microchips and integrated fiber optics, the concept of atom chips is suitable to explore the domain of mesoscopic physics with matter waves. We use current and charge carrying structures to form complex potentials with high spatial resolution only microns from the surface. In particular, atoms can be confined to an essentially one-dimensional motion. In this talk, we will give an overview of our experiments studying the manipulation of both thermal atoms and BECs on atom chips. First experiments in the quasi one-dimensional regime will be presented. These experiments profit from strongly reduced residual disorder potentials caused by imperfections of the chip fabrication with respect to previously published experiments. This is due to our purely lithographic fabrication technique that proves to be advantageous over electroplating. We have used one dimensionally confined BECs as an ultra-sensitive probe to characterize these potentials. These smooth potentials allow us to explore various aspects of the physics of degenerate quantum gases in low dimensions. (author)

  11. Quasi-atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of a quasi-atom is discussed, and several experiments are described in which molecular or quasi-atomic transitions have been observed. X-ray spectra are shown for these experiments in which heavy ion projectiles were incident on various targets and the resultant combined system behaved as a quasi-atom. This rapidly developing field has already given new insight into atomic collision phenomena. (P.J.S.)

  12. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  13. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  14. TlCu1.73Fe0.27Se2 studied by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali-M, S; Ericsson, T; Haeggstroem, L; Berger, R; Ronneteg, S; Felton, S

    2006-01-01

    TlCu 2-x Fe x Se 2 is a p-type metal for x c is 55(5) K as found from both SQUID and Moessbauer spectra. At T c the magnetic hyperfine fields are distributed with a maximum at about 30 T, which are compared to the measured magnetic moment per iron atom, which is 0.97 μ B /Fe as found from SQUID measurements. The experimental results are compared to results using other methods on isostructural Tl selenides

  15. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  16. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  17. For seeing atoms: tunnel effect microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, E.; Humbert, A.

    1985-01-01

    A new technique, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is described, which allows surface detail to be resolved at atomic level. The principles are described, together with an account of a recent experiment; various theoretical considerations are examined. Samples of recorded topographies are depicted and analysed. It is concluded that the technique is of value for chemical studies of surfaces on an atomic scale. (D.A.J.)

  18. On the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1963-07-15

    The main concepts motivating the decision to establish an international agency for peaceful uses of atomic energy are presented in the paper. They consists of: 1) co-ordination in the fields of safety field, legal liability and safeguards; 2) ensuring that scientific and technical data are made freely accessible on a worldwide scale and 3) assisting the developing countries in benefiting from this new science and technology and use the atomic energy for economic and social development

  19. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron scattering by trapped fermionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun; Jhe, Wonho

    2002-01-01

    Considering the Fermi gases of alkali-metal atoms that are trapped in a harmonic potential, we study theoretically the elastic and inelastic scattering of the electrons by the trapped Fermi atoms and present the corresponding differential cross sections. We also obtain the stopping power for the cases that the electronic state as well as the center-of-mass state are excited both separately and simultaneously. It is shown that the elastic scattering process is no longer coherent in contrast to the electron scattering by the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). For the inelastic scattering process, on the other hand, the differential cross section is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the number of the trapped atoms. In particular, the trapped fermionic atoms display the effect of ''Fermi surface,'' that is, only the energy levels near the Fermi energy have dominant contributions to the scattering process. Moreover, it is found that the stopping power scales as the 7/6 power of the atomic number. These results are fundamentally different from those of the electron scattering by the atomic BEC, mainly due to the different statistics obeyed by the trapped atomic systems

  1. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  2. Atoms - molecules - nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, G.; Honecker, R.

    1993-01-01

    This first volume covers the following topics: Wave-particle dualism, classical atomic physics; the Schroedinger equation, angular momentum in quantum physics, one-electron atoms and many-electron atoms with atomic structure, atomic spectra, exotic atoms, influence of electric and magnetic fields

  3. Atomic and molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical atomic and molecular physics program at Rice University addresses basic questions about the collision dynamics of electrons, atoms, ions and molecules, emphasizing processes related to possible new energy technologies and other applications. The program focuses on inelastic collision processes that are important in understanding energy and ionization balance in disturbed gases and plasmas. Emphasis is placed on systems and processes where some experimental information is available or where theoretical results may be expected to stimulate new measurements. Examples of current projects include: excitation and charge-transfer processes; orientation and alignment of excited states following collisions; Rydberg atom collisions with atoms and molecules; Penning ionization and ion-pair formation in atom-atom collisions; electron-impact ionization in dense, high-temperature plasmas; electron-molecule collisions; and related topics

  4. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  5. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  7. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  8. Atomic physics made clear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, H.

    1980-01-01

    This book is a popular introduction into the foundations of atomic physics und quantum mechanics. Starting from some phenomenological concepts Bohr's model and the construction of the periodic system regarding the shell structure of atoms are introduced. In this framework the selection rules and magnetic moments of atomic electrons are considered. Finally the wave-particle dualism is considered. In the appendix some mathematical methods are described which are useful for a deeper penetration into the considered ideas. (HSI)

  9. Deeply bound pionic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1989-01-01

    The standard method of pionic atom formation does not produce deeply bound pionic atoms. A study is made on the properties of deeply bound pionic atom states by using the standard pion-nucleus optical potential. Another study is made to estimate the cross sections of the formation of ls pionic atom states by various methods. The pion-nucleus optical potential is determined by weakly bound pionic atom states and pion nucleus scattering. Although this potential may not be valid for deeply bound pionic atoms, it should provide some hint on binding energies and level widths of deeply bound states. The width of the ls state comes out to be 0.3 MeV and is well separated from the rest. The charge dependence of the ls state is investigated. The binding energies and the widths increase linearly with Z azbove a Z of 30. The report then discusses various methods to populate deeply bound pionic atoms. In particular, 'pion exchange' reactions are proposed. (n, pπ) reaction is discussed first. The cross section is calculated by assuming the in- and out-going nucleons on-shell and the produced pion in (n1) pionic atom states. Then, (n, dπ - ) cross sections are estimated. (p, 2 Heπ - ) reaction would have cross sections similar to the cross section of (n, dπ - ) reaction. In conclusion, it seems best to do (n, p) experiment on heavy nuclei for deeply bound pionic atom. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Single atom oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiorkowski, P.; Walther, H.

    1990-01-01

    Modern methods of laser spectroscopy allow the study of single atoms or ions in an unperturbed environment. This has opened up interesting new experiments, among them the detailed study of radiation-atom coupling. In this paper, the following two experiments dealing with this problem are reviewed: the single-atom maser and the study of the resonance fluorescence of a single stored ion. The simplest and most fundamental system for studying radiation-matter coupling is a single two-level atom interacting with a single mode of an electromagnetic field in a cavity. This problem received a great deal of attention shortly after the maser was invented

  11. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  12. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  13. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Atoms stories; Histoire d`atomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radvanyi, P; Bordry, M [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    1988-12-31

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  15. Low energy atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    The semiclassical theory of atom-atom potential scattering and of low energy inelastic atom-atom scattering is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the origin and interpretation of rainbow structure, diffraction oscillations and exchange oscillations in the potential scattering differential cross-section, and to the glory structure and symmetry oscillations in the integral cross-section. Available methods for direct inversion of the cross-section data to recover the potential are reviewed in some detail. The theory of non-adiabatic transitions is introduced by a short discussion of interaction mechanisms and of diabetic and adiabatic representations. Analytical S matrix elements are presented for two state curve-crossing (Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg), Demkov and Nikitin models. The relation between Stuckelberg oscillations in the S matrix and in the differential cross-section is discussed in terms of interference between trajectories belonging to two different classical deflection functions. The energy dependences of the inelastic integral cross-section for curve-crossing and Demkov type transitions are also discussed. Finally the theory is reviewed in relation to a recent close-coupled study of fine structure transitions in F( 2 P) + Xe( 2 S) scattering

  16. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  17. Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackman, N.S.; Gummer, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    This paper has been prepared to provide an overview of the responsibilities and activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board. It is designed to address questions that are often asked concerning the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board, its enabling legislation, licensing and compliance activities, federal-provincial relationships, international obligations, and communications with the public

  18. mu. -nucleon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobretsov, Yu; Dolgoshein, B; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V

    1980-12-01

    The properties and formation are described of ..mu..-nucleon atoms, the Larmor method of muon spin precession is discussed and the experimental confirmation of the existence of ..mu..-nucleon atoms is shown. The prospects of their use are indicated.

  19. μ-nucleon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, Yu.; Dolgoshejn, B.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V.

    1980-01-01

    The properties and formation are described of μ-nucleon atoms, the Larmor method of muon spin precession is discussed and the experimental confirmation of the existence of μ-nucleon atoms is shown. The prospects of their use are indicated. (J.P.)

  20. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  1. Atom lithography of Fe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, te E.; Smeets, B.; van der Stam, K.M.R.; Herfst, R.W.; Straten, van der P.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Leeuwen, van K.A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Direct write atom lithography is a technique in which nearly resonant light is used to pattern an atom beam. Nanostructures are formed when the patterned beam falls onto a substrate. We have applied this lithography scheme to a ferromagnetic element, using a 372 nm laser light standing wave to

  2. Beyond the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction - the atom in the seventies; 2. The vacuum tube; 3. The new rays; 4. The new substances; 5. Disintegration; 6. A family tree; 7. Verifications and results; 8. The objective reality of molecules; 9. The new atom; Bibliography; Index.

  3. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  4. Atom electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, B.

    1976-01-01

    Green Lippmann-Schwinger functions operator representations, derivation of perturbation method using Green function and atom electron scattering, are discussed. It is concluded that by using complex coordinate places where resonances occur, can be accurately identified. The resonance can be processed further for practical purposes, for example for the separation of atom. (RUW)

  5. Atomic energy for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The film discusses the functions and activities of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. Shown are the applications of atomic energy in research, agriculture, engineering, industry and medicine, as well as the construction of the research reactor and its inauguration by President Marcos

  6. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  7. Isotopes and atomic weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinglian

    1990-01-01

    A review of the chemical and mass spectrometric methods of determining the atomic weights of elements is presented. A, special discussion is devoted to the calibration of the mass spectrometer with highly enriched isotopes. It is illustrated by the recent work on europium. How to choose the candidate element for new atomic weight determination forms the last section of the article

  8. Ionization of H Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillermier, C.F.; Bluemental, R.; Smilansky, U.

    1991-07-01

    Concepts from the theory of transient chaos are applied to study the classical ionization process of one dimensional model of kicked hydrogen Rydberg atoms. The phase-space dynamics is represented by a mapping T which is proved to be hyperbolic. The fraction of atoms not ionized after time t, P B (t), decays asymptotically according to P B (t)∼t -α with α ∼ 1.65. The observed algebraic decay, which seems to contradict the hyperbolicity of T, is explained by (i) the symbolic dynamics of T consists of a countably infinite number of symbols and (ii) the invariant manifold of phase-space points which never ionize is an anomalously scaling fractal. Therefore, the one-dimensional kicked hydrogen atom provides a counterexample to the hypothesis that algebraic decay marks regular dynamics, whereas hyperbolic systems decay exponentially. The algebraic decay is reproduced by an analytically solvable diffusion model which predicts α = 3/2. Replacing zero-width δ-kicks by smooth finite-width pulses, the mapping T is no longer completely hyperbolic, and a subset of phase-space is regular. For this case we observe that P B (t) shows a transition between two power-law decays with α ∼ 1.65 for short times and α ∼ 2.1 for long times where the effect of the regular domain is felt. (author)

  9. Atomic crystals resistive switching memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunsen; Zhang David Wei; Zhou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Facing the growing data storage and computing demands, a high accessing speed memory with low power and non-volatile character is urgently needed. Resistive access random memory with 4F 2 cell size, switching in sub-nanosecond, cycling endurances of over 10 12 cycles, and information retention exceeding 10 years, is considered as promising next-generation non-volatile memory. However, the energy per bit is still too high to compete against static random access memory and dynamic random access memory. The sneak leakage path and metal film sheet resistance issues hinder the further scaling down. The variation of resistance between different devices and even various cycles in the same device, hold resistive access random memory back from commercialization. The emerging of atomic crystals, possessing fine interface without dangling bonds in low dimension, can provide atomic level solutions for the obsessional issues. Moreover, the unique properties of atomic crystals also enable new type resistive switching memories, which provide a brand-new direction for the resistive access random memory. (topical reviews)

  10. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  11. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  12. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  13. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun

    2012-01-01

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/√Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 μm with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 μm, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  14. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun, E-mail: sxu7@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/{radical}Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 {mu}m with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 {mu}m, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  15. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  16. The general atomic strand winding machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matt, P.

    1976-01-01

    In conjunction with the integrated development of their high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), General Atomic of San Diego, USA, also developed a strand winding system for the horizontal prestressing of pressure vessels. The machine lay-out, its capabilities and the test program carried out in the laboratory and on a full scale pressure vessel model are described. (author)

  17. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental atomic physics program within the physics division is carried out by two groups, whose reports are given in this section. Work of the accelerator atomic physics group is centered around the 6.5-MV EN tandem accelerator; consequently, most of its research is concerned with atomic processes occurring to, or initiated by, few MeV/amu heavy ions. Other activities of this group include higher energy experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), studies of electron and positron channeling radiation, and collaborative experiments at other institutions. The second experimental group concerns itself with lower energy atomic collision physics in support of the Fusion Energy Program. During the past year, the new Electron Cyclotron Resonance Source has been completed and some of the first data from this facility is presented. In addition to these two activities in experimental atomic physics, other chapters of this report describe progress in theoretical atomic physics, experimental plasma diagnostic development, and atomic data center compilation activities

  18. Radical Chemistry and Charge Manipulation with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Leo

    The fuctionalization of tips by atomic manipulation dramatically increased the resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination of high-resolution AFM with atomic manipulation now offers the unprecedented possibility to custom-design individual molecules by making and breaking bonds with the tip of the microscope and directly characterizing the products on the atomic scale. We recently applied this technique to generate and study reaction intermediates and to investigate chemical reactions trigged by atomic manipulation. We formed diradicals by dissociating halogen atoms and then reversibly triggered ring-opening and -closing reactions via atomic manipulation, allowing us to switch and control the molecule's reactivity, magnetic and optical properties. Additional information about charge states and charge distributions can be obtained by Kelvin probe force spectroscopy. On multilayer insulating films we investigated single-electron attachment, detachment and transfer between individual molecules. EU ERC AMSEL (682144), EU project PAMS (610446).

  19. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  20. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.