WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic scale magnetometry

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Atom-specific surface magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Rossi, Giorgio

    1995-12-01

    A powerful atom-specific surface magnetometry can be based on efficient measurements of magnetic dichroism in l>~0 core level photoemission. The temperature dependence M(T) of the Fe(100) surface magnetization was obtained from the photoemission magnetic asymmetry of 3p core levels, providing the measure of the surface exchange coupling via the spin-wave stiffness and of the surface critical exponent. Beyond the magnetic order the photoemission dichroism allows us to derive the energy splitting of the magnetic sublevels of the photoexcited core hole. Fe 3p photoemission dichroism probes directly the magnetic moment changes of iron atoms at Fe(100) surfaces as a function of structural disorder or sulfur segregation. The appearance of dichroism in the 2p photoemission of segregated sulfur atoms in the c(2×2)S/Fe(100) superstructure measures the magnetic-moment transfer and shows the possibility of investigating surface magnetochemistry in a very direct way.

  4. Atom-specific surface magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirotti, F.; Panaccione, G. [Laboratoire pour l`Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, MESR, F-91405 Orsay (France); Rossi, G. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule-Zuerich, Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland)

    1995-12-15

    A powerful atom-specific surface magnetometry can be based on efficient measurements of magnetic dichroism in {ital l}{gt}0 core level photoemission. The temperature dependence M({ital T}) of the Fe(100) surface magnetization was obtained from the photoemission magnetic asymmetry of 3{ital p} core levels, providing the measure of the surface exchange coupling via the spin-wave stiffness and of the surface critical exponent. Beyond the magnetic order {l_angle}M{r_angle} the photoemission dichroism allows us to derive the energy splitting of the magnetic sublevels of the photoexcited core hole. Fe 3{ital p} photoemission dichroism probes directly the magnetic moment changes of iron atoms at Fe(100) surfaces as a function of structural disorder or sulfur segregation. The appearance of dichroism in the 2{ital p} photoemission of segregated sulfur atoms in the {ital c}(2{times}2)S/Fe(100) superstructure measures the magnetic-moment transfer and shows the possibility of investigating surface magnetochemistry in a very direct way.

  5. Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particledetection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shoujun; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Pines, Alexander; Rochester,Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2006-09-17

    We demonstrate the detection of magnetic particles carriedby water in a continuous flow using an atomic magnetic gradiometer.Studies on three types of magnetic particles are presented: a singlecobalt particle (diameter ~;150 mum, multi-domain), a suspension ofsuperparamagnetic magnetite particles (diameter ~;1 mum), andferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (diameter ~;10 nm, 120 kA/mmagnetization). Estimated detection limits are 20 mum diameter for asingle cobalt particle at a water flow rate 30 ml/min, 5x103 magnetiteparticles at 160 ml/min, and 50 pl for the specific ferromagnetic fluidat 130 ml/min. Possible applications of our method arediscussed.

  6. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  7. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

    Information stored in magnetic fields plays an important role in everyday life. This information exists over a remarkably wide range of sizes, so that magnetometry at a variety of length scales can extract useful information. Examples at centimeter to millimeter length scales include measurement of spatial and temporal character of fields generated in the human brain and heart, and active manipulation of spins in the human body for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At micron length scales, magnetometry can be used to measure magnetic objects such as flux qubits; at nanometer length scales it can be used to study individual magnetic domains, and even individual spins. The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based magnetometer for two such applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nanoscale magnetometry, are the focus of this thesis. Conventional MRI has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body. This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of protons with the addition application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information. Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems. Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. The prepolarized, SQUID detected ultra-low field MRI (ULF MRI) developed by the Clarke group allows imaging in very weak fields (typically 132 muT, corresponding to a resonant frequency of 5.6 kHz). At these low field strengths, there is enhanced contrast in the longitudinal relaxation time of various tissue types, enabling imaging of objects which are not visible to conventional MRI, for instance prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the contrast between normal and cancerous

  8. In situ magnetometry for experiments with atomic quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinner, Ludwig; Stewart, Michael; Pazmiño, Arturo; Schneble, Dominik

    2018-01-01

    Precise control of magnetic fields is a frequent challenge encountered in experiments with atomic quantum gases. Here we present a simple method for performing in situ monitoring of magnetic fields that can readily be implemented in any quantum-gas apparatus in which a dedicated field-stabilization approach is not feasible. The method, which works by sampling several Rabi resonances between magnetically field sensitive internal states that are not otherwise used in a given experiment, can be integrated with standard measurement sequences at arbitrary fields. For a condensate of 87Rb atoms, we demonstrate the reconstruction of Gauss-level bias fields with an accuracy of tens of microgauss and with millisecond time resolution. We test the performance of the method using measurements of slow resonant Rabi oscillations on a magnetic-field sensitive transition and give an example for its use in experiments with state-selective optical potentials.

  9. Optical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  10. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  11. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-05

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting.

  12. M(H) dependence and size distribution of SPIONs measured by atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quasistatic recording of the magnetic excitation function M(H) of superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (SPION) suspensions by an atomic magnetometer allows a precise determination of the sample's iron mass content mFe and the particle size distribution.

  13. A quantitative study of particle size effects in the magnetorelaxometry of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgovskiy, V. [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Lebedev, V., E-mail: victor.lebedev@unifr.ch [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Colombo, S.; Weis, A. [Physics Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Michen, B.; Ackermann-Hirschi, L. [Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Petri-Fink, A. [Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Chemistry Department, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The discrimination of immobilised superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) against SPIONs in fluid environments via their magnetic relaxation behaviour is a powerful tool for bio-medical imaging. Here we demonstrate that a gradiometer of laser-pumped atomic magnetometers can be used to record accurate time series of the relaxing magnetic field produced by pre-polarised SPIONs. We have investigated dry in vitro maghemite nanoparticle samples with different size distributions (average radii ranging from 14 to 21 nm) and analysed their relaxation using the Néel–Brown formalism. Fitting our model function to the magnetorelaxation (MRX) data allows us to extract the anisotropy constant K and the saturation magnetisation M{sub S} of each sample. While the latter was found not to depend on the particle size, we observe that K is inversely proportional to the (time- and size-) averaged volume of the magnetised particle fraction. We have identified the range of SPION sizes that are best suited for MRX detection considering our specific experimental conditions and sample preparation technique. - Highlights: • We studied magnetorelaxation of magnetic nanoparticles using atomic magnetometers. • We show that atomic magnetometers yield high precision MRX data. • The observed magnetorelaxation is well described by the moment superposition model. • Model fits allow extraction of nanoparticle material parameters of six samples. • All samples exhibit an unexpected size-dependent anisotropy constant.

  14. Atomic-scale sensing of the magnetic dipolar field from single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Paul, William; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Willke, Philip; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2017-05-01

    Spin resonance provides the high-energy resolution needed to determine biological and material structures by sensing weak magnetic interactions. In recent years, there have been notable achievements in detecting and coherently controlling individual atomic-scale spin centres for sensitive local magnetometry. However, positioning the spin sensor and characterizing spin-spin interactions with sub-nanometre precision have remained outstanding challenges. Here, we use individual Fe atoms as an electron spin resonance (ESR) sensor in a scanning tunnelling microscope to measure the magnetic field emanating from nearby spins with atomic-scale precision. On artificially built assemblies of magnetic atoms (Fe and Co) on a magnesium oxide surface, we measure that the interaction energy between the ESR sensor and an adatom shows an inverse-cube distance dependence (r-3.01±0.04). This demonstrates that the atoms are predominantly coupled by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, which, according to our observations, dominates for atom separations greater than 1 nm. This dipolar sensor can determine the magnetic moments of individual adatoms with high accuracy. The achieved atomic-scale spatial resolution in remote sensing of spins may ultimately allow the structural imaging of individual magnetic molecules, nanostructures and spin-labelled biomolecules.

  15. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4 in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate. The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (Ubias influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G0 (G0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant or 2G0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  16. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  17. Remote Nanodiamond Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Yinlan; Jeske, Jan; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Lau, Desmond W M; Ji, Hong; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; V., Shahraam Afshar; Hollenberg, Lloyd; Greentree, Andrew D; Monro, Tanya M; Gibson, Brant C

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres have transformed the way people interact with the world and now permeate many areas of science. Optical fibres are traditionally thought of as insensitive to magnetic fields, however many application areas from mining to biomedicine would benefit from fibre-based remote magnetometry devices. In this work, we realise such a device by embedding nanoscale magnetic sensors into tellurite glass fibres. Remote magnetometry is performed on magnetically active defect centres in nanodiamonds embedded into the glass matrix. Standard optical magnetometry techniques are applied to initialize and detect local magnetic field changes with a measured sensitivity of 26 micron Tesla/square root(Hz). Our approach utilizes straight-forward optical excitation, simple focusing elements, and low power components. We demonstrate remote magnetometry by direct reporting of the magnetic ground states of nitrogen-vacancy defect centres in the optical fibres. In addition, we present and describe theoretically an all-optica...

  18. Ohm's law survives to the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Mahapatra, S; Ryu, H; Lee, S; Fuhrer, A; Reusch, T C G; Thompson, D L; Lee, W C T; Klimeck, G; Hollenberg, L C L; Simmons, M Y

    2012-01-06

    As silicon electronics approaches the atomic scale, interconnects and circuitry become comparable in size to the active device components. Maintaining low electrical resistivity at this scale is challenging because of the presence of confining surfaces and interfaces. We report on the fabrication of wires in silicon--only one atom tall and four atoms wide--with exceptionally low resistivity (~0.3 milliohm-centimeters) and the current-carrying capabilities of copper. By embedding phosphorus atoms within a silicon crystal with an average spacing of less than 1 nanometer, we achieved a diameter-independent resistivity, which demonstrates ohmic scaling to the atomic limit. Atomistic tight-binding calculations confirm the metallicity of these atomic-scale wires, which pave the way for single-atom device architectures for both classical and quantum information processing.

  19. The Swarm Magnetometry Package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    2008-01-01

    The Swarm mission under the ESA's Living Planet Programme is planned for launch in 2010 and consists of a constellation of three satellites at LEO. The prime objective of Swarm is to measure the geomagnetic field with unprecedented accuracy in space and time. The magnetometry package consists of ...... of an extremely accurate and stable vector magnetometer, which is co-mounted in an optical bench together with a start tracker system to ensure mechanical stability of the measurements....

  20. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M.; Jamali, T.; Sadeghi, A.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Fesler, G.; Meyer, E.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H =0.61 ±0.02 at a 1 σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h (q ) , on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  1. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M; Jamali, T; Sadeghi, A; Movahed, S M S; Fesler, G; Meyer, E; Khoshnevisan, B; Jafari, G R

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H=0.61±0.02 at a 1σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h(q), on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  2. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied....... Kinetic friction is observed to be caused by atomic-scale Stick and slip which occurs by nucleation and subsequent motion of dislocations preferably between close-packed {111} planes. Stick and slip seems ro occur in different situations. For single crystalline contacts without grain boundaries...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  3. Long term stability of atomic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Gérard; Arias, Elisa Felicitas

    2012-08-01

    International Atomic Time TAI gets its stability from some 400 atomic clocks worldwide that generate the free atomic scale EA L and its accuracy from a small number of primary frequency standards (PFS) which frequency measurements are used to steer the EAL frequency. Because TAI is computed in "real - time" (every month) and has operational constraints, it is not optimal and the BIPM computes in deferred time another time scale TT(BIPM), which is based on a weighted average of the evaluations of TAI frequency by the PFS. We show that a point has been reached where the stability of atomic time scales, the accuracy of primary frequency standards, and the capabilities of frequency transfer are approximately at a similar level, in the low 10 - 16 in relative frequency. The goal is now to reach and surpass 1x10 - 16 and the three fields are in various stages of advancement towards this aim. We review the stability and accuracy recently achieved by frequency standards, focusing on primary frequency standards on one hand, and on new secondary realizations e.g. based on optical transitions on the other hand. We study how these performances can translate to the performance of atomic time scales, and the possible implications of the availability of new high - accuracy frequency standards operating on a regular basis. Finally we show how time transfer is trying to keep up with the progresses of frequency standards. Time transfer is presently the limiting factor at short averaging time (e.g. 1 - 2 weeks) but it should not be limiting the long term stability of atomic time scales, which is the main need of many applications in astronomy.

  4. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale - the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  5. Seebeck effect at the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-04

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging.

  6. Atom capture by nanotube and scaling anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Pulak Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    The existence of bound state of the polarizable neutral atom in the inverse square potential created by the electric field of single walled charged carbon nanotube (SWNT) is shown to be theoretically possible. The consideration of inequivalent boundary conditions due to self-adjoint extensions lead to this nontrivial bound state solution. It is also shown that the scaling anomaly is responsible for the existence of bound state. Binding of the polarizable atoms in the coupling constant interval \\eta^2\\in[0,1) may be responsible for the smearing of the edge of steps in quantized conductance, which has not been considered so far in literature.

  7. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative

  8. Subpicotesla Diamond Magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wolf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-vacancy (NV defect centers in diamond are promising solid-state magnetometers. Single centers allow for high-spatial-resolution field imaging but are limited in their magnetic field sensitivity. Using defect-center ensembles, sensitivity can be scaled with sqrt[N] when N is the number of defects. In the present work, we use an ensemble of N∼10^{11} defect centers within an effective sensor volume of 8.5×10^{-4}  mm^{3} for sensing at room temperature. By carefully eliminating noise sources and using high-quality diamonds with large NV concentrations, we demonstrate, for such sensors, a sensitivity scaling as 1/sqrt[t], where t is the total measurement time. The associated photon-shot-noise-limited magnetic-field sensitivity for ac signals of f=20  kHz is 0.9  pT/sqrt[Hz]. For a total measurement time of 100 s, we reach a standard deviation of about 100 fT. Further improvements using decoupling sequences and material optimization could lead to fT/sqrt[Hz] sensitivity.

  9. A comparison of Solar proxy-magnetometry diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaarts, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837946; Rutten, R.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074143662; Carlsson, M.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. We test various proxy-magnetometry diagnostics, i.e., brightness signatures of small-scale magnetic elements, for studying magnetic field structures in the solar photosphere. Methods. Images are numerically synthesized from a 3D solar magneto-convection simulation for, respectively, the G band

  10. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Akrami, S.M.R.; Nakayachi, H.; Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O3 cleaning. ...

  11. Atomic scale front propagation at the onset of frictional sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Taloni, Alessandro; Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro; Manini, Nicola; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Macroscopic frictional sliding emerges from atomic-scale interactions and processes at the contact interface, but bridging the gap between micro and macro scales still remains an unsolved challenge. Direct imaging of the contact surface and simultaneous measurement of stress fields during macroscopic frictional slip revealed the formation of crack precursors, questioning the traditional picture of frictional contacts described in terms of a single degree of freedom. Here we study the onset of frictional slip at atomic scale by simulating the motion of an aluminum block pushed by a slider on a copper substrate. We show the formation of dynamic slip front propagation and precursory activity that resemble macroscopic observations. The analysis of stress patterns during slip, however, reveals subtle effects due to the lattice structures which hinder a direct application of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Our results illustrate that dynamic front propagation arises already at the atomic scales and shed light on the connections between atomic-scale and macroscopic friction.

  12. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  13. Cantilever torque magnetometry on coordination compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfetti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Cantilever Torque Magnetometry (CTM) is one of the leading techniques to deeply understand magnetic anisotropy of coordination compounds. The knowledge of magnetic anisotropy is a mandatory requirement before proceeding with any future application related to the magnetic properties of coordination...

  14. Effect of atomizer scale and fluid properties on atomization mechanisms and spray characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waind, Travis

    Atomization is chaos. The breakup of liquid structures by a gas encompasses such a wide range of possible configurations that a definitive mechanism describing breakup in any and all situations is an impossibility. However, when focus is applied, trends can be teased out of experimental data that seem to appropriately describe the action undertaken. These studies sought to better understand atomization, specifically coaxial, two-stream, airblast (or air-assist) atomization in which a central liquid jet is broken up by an annular, high-velocity gas stream. The studies enclosed focused on identifying the effect of changing the atomizer's scale on atomization. While most (but not all) atomization studies only focus on the resulting far-field drop diameters, these studies placed the focus largely on the intermediate structures, in the form of the intact liquid jet (ILJ), while also quantifying the resulting drop diameters. The location and shape of the ILJ constantly change, and on its surface, wavelengths were seen to form and grow, which have been correlated to the resulting drop diameters in previous studies. The studies enclosed herein are unique in that they attempt to apply and explain exiting mechanism-based breakup mechanisms to regimes, fluids, and geometry changes not yet evaluated in the literature. Existing correlations were compared to the experimental data for a range of atomizer geometries, and when they were found lacking, Buckingham-(Pi) theorem was used to develop new correlations for predicting behavior. Additionally, the method developed for the calculation of these parameters for other image sets is included, allowing for easy comparison and value verification. A small-scale, coaxial atomization system was used to atomize water and two silicone oils with air. The atomizers used in these studies had the same general geometry type, but had varying sizes, allowing for the effect of both scale and geometry to be evaluated. These studies quantified

  15. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  16. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  17. Understanding the Atomic-Scale World with the Molecular Workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert F.

    2006-12-01

    The Molecular Workbench (MW) is a sophisticated system for developing and delivering interactive learning activities to teach basic concepts that govern atomic and nanoscale phenomena. The system is based on a molecular dynamics model that calculates the motion of atoms, molecules, and other objects in real time as a result of the applicable forces, including Lennard-Jones potentials, electrostatic potentials, elastic bonds, and external fields. Light-atom interactions are modeled with photons of selectable energy that interact with the excited states of atoms. The built-in authoring functions can be used to create or modify learning activities. The ease of creating MW materials has led to over 200 activities contributed by staff and collaborators. Many are housed in a database with fields that include an overview, learning objectives, a description of the central concepts addressed, textbook references, and extensions. MW has been used extensively in classrooms in grades 7-14. In several settings student learning gains have been measured using a pre-posttest design. Research results will be reported that show Overall increases in understanding of atomic scale phenomena at high school and community college levels. The ability to transfer understanding of atomic-scale phenomena to new situations and to reason about macroscopic phenomena on the basis of atomic-scale interactions. Better understanding of difficult questions that required immersive visualization and prediction MW is written in Java, so it runs under all common operating systems, including Mac OSX, Windows, and Linux. It is open source, so it can be shared and copied by any user.

  18. Atomic scale structures of interfaces between kaolinite edges and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Wang, R.; Meijer, E.J.; Zhou, H.; He, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the atomic scale structures of kaolinite edge surfaces in contact with water. The commonly occurring edge surfaces are investigated (i.e. (0 1 0) and (1 1 0)) by using first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) technique. For (1 1 0)-type edge surface, there are two different

  19. Contact and Alignment Marker Technology for Atomic Scale Device Fabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiddam, M.R.; Rogge, S.; Drift, E. van der; Ilge, B.; Palasantzas, G.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on the technology to link atomic scale structures to macroscopic contact pads. Dedicated processes for electrode pattern formation in several materials have been developed and characterised. For pattern formation in CoSi2 a thermal compromise between proper silicide formation

  20. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  1. Significant improvements in stability and reproducibility of atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, S M R; Nakayachi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2014-11-14

    Recent advancement of dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for liquid-environment applications enabled atomic-scale studies on various interfacial phenomena. However, instabilities and poor reproducibility of the measurements often prevent systematic studies. To solve this problem, we have investigated the effect of various tip treatment methods for atomic-scale imaging and force measurements in liquid. The tested methods include Si coating, Ar plasma, Ar sputtering and UV/O₃ cleaning. We found that all the methods provide significant improvements in both the imaging and force measurements in spite of the tip transfer through the air. Among the methods, we found that the Si coating provides the best stability and reproducibility in the measurements. To understand the origin of the fouling resistance of the cleaned tip surface and the difference between the cleaning methods, we have investigated the tip surface properties by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results show that the contaminations adsorbed on the tip during the tip transfer through the air should desorb from the surface when it is immersed in aqueous solution due to the enhanced hydrophilicity by the tip treatments. The tip surface prepared by the Si coating is oxidized when it is immersed in aqueous solution. This creates local spots where stable hydration structures are formed. For the other methods, there is no active mechanism to create such local hydration sites. Thus, the hydration structure formed under the tip apex is not necessarily stable. These results reveal the desirable tip properties for atomic-scale AFM measurements in liquid, which should serve as a guideline for further improvements of the tip treatment methods.

  2. Capturing atomic-scale carrier dynamics with electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Peter; Krausz, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    Light-driven electronic motion unfolds on times as short as the cycle period of light and on length scales as small as the distance between two neighboring atoms in a molecule. Visualizing fundamental light-matter interactions therefore requires access to attosecond and picometer dimensions. Here we report on a potential unification of electron diffraction and microscopy with attosecond technology, which could provide a full space-time access to elementary electronic processes in matter and materials. We review recent progress in ultrafast diffraction and microscopy towards temporal resolutions approaching 10 fs by use of state-of-the-art microwave technology and discuss our latest findings on all-optical compression approaches for reaching sub-femtosecond, sub-optical-cycle resolution. Four-dimensional electron diffraction with attosecond-picometer resolution will access all dynamics outside the atomic core, offering an all-embracing insight into fundamental electron-nuclear dynamics of complex materials.

  3. Atom-scale molecular interactions in lipid raft mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Hyvönen, Marja T; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    We review the relationship between molecular interactions and the properties of lipid environments. A specific focus is given on bilayers which contain sphingomyelin (SM) and sterols due to their essential role for the formation of lipid rafts. The discussion is based on recent atom-scale molecular....... As a particularly intriguing example of this, the lateral pressure profiles of raft-like and non-raft systems indicate that the lipid composition of membrane domains may have a major impact on membrane protein activation....

  4. Tuning magnetotransport in a compensated semimetal at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Barreteau, Céline; Ubrig, Nicolas; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2015-11-01

    Either in bulk form, or in atomically thin crystals, layered transition metal dichalcogenides continuously reveal new phenomena. The latest example is 1T'-WTe2, a semimetal found to exhibit the largest known magnetoresistance in the bulk, and predicted to become a topological insulator in strained monolayers. Here we show that reducing the thickness through exfoliation enables the electronic properties of WTe2 to be tuned, which allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed magnetotransport down to the atomic scale. The longitudinal resistance and the unconventional magnetic field dependence of the Hall resistance are reproduced quantitatively by a classical two-band model for crystals as thin as six monolayers, whereas a crossover to an Anderson insulator occurs for thinner crystals. Besides establishing the origin of the magnetoresistance of WTe2, our results represent a complete validation of the classical theory for two-band electron-hole transport, and indicate that atomically thin WTe2 layers remain gapless semimetals.

  5. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  6. Optically trapped nanodiamonds with nitrogen-vacancy center spins for scanning magnetometry and thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Benjamin J.; Horowitz, Viva R.; Andrich, Paolo; Christle, David J.; Toyli, David M.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    Nanodiamonds with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are a versatile sensing platform that combines the optically addressable atom-like properties of embedded NV centers, which are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and temperature, with the physical size and mobility necessary for nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We constructed an optical tweezers apparatus that accomplishes position control of nanodiamonds in solution within a microfluidic circuit and enables simultaneous optical measurement and microwave manipulation of the NV centers' ground-state spins. We observe nanodiamond fluorescence and trapping stability over many hours, and infer high d.c. magnetic field and temperature sensitivities from measured spin resonance spectra. Scanning the position of the trapped nanodiamonds enables us to map the magnetic field of current-carrying wires and magnetic nanostructures, and perform thermometry in liquid. This work provides an approach to three-dimensional spin-based scanning probe magnetometry and thermometry in fluids for applications in the biological and physical sciences. This work was supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  7. Atomic-scale electron microscopy at ambient pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creemer, J.F. [DIMES-ECTM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5053, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.creemer@tudelft.nl; Helveg, S. [Haldor Topsoe A/S, Nymollevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hoveling, G.H. [DEMO, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Ullmann, S.; Molenbroek, A.M. [Haldor Topsoe A/S, Nymollevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Sarro, P.M. [DIMES-ECTM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5053, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands); Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, HREM, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-08-15

    We demonstrate a novel nanoreactor for performing atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) of nanostructured materials during exposure to gases at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. The nanoreactor is a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and is functionalized with a micrometer-sized gas-flow channel, electron-transparent windows and a heating device. It fits into the tip of a dedicated sample holder that can be used in a normal CM microscope of Philips/FEI Company. The nanoreactor performance was demonstrated by ETEM imaging of a Cu/ZnO catalyst for methanol synthesis during exposure to hydrogen. Specifically, the nanoreactor facilitated the direct observation of Cu nanocrystal growth and mobility on a sub-second time scale during heating to 500 deg. C and exposure to 1.2 bar of H{sub 2}. For the same gas reaction environment, ETEM images show atomic lattice fringes in the Cu nanocrystals with spacing of 0.18 nm, attesting the spatial resolution limit of the system. The nanoreactor concept opens up new possibilities for in situ studies of nanomaterials and the ways they interact with their ambient working environment in diverse areas, such as heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, nanofabrication, materials science and biology.

  8. Shrinking light to allow forbidden transitions on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Kaminer, Ido; Zhen, Bo; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of light-matter interactions accessible to a system is limited by the small size of an atom relative to the wavelength of the light it emits, as well as by the small value of the fine-structure constant. We developed a general theory of light-matter interactions with two-dimensional systems supporting plasmons. These plasmons effectively make the fine-structure constant larger and bridge the size gap between atom and light. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions—such as extremely high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and singlet-triplet phosphorescence processes—can occur on very short time scales comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings may lead to new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, and broadband light generation, a potential testing ground for quantum electrodynamics (QED) in the ultrastrong coupling regime, and the ability to take advantage of the full electronic spectrum of an emitter.

  9. Interpreting atom probe data from chromium oxide scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Breen, Andrew; Stephenson, Leigh; Ceguerra, Anna V.; Yang, Limei [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dinh Nguyen, Thuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Young, David J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Cairney, Julie M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Picosecond-pulsed ultraviolet-laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was used to analyze protective, thermally grown chromium oxides formed on stainless steel. The influence of analysis parameters on the thermal tail observed in the mass spectra and the chemical composition is investigated. A new parameter termed “laser sensitivity factor” is introduced in order to quantify the effect of laser energy on the extent of the thermal tail. This parameter is used to compare the effect of increasing laser energy on thermal tails in chromia and chromite samples. Also explored is the effect of increasing laser energy on the measured oxygen content and the effect of specimen base temperature and laser pulse frequency on the mass spectrum. Finally, we report a preliminary analysis of molecular ion dissociations in chromia. - Highlights: • Chromium oxide scales are analyzed by picosecond-pulsed ultraviolet-laser assisted atom probe tomography. • The influence of laser energy, pulse frequency and temperature on thermal tail and composition is reported. • “Laser sensitivity factor”, a new thermal tail quantification parameter was introduced. • Ions dissociations in chromia during the analysis are discussed.

  10. Spin mapping at the nanoscale and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-10-01

    The direct observation of spin structures with atomic-scale resolution, a long-time dream in condensed matter research, recently became a reality based on the development of spin-sensitive scanning probe methods, such as spin-polarized scanning-tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) and magnetic exchange force microscopy (MExFM). This article reviews the basic principles and methods of SP-STM and MExFM and describes recently achieved milestones in the application of these techniques to metallic and electrically insulating magnetic nanostructures. Discoveries of novel types of magnetic order at the nanoscale are presented as well as challenges for the future, including studies of local spin excitations based on spin-resolved inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and measurements of damping forces in MExFM experiments.

  11. Nanometer-scale metallic grains connected with atomic-scale conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, A.; Korotkov, A. L.; Bowman, M.; Waddell, J.; Davidovic, D.

    2003-03-01

    We describe a technique for connecting a nanometer-scale gold grain to leads by atomic-scale gold point contacts. These devices differ from previous metallic quantum dots in that the conducting channels are relatively well transmitting. We investigate the dependence of the Coulomb blockade on contact resistance. The high-resistance devices display Coulomb blockade and the low-resistance devices display a zero-bias conductance dip, both in quantitative agreement with theory. We find that in the intermediate regime, where the sample resistance is close to h/e2, the I-V curve displays a Coulomb staircase with symmetric contact capacitances.

  12. Probing the conformal Calabrese-Cardy scaling with cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Unmuth-Yockey, J; Preiss, P M; Yang, Li-Ping; Tsai, S -W; Meurice, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that current experiments using cold bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices and designed to measure the second-order Renyi entanglement entropy S_2, can be used to verify detailed predictions of conformal field theory (CFT) and estimate the central charge c. We discuss the adiabatic preparation of the ground state at half-filling where we expect a CFT with c=1. This can be accomplished with a very small hoping parameter J, in contrast to existing studies with density one where a much larger J is needed. We provide two complementary methods to estimate and subtract the classical entropy generated by the experimental preparation and imaging processes. We compare numerical calculations for the classical O(2) model with a chemical potential on a 1+1 dimensional lattice, and the quantum Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian implemented in the experiments. S_2 is very similar for the two models and follows closely the Calabrese-Cardy scaling, (c/8)\\ln(N_s), for N_s sites with open boundary condi...

  13. A theoretical study of the atomic and electronic structures of three prospective atomic scale wire systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevlin, S A

    2001-01-01

    transport properties of the line are also calculated. Finally we find which of the two models of the (4x1)-Si(111)-ln reconstruction is thermodynamically favoured in a supercell geometry. We use ab initio plane wave techniques in the Local-Density-Approximation, and calculate and compare the electronic structure of the two models with respect to the characteristic energies for electron dispersion along and across the chain structures. We also consider the effects of electronic structure on the in-plane transport properties of the indium lines. The structural and electronic properties of several candidate atomic scale wires are analysed. Three candidates are studied: the trans-polyacetylene molecule, the silicon line on the (001) face of cubic silicon carbide (the (nx2) series of reconstructions) and the indium chain on the (111) face of silicon carbide (the (4x1) reconstruction). We use the polyacetylene molecule as a test-bed for the techniques that we use to calculate transport properties in an empirically ...

  14. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  15. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  16. Understanding the Atomic-Scale Contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local...

  17. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  18. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  19. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...

  20. Schlieren imaging of nano-scale atom-surface inelastic transition using a Fresnel biprism atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Perales, F.; Dutier, G.; Bocvarski, V.; Karam, J.-C.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.

    2008-05-01

    Surface-induced exo-energetic inelastic transitions among atomic Zeeman states in a magnetic field (“van der Waals Zeeman” transitions) are useable as tuneable beam splitters. A transversally coherent atom beam impinging a pair of opposite surfaces (e.g. 2 edges of a slit or of an ensemble of periodic slits) gives rise to two coherently diffracted wave packets. Within the wave packet overlap, non-localised interference fringes of the Young-slit type are predicted. From the diffraction pattern observed in the Fraunhofer regime (Schlieren image), detailed information about the transition amplitude on a scale of a few nanometers should be derived.

  1. Controlling Mobility in Perovskite Oxides by Ferroelectric Modulation of Atomic-Scale Interface Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashevich, Andrei; Marshall, Matthew S J; Visani, Cristina; Disa, Ankit S; Xu, Haichao; Walker, Frederick J; Ahn, Charles H; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2017-12-26

    Coherent and epitaxial interfaces permit the realization of electric field driven devices controlled by atomic-scale structural and electronic effects at interfaces. Compared to conventional field effect devices where channel conductivity is modulated by carrier density modification, the propagation of atomic-scale distortions across an interface can control the atomic scale bonding, interatomic electron tunneling rates and thus the mobility of the channel material. We use first-principles theory to design an atomically abrupt epitaxial perovskite heterostructure involving an oxide ferroelectric (PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3) and conducting oxide channel (LaNiO3) where coupling of polar atomic motions to structural distortions can induce large, reversible changes in the channel mobility. We fabricate and characterize the heterostructure and measure record values, larger than 1000%, for the conductivity modulation. Our results describe how purely interfacial effects can be engineered to deliver unique electronic device properties and large responses to external fields.

  2. Deciphering Adsorption Structure on Insulators at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Feibelman, Peter J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Nanotechnologies

    2014-09-01

    We applied Scanning Probe Microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) to discover the basics of how adsorbates wet insulating substrates, addressing a key question in geochemistry. To allow experiments on insulating samples we added Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) capability to our existing UHV Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). This was accomplished by integrating and debugging a commercial qPlus AFM upgrade. Examining up-to-40-nm-thick water films grown in vacuum we found that the exact nature of the growth spirals forming around dislocations determines what structure of ice, cubic or hexagonal, is formed at low temperature. DFT revealed that wetting of mica is controlled by how exactly a water layer wraps around (hydrates) the K+ ions that protrude from the mica surface. DFT also sheds light on the experimentally observed extreme sensitivity of the mica surface to preparation conditions: K atoms can easily be rinsed off by water flowing past the mica surface.

  3. Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, R.; Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J.; Meyer, E; Gnecco, E.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superim...

  4. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  5. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  6. Atomic force microscopy of atomic-scale ledges and etch pits formed during dissolution of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, A. J.; Manne, S.; Hansma, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    The processes involved in the dissolution and growth of crystals are closely related. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of faceted pits (called negative crystals) formed during quartz dissolution reveals subtle details of these underlying physical mechanisms for silicates. In imaging these surfaces, the AFM detected ledges less than 1 nm high that were spaced 10 to 90 nm apart. A dislocation pit, invisible to optical and scanning electron microscopy measurements and serving as a ledge source, was also imaged. These observations confirm the applicability of ledge-motion models to dissolution and growth of silicates; coupled with measurements of dissolution rate on facets, these methods provide a powerful tool for probing mineral surface kinetics.

  7. Atomic-order thermal nitridation of group IV semiconductors for ultra-large-scale integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Junichi; Le Thanh, Vinh

    2015-03-01

    One of the main requirements for ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) is atomic-order control of process technology. Our concept of atomically controlled processing for group IV semiconductors is based on atomic-order surface reaction control in Si-based CVD epitaxial growth. On the atomic-order surface nitridation of a few nm-thick Ge/about 4 nm-thick Si0.5Ge0.5/Si(100) by NH3, it is found that N atoms diffuse through nm-order thick Ge layer into Si0.5Ge0.5/Si(100) substrate and form Si nitride, even at 500 °C. By subsequent H2 heat treatment, although N atomic amount in Ge layer is reduced drastically, the reduction of the Si nitride is slight. It is suggested that N diffusion in Ge layer is suppressed by the formation of Si nitride and that Ge/atomic-order N layer/Si1-xGex/Si (100) heterostructure is formed. These results demonstrate the capability of CVD technology for atomically controlled nitridation of group IV semiconductors for ultra-large-scale integration. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November, 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  8. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  9. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  10. Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Takane; Akanuma, Yuki; Haruta, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Shogo; Ishihara, Kentaro; Okayasu, Takeshi; Chun, Wang-Jae; Takahashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-09-25

    Subnanometer noble metal clusters have enormous potential, mainly for catalytic applications. Because a difference of only one atom may cause significant changes in their reactivity, a preparation method with atomic-level precision is essential. Although such a precision with enough scalability has been achieved by gas-phase synthesis, large-scale preparation is still at the frontier, hampering practical applications. We now show the atom-precise and fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters on a milligram scale from tiara-like platinum complexes with various ring numbers (n = 5-13). Low-temperature calcination of the complexes on a carbon support under hydrogen stream affords monodispersed platinum clusters, whose atomicity is equivalent to that of the precursor complex. One of the clusters (Pt 10 ) exhibits high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of styrene compared to that of the other clusters. This method opens an avenue for the application of these clusters to preparative-scale catalysis.The catalytic activity of a noble metal nanocluster is tied to its atomicity. Here, the authors report an atom-precise, fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters from molecular ring precursors, and show that a variation of only one atom can dramatically change a cluster's reactivity.

  11. Continuum mechanics at the atomic scale : Insights into non-adhesive contacts using molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2016-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study non-adhesive contact at the atomic scale. Starting from the case of Hertzian contact, it was found that the reduced Young’s modulus E* for shallow indentations scales as a function of, both, the indentation depth and the contact

  12. JANNUS: experimental validation at the scale of atomic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruys, Yves; Ruault, Marie-Odile; Trocellier, Patrick; Miro, Sandrine; Barbu, Alain; Boulanger, Loïc; Kaïtasov, Odile; Henry, Sylvain; Leseigneur, Olivier; Trouslard, Philippe; Pellegrino, Stéphanie; Vaubaillon, Sylvain

    2008-04-01

    Ion irradiation is well suited to simulate neutron irradiation because primary knock-on atoms (PKA) produced by neutron collisions are self ions of the target. As the main difference, the energy spectrum of ion-produced PKAs is somewhat broader than in the case of fast neutrons. Studies of the combined effects of target damaging, ion implantation effects, helium and hydrogen production, and the occurrence of nuclear reactions should be performed by co-irradiation experiments (dual or triple beam irradiation). The JANNUS project (Joint Accelerators for Nanosciences and NUclear Simulation) was started in 2002 in the frame of a collaboration between CEA (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique) and CNRS-IN2P3 (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Institut National de Physique Nucléaire et de Physique des Particules). Two experimental sites are involved. At Saclay, three electrostatic accelerators are being coupled: a new 3 MV Pelletron™ machine equipped with an ECR multi-charged ion source, a 2.5 MV single ended Van de Graaff and a 2.25 MV General Ionex tandem. At Orsay, the 2 MV tandem ARAMIS and the 190 kV ion implanter IRMA are being coupled with a 200 kV TECNAI™ transmission electron microscope to allow simultaneous co-irradiation and observation. This paper will first discuss both advantages and limitations of the use of ion beam irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation. A technical description of both set-ups is then presented, and some details will be given concerning multi-irradiation facilities running worldwide. The main application fields of JANNUS will be further detailed. To cite this article: Y. Serruys et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  13. Probing electronic state at atomic scale on the surface of SrVO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Ryota; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2014-03-01

    Probing electronic structure of atomically well controlled surface of Perovskite-type 3d transition-metal oxides have been attracting much interest because of their intriguing emergent physical properties by heterostructure engineering. In this study, we have especially focused on SrVO3, where importance of correlation effects has been considered. We successfully obtained atomically flat surfaces of SrVO3, which gave us the great opportunity to visualize correlated electronic state at atomic scale by means of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Based on the experimental data, we discuss spectroscopic signature of many body effects on the surface of SrVO3 system.

  14. Rolling a single molecular wheel at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, L.; Rieder, K.-H.; Moresco, F.; Rapenne, G.; Stojkovic, S.; Bouju, X.; Joachim, C.

    2007-02-01

    The design of a single-molecule machine consisting of functional components requires a detailed understanding of its mechanical motion. The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) is the only available tool for driving and imaging such a nanoscale machine on a surface. Both lateral hopping motions and conformational changes of single molecules can be induced using the STM tip. However, no rolling of a wheel has been demonstrated so far at the nanoscale, even though this is a very useful motion at the macroscopic scale. Here we show how the rolling of a single molecule equipped with two wheels (0.8 nm in diameter) can be induced by the STM tip. The characteristics of the rolling are recorded in the STM feedback loop manipulation signal and in real time. We capture unambiguous signatures of the conformational change happening during the rolling. Our approach of controlling the intramolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more complex molecular machines.

  15. Fundamental Enabling Issues in Nanotechnology: Stress at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Foiles, Stephen Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hearne, Sean Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoyt, Jeffrey John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seel, Steven Craig [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Edmund Blackburn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morales, Alfredo Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Zimmerman, Jonathan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-10-01

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also support the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g., continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in

  16. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  17. Atomic-scale Modelling of Electro-catalytic Surfaces and Dynamic Electrochemical Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard

    This dissertation addresses numerical calculations on the atomic scale to study catalytic surfaces for electrochemistry. The first half of the thesis deals with calculations on the properties of catalytic surfaces, using well known methodology, whereas the second half of the thesis deals with the......This dissertation addresses numerical calculations on the atomic scale to study catalytic surfaces for electrochemistry. The first half of the thesis deals with calculations on the properties of catalytic surfaces, using well known methodology, whereas the second half of the thesis deals...... with the development of new methodology to explicitly include the electrolyte in the atomic scale calculations. Chapter 3 presents calculations on contracted and reconstructed platinum surfaces, which are relevant for development of catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Correlation of the results...

  18. Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyo-Ki; Jo, Junhyeon; Hwang, Daeyeon; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Son, Seungwoo; Kim, Jung Hwa; Jin, Mi-Jin; Jun, Young Chul; Erni, Rolf; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Zonghoon

    2017-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconducting oxide on graphene carries a unique combination of wide band gap, high charge carrier mobility, and optical transparency, which can be widely applied for optoelectronics. However, study on the epitaxial formation and properties of oxide monolayer on graphene remains unexplored due to hydrophobic graphene surface and limits of conventional bulk deposition technique. Here, we report atomic scale study of heteroepitaxial growth and relationship of a single-atom-thick ZnO layer on graphene using atomic layer deposition. We demonstrate atom-by-atom growth of zinc and oxygen at the preferential zigzag edge of a ZnO monolayer on graphene through in situ observation. We experimentally determine that the thinnest ZnO monolayer has a wide band gap (up to 4.0 eV), due to quantum confinement and graphene-like structure, and high optical transparency. This study can lead to a new class of atomically thin two-dimensional heterostructures of semiconducting oxides formed by highly controlled epitaxial growth.

  19. Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam S; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-07-17

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local contact potential difference does reflect the periodicity of the ionic crystal, but not the magnitude of its Madelung surface potential. The imaging mechanism relies on the induced polarization of the ions at the tip-surface interface owing to the modulation of the applied bias voltage. Our findings are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical expectations and experimental observations.

  20. Role of cardiolipins in the inner mitochondrial membrane: insight gained through atom-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Munck, Nana

    2009-01-01

    , the exceptional nature of cardiolipins is characterized by their small charged head group connected to typically four hydrocarbon chains. In this work, we present atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the inner mitochondrial membrane modeled as a mixture of cardiolipins (CLs), phosphatidylcholines (PCs...

  1. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  2. Electric field as a switching tool for magnetic states in atomic-scale nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negulyaev, N N; Stepanyuk, V S; Hergert, W; Kirschner, J

    2011-01-21

    One of the most promising candidates for the construction of ultrahigh-density storage media is low-dimensional atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures exhibiting magnetic bi- or multistability. Here we propose a novel route of locally controlling and switching magnetism in such nanostructures. Our ab initio studies reveal that externally applied electric field can be used for this purpose.

  3. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2012-01-01

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phen...

  4. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...

  5. Direct evidence of atomic-scale structural fluctuations in catalyst nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pin Ann; Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Burgos, Juan C; Balbuena, Perla B; Natarajan, Bharath; Sharma, Renu

    2017-05-01

    Rational catalyst design requires an atomic scale mechanistic understanding of the chemical pathways involved in the catalytic process. A heterogeneous catalyst typically works by adsorbing reactants onto its surface, where the energies for specific bonds to dissociate and/or combine with other species (to form desired intermediate or final products) are lower. Here, using the catalytic growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a prototype reaction, we show that the chemical pathway may in-fact involve the entire catalyst particle, and can proceed via the fluctuations in the formation and decomposition of metastable phases in the particle interior. We record in situ and at atomic resolution, the dynamic phase transformations occurring in a Cobalt catalyst nanoparticle during SWCNT growth, using a state-of-the-art environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). The fluctuations in catalyst carbon content are quantified by the automated, atomic-scale structural analysis of the time-resolved ETEM images and correlated with the SWCNT growth rate. We find the fluctuations in the carbon concentration in the catalyst nanoparticle and the fluctuations in nanotube growth rates to be of complementary character. These findings are successfully explained by reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations that track the spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of carbon atoms within and on the surface of the catalyst particle. We anticipate that our approach combining real-time, atomic-resolution image analysis and molecular dynamics simulations will facilitate catalyst design, improving reaction efficiencies and selectivity towards the growth of desired structure.

  6. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yen-Ting; Lo, Ming-Cheng; Wu, Chu-Chun; Chen, Peng-Yu; Wu, Jenq-Shinn; Liang, Chi-Te; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  7. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  8. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  9. The bone-implant interface of dental implants in humans on the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Gustav; Dahlin, Christer; Andersson, Martin; Thuvander, Mattias

    2017-01-15

    Osseointegration of dental implants occurs on a hierarchy of length scales down to the atomic level. A deeper understanding of the complex processes that take place at the surface of an implant on the smallest scale is of interest for the development of improved biomaterials. To date, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been utilized for examination of the bone-implant interface, providing details on the nanometer level. In this study we show that TEM imaging can be complemented with atom probe tomography (APT) to reveal the chemical composition of a Ti-based dental implant in a human jaw on the atomic level of resolution. As the atom probe technique has equal sensitivity for all elements, it allows for 3 dimensional characterizations of osseointegrated interfaces with unprecedented resolution. The APT reconstructions reveal a Ca-enriched zone in the immediate vicinity of the implant surface. A surface oxide of some 5nm thickness was measured on the titanium implant, with a sub-stoichiometric composition with respect to TiO2. Minor incorporation of Ca into the thin oxide film was also evident. We conclude that the APT technique is capable of revealing chemical information from the bone-implant interface in 3D with unprecedented resolution, thus providing important insights into the mechanisms behind osseointegration. Osseointegration of dental implants occurs on a hierarchy of length scales down to the atomic level. A deeper understanding of the complex processes that take place at the surface of an implant on the smallest scale is of interest for the development of improved biomaterials. To date, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been utilized for examination of the bone-implant interface, providing details on the nanometer level. In this study we show that TEM imaging can be complemented with atom probe tomography (APT) to reveal the chemical composition of a Ti-based dental implant in a human jaw on the atomic level of resolution. Correlative

  10. Finite Bias Calculations to Model Interface Dipoles in Electrochemical Cells at the Atomic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure t...... to satisfy the thermodynamic constraints imposed by the environment. This is captured by the generalized computational hydrogen electrode model, which enables us to make efficient first-principles calculations of atomic scale properties of the electrochemical interface.......The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure...

  11. Sensing Noncollinear Magnetism at the Atomic Scale Combining Magnetic Exchange and Spin-Polarized Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Gerritsen, Jan W; Wegner, Daniel; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-09-13

    Storing and accessing information in atomic-scale magnets requires magnetic imaging techniques with single-atom resolution. Here, we show simultaneous detection of the spin-polarization and exchange force with or without the flow of current with a new method, which combines scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy. To demonstrate the application of this new method, we characterize the prototypical nanoskyrmion lattice formed on a monolayer of Fe/Ir(111). We resolve the square magnetic lattice by employing magnetic exchange force microscopy, demonstrating its applicability to noncollinear magnetic structures for the first time. Utilizing distance-dependent force and current spectroscopy, we quantify the exchange forces in comparison to the spin-polarization. For strongly spin-polarized tips, we distinguish different signs of the exchange force that we suggest arises from a change in exchange mechanisms between the probe and a skyrmion. This new approach may enable both nonperturbative readout combined with writing by current-driven reversal of atomic-scale magnets.

  12. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junggoo; Lee, Joonho; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Mori, Hirotaro

    2009-11-01

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  13. In situ atomic-scale observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized gold particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junggoo [Functional Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 66 Sangnam-dong, Changwon, Kyungsangnam-Do 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joonho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Tanaka, Toshihiro [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mori, Hirotaro, E-mail: jglee36@kims.re.k [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2009-11-25

    Phase stabilities of nanometer-sized materials are quite different from those of the corresponding bulk materials. Among the phase stabilities, melting point suppression is one of the most fundamentally important issues. In this work, real-time, atomic-scale direct observation of melting point suppression in nanometer-sized Au particles, along with simple size reduction, was carried out by means of in situ high resolution electron microscopy. Namely, it was confirmed in real space on an atomic scale that a solid-to-liquid transition occurred when the size of a particle, placed on a graphite substrate maintained at 1100 K, decreased to 5 nm during diminution. Furthermore, a monolayer-thick hole was formed on the substrate at the position of the liquid Au particle, probably due to carbon dissolution into the liquid Au particle.

  14. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... a quasipoint source with a spatial extension similar to the size of a dangling bond. [S0031-9007(98)08376-8]....

  15. Stabilized Skyrmion Phase Detected in MnSi Nanowires by Dynamic Cantilever Magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlin, A; Xue, F; Liang, D; Du, H F; Stolt, M J; Jin, S; Tian, M L; Poggio, M

    2015-07-08

    Using dynamic cantilever magnetometry we measure an enhanced skyrmion lattice phase extending from around 29 K down to at least 0.4 K in single MnSi nanowires (NWs). Although recent experiments on two-dimensional thin films show that reduced dimensionality stabilizes the skyrmion phase, our results are surprising given that the NW dimensions are much larger than the skyrmion lattice constant. Furthermore, the stability of the phase depends on the orientation of the NWs with respect to the applied magnetic field, suggesting that an effective magnetic anisotropy, likely due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of these nanostructures, is responsible for the stabilization. The compatibility of our technique with nanometer-scale samples paves the way for future studies on the effect of confinement and surfaces on magnetic skyrmions.

  16. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schumann, F.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  17. High-mobility three-atom-thick semiconducting films with wafer-scale homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kibum; Xie, Saien; Huang, Lujie; Han, Yimo; Huang, Pinshane Y; Mak, Kin Fai; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Muller, David; Park, Jiwoong

    2015-04-30

    The large-scale growth of semiconducting thin films forms the basis of modern electronics and optoelectronics. A decrease in film thickness to the ultimate limit of the atomic, sub-nanometre length scale, a difficult limit for traditional semiconductors (such as Si and GaAs), would bring wide benefits for applications in ultrathin and flexible electronics, photovoltaics and display technology. For this, transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which can form stable three-atom-thick monolayers, provide ideal semiconducting materials with high electrical carrier mobility, and their large-scale growth on insulating substrates would enable the batch fabrication of atomically thin high-performance transistors and photodetectors on a technologically relevant scale without film transfer. In addition, their unique electronic band structures provide novel ways of enhancing the functionalities of such devices, including the large excitonic effect, bandgap modulation, indirect-to-direct bandgap transition, piezoelectricity and valleytronics. However, the large-scale growth of monolayer TMD films with spatial homogeneity and high electrical performance remains an unsolved challenge. Here we report the preparation of high-mobility 4-inch wafer-scale films of monolayer molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and tungsten disulphide, grown directly on insulating SiO2 substrates, with excellent spatial homogeneity over the entire films. They are grown with a newly developed, metal-organic chemical vapour deposition technique, and show high electrical performance, including an electron mobility of 30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and 114 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 90 K for MoS2, with little dependence on position or channel length. With the use of these films we successfully demonstrate the wafer-scale batch fabrication of high-performance monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors with a 99% device yield and the multi-level fabrication of vertically stacked transistor devices for three

  18. Evolution of the Contact Area with Normal Load for Rough Surfaces: from Atomic to Macroscopic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiping

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of the contact area with normal load for rough surfaces has great fundamental and practical importance, ranging from earthquake dynamics to machine wear. This work bridges the gap between the atomic scale and the macroscopic scale for normal contact behavior. The real contact area, which is formed by a large ensemble of discrete contacts (clusters), is proven to be much smaller than the apparent surface area. The distribution of the discrete contact clusters and the interaction between them are key to revealing the mechanism of the contacting solids. To this end, Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) is used to study both how the contact cluster evolves from the atomic scale to the macroscopic scale and the interaction between clusters. It is found that the interaction between clusters has a strong effect on their formation. The formation and distribution of the contact clusters is far more complicated than that predicted by the asperity model. Ignorance of the interaction between them leads to overestimating the contacting force. In real contact, contacting clusters are smaller and more discrete due to the interaction between the asperities. Understanding the exact nature of the contact area with the normal load is essential to the following research on friction.

  19. Implementation of highly parallel and large scale GW calculations within the OpenAtom software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    The need to describe electronic excitations with better accuracy than provided by band structures produced by Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a long-term enterprise for the computational condensed matter and materials theory communities. In some cases, appropriate theoretical frameworks have existed for some time but have been difficult to apply widely due to computational cost. For example, the GW approximation incorporates a great deal of important non-local and dynamical electronic interaction effects but has been too computationally expensive for routine use in large materials simulations. OpenAtom is an open source massively parallel ab initiodensity functional software package based on plane waves and pseudopotentials (http://charm.cs.uiuc.edu/OpenAtom/) that takes advantage of the Charm + + parallel framework. At present, it is developed via a three-way collaboration, funded by an NSF SI2-SSI grant (ACI-1339804), between Yale (Ismail-Beigi), IBM T. J. Watson (Glenn Martyna) and the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (Laxmikant Kale). We will describe the project and our current approach towards implementing large scale GW calculations with OpenAtom. Potential applications of large scale parallel GW software for problems involving electronic excitations in semiconductor and/or metal oxide systems will be also be pointed out.

  20. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoy, A.; Bissbort, U.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cappellaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  1. Subatomic-scale force vector mapping above a Ge(001) dimer using bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Turanský, Robert; Brndiar, Ján; Li, Yan Jun; Štich, Ivan; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-07-01

    Probing physical quantities on the nanoscale that have directionality, such as magnetic moments, electric dipoles, or the force response of a surface, is essential for characterizing functionalized materials for nanotechnological device applications. Currently, such physical quantities are usually experimentally obtained as scalars. To investigate the physical properties of a surface on the nanoscale in depth, these properties must be measured as vectors. Here we demonstrate a three-force-component detection method, based on multi-frequency atomic force microscopy on the subatomic scale and apply it to a Ge(001)-c(4 × 2) surface. We probed the surface-normal and surface-parallel force components above the surface and their direction-dependent anisotropy and expressed them as a three-dimensional force vector distribution. Access to the atomic-scale force distribution on the surface will enable better understanding of nanoscale surface morphologies, chemical composition and reactions, probing nanostructures via atomic or molecular manipulation, and provide insights into the behaviour of nano-machines on substrates.

  2. Large scale ab initio molecular dynamics using the OpenAtom software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Mandal, Subhasish; Kim, Minjung; Mikida, Eric; Bohm, Eric; Jindal, Prateek; Jain, Nikhil; Kale, Laxmikant; Martyna, Glenn

    First principles molecular dynamics approaches permit one to simulate dynamic and time-dependent phenomena in physics, chemistry, and materials science without the use of empirical potentials or ad hoc assumptions about the interatomic interactions since they describe electrons, nuclei and their interactions explicitly. We describe our collaborative efforts in developing and enhancing the OpenAtom open source ab initio density functional software package based on plane waves and pseudopotentials (http://charm.cs.uiuc.edu/OpenAtom/). OpenAtom takes advantage of the Charm++ parallel framework. We present parallel scaling results on a large metal organic framework (MOF) material of scientific and potential technological interest for hydrogen storage. In the process, we highlight the capabilities of the software which include molecular dynamics (Car-Parrinello or Born-Oppenheimer), k-points, spin, path integral beads for quantum nuclear effects, and parallel tempering for exploration of complex phase spaces. Particular efforts have been made to ensure that the different capabilities interoperate in various combinations with high performance and scaling. Comparison to other available open source software will also be assessed. This collaboration is supported NSF SI2-SSI Grant ACI-1339804.

  3. New Strategies for Atomic Scale Measurements at Interfaces using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David A.

    1997-03-01

    The local electronic structure of a material can be measured directly from the energy loss spectrum of a swift electron scattered through it. When the electron beam is focussed down to the width of an atomic column, the electronic density of states at an interface, grain boundary or impurity site can be decomposed by site, chemical species and angular momentum. Here, we discuss the use of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) fine structure to provide insight into the origin of grain boundary and interfacial properties. EELS can reveal the physics underlying why a particular local bonding arrangement develops. Even a qualitative understanding of local bonding can help indentify possible sites for chemical reactions and potentially weak points at a grain boundary. More can be done however: an EELS sum rule allows quantitative estimates of grain boundary energies. This is particularly useful at general, large angle grain boundaries where no other atomic scale information can be obtained. As an example, we show how atomic-scale EELS measurements of grain boundaries in Ni_3Al (D.A. Muller, S. Subramanian, P.E. Batson, S.L. Sass, J. Silcox, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75 4744 (1995). lead not only to rules-of-thumb for segregation and bond strength, but also to quantitative estimates of the boundary cohesion. Application to magnetic multilayers and Al:Cu interconnects will also be touched on. (Work at Cornell supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER45322 and NSF grant DMR-9121654.)

  4. Atomic-scale characterization of the interfacial phonon in graphene/SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Emi; Arafune, Ryuichi; Frederiksen, Thomas; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Norifumi; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2017-10-01

    Epitaxial graphene on SiC that provides wafer-scale and high-quality graphene sheets on an insulating substrate is a promising material to realize graphene-based nanodevices. The presence of the insulating substrate changes the physical properties of free-standing graphene through the interfacial phonon, e.g., limiting the mobility. Despite such known impacts on the material properties, a complete and microscopic picture is missing. Here, we report on atomically resolved inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) with a scanning tunneling microscope for epitaxial graphene grown on 4 H -SiC(0001). Our data reveal a strong spatial dependence in the IETS spectrum, which cannot be explained by intrinsic graphene properties. We show that this variation in the IETS spectrum originates from a localized low-energy vibration of the interfacial Si atom with a dangling bond via ab initio electronic and phononic state calculations. This insight may help advancing graphene device performance through interfacial control.

  5. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  6. Experimental investigation of atomic collisions in time scales varying from nanosecond to microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Matherson, K J; Wallace, W; Sang, R T, E-mail: R.Sang@griffith.edu.a [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

    2010-02-01

    We present the results from two experiments investigating collisions that differ in time scale by three orders of magnitude. The first experiment enables the determination of absolute total collision cross sections using a technique that measures a change in the loss rate of trapped atoms from a magneto optical trap (MOT). We also investigate light assisted collision processes between cold metastable neon atoms in the {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable state within the MOT. A catalysis laser is scanned in frequency across the {sup 3}P{sub 2} - {sup 3}D{sub 3} cooling transition and the ionization rate was observed. Ionization spectra are obtained which demonstrate a dependence on the magnetic sublevels of the transition that the catalysis laser is exciting.

  7. Applicability of Macroscopic Wear and Friction Laws on the Atomic Length Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, S J; Feldbauer, G; Bianchi, D; Cihak-Bayr, U; Betz, G; Vernes, A

    2015-07-10

    Using molecular dynamics, we simulate the abrasion process of an atomically rough Fe surface with multiple hard abrasive particles. By quantifying the nanoscopic wear depth in a time-resolved fashion, we show that Barwell's macroscopic wear law can be applied at the atomic scale. We find that in this multiasperity contact system, the Bowden-Tabor term, which describes the friction force as a function of the real nanoscopic contact area, can predict the kinetic friction even when wear is involved. From this the Derjaguin-Amontons-Coulomb friction law can be recovered, since we observe a linear dependence of the contact area on the applied load in accordance with Greenwood-Williamson contact mechanics.

  8. Atomic-scale simulation of dust grain collisions: Surface chemistry and dissipation beyond existing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Doan, Baochi D.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K.

    2017-10-01

    The early stages of planet formation involve steps where submicron-sized dust particles collide to form aggregates. However, the mechanism through which millimeter-sized particles aggregate to kilometer-sized planetesimals is still not understood. Dust grain collision experiments carried out in the environment of the Earth lead to the prediction of a 'bouncing barrier' at millimeter-sizes. Theoretical models, e.g., Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov theories, lack two key features, namely the chemistry of dust grain surfaces, and a mechanism for atomic-scale dissipation of energy. Moreover, interaction strengths in these models are parameterized based on experiments done in the Earth's environment. To address these issues, we performed atomic-scale simulations of collisions between nonhydroxylated and hydroxylated amorphous silica nanoparticles. We used the ReaxFF approach which enables modeling chemical reactions using an empirical potential. We found that nonhydroxylated nanograins tend to adhere with much higher probability than suggested by existing theories. By contrast, hydroxylated nanograins exhibit a strong tendency to bounce. Also, the interaction between dust grains has the characteristics of a strong chemical force instead of weak van der Waals forces. This suggests that the formation of strong chemical bonds and dissipation via internal atomic vibration may result in aggregation beyond what is expected based on our current understanding. Our results also indicate that experiments should more carefully consider surface conditions to mimic the space environment. We also report results of simulations with molten silica nanoparticles. It is found that molten particles are more likely to adhere due to viscous dissipation, which supports theories that suggest aggregation to kilometer scales might require grains to be in a molten state.

  9. In situ atom scale visualization of domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-10-08

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application.

  10. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  11. Microwave atomic force microscopy imaging for nanometer-scale electrical property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Ju, Yang; Hosoi, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Akifumi

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a new type of microscopy which is capable of investigating surface topography and electrical property of conductive and dielectric materials simultaneously on a nanometer scale. The microwave atomic force microscopy is a combination of the principles of the scanning probe microscope and the microwave-measurement technique. As a result, under the noncontact AFM working conditions, we successfully generated a microwave image of a 200-nm Au film coating on a glass wafer substrate with a spatial resolution of 120 nm and a measured voltage difference of 19.2 mV between the two materials.

  12. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends...... in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  13. Magnetic properties of cobalt microwires measured by piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosolini G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic characterization of cobalt wires grown by focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID and studied using static piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry. We have used previously developed high force sensitive submicron-thick silicon piezoresistive cantilevers. High quality polycrystalline cobalt microwires have been grown by FEBID onto the free end of the cantilevers using dual beam equipment. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the magnetic cobalt wires become magnetized, which leads to the magnetic field dependent static deflection of the cantilevers. We show that the piezoresistive signal from the cantilevers, corresponding to a maximum force of about 1 nN, can be measured as a function of the applied magnetic field with a good signal to noise ratio at room temperature. The results highlight the flexibility of the FEBID technique for the growth of magnetic structures on specific substrates, in this case piezoresistive cantilevers.

  14. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  15. Atomic-scale origin of dynamic viscoelastic response and creep in disordered solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkus, Rico; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Viscoelasticity has been described since the time of Maxwell as an interpolation of purely viscous and purely elastic response, but its microscopic atomic-level mechanism in solids has remained elusive. We studied three model disordered solids: a random lattice, the bond-depleted fcc lattice, and the fcc lattice with vacancies. Within the harmonic approximation for central-force lattices, we applied sum rules for viscoelastic response derived on the basis of nonaffine atomic motions. The latter motions are a direct result of local structural disorder, and in particular, of the lack of inversion symmetry in disordered lattices. By defining a suitable quantitative and general atomic-level measure of nonaffinity and inversion symmetry, we show that the viscoelastic responses of all three systems collapse onto a master curve upon normalizing by the overall strength of inversion-symmetry breaking in each system. Close to the isostatic point for central-force lattices, power-law creep G(t)∼t^{-1/2} emerges as a consequence of the interplay between soft vibrational modes and nonaffine dynamics, and various analytical scalings, supported by numerical calculations, are predicted by the theory.

  16. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, Marjorie, E-mail: marjorie.bertolus@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Freyss, Michel; Dorado, Boris; Martin, Guillaume; Hoang, Kiet; Maillard, Serge; Skorek, Richard; Garcia, Philippe; Valot, Carole [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chartier, Alain; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Fossati, Paul [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grimes, Robin W.; Parfitt, David C.; Bishop, Clare L.; Murphy, Samuel T.; Rushton, Michael J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Staicu, Dragos; Yakub, Eugen; Nichenko, Sergii [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-07-15

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO{sub 2}, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels.

  17. Atomic-scale investigations of the struct. and dynamics of complex catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl Sohlberg, Drexel University

    2007-05-16

    By some accounts, catalysis impacts ≥ 30% of GDP in developed countries [Maxwell, I. E. Nature 394, 325-326 (1998)]. Catalysis is the enabling technology for petroleum production, for control of gaseous emissions from petroleum combustion, and for the production of industrial and consumer chemicals. Future applications of catalysis are potentially even more far reaching. There is an ever-growing need to move the economy from a fossil-fuel energy base to cleaner alternatives. Hydrogen-based combustion systems and fuel cells could play a dominant role, given a plentiful and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Photocatalysis is the most promising clean technology for hydrogen production, relying solely on water and sunlight, but performance enhancements in photocatalysis are needed to make this technology economically competitive. Given the enormously wide spread utilization of catalysts, even incremental performance enhancements would have far-reaching benefits for multiple end-use sectors. In the area of fuel and chemical production, such improvements would translate into vast reductions in energy consumption. At the consumption end, improvements in the catalysts involved would yield tremendous reductions in pollution. In the area of photocatalysis, such efficiency improvements could finally render hydrogen an economically viable fuel. Prerequisite to the non-empirical design and refinement of improved catalysts is the identification of the atomic-scale structure and properties of the catalytically active sites. This has become a major industrial research priority. The focus of this research program was to combine atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy with first-principles density functional theory calculations to deliver an atomic-scale description of heterogeneous catalytic systems that could form the basis for non-empirical design of improved catalysts with greater energy efficiency.

  18. Correlation of experimentally measured atomic scale properties of EUV photoresist to modeling performance: an exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Chandonait, Jonathan; Melvin, Lawrence S.; Marokkey, Sajan; Yan, Qiliang; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Painter, Benjamin; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm stands at the crossroads of next generation patterning technology for high volume manufacturing of integrated circuits. Photo resist models that form the part of overall pattern transform model for lithography play a vital role in supporting this effort. The physics and chemistry of these resists must be understood to enable the construction of accurate models for EUV Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). In this study, we explore the possibility of improving EUV photo-resist models by directly correlating the parameters obtained from experimentally measured atomic scale physical properties; namely, the effect of interaction of EUV photons with photo acid generators in standard chemically amplified EUV photoresist, and associated electron energy loss events. Atomic scale physical properties will be inferred from the measurements carried out in Electron Resist Interaction Chamber (ERIC). This study will use measured physical parameters to establish a relationship with lithographically important properties, such as line edge roughness and CD variation. The data gathered from these measurements is used to construct OPC models of the resist.

  19. Fabrication of large scale nanostructures based on a modified atomic force microscope nanomechanical machining system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z J; Yan, Y D; Zhao, X S; Gao, D W; Wei, Y Y; Wang, J H

    2011-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomechanical machining has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for fabricating complex 2D∕3D nanostructures. But the machining scale is very small, which holds back this technique severely. How to enlarge the machining scale is always a major concern for the researches. In the present study, a modified AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining system is established through combination of a high precision X-Y stage with the moving range of 100 mm × 100 mm and a commercial AFM in order to enlarge the machining scale. It is found that the tracing property of the AFM system is feasible for large scale machining by controlling the constant normal load. Effects of the machining parameters including the machining direction and the tip geometry on the uniform machined depth with a large scale are evaluated. Consequently, a new tip trace and an increasing load scheme are presented to achieve a uniform machined depth. Finally, a polymer nanoline array with the dimensions of 1 mm × 0.7 mm, the line density of 1000 lines/mm and the average machined depth of 150 nm, and a 20 × 20 polymer square holes array with the scale of 380 μm × 380 μm and the average machined depth of 250 nm are machined successfully. The uniform of the machined depths for all the nanostructures is acceptable. Therefore, it is verified that the AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining method can be used to machine millimeter scale nanostructures.

  20. Performing the Millikan experiment at the molecular scale: Determination of atomic Millikan-Thomson charges by computationally measuring atomic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T. Ryan; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    An atomic version of the Millikan oil drop experiment is performed computationally. It is shown that for planar molecules, the atomic version of the Millikan experiment can be used to define an atomic partial charge that is free from charge flow contributions. We refer to this charge as the Millikan-Thomson (MT) charge. Since the MT charge is directly proportional to the atomic forces under a uniform electric field, it is the most relevant charge for force field developments. The MT charge shows good stability with respect to different choices of the basis set. In addition, the MT charge can be easily calculated even at post-Hartree-Fock levels of theory. With the MT charge, it is shown that for a planar water dimer, the charge transfer from the proton acceptor to the proton donor is about -0.052 e. While both planar hydrated cations and anions show signs of charge transfer, anions show a much more significant charge transfer to the hydration water than the corresponding cations. It might be important to explicitly model the ion charge transfer to water in a force field at least for the anions.

  1. Performing the Millikan experiment at the molecular scale: Determination of atomic Millikan-Thomson charges by computationally measuring atomic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    An atomic version of the Millikan oil drop experiment is performed computationally. It is shown that for planar molecules, the atomic version of the Millikan experiment can be used to define an atomic partial charge that is free from charge flow contributions. We refer to this charge as the Millikan-Thomson (MT) charge. Since the MT charge is directly proportional to the atomic forces under a uniform electric field, it is the most relevant charge for force field developments. The MT charge shows good stability with respect to different choices of the basis set. In addition, the MT charge can be easily calculated even at post-Hartree-Fock levels of theory. With the MT charge, it is shown that for a planar water dimer, the charge transfer from the proton acceptor to the proton donor is about −0.052 e. While both planar hydrated cations and anions show signs of charge transfer, anions show a much more significant charge transfer to the hydration water than the corresponding cations. It might be important to explicitly model the ion charge transfer to water in a force field at least for the anions. PMID:29096447

  2. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  3. An integrated, cross-disciplinary study of soil hydrophobicity at atomic, molecular, core and landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Van Keulen, Geertje; Dudley, Ed; Francis, Lewis; Whalley, Richard; Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kat; Ashton, Rhys

    2017-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity can lead to reduced soil fertility and heightened flood risk caused by increased run-off. Soil hydrophobicity is a well-known phenomenon when induced by natural events such as wildfires and anthropogenic causes including adding organic wastes or hydrocarbon contaminants. This presentation concerns a much more subtle effect - the naturally occurring changes between hydrophilic and hydrophobic states caused by periods of wetness and drought. Although subtle, they nevertheless affect vast areas of soil, and so their effects can be very significant, and are predicted to increase under climate change conditions. To understand the effect, a major interdisciplinary study has been commissioned by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to investigate soil hydrophobicity over length scales ranging from atomic through molecular, core and landscape scale. We present the key findings from the many publications currently in preparation. The programme is predicated on the hypothesis that changes in soil protein abundance and localization, induced by variations in soil moisture and temperature, are crucial driving forces for transitions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic conditions at soil particle surfaces, and that these effects can be meaningfully upscaled from molecular to landscape scale. Three soils were chosen based on the severity of hydrophobicity that can be achieved in the field: severe to extreme (natural rough pasture, Wales), intermediate to severe (pasture, Wales), and subcritical (managed research grassland, Rothamsted Research, England). The latter is already highly characterised so was also used as a control. Hydrophobic/ hydrophilic transitions were determined from water droplet penetration times. Scientific advances in the following five areas will be described: (i) the identification of these soil proteins by proteomic methods, using novel separation methods which reduces interference by humic acids, and allows identification

  4. Atomic layer lithography of wafer-scale nanogap arrays for extreme confinement of electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Park, Hyeong-Ryeol; Pelton, Matthew; Piao, Xianji; Lindquist, Nathan C; Im, Hyungsoon; Kim, Yun Jung; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Park, Namkyoo; Kim, Dai-Sik; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Squeezing light through nanometre-wide gaps in metals can lead to extreme field enhancements, nonlocal electromagnetic effects and light-induced electron tunnelling. This intriguing regime, however, has not been readily accessible to experimentalists because of the lack of reliable technology to fabricate uniform nanogaps with atomic-scale resolution and high throughput. Here we introduce a new patterning technology based on atomic layer deposition and simple adhesive-tape-based planarization. Using this method, we create vertically oriented gaps in opaque metal films along the entire contour of a millimetre-sized pattern, with gap widths as narrow as 9.9 Å, and pack 150,000 such devices on a 4-inch wafer. Electromagnetic waves pass exclusively through the nanogaps, enabling background-free transmission measurements. We observe resonant transmission of near-infrared waves through 1.1-nm-wide gaps (λ/1,295) and measure an effective refractive index of 17.8. We also observe resonant transmission of millimetre waves through 1.1-nm-wide gaps (λ/4,000,000) and infer an unprecedented field enhancement factor of 25,000.

  5. DFT +U studies of atomic scale magnetism: A curious case study for future spintronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Hashemi, Hossein; Jones, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    Atomic scale magnetism attracts interest due to both its possible application to nanoscale spintroic devices, and due to its inherent interest as a source of basic quantum mechanical interactions. We work together with the local Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) team to match our calculations to experiment, and in the process learn much which can't be measured with the STM. In particular we use DFT +U to calculate the properties of magnetic atoms on nanolayers of insulator on top of a metal such as silver. In this talk we report the results of detailed calculations of singles and dimers of Mn on MgO/Ag. As time permits we may include our calculations of other magnetic adatoms for comparison. We find that the local interactions are very different for the three stable binding sites on this surface, both for charge and spin densities. Using on onsite Hubbard U parameter which we determine from first principles, we are able to study the variability of the magnetic moment between the binding sites, as well as determine the lowest energy binding site. The magnetic adatoms affect the surrounding interface layer in unexpected ways. We are able to obtain interesting insights which help us understand how magnetism propagates along surfaces as well as between interfaces. Research for this project is partially funded by KAUST.

  6. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  7. Inversion of potential field data : theory and applications in gravimetry and magnetometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirzaei, M.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis deals with the inversion of potential field data. Theoretical aspects and applications in gravimetry and magnetometry are treated. Inverse theory provides mathematical techniques to obtain useful infonnation about the earth based on measurements (data). These techniques estimate

  8. Atomic-scale modelling of primary damage and properties of radiation defects in metals

    CERN Document Server

    Osetsky, Y N

    2003-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in recent years in the understanding of radiation damage production in high-energy displacement cascades, the properties of the defects and evolution of radiation damage in metals. Two main reasons form the basis of this success. First, the significant increase in computing power has allowed simulation of realistic cascade energies with good statistics and relatively long-time evolution of defects to be carried out. Second, new experimental findings and corresponding theoretical calculations have allowed interpretation of a number of mechanisms and phenomena crucial for understanding and prediction of practically important radiation effects, such as void swelling, radiation growth, matrix hardening and plastic flow localisation. In this paper we review the most significant results in atomic-scale computer modelling related to these issues, mainly focusing on new achievements such as the formation of extended defect clusters, the dynamic properties of defect clusters, int...

  9. Nanometer-scale lithography of ultrathin films with atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J C; Shin, Y W; Park, S W

    1998-01-01

    Ultrathin resist films have been prepared by both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly (SA) techniques. Nanometer-scale patterning of these thin films has been performed by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) as the exposing tool. The poly (methylphenylmethacrylate) (PMPMA) LB films were prepared and fabricated by AFM lithography. When the exposure was carried out at the bias voltage of -25V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions. The preoptimized LB films at various conditions exhibited 120 nm line resolution. An organosilane monolayer composed of octadecyldimethylsilyl groups was prepared on a Si substrate. It was then patterned through the localized degradation of the monolayer due to anodic reaction induced by an AFM tip. When the bias voltage was -30 V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions.

  10. Atomic-scale investigation of graphene grown on Cu foil and the effects of thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Gao, Li; Tian, Jifa; Cao, Helin; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Yitamben, Esmeralda N; Fisher, Brandon; Guest, Jeffrey R; Chen, Yong P; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2011-05-24

    We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing on ex-situ chemically vapor deposited submonolayer graphene islands on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. Low-temperature annealed graphene islands on Cu foil (at ∼430 °C) exhibit predominantly striped Moiré patterns, indicating a relatively weak interaction between graphene and the underlying polycrystalline Cu foil. Rapid high-temperature annealing of the sample (at 700-800 °C) gives rise to the removal of Cu oxide and the recovery of crystallographic features of the copper that surrounds the intact graphene. These experimental observations of continuous crystalline features between the underlying copper (beneath the graphene islands) and the surrounding exposed copper areas revealed by high-temperature annealing demonstrates the impenetrable nature of graphene and its potential application as a protective layer against corrosion.

  11. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  12. Atomic Scale Picture of the Ion Conduction Mechanism in Tetrahedral Network of Lanthanum Barium Gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalarvo, Niina H [ORNL; Gourdon, Olivier [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Gout, Delphine J [ORNL; Ohl, Michael E [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Combined experimental study of impedance spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and quasielastic neutron scattering was performed to shed light into the atomic scale ion migration processes in proton and oxide ion conductor; La0.8Ba1.2GaO3.9 . This material consist of tetrahedral GaO4 units, which are rather flexible and rocking motion of these units promotes the ionic migration process. The oxide ion (vacancy) conduction takes place on channels along c axis, involving a single elementary step, which occurs between adjacent tetrahedron (inter-tetrahedron jump). The proton conduction mechanism consists of intra-tetrahedron and inter-tetrahedron elementary processes. The intra-tetrahedron proton transport is the rate-limiting process, with activation energy of 0.44 eV. The rocking motion of the GaO4 tetrahedron aids the inter-tetrahedral proton transport, which has the activation energy of 0.068 eV.

  13. Atom probe tomography of thermally grown oxide scale on FeCrAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang, E-mail: fang.liu@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Thermally grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales formed on a FeCrAl alloy were successfully analyzed using pulsed green laser atom probe tomography. Two types of atom probe tomography specimens, the “thin oxide” type: a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (<100 nm) with underlying metal (1 μm), and the “thick oxide” type: only with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 μm), were prepared and analyzed. It was found that the thin oxide type yields poorer mass resolution due to a combined effect of laser absorption and thermal conduction effects. Application of a relatively low laser energy yields a better mass resolution and increased multiple events, however, more accurate quantification results. Although no other oxide phase than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is expected to form, some iron–oxygen and chromium–oxygen molecular ions were recorded at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/metal interface due to the large change in evaporation field over this zone. - Highlights: ► Thermally grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales formed on a FeCrAl alloy were successfully analyzed. ► Specimens with a thin oxide and underlying metal yield poorer mass resolution. ► Low laser energy yields a better mass resolution. ► Fe–O, Cr–O molecular ions were found at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/metal interface; this is an ion evaporation effect.

  14. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  15. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra, E-mail: a.caprile@inrim.it; Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Electromagnetics Division, Torino 10135 (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1–0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  16. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra; Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1-0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  17. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb < DOgb < DFegb < DMggb) and are only one order of magnitude smaller than those evaluated in the supercooled melt. In using a newly derived expression for the bulk self-diffusion coefficient it is concluded that the latter one is driven by the grain boundary contribution as long as the grain size is smaller than a centimeter. In assuming that the electrical conduction at grain boundaries is purely ionic, the macroscopic grain boundary conductivity is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than in molten olivine, and one order of magnitude higher than the lattice conductivity. A consequence is that the conductivity of the olivine polycrystal is dominated by the grain interior contribution as soon as the grain size is larger than a micrometer or so. The grain boundary viscosity has been evaluated from the Green-Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with

  18. Towards the atomic-scale characterization of isolated iron sites confined in a nitrogen-doped graphene matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingfei; Liu, Yun; Li, Haobo [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Li, Lulu [College of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116023 (China); Deng, Dehui [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Yang, Fan, E-mail: fyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China); Bao, Xinhe, E-mail: xhbao@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, 116023 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Local atomic and electronic structure of the Fe-N-C catalyst characterized by STM and STS. • The combination of air-AFM, UHV-STM and DFT calculations for the characterization of powder catalysts. • The selection of solvent is vital to the homogeneous dispersion of powder catalyst on a planar support. - Abstract: Atomic scale characterization of the surface structure of powder catalysts is essential to the identification of active sites, but remains a major challenge in catalysis research. We described here a procedure that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM), operated in air, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), operated in UHV, to obtain the atomic structure and local electronic properties of powder catalysts. The atomically dispersed Fe-N-C catalyst was used as an example, which was synthesized by low temperature ball milling methods. We discussed the effect of solvents in the dispersion of powder catalysts on a planar support, which is key to the subsequent atomic characterization. From the morphology, atomic structure and local electronic properties of the Fe-N-C catalyst, our combined measurements also provide an insight for the effect of ball milling in the preparation of atomically dispersed metal catalysts.

  19. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials' frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-01

    Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  20. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  1. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  2. Nanometer-scale isotope analysis of bulk diamond by atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, R.; Raatz, N.; Meijer, J.; Markham, M.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) combines field emission of atoms with mass spectrometry to reconstruct three-dimensional tomograms of materials with atomic resolution and isotope specificity. Despite significant recent progress in APT technology, application to wide-bandgap materials with strong

  3. Atomic-scale observation of migration and coalescence of Au nanoclusters on YSZ surface by aberration-corrected STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Chen, Chunlin; Huang, Sumei

    2014-07-01

    Unraveling structural dynamics of noble metal nanoclusters on oxide supports is critical to understanding reaction process and origin of catalytic activity in heterogeneous catalysts. Here, we show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy can provide direct atomic-resolution imaging of surface migration, coalescence, and atomic rearrangement of Au clusters on an Y:ZrO₂ (YSZ) support. The high resolution enables us to reveal migration and coalescence process of Au clusters at the atomic scale, and to demonstrate that the coalesced clusters undergo a cooperative atomic rearrangement, which transforms the coherent into incoherent Au/YSZ interface. This approach can help to elucidate atomistic mechanism of catalytic activities and to develop novel catalysts with enhanced functionality.

  4. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tekielak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok 15-424 Poland (Poland); Schäfer, R., E-mail: r.schaefer@ifw-dresden.de [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented.

  5. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity.

  6. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  7. Universal scaling relations for the energies of many-electron Hooke atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriazola, A.; Solanpää, J.; Kylänpää, I.; González, A.; Räsänen, E.

    2017-04-01

    A three-dimensional harmonic oscillator consisting of N ≥2 Coulomb-interacting charged particles, often called a (many-electron) Hooke atom, is a popular model in computational physics for, e.g., semiconductor quantum dots and ultracold ions. Starting from Thomas-Fermi theory, we show that the ground-state energy of such a system satisfies a nontrivial relation: Eg s=ω N4 /3fg s(β N1 /2) , where ω is the oscillator strength, β is the ratio between Coulomb and oscillator characteristic energies, and fg s is a universal function. We perform extensive numerical calculations to verify the applicability of the relation. In addition, we show that the chemical potentials and addition energies also satisfy approximate scaling relations. In all cases, analytic expressions for the universal functions are provided. The results have predictive power in estimating the key ground-state properties of the system in the large-N limit, and can be used in the development of approximative methods in electronic structure theory.

  8. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  9. Atomic-Scale Mechanism of Efficient Hydrogen Evolution at SiC Nanocrystal Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2013-01-03

    Efficient electrochemical hydrogen evolution at ultrathin 3C-SiC nanocrystal electrodes in acid solutions was recently reported, but the atomic-scale mechanism of the reaction was not identified. Here we report quantum mechanical calculations of pertinent reactions and show that the reaction happens at pre-existing hydrogenated surface Si-H sites through a mechanism that is related to the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism that occurs in metals. Here the Heyrovsky reaction occurs as the first step, where an electron from the substrate reacts with a hydronium adsorbed at a Si-H site, creating an H2 molecule and a Si dangling bond. The Volmer reaction follows and regenerates the Si-H. This ordering of reactions is supported by the fact that the hydrogen coverage on SiC electrodes does not depend on the applied voltage, in contrast to the cases of metal electrodes. Moreover, the Volmer reaction, which is a one-step process on metal surface, is a two-step process here. We then show that the rise of the conduction band due to quantum confinement accounts for the fact that only ultrasmall SiC nanocrystals are electrochemically active. We also show that the ability of a Si-H bond to bind a hydronium is essential for the hydrogen evolution to occur at high rate.

  10. Comparative study of the scaling behavior of the Rényi entropy for He-like atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, M.; Abdel-Hady, A.; Nasser, I.

    2017-07-01

    We solve the Schrödinger equation in the spherical or Hylleraas-coordinate systems, and within the framework of the Ritz’s variational principle. The eigenvalues, and the eigenfunctions ψ(r) in r- or Hylleraas-space for the 1s2-state of the He-like atoms as a function of two variational parameters are calculated. Using a simple scaling procedure, we calculate the scaled wavefunction as a function of the nuclear charge Z. Given the density of states, ρ(r), the scaling behavior of the information entropies, e.g., Fisher, Shannon and Rényi’s entropies, with their powers and products, as functions of Z are calculated. Scaled wavefunctions for the 1s2-state of the He-like atoms, with exchange, have been used to study the scaling behavior. Our results agree with the published results. Furthermore, we present a simple logarithmic equation that shows the dependence of information entropies on Z for He-like atoms. The formulation enhances the computational efficiency of the entropies and other related quantities.

  11. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  12. Ab initio calculation of the real contact area on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolloch, M.; Feldbauer, G.; Mohn, P.; Redinger, J.; Vernes, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present an approach to determine the onset of contact between a tip and a surface. The real contact area depending on the distance is calculated using Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The jump to contact, which is often observed in atomic force microscopy experiments, is used as an indicator for the initial point of contact, which in turn is defined by atomic relaxations and thus without the need of external parameters. Within our approach the contact area is estimated by evaluating the zero flux surfaces between the touching Bader atoms, where the necessary electronic density cutoff for the Bader partitioning is calculated to depend on the initial point of contact. Our proposed approach is therefore completely ab initio and we are able to define and calculate the real area of contact without imposing restrictions or free parameters. As a prototype system we choose a tip made of a ten-atom tungsten pyramid above a moiré layer of graphene on an fcc iridium (111) substrate. We find that the contact area depends exponentially on the effective distance between the tip apex and the surface atom directly below within the atomically relaxed nanosystem.

  13. Atomic-scale scanning tunneling microscopy study of plasma-oxidized ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J I; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2003-02-15

    In the present work, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was employed to study the surface modification of ultrahigh modulus carbon fibers at the atomic level by oxygen plasma. As detected by STM, the distinctive feature of the fresh, untreated surface was the general presence of atomic-scale arrangements in different degrees of order (from atomic-sized spots without a clearly ordered disposition to triangular patterns identical to those typical of perfect graphite). Following fiber exposure to the plasma, the STM images showed evidence of the abstraction of carbon atoms from random locations on the fiber surface, giving rise to the development of defects (i.e., structural disorder), which in turn were the places where oxygen could be introduced during and after the plasma etching. It was observed that the most effective treatments in terms of extent of surface structural modification (disordering) and uniform introduction of oxygen were those carried out for just a few ( approximately 3) minutes. Considerably shorter exposures failed to provide a homogeneous modification and many locations on the fiber surface remained unaltered, retaining their original atomic-scale order, whereas longer treatments did not bring about further structural changes to the surface and only led to fiber consumption. These results are consistent with previous X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements on these fibers and provide an atomic-level understanding of the saturation effect observed in the surface oxygen concentration of this and other types of carbon fibers with plasma oxidation. Such understanding may also prove helpful for the accurate control and optimization of fiber-matrix interaction in composite materials.

  14. Atomic mechanism for the growth of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene: theoretical perspective and scanning tunneling microscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianchao; Zhang, Jialin; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most promising approach for producing low-cost, high-quality, and large area graphene. Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for realizing single crystal graphene (SCG) over wafer scale. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations are playing an increasingly important role in revealing the structure of the most stable carbon species, understanding the evolution processes, and disclosing the active sites. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful surface characterization tool to illustrate the real space distribution and atomic structures of growth intermediates during the CVD process. Combining them together can provide valuable information to improve the atomically controlled growth of SCG. Starting from a basic concept of the substrate effect on realizing SCG, this review covers the progress made in theoretical investigations on various carbon species during graphene growth on different transition metal substrates, in the STM study of the structural intermediates on transition metal surfaces, and in synthesizing graphene nanoribbons with atomic-precise width and edge structure, ending with a perspective on the future development of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  15. Atomic-scale structure evolution in a quasi-equilibrated electrochemical process of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have proven to be extremely attractive candidates for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and smart grid in terms of energy density, power density, and service life. Further performance optimization to satisfy ever-increasing demands on energy storage of such applications is highly desired. In most of cases, the kinetics and stability of electrode materials are strongly correlated to the transport and storage behaviors of lithium ions in the lattice of the host. Therefore, information about structural evolution of electrode materials at an atomic scale is always helpful to explain the electrochemical performances of batteries at a macroscale. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows simultaneous imaging of light and heavy elements, providing an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nearly equilibrated local structure of electrode materials after electrochemical cycling at atomic resolution. Recent progress toward unraveling the atomic-scale structure of selected electrode materials with different charge and/or discharge state to extend the current understanding of electrochemical reaction mechanism with the ABF and high angle annular dark field STEM imaging is presented here. Future research on the relationship between atomic-level structure evolution and microscopic reaction mechanisms of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries is envisaged. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  17. Atomic number scaling of the nickel-like soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, H.; Ninomiya, S.; Imani, T. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-30

    The authors report the review of the experimental results obtained at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, of the soft X-ray lasing in various Ni-like ions whose atomic numbers range from 47(Ag) to 66(Dy). The lasing wavelengths are between 14 nm and 5 nm. X-ray lasing in these materials were obtained when the plasma profiles were properly controlled in time and space by irradiation of curved slab targets with multiple laser pulses. They also describe the original work of the atomic physics calculations which provide the transition energies, transition probabilities and other atomic constants for Ni-like ion species whose atomic numbers range from 36 to 92 calculated with GRASP code (multi-configuration Dirac Fock code) and YODA code (relativistic distorted wave code). Based on these atomic constants, they have calculated the kinetics of the population inversion with a simplified rate equation model in conjunction with a one-dimensional hydrodynamic code to find out the desired pumping conditions. They show a possibility for significant improvement in the pumping efficiency with the use of a picosecond laser irradiating a properly configured preformed plasma. Finally, a simplified estimation of the pumping efficiency is described based on the atomic constants and plasma physics issues.

  18. Atomic-scale insight into the origin of pyridine inhibition of MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temel, Burcin; Tuxen, Anders K.; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Basic nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyridine are well known to be inhibitors of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction for the MoS2-based catalysts. From an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, atomic-scale insight...... also at the edges. The calculated DFT energies and simulated STM images allowed us to conclude that these species are pyridinium ions located at the catalytically active brim sites. Furthermore, the DFT results for the vibrational modes of the adsorbed pyridinium species agree well with those observed...... in earlier IR experiments on high surface alumina-supported MoS2 catalyst. The adsorption sites appear to be very similar to the brim sites involved in hydrogenation reactions in HDS. Thus, the combined STM and DFT results provide new atomic-scale insight into the inhibition effect of basic N...

  19. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    2015. 15. Invited. New Insights into Friction and Wear through In-Situ Nanotribology. Joint Symposium of the Surface Science Society of Japan and...and Carpick, R.W. Influence of Surface Passivation on the Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond and Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0053 Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanism that controls the attainment of ultralow friction and wear in carbon based

  20. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Droplet Coalescence Driven Nucleation and Growth at Liquid/Solid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2017-06-27

    Unraveling dynamical processes of liquid droplets at liquid/solid interfaces and the interfacial ordering is critical to understanding solidification, liquid-phase epitaxial growth, wetting, liquid-phase joining, crystal growth, and lubrication processes, all of which are linked to different important applications in material science. In this work, we observe direct in situ atomic-scale behavior of Bi droplets segregated on SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and demonstrate ordered interface and surface structures for the droplets on the oxide at the atomic scale and unravel a nucleation mechanism involving droplet coalescence at the liquid/solid interface. We identify a critical diameter of the formed nanocrystal in stabilizing the crystalline phase and reveal lattice-induced fast crystallization of the droplet at the initial stage of the coalescence of the nanocrystal with the droplet. Further sequential observations show the stepped coalescence and growth mechanism of the nanocrystals at the atomic scale. These results offer insights into the dynamic process at liquid/solid interfaces, which may have implications for many functionalities of materials and their applications.

  1. Origin of the catalytic activity of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles determined from an atomic-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, L S R; Sakata, Osami; Kohara, Shinji; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-09

    The 3-dimensional (3D) atomic-scale structure of newly discovered face-centered cubic (fcc) and conventional hexagonal close packed (hcp) type ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles (NPs) of 2.2 to 5.4 nm diameter were studied using X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling. Atomic PDF based high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements show highly diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns for fcc- and hcp-type Ru NPs. We here report the atomic-scale structure of Ru NPs in terms of the total structure factor and Fourier-transformed PDF. It is found that the respective NPs have substantial structural disorder over short- to medium-range order atomic distances from the PDF analysis. The first-nearest-neighbor peak analyses show a significant size dependence for the fcc-type Ru NPs demonstrating the increase in the peak height due to an increase in the number density as a function of particle size. The bond angle and coordination number (CN) distribution for the RMC-simulated fcc- and hcp-type Ru NP models indicated inherited structural features from their bulk counterparts. The CN analysis of the whole NP and surface of each RMC model of Ru NPs show the low activation energy packing sites on the fcc-type Ru NP surface atoms. Finally, our newly defined order parameters for RMC simulated Ru NP models suggested that the enhancement of the CO oxidation activity of fcc-type NPs was due to a decrease in the close packing ordering that resulted from the increased NP size. These structural findings could be positively supported for synthesized low-cost and high performance nano-sized catalysts and have potential application in fuel-cell systems and organic synthesis.

  2. Micro-Hall magnetometry on a Co-organic chain compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, L.; Simonet, V. E-mail: simonet@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Wernsdorfer, W.; Bogani, L.; Sessoli, R

    2004-05-01

    The static and dynamical properties of Co-organic chains, with strong magnetic anisotropy, are studied by micro-Hall magnetometry. The low-temperature hysteresis cycles are discussed with respect to the helical structure of the chains. Thermally activated relaxation of the magnetization is observed, compatible with the Glauber model for a 1D Ising system.

  3. Pump-Enhanced Continuous-Wave Magnetometry Using Nitrogen-Vacancy Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Sepehr; El-Ella, Haitham A. R.; Hansen, Jørn Otto Bindslev

    2017-01-01

    Ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond are a highly promisingplatform for high-sensitivity magnetometry, whose efficacy is often based onefficiently generating and monitoring magnetic-field dependent infraredfluorescence. Here we report on an increased sensing efficiency with the use ofa...

  4. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs ...

  5. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  6. Large scale structural optimization of trimetallic Cu-Au-Pt clusters up to 147 atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Genhua; Sun, Yan; Wu, Xia; Chen, Run; Wang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    The stable structures of Cu-Au-Pt clusters up to 147 atoms are optimized by using an improved adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA-IC method), in which several motifs, such as decahedron, icosahedron, face centered cubic, sixfold pancake, and Leary tetrahedron, are randomly selected as the inner cores of the starting structures. The structures of Cu8AunPt30-n (n = 1-29), Cu8AunPt47-n (n = 1-46), and partial 75-, 79-, 100-, and 147-atom clusters are analyzed. Cu12Au93Pt42 cluster has onion-like Mackay icosahedral motif. The segregation phenomena of Cu, Au and Pt in clusters are explained by the atomic radius, surface energy, and cohesive energy.

  7. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  8. Reversible 2D Phase Transition Driven By an Electric Field: Visualization and Control on the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, B; van Vörden, D; Graf, P; Robles, R; Abufager, P; Lorente, N; Bobisch, C A; Möller, R

    2016-01-13

    We report on a reversible structural phase transition of a two-dimensional system that can be locally induced by an external electric field. Two different structural configurations may coexist within a CO monolayer on Cu(111). The balance between the two phases can be shifted by an external electric field, causing the domain boundaries to move, increasing the area of the favored phase controllable both in location and size. If the field is further enhanced new domains nucleate. The arrangement of the CO molecules on the Cu surface is observed in real time and real space with atomic resolution while the electric field driving the phase transition is easily varied over a broad range. Together with the well-known molecular manipulation of CO adlayers, our findings open exciting prospects for combining spontaneous long-range order with man-made CO structures such as "molecule cascades" or "molecular graphene". Our new manipulation mode permits us to bridge the gap between fundamental concepts and the fabrication of arbitrary atomic patterns in large scale, by providing unprecedented insight into the physics of structural phase transitions on the atomic scale.

  9. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    Program summaryTitle of program: GRASP92 Catalogue identifier: ADCU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCU_v1_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: no Programming language used: Fortran Computer: IBM POWERstation 320H Operating system: IBM AIX 3.2.5+ RAM: 64M words No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 65 224 No of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 409 198 Distribution format: tar.gz Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADCU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic spectra—atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative decay rates—using a 'fully relativistic' approach. Solution method: Atomic orbitals are assumed to be four-component spinor eigenstates of the angular momentum operator, j=l+s, and the parity operator Π=βπ. Configuration state functions (CSFs) are linear combinations of Slater determinants of atomic orbitals, and are simultaneous eigenfunctions of the atomic electronic angular momentum operator, J, and the atomic parity operator, P. Lists of CSFs are either explicitly prescribed by the user or generated from a set of reference CSFs, a set of subshells, and rules for deriving other CSFs from these. Approximate atomic state functions (ASFs) are linear combinations of CSFs. A variational functional may be constructed by combining expressions for the energies of one or more ASFs. Average level (AL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of all possible ASFs that may be constructed from a set of CSFs; the number of ASFs is then the same as the number, n, of CSFs. Optimal level (OL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of some subset of ASFs; the GRASP92 package is optimized for this latter class of functionals. The composition of an ASF in terms

  10. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  11. Atomic structures and gram scale synthesis of three tetrahedral quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, Alexander N; Yang, Xiaohao; Palmer, Joshua H; LaGrassa, Alexandra L; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J L; Owen, Jonathan S

    2014-07-30

    Luminescent semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) are central to emerging technologies that range from tissue imaging to solid-state lighting. However, existing samples are heterogeneous, which has prevented atomic-resolution determination of their structures and obscured the relationship between their atomic and electronic structures. Here we report the synthesis, isolation, and structural characterization of three cadmium selenide QDs with uniform compositions (Cd35Se20(X)30(L)30, Cd56Se35(X)42(L)42, Cd84Se56(X)56(L)56; X = O2CPh, L = H2N-C4H9). Their UV-absorption spectra show a lowest energy electronic transition that decreases in energy (3.54 eV, 3.26 eV, 3.04 eV) and sharpens as the size of the QD increases (fwhm = 207 meV, 145 meV, 115 meV). The photoluminescence spectra of all three QDs are broad with large Stokes shifts characteristic of trap-luminescence. Using a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis, we determine the structures of their inorganic cores, revealing a series of pyramidal nanostuctures with cadmium terminated {111} facets. Theoretical and experimental studies on these materials will open the door to a deeper fundamental understanding of structure-property relationships in quantum-confined semiconductors.

  12. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  13. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  14. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  15. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Composition and Bonding at Perovskite Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting Kourkoutis, L.

    2010-03-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study buried perovskite oxide heterointerfaces. With the recent addition of 3^rd order and now 5^th order aberration correction, which provides a factor of 100x increase in signal over an uncorrected system, we are now able to record 2D maps of composition and bonding of oxide interfaces at atomic resolution [1]. Here, we present studies of the microscopic structure of oxide/oxide multilayers and heterostructures by STEM in combination with EELS and its effect on the properties of the film. Using atomic-resolution spectroscopic imaging we show that the degradation of the magnetic and transport properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayers correlates with atomic intermixing at the interfaces and the presence of extended defects in the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layers. When these defects are eliminated, metallic ferromagnetism at room temperature can be stabilized in 5 unit cell thick manganite layers, almost 40% thinner than the previously reported critical thickness of 3-5 nm for sustaining metallic ferromagnetism below Tc in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3.[4pt] [1] D.A. Muller, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, M. Murfitt, J.H. Song, H.Y. Hwang, J. Silcox, N. Dellby, O.L. Krivanek, Science 319, 1073-1076 (2008).

  16. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations......, the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width...

  17. Atomic-Scale Time and Space Resolution of Terahertz Frequency Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kim, Ki-Yong; Glownia, James H.

    2008-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and analytics, we find that strain waves of terahertz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. By considering AlN/GaN heterostructures, we show that the radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time dependence of the strain wave with potentially subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution. We demonstrate this phenomenon within the context of high amplitude terahertz frequency strain waves that spontaneously form at the front of shock waves in GaN crystals.

  18. Beyond Magic Numbers: Atomic Scale Equilibrium Nanoparticle Shapes for Any Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, J Magnus; Erhart, Paul

    2017-09-13

    In the pursuit of complete control over morphology in nanoparticle synthesis, knowledge of the thermodynamic equilibrium shapes is a key ingredient. While approaches exist to determine the equilibrium shape in the large size limit (≳10-20 nm) as well as for very small particles (≲2 nm), the experimentally increasingly important intermediate size regime has largely remained elusive. Here, we present an algorithm, based on atomistic simulations in a constrained thermodynamic ensemble, that efficiently predicts equilibrium shapes for any number of atoms in the range from a few tens to many thousands of atoms. We apply the algorithm to Cu, Ag, Au, and Pd particles with diameters between approximately 1 and 7 nm and reveal an energy landscape that is more intricate than previously suggested. The thus obtained particle type distributions demonstrate that the transition from icosahedral particles to decahedral and further into truncated octahedral particles occurs only very gradually, which has implications for the interpretation of experimental data. The approach presented here is extensible to alloys and can in principle also be adapted to represent different chemical environments.

  19. Effective field analysis using the full angular spin-orbit torque magnetometry dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Tomek; Lee, Kyujoon; Krüger, Benjamin; Lo Conte, Roberto; Karnad, Gurucharan V.; Garcia, Karin; Vila, Laurent; Ocker, Berthold; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Kläui, Mathias

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit torques promise ultraefficient magnetization switching used for advanced devices based on emergent quasiparticles such as domain walls and skyrmions. Recently, the spin structure dynamics, materials, and systems with tailored spin-orbit torques are being developed. A method, which allows one to detect the acting torques in a given system as a function of the magnetization direction is the torque magnetometry method based on a higher harmonics analysis of the anomalous Hall effect. Here we show that the effective fields acting on magnetic domain walls that govern the efficiency of their dynamics require a sophisticated analysis taking into account the full angular dependence of the torques. Using a one-dimensional model, we compared the spin-orbit torque efficiencies by depinning measurements and spin torque magnetometry. We show that the effective fields can be accurately determined and we find good agreement. Thus, our method allows us now to rapidly screen materials and predict the resulting quasiparticle dynamics.

  20. A SQUID magnetometry system for a cryogenic neutron electric dipole moment experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S., E-mail: s.henry@physics.ox.ac.uk; Clarke, C.; Cottle, A.; Lynch, A.; Pipe, M.

    2014-11-01

    Precision magnetometry is an essential component of any neutron electric dipole moment experiment in order to correct shifts in the neutron precession frequency due to changes in the magnetic field. We have developed a magnetometry system using 12 SQUID sensors, designed to operate in 0.5 K superfluid helium. The pick-up loops located near the neutron cell are connected to the SQUID sensors by ∼2 m twisted wire pairs. The SQUID readout cables are run via an intermediate stage at 4.2 K. The system has been installed and tested in the cryoEDM apparatus at the ILL, Grenoble, and used to characterise the magnetic environment. Further tests in a suitable low noise environment confirm it meets our requirements.

  1. Nano-scale imaging of chromosomes and DNA by scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Hagiwara, Shoji; Fukushi, Daisuke; Shichiri, Motoharu; Nakao, Hidenobu; Kim, J.-M.; Hirose, Tamaki; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Toshio

    2003-10-15

    Nano-scale structures of the YOYO-1-stained barley chromosomes and lambda-phage DNA were investigated by scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM). This technique enabled precise analysis of fluorescence structural images in relation to the morphology of the biomaterials. The results suggested that the fluorescence intensity does not always correspond to topographic height of the chromosomes, but roughly reflects the local amount and/or density of DNA. Various sizes of the bright fluorescence spots were clearly observed in fluorescence banding-treated chromosomes. Furthermore, fluorescence-stained lambda-phage DNA analysis by SNOM/AFM demonstrated the possibility of nanometer-scale imaging for a novel technique termed nano-fluorescence in situ hybridization (nano-FISH). Thus, SNOM/AFM is a powerful tool for analyzing the structure and the function of biomaterials with higher resolution than conventional optical microscopes.

  2. Ultracold Field Gradient Magnetometry and Transport to Study Correlated Topological Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    magnetism and correlation effects in f-electron systems. This project aims at the discovery of emergent topological phases “beyond band theory.” In order...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Form Approved OMB NO. 0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - Approved for Public ...Release; Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 01-10-2016 1-Jul-2015 30-Jun-2016 Final Report: Ultracold Field Gradient Magnetometry and Transport to Study

  3. Experimental verification of orbital engineering at the atomic scale: Charge transfer and symmetry breaking in nickelate heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Rui, Xue; Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Disa, Ankit S.; Longo, Paolo; Okunishi, Eiji; Walker, Fred; Ahn, Charles H.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Epitaxial strain, layer confinement, and inversion symmetry breaking have emerged as powerful new approaches to control the electronic and atomic-scale structural properties of complex metal oxides. Trivalent rare-earth (RE) nickelate R E NiO3 heterostructures have been shown to be exemplars since the orbital occupancy, degeneracy, and, consequently, electronic/magnetic properties can be altered as a function of epitaxial strain, layer thickness, and superlattice structure. One recent example is the tricomponent LaTiO3-LaNiO3-LaAlO3 superlattice which exhibits charge transfer and orbital polarization as the result of its interfacial dipole electric field. A crucial step towards control of these parameters for future electronic and magnetic device applications is to develop an understanding of both the magnitude and range of the octahedral network's response towards interfacial strain and electric fields. An approach that provides atomic-scale resolution and sensitivity towards the local octahedral distortions and orbital occupancy is therefore required. Here, we employ atomic-resolution imaging coupled with electron spectroscopies and first-principles theory to examine the role of interfacial charge transfer and symmetry breaking in a tricomponent nickelate superlattice system. We find that nearly complete charge transfer occurs between the LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 layers, resulting in a mixed Ni2 +/Ni3 + valence state. We further demonstrate that this charge transfer is highly localized with a range of about 1 unit cell within the LaNiO3 layers. We also show how Wannier-function-based electron counting provides a simple physical picture of the electron distribution that connects directly with formal valence charges. The results presented here provide important feedback to synthesis efforts aimed at stabilizing new electronic phases that are not accessible by conventional bulk or epitaxial film approaches.

  4. Playing pinball with atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely controlling the tip current and distance we make two atom pairs behave like the flippers of an atomic-sized pinball machine. This atomic scale mechanical device exhibits six different configurations.

  5. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  6. Scale-up of electrospray atomization using linear arrays of Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.

    1993-03-01

    Linear arrays of Taylor cones were established on capillary electrode tubes opposite a slotted flat plate counterelectrode to investigate the feasibility of increasing the liquid throughput rate in electrospray atomizers. It was found that individual Taylor cones could be established on each capillary over a wide range of the capillary radius to spacing ratio R/S. The onset potential Vs required to establish the cones varied directly with R/S, but the liquid flow rate per cone and current per cone were nearly independent of R/S for a given overpotential ratio P=V/Vs. Only six working capillaries were used, but the results per cone are applicable to larger arrays of cones since end effects were minimized.

  7. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Atomic-scale chemical imaging of composition and bonding by aberration-corrected microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, D A; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Murfitt, M; Song, J H; Hwang, H Y; Silcox, J; Dellby, N; Krivanek, O L

    2008-02-22

    Using a fifth-order aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which provides a factor of 100 increase in signal over an uncorrected instrument, we demonstrated two-dimensional elemental and valence-sensitive imaging at atomic resolution by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy, with acquisition times of well under a minute (for a 4096-pixel image). Applying this method to the study of a La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayer, we found an asymmetry between the chemical intermixing on the manganese-titanium and lanthanum-strontium sublattices. The measured changes in the titanium bonding as the local environment changed allowed us to distinguish chemical interdiffusion from imaging artifacts.

  9. Atomic-Scale Topographic and Electronic Structure of Graphene Films on Ultraflat Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Zhao, Liuyan; Ghahari, Fereshte; Dean, Cory; Rim, Kwang; Hone, James; Flynn, George; Kim, Philip; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2011-03-01

    Graphene, a unique two-dimensional material, has attracted much attention for its exotic electronic properties. But owing to its nature as a single monolayer, many of these interesting properties depend heavily on the substrate on which the graphene rests. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments offer the unique ability to investigate the effect of the substrate on the surface roughness (via topography maps) as well as the local electronic properties (via spectroscopy maps) of graphene. In this talk we will present such experimental results of graphene on atomically flat insulating substrates such as mica and boron nitride, as well as suspended graphene sheets. We will describe experiments performed both on exfoliated graphene flakes as well as large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

  10. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Li-Yong; Cheng, Yingchun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Li, Qianqian; Dong, Cezhou; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hong-Tao; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Klie, Robert F; Yassar, Reza S

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1[overline]1[overline]1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed.

  11. Atomic Scale Control of Competing Electronic Phases in Ultrathin Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kyle

    2015-03-01

    Ultrathin epitaxial thin films offer a number of unique advantages for engineering the electronic properties of correlated transition metal oxides. For example, atomically thin films can be synthesized to artificially confine electrons in two dimensions. Furthermore, using a substrate with a mismatched lattice constant can impose large biaxial strains of larger than 3% (Δa / a), much larger than can achieved in bulk single crystals. Since these dimensionally confined or strained systems may necessarily be less than a few unit cells thick, investigating their properties and electronic structure can be particularly challenging. We employ a combination of reactive oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate how dimensional confinement and epitaxial strain can be used to manipulate electronic properties and structure in correlated transition metal oxide thin films. We describe some of our recent work manipulating and studying the electronic structure of ultrathin LaNiO3 through a thickness-driven metal-insulator transition between three and two unit cells (Nature Nanotechnology 9, 443, 2014), where coherent Fermi liquid-like quasiparticles are suppressed at the metal-insulator transition observed in transport. We also will describe some recent unpublished work using epitaxial strain to drive a Lifshitz transition in atomically thin films of the spin-triplet ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, where we also can dramatically alter the quasiparticle scattering rates and drive the system towards non-Fermi liquid behavior near the critical point (B. Burganov, C. Adamo, in preparation). Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. Ultrafast atomic-scale visualization of acoustic phonons generated by optically excited quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, Giovanni M; Hu, Jianbo; Liang, Wenxi; Bietti, Sergio; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Carbone, Fabrizio; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of atomic vibrations confined in quasi-zero dimensional systems is crucial from both a fundamental point-of-view and a technological perspective. Using ultrafast electron diffraction, we monitored the lattice dynamics of GaAs quantum dots-grown by Droplet Epitaxy on AlGaAs-with sub-picosecond and sub-picometer resolutions. An ultrafast laser pulse nearly resonantly excites a confined exciton, which efficiently couples to high-energy acoustic phonons through the deformation potential mechanism. The transient behavior of the measured diffraction pattern reveals the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics both within the dots and in the region surrounding them. The experimental results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of a non-Markovian decoherence, according to which the optical excitation creates a localized polaron within the dot and a travelling phonon wavepacket that leaves the dot at the speed of sound. These findings indicate that integration of a phononic emitter in opto-electronic devices based on quantum dots for controlled communication processes can be fundamentally feasible.

  13. Ultrafast atomic-scale visualization of acoustic phonons generated by optically excited quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Vanacore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of atomic vibrations confined in quasi-zero dimensional systems is crucial from both a fundamental point-of-view and a technological perspective. Using ultrafast electron diffraction, we monitored the lattice dynamics of GaAs quantum dots—grown by Droplet Epitaxy on AlGaAs—with sub-picosecond and sub-picometer resolutions. An ultrafast laser pulse nearly resonantly excites a confined exciton, which efficiently couples to high-energy acoustic phonons through the deformation potential mechanism. The transient behavior of the measured diffraction pattern reveals the nonequilibrium phonon dynamics both within the dots and in the region surrounding them. The experimental results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of a non-Markovian decoherence, according to which the optical excitation creates a localized polaron within the dot and a travelling phonon wavepacket that leaves the dot at the speed of sound. These findings indicate that integration of a phononic emitter in opto-electronic devices based on quantum dots for controlled communication processes can be fundamentally feasible.

  14. On the cohesion of fluids and their adhesion to solids: Young's equation at the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Toledano, J-C; Blake, T D; Lambert, P; De Coninck, J

    2017-07-01

    Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we model a 9.2nm liquid bridge between two solid plates having a regular hexagonal lattice and analyse the forces acting at the various interfaces for a range of liquid-solid interactions. Our objective is to study the mechanical equilibrium of the system, especially that at the three-phase contact line. We confirm previous MD studies that have shown that the internal pressure inside the liquid is given precisely by the Laplace contribution and that the solid exerts a global force at the contact line in agreement with Young's equation, validating it down to the nanometre scale, which we quantify. In addition, we confirm that the force exerted by the liquid on the solid has the expected normal component equal to γ lv sinθ 0 , where γ lv is the surface tension of the liquid and θ 0 is the equilibrium contact angle measured on the scale of the meniscus. Recent thermodynamic arguments predict that the tangential force exerted by the liquid on the solid should be equal to the work of adhesion expressed as Wa 0 =γ lv (1+cosθ 0 ). However, we find that this is true only when any layering of the liquid molecules close to liquid-solid interface is negligible. The force significantly exceeds this value when strong layering is present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  16. Atomic scale analysis of phase formation and diffusion kinetics in Ag/Al multilayer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulfadl, Hisham; Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf; Mücklich, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Thin films generally exhibit unusual kinetics leading to chemical reactions far from equilibrium conditions. Binary metallic multilayer thin films with miscible elements show some similar behaviors with respect to interdiffusion and phase formation mechanisms. Interfacial density, lattice defects, internal stresses, layer morphologies and deposition conditions strongly control the mass transport between the individual layers. In the present work, Ag/Al multilayer thin films are used as a simple model system, in which the effects of the sputtering power and the bilayer period thickness on the interdiffusion and film reactions are investigated. Multilayers deposited by DC magnetron sputtering undergo calorimetric and microstructural analyses. In particular, atom probe tomography is extensively used to provide quantitative information on concentration gradients, grain boundary segregations, and reaction mechanisms. The magnitude of interdiffusion was found to be inversely proportional to the period thickness for the films deposited under the same conditions, and was reduced using low sputtering power. Both the local segregation at grain boundaries as well as pronounced non-equilibrium supersaturation effects play crucial roles during the early stages of the film reactions. For multilayers with small periods of 10 nm supersaturation of the Al layers with Ag precedes the polymorphic nucleation and growth of the hcp γ-Ag2Al phase. In larger periods the γ phase formation is triggered at junctions between grain boundaries and layers interfaces, where the pathway to heterogeneous nucleation is local supersaturation. Other Ag-rich phases also form as intermediate phases due to asymmetric diffusion rates of parent phases in the γ phase during annealing.

  17. Role of support-nanoalloy interactions in the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering for tuning catalytic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Wanjala, Bridgid N; Engelhard, Mark H; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-09-12

    The understanding of the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in supported nanosized alloy particles is fundamental for achieving active catalysts by design. This report shows how such knowledge can be obtained by a combination of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fine structure absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis, and how the support-nanoalloy interaction influences the catalytic activity of ternary nanoalloy (platinum-nickel-cobalt) particles on three different supports: carbon, silica, and titania. The reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen is employed as a probe to the catalytic activity. The thermochemical processing of this ternary composition, in combination with the different support materials, is demonstrated to be capable of fine-tuning the catalytic activity and stability. The support-nanoalloy interaction is shown to influence structural and chemical ordering in the nanoparticles, leading to support-tunable active sites on the nanoalloys for oxygen activation in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. A nickel/cobalt-tuned catalytic site on the surface of nanoalloy is revealed for oxygen activation, which differs from the traditional oxygen-activation sites known for oxide-supported noble metal catalysts. The discovery of such support-nanoalloy interaction-enabled oxygen-activation sites introduces a very promising strategy for designing active catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

  18. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years\\' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Atomic-scale study of the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition mechanism in GeTe thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R; Fallica, R; Mokhles Gerami, A; Mølholt, T E; Wiemer, C; Longo, M; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Johnston, K; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Ncube, M; Bharuth-Ram, K; Fanciulli, M; Gislason, H P; Langouche, G; Ólafsson, S; Weyer, G

    2017-08-15

    The underlying mechanism driving the structural amorphous-to-crystalline transition in Group VI chalcogenides is still a matter of debate even in the simplest GeTe system. We exploit the extreme sensitivity of 57Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy, following dilute implantation of 57Mn (T½ = 1.5 min) at ISOLDE/CERN, to study the electronic charge distribution in the immediate vicinity of the 57Fe probe substituting Ge (FeGe), and to interrogate the local environment of FeGe over the amorphous-crystalline phase transition in GeTe thin films. Our results show that the local structure of as-sputtered amorphous GeTe is a combination of tetrahedral and defect-octahedral sites. The main effect of the crystallization is the conversion from tetrahedral to defect-free octahedral sites. We discover that only the tetrahedral fraction in amorphous GeTe participates to the change of the FeGe-Te chemical bonds, with a net electronic charge density transfer of  ~ 1.6 e/a0 between FeGe and neighboring Te atoms. This charge transfer accounts for a lowering of the covalent character during crystallization. The results are corroborated by theoretical calculations within the framework of density functional theory. The observed atomic-scale chemical-structural changes are directly connected to the macroscopic phase transition and resistivity switch of GeTe thin films.

  20. Strain-induced preferential dissolution at the dislocation emergences in MnS: an atomic scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Wang, Y. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2015-08-01

    The long-standing problem of dislocation-preferential dissolution in a crystal has been generally ascribed to the distortion energy stored in the vicinity of the dislocation core. However, due to lack of experimental means, the relationship between the local distortion state and the electrochemical behaviour of a single dislocation has not been established so far. via in situ ex-environment transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we demonstrate that the emergences of both edge and screw dislocations on MnS surfaces are the preferential sites for dissolution of the MnS inclusions within a stainless steel. In addition, we map the strain-induced variation of the standard electrode potential around the edge dislocation by a combination of the aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM and strain-analysis-based mechanochemistry theory. Significantly, our report provides a new approach to investigate the strain-corrosion correlation at an atomic scale.

  1. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Angstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Hartsock, R; Kozina, M; Minitti, M P; Nelson, S; Robinson, J; Sato, T; van Driel, T; Welch, G; Weninger, C; Zhi, D; Bucksbaum, P H

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with time and space resolution of $30~$fs and $0.3$ \\AA . The high spatial fidelity is due to interference between the moving excitation and the static initial charge distribution. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on \\AA ngstrom and femtosecond scales. Coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  2. Atomic scale study of surface orientations and energies of Ti 2 O 3 crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Meng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Blvd, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China; Wang, Zhiguo [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, People' s Republic of China; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2017-10-30

    For nanostructured particles, the faceting planes and their terminating chemical species are two critical factors that govern the chemical behavior of the particle. The surface atomistic structure and termination of the Ti2O3 crystals were analyzed using atomic-scale aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combining with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. STEM imaging reveals that the Ti2O3 crystal are most often faceted along (001), (012), (-114) and (1-20) planes. DFT calculation indicates that the (012) surface with TiO-termination have the lowest cleavage energy and correspondingly the lowest surface energy, indicating that (012) will be the most stable and prevalent surfaces in Ti2O3 nanocrystals. These observations provide insights for exploring the interfacial process involving Ti2O3 nanoparticles.

  3. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for ;production use;, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis.

  4. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  5. Atomic scale engineering of HfO{sub 2}-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-02-14

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO{sub 2} (BaHfO{sub 3}) films and Ti-added BaHfO{sub 3} (BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}38) and BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}90) with respect to monoclinic HfO{sub 2} (k{proportional_to}19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO{sub 3} and {proportional_to}0.8 nm for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} with respect to HfO{sub 2} (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf{sup 4+} ions substitution in BaHfO{sub 3} by Ti{sup 4+} ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO{sub 3} to 700 C for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Future studies need to focus

  6. Wafer-scale single-domain-like graphene by defect-selective atomic layer deposition of hexagonal ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Kim, Sejoon; Kim, Hongbum; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Min, Sung-Wook; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Lim, Seulky; Shin, Hyunjung; Koo, Sang Man; Sung, Myung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also demonstrate how ZnO-stitched CVD graphene can be successfully integrated into wafer-scale arrays of top-gated field-effect transistors on 4-inch Si and polymer substrates, revealing remarkable device-to-device uniformity.Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also

  7. Hybrid optical pumping of K and Rb atoms in a paraffin coated vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Peng, Xiang; Budker, Dmitry; Wickenbrock, Arne; Pang, Bo; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic hybrid optical pumping effects with a radio-frequency-field-driven nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (RF NMOR) scheme are studied in a dual-species paraffin coated vapor cell. By pumping K atoms and probing $^{87}$Rb atoms, we achieve an intrinsic magnetic resonance linewidth of 3 Hz and the observed resonance is immune to power broadening and light-shift effects. Such operation scheme shows favorable prospects for atomic magnetometry applications.

  8. In situ atomic scale mechanical microscopy discovering the atomistic mechanisms of plasticity in nano-single crystals and grain rotation in polycrystalline metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaodong; Wang, Lihua; Yue, Yonghai; Zhang, Ze

    2015-04-01

    In this review, we briefly introduce our in situ atomic-scale mechanical experimental technique (ASMET) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can observe the atomic-scale deformation dynamics of materials. This in situ mechanical testing technique allows the deformation of TEM samples through a simultaneous double-tilt function, making atomic-scale mechanical microscopy feasible. This methodology is generally applicable to thin films, nanowires (NWs), tubes and regular TEM samples to allow investigation of the dynamics of mechanically stressed samples at the atomic scale. We show several examples of this technique applied to Pt and Cu single/polycrystalline specimens. The in situ atomic-scale observation revealed that when the feature size of these materials approaches the nano-scale, they often exhibit "unusual" deformation behaviours compared to their bulk counterparts. For example, in Cu single-crystalline NWs, the elastic-plastic transition is size-dependent. An ultra-large elastic strain of 7.2%, which approaches the theoretical elasticity limit, can be achieved as the diameter of the NWs decreases to ∼6 nm. The crossover plasticity transition from full dislocations to partial dislocations and twins was also discovered as the diameter of the single-crystalline Cu NWs decreased. For Pt nanocrystals (NC), the long-standing uncertainties of atomic-scale plastic deformation mechanisms in NC materials (grain size G less than 15 nm) were clarified. For larger grains with G<∼10 nm, we frequently observed movements and interactions of cross-grain full dislocations. For G between 6 and 10 nm, stacking faults resulting from partial dislocations become more frequent. For G<∼6 nm, the plasticity mechanism transforms from a mode of cross-grain dislocation to a collective grain rotation mechanism. This grain rotation process is mediated by grain boundary (GB) dislocations with the assistance of GB diffusion and shuffling. These in situ atomic-scale images

  9. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  10. On the thermodynamic efficiency of a multiferroic thermomagnetic generator: From bulk to atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Samuel Mancilla

    A unique multiferroic type of thermomagnetic generator is being investigated in order to establish its thermodynamic efficiency at different size scales. This device generates electricity when a magnetic material interacts with a thermal gradient by means of a spring-magnet mechanism. This unique technology is compared to other thermal-electric energy harvesting technologies to show that these devices have a similar goal of achieving a maximum theoretical efficiency of around 50% relative to Carnot. The first approach towards achieving improved performance relies on the analytical modeling, and experimental verification, of several subsystems stemming from the original design, which include the optimization of the magnetic force component, the optimization of the heat transfer process and the efficiency of the energy conversion process. The method to improve the magnetic force component is not recommended and neither is the method to improve the heat transfer process. Nevertheless, the energy conversion subsystem is successfully modeled and verified; thereby suggesting that an electromagnetic induction coil may be better suited for the energy conversion process over a ferroelectric transduction mechanism at bulk scale. A cascade design is also investigated as a method to improve device efficiency; though analysis reveals a design flaw, which leads to other methods for improving efficiency. Two models of thermomagnetic generator thermodynamic efficiency are developed, which are based on distinct approaches taken by Solomon and Brillouin in order to compare this unique system to a Carnot engine. The model based on a modified form of Solomon's approach results in a relative efficiency of 0.5%, which compares well with an estimate of efficiency based on provided data from the original design. This representative model of efficiency was then applied to a survey of pure elements for comparison, which confirms gadolinium as the best material for use as a working body with

  11. Thickness scaling of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films and their application to wafer-scale graphene tunnelling transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Gu, Yeahyun; Heo, Jinseong; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Hyun; Lee, Yunseong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2016-02-10

    The downscaling of the capacitance equivalent oxide thickness (CET) of a gate dielectric film with a high dielectric constant, such as atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO2, is a fundamental challenge in achieving high-performance graphene-based transistors with a low gate leakage current. Here, we assess the application of various surface modification methods on monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapour deposition to obtain a uniform and pinhole-free ALD HfO2 film with a substantially small CET at a wafer scale. The effects of various surface modifications, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone treatment and introduction of sputtered ZnO and e-beam-evaporated Hf seed layers on monolayer graphene, and the subsequent HfO2 film formation under identical ALD process parameters were systematically evaluated. The nucleation layer provided by the Hf seed layer (which transforms to the HfO2 layer during ALD) resulted in the uniform and conformal deposition of the HfO2 film without damaging the graphene, which is suitable for downscaling the CET. After verifying the feasibility of scaling down the HfO2 thickness to achieve a CET of ~1.5 nm from an array of top-gated metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors, we fabricated graphene heterojunction tunnelling transistors with a record-low subthreshold swing value of <60 mV/dec on an 8" glass wafer.

  12. Confirmation by SQUID magnetometry of FMR measurements of magnetization in ultrathin Fe-B amorphous films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Rado, George T.

    1987-04-01

    Direct measurements were made by means of SQUID magnetometry of the magnetization of ultrathin Fe50B50 and Fe70B30 amorphous films at room temperature. The film thicknesses used included most of those investigated in the authors' recent ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) determinations of the surface anisotropy Ks and the magnetization M of such films. The directly measured values of M confirm adequately the M values obtained by computer fitting of a theory to experimental FMR data. Thus, the present experiments offer substantial support for the reliability of the FMR method for measurements of Ks and M in ultrathin films.

  13. Atomic scale characterization of the origin of mobility loss at the silicon carbide/silicon dioxide interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Trinity Leigh

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band gap semiconductor with material properties which make it ideally suited for high temperature, high frequency, and high power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) applications. The wide scale commercial development of these devices has been hindered due to disappointing electron mobility when compared to properties of the bulk material. This mobility loss has been associated with the interface between SiC and the native oxide formed (SiO2). Many improvements in mobility have been realized, but it is currently still significantly less than that of the bulk material. The work in this dissertation is aimed at understanding the origin of this mobility loss from an atomic perspective. Analytical electron microscopy techniques including scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) are used in this study to characterize the 4HSiC/SiO2 interface. The effect of aluminum implantation, nitric oxide annealing, oxidation rate, and activation annealing temperature on the interface was examined. We found a carbon rich transition layer present on the SiC side of the interface which varies in thickness depending on processing conditions. The thickness of this transition region is linearly related to the electron mobility. We were also able to determine that this transition region occurs as a result of the oxidation process. During oxidation, carbon interstitials are emitted on both sides of the interface, causing a carbon pileup on the SiC side of the interface, which we detect as a transition region. The rate of oxidation is also very important as oxidizing at a fast rate leads to greater carbon pileup. The extra carbon in this transition region acts as electron scattering centers, which ultimately lead to a reduced electron mobility. This study is able to directly correlate the microstructure on an atomic

  14. Hierarchical, Dual-Scale Structures of Atomically Thin MoS2 for Tunable Wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Mun, Jihun; Wang, Michael Cai; Ashraf, Ali; Kang, Sang-Woo; Nam, SungWoo

    2017-03-08

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a well-known solid lubricant for low friction surface coatings, has recently drawn attention as an analogue two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene. When patterned to produce vertically grown, nanoflower-structures, MoS2 shows promise as a functional material for hydrogen evolution catalysis systems, electrodes for alkali metal-ion batteries, and field-emission arrays. Whereas the wettability of graphene has been substantially investigated, that of MoS2 structures, especially nanoflowers, has remained relatively unexplored despite MoS2 nanoflower's potential in future applications. Here, we demonstrate that the wettability of MoS2 can be controlled by multiscale modulation of surface roughness through (1) tuning of the nanoflower structures by chemical vapor deposition synthesis and (2) tuning of microscale topography via mechanical strain. This multiscale modulation offers broadened tunability (80-155°) compared to single-scale tuning (90-130°). In addition, surface adhesion, determined from contact angle hysteresis (CAH), can also be tuned by multiscale surface roughness modulation, where the CAH is changed in range of 20-40°. Finally, the wettability of crumpled MoS2 nanoflowers can be dynamically and reversibly controlled through applied strain (∼115-150° with 0-200% strain), and remains robust over 1000 strain cycles. These studies on the tunable wettability of MoS2 will contribute to future MoS2-based applications, such as tunable wettability coatings for desalination and hydrogen evolution.

  15. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  16. "Bottom-up" meets "top-down" : self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2009-04-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 102660 - 'Bottomup' meets 'top-down': Self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns - funded through the Strategic Partnerships investment area as part of the National Institute for Nano-Engineering (NINE) project.

  17. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions : Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Schlathölter, T.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH+) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections

  18. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  19. Atomic-scale structure of biogenic materials by total X-ray diffraction: a study of bacterial and fungal MnOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, V; Ren, Y; Saratovsky, I; Pastén, P; Gurr, S J; Hayward, M A; Poeppelmeier, K R; Gaillard, J-F

    2009-02-24

    Biogenic materials are produced by microorganisms and are typically found in a nanophase state. As such, they are difficult to characterize structurally. In this report, we demonstrate how high-energy X-ray diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis can be used to determine the atomic-scale structures of MnO(x) produced by bacteria and fungi. These structures are well-defined, periodic, and species-specific, built of Mn-O(6) octahedra forming birnessite-type layers and todorokite-type tunnels, respectively. The inherent structural diversity of biogenic material may offer opportunities for practical applications.

  20. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  1. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, C., E-mail: C.Morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T. [School of Computer Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Anh Nguyen, T. N. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Spintronics Research Group, Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT), VNU-HCM, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  2. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  3. Magnetic behavior of NiO nanoparticles determined by SQUID magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Farrakh; Nadeem, Kashif; Weber, Julia; Krenn, Heinz; Knoll, Peter

    2017-08-01

    NiO nanoparticles (4 nm-80 nm diameter) are investigated by SQUID magnetometry. Hysteresis loops at various temperatures and susceptibility versus temperature measurements using field-cooled/zero-field cooled protocols at various magnetic fields are performed. The measurements give evidence for a strong increase of magnetic moments with decreasing size of NiO nanoparticles. From the dependence of the magnetic moment on temperature and external field, blocked superparamagnetism is observed superimposed to the core antiferromagnetism of NiO-particles. A quantitative estimate demonstrates that uncompensated surface spins contribute to a ferromagnetic-like hysteresis modelled by a broad distribution of anisotropy fields at the surface induced by the antiferromagnetic core.

  4. Atom-surface interaction at the nanometre scale: van der Waals-Zeeman transitions in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamda, M.; Boustimi, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Taillandier-Loize, T.; Dutier, G.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.

    2012-04-01

    van der Waals-Zeeman transitions between magnetic states of metastable rare-gas atoms Ar*, Kr* and Xe* (3P2) induced by a solid surface in the presence of a magnetic field, are investigated theoretically and experimentally. By use of a Zeeman slower, metastable argon atoms with various velocities ranging from 170 to 560 m/s allow us to investigate the small impact parameter range (3-7 nm) within which these transitions occur, as well as the effect of atom polarisation on the sharing out of the M states.

  5. xGASS: Total cold gas scaling relations and molecular-to- atomic gas ratios of galaxies in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, Barbara; Saintonge, Amélie; Janowiecki, Steven; Cortese, Luca; Davé, Romeel; Lemonias, Jenna J.; Cooper, Andrew P.; Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron B.; Fabello, Silvia; Geréb, Katinka; Kilborn, Virginia; Wang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    We present the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (xGASS), a gas fraction-limited census of the atomic hydrogen (HI) gas content of 1179 galaxies selected only by stellar mass (M⋆=109 - 1011.5 M⊙) and redshift (0.01 < z < 0.05). This includes new Arecibo observations of 208 galaxies, for which we release catalogs and HI spectra. In addition to extending the GASS HI scaling relations by one decade in stellar mass, we quantify total (atomic+molecular) cold gas fractions and molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios, Rmol, for the subset of 477 galaxies observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that atomic gas fractions keep increasing with decreasing stellar mass, with no sign of a plateau down to log M⋆/M⊙ = 9. Total gas reservoirs remain HI-dominated across our full stellar mass range, hence total gas fraction scaling relations closely resemble atomic ones, but with a scatter that strongly correlates with Rmol, especially at fixed specific star formation rate. On average, Rmol weakly increases with stellar mass and stellar surface density μ⋆, but individual values vary by almost two orders of magnitude at fixed M⋆ or μ⋆. We show that, for galaxies on the star-forming sequence, variations of Rmol are mostly driven by changes of the HI reservoirs, with a clear dependence on μ⋆. Establishing if galaxy mass or structure plays the most important role in regulating the cold gas content of galaxies requires an accurate separation of bulge and disk components for the study of gas scaling relations.

  6. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  7. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Electrochemical Delithiation Induced Structure Evolution of LiCoO2 Cathode in a Working All-Solid-State Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yue; Zhang, Jienan; Jiang, Liwei; Shi, Jin-An; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Zou, Dongli; Wang, Jiangyong; Yu, Xiqian; Xiao, Ruijuan; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan

    2017-03-29

    We report a method for in situ atomic-scale observation of electrochemical delithiation in a working all-solid-state battery using a state-of-the-art chip based in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) holder and focused ion beam milling to prepare an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery sample. A battery consisting of LiCoO2 cathode, LLZO solid state electrolyte and gold anode was constructed, delithiated and observed in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope at atomic scale. We found that the pristine single crystal LiCoO2 became nanosized polycrystal connected by coherent twin boundaries and antiphase domain boundaries after high voltage delithiation. This is different from liquid electrolyte batteries, where a series of phase transitions take place at LiCoO2 cathode during delithiation. Both grain boundaries become more energy favorable along with extraction of lithium ions through theoretical calculation. We also proposed a lithium migration pathway before and after polycrystallization. This new methodology could stimulate atomic scale in situ scanning/TEM studies of battery materials and provide important mechanistic insight for designing better all-solid-state battery.

  8. Playing Pinball with Atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely

  9. Atomic Scale coexistence of Periodic and quasiperiodic order in a2-fold A1-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Young; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Ribeiro,R.A.; Canfield, P.C.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.

    2005-11-14

    Decagonal quasicrystals are made of pairs of atomic planes with pentagonal symmetry periodically stacked along a 10-fold axis. We have investigated the atomic structure of the 2-fold surface of a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The surface consists of terraces separated by steps of heights 1.9, 4.7, 7.8, and 12.6{angstrom} containing rows of atoms parallel to the 10-fold direction with an internal periodicity of 4{angstrom}. The rows are arranged aperiodically, with separations that follow a Fibonacci sequence and inflation symmetry. The results indicate that the surfaces are preferentially Al-terminated and in general agreement with bulk models.

  10. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-04

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  11. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ˜1020 cm-3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed.

  12. Effects of rock wool on the lungs evaluated by magnetometry and biopersistence test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Masayuki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asbestos has been reported to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and its use has been banned all over the world. The related industries are facing an urgent need to develop a safer fibrous substance. Rock wool (RW, a kind of asbestos substitute, is widely used in the construction industry. In order to evaluate the safety of RW, we performed a nose-only inhalation exposure study in rats. After one-month observation period, the potential of RW fibers to cause pulmonary toxicity was evaluated based on lung magnetometry findings, pulmonary biopersistence, and pneumopathology. Methods Using the nose-only inhalation exposure system, 6 male Fischer 344 rats (6 to 10 weeks old were exposed to RW fibers at a target fiber concentration of 100 fibers/cm3 (length [L] > 20 μm for 6 hours daily, for 5 consecutive days. As a magnetometric indicator, 3 mg of triiron tetraoxide suspended in 0.2 mL of physiological saline was intratracheally administered after RW exposure to these rats and 6 unexposed rats (controls. During one second magnetization in 50 mT external magnetic field, all magnetic particles were aligned, and immediately afterwards the strength of their remanent magnetic field in the rat lungs was measured in both groups. Magnetization and measurement of the decay (relaxation of this remanent magnetic field was performed over 40 minutes on 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after RW exposure, and reflected cytoskeleton dependent intracellular transport within macrophages in the lung. Similarly, 24 and 12 male Fisher 344-rats were used for biopersistence test and pathologic evaluation, respectively. Results In the lung magnetometric evaluation, biopersistence test and pathological evaluation, the arithmetic mean value of the total fiber concentration was 650.2, 344.7 and 390.7 fibers/cm3, respectively, and 156.6, 93.1 and 95.0 fibers/cm3 for fibers with L > 20 μm, respectively. The lung magnetometric evaluation revealed that impaired relaxation

  13. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  14. A bound on Planck-scale modifications of the energy-momentum composition rule from atomic interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzano, M.; Kowalski-Glikman, J.; Walkus, A.

    2010-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements in atomic spectroscopy were recently used by Amelino- Camelia et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 103 (2009) 171302) to constraint the form of possible modifications of the energy-momentum dispersion relation resulting from Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). In this letter we

  15. Sub-nano tesla magnetic imaging based on room-temperature magnetic flux sensors with vibrating sample magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke

    2017-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional imaging method for weak magnetic charge distribution using a commercially available magnetic impedance sensor whose magnetic field resolution is 10 pT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz. When we applied the vibrating sample magnetometry, giving a minute mechanical vibration to the sample and detecting magnetic signals modulated by the vibration frequency, the effects of 1/f noise and the environmental low-frequency band noise were suppressed, and a weak magnetic charge distribution was obtained without magnetic shielding. Furthermore, improvement in the spatial resolution was also expected when the signals were demodulated at the second harmonic frequency of the vibration. In this paper, a preliminary magnetic charge imaging using the vibrating sample magnetometry and its results are demonstrated.

  16. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V A

    2017-11-14

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  17. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  18. A Comparative Study of the Second-Order Hydrophobic Moments for Globular Proteins: The Consensus Scale of Hydrophobicity and the CHARMM Partial Atomic Charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Jen Lee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the second-order hydrophobic moment for fifteen globular proteins in 150 nonhomologous protein chains was performed in a comparative study involving two sets of hydrophobicity: one selected from the consensus scale and the other derived from the CHARMM partial atomic charges. These proteins were divided into three groups, based on their number of residues (N and the asphericity (δ. Proteins in Group I were spherical and those in Groups II and III were prolate. The size of the proteins is represented by the mean radius of gyration (Rg, which follows the Flory scaling law, Rg ∝ Nv. The mean value of v was 0.35, which is similar to a polymer chain in a poor solvent. The spatial distributions of the second-order moment for each of the proteins, obtained from the two sets of hydrophobicity, were compared using the Pearson correlation coefficient; the results reveal that there is a strong correlation between the two data sets for each protein structure when the CHARMM partial atomic charges, |qi|  ≥ 0.3, assigned for polar atoms, are used. The locations at which these distributions vanish and approach a negative value are at approximately 50% of the percentage of solvent accessibility, indicating that there is a transition point from hydrophobic interior to hydrophilic exterior in the proteins. This may suggest that there is a position for the proteins to determine the residues at exposed sites beyond this range.

  19. Transport and torque magnetometry measurements on CeAuSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lishan; Yelland, Edward; Bruin, Jan; Sakai, Hide; Sheikin, Ilya; MacKenzie, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The tetragonal crystal CeAuSb2 has a layered structure and orders antiferromagnetically at T ~ 6K. Under a c-axis magnetic field, the Neel temperature is gradually suppressed to zero at a possible field-tuned quantum critical point at about 6 T. Within this antiferromagnetic phase, between the QCP and about 2.8 T, there is an additional, novel phase. We report transport measurements on pure single crystals of CeAuSb2, in fields of up to 35 T and from room temperature down to 100 mK. We also report torque magnetometry measurements. Unlike a recent report, we find single, sharp transitions into the novel phase. We discuss the nature of the novel phase. The work presented is supported by TOPNES(Topological Protection and Non-Equilibrium States in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems research programme), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, UK) and Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids(Dresden, Germany) etc.

  20. A Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry study of magnetic multilayers and oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bland, J

    2002-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of thin films, multilayers and oxides has been performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The systems studied are DyFe sub 2 , HoFe sub 2 and YFe sub 2 cubic Laves Phase thin films, DyFe sub 2 /Dy and DyFe sub 2 /YFe sub 2 multilayers; Ce/Fe and U/Fe multilayers; and iron oxide powders and thin films. CEMS results at room temperature show a low symmetry magnetic easy axis for all of the Laves Phase samples studied. Analysis of the dipolar and contact hyperfine fields show that this axis is close to the [2-bar41] and [3-bar51] directions but cannot be fully determined. The spin moments lie out of plane in all samples by approximately 22 deg, indicating a significant magneto-elastic anisotropy. 2.5 kG inplane applied field measurements indicate a much larger magnitude of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the DyFe sub 2 system than in the YFe sub 2 system. In the DyFe sub 2 /YFe sub 2 multilayer samples the anisotropy is dominated by the dysprosium single-io...

  1. Direct observation of temperature-driven magnetic symmetry transitions by vectorial resolved MOKE magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuñado, Jose Luis F.; Pedrosa, Javier; Ajejas, Fernando; Perna, Paolo; Miranda, Rodolfo; Camarero, Julio

    2017-10-01

    Angle- and temperature-dependent vectorial magnetometry measurements are necessary to disentangle the effective magnetic symmetry in magnetic nanostructures. Here we present a detailed study on an Fe(1 0 0) thin film system with competing collinear biaxial (four-fold symmetry) and uniaxial (two-fold) magnetic anisotropies, carried out with our recently developed full angular/broad temperature range/vectorial-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer, named TRISTAN. The data give direct views on the angular and temperature dependence of the magnetization reversal pathways, from which characteristic axes, remanences, critical fields, domain wall types, and effective magnetic symmetry are obtained. In particular, although the remanence shows four-fold angular symmetry for all investigated temperatures (15 K-400 K), the critical fields show strong temperature and angular dependencies and the reversal mechanism changes for specific angles at a given (angle-dependent) critical temperature, showing signatures of an additional collinear two-fold symmetry. This symmetry-breaking is more relevant as temperature increases to room temperature. It originates from the competition between two anisotropy contributions with different symmetry and temperature evolution. The results highlight the importance of combining temperature and angular studies, and the need to look at different magnetic parameters to unravel the underlying magnetic symmetries and temperature evolutions of the symmetry-breaking effects in magnetic nanostructures.

  2. Volumetric localization of epileptic activities in tuberous sclerosis using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zheng [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Xiang, Jing [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hunjan, Amrita; Sharma, Rohit; Otsubo, Hiroshi [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a novel noninvasive technique for localizing epileptic zones. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is often associated with medically refractory epilepsy with multiple epileptic zones. Surgical treatment of TSC requires accurate localization of epileptogenic tubers. The objective of this study was to introduce a new MEG technique, synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM), to volumetrically localize irritable zones and clarify the correlations between SAM, dipole modeling and anatomical tubers. Eight pediatric patients with TSC confirmed by clinical and neuroimaging findings were retrospectively studied. MEG data were recorded using a whole-cortex CTF OMEGA system. Sleep deprivation was employed to provoke epileptiform activity. Irritable zones were localized using both dipole modeling and SAM. MRI detected 42 tubers in the eight patients. Dipole modeling localized 28 irritable zones, and 19 out of the 28 zones were near tubers (19/42, 45%). SAM found 51 irritable zones, and 31 out of the 51 zones were near tubers (31/42, 74%). Among the 51 irritable zones determined by SAM, thirty-five zones were in 1-35 Hz, nine zones were in 35-60 Hz, and seven zones were in 60-120 Hz. The new method, SAM, yielded very plausible equivalent sources for patients who showed anatomical tubers on MRI. Compared to conventional dipole modeling, SAM appeared to offer increased detection of irritable zones and beneficial volumetric and frequency descriptions. (orig.)

  3. Pump-Enhanced Continuous-Wave Magnetometry Using Nitrogen-Vacancy Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Sepehr; El-Ella, Haitham A. R.; Hansen, Jørn O. B.; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2017-09-01

    Ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond are a highly promising platform for high-sensitivity magnetometry, whose efficacy is often based on efficiently generating and monitoring magnetic-field-dependent infrared fluorescence. Here, we report on an increased sensing efficiency with the use of a 532-nm resonant confocal cavity and a microwave resonator antenna for measuring the local magnetic noise density using the intrinsic nitrogen-vacancy concentration of a chemical-vapor deposited single-crystal diamond. We measure a near-shot-noise-limited magnetic noise floor of 200 pT /√{Hz } spanning a bandwidth up to 159 Hz, and an extracted sensitivity of approximately 3 nT /√{Hz } , with further enhancement limited by the noise floor of the lock-in amplifier and the laser damage threshold of the optical components. Exploration of the microwave and optical pump-rate parameter space demonstrates a linewidth-narrowing regime reached by virtue of using the optical cavity, allowing an enhanced sensitivity to be achieved, despite an unoptimized collection efficiency of low nitrogen-vacancy concentration of about 0.2 ppb.

  4. High Resolution Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Atomic Scale: CO on Au(110) and Cu(100), and C2H2 on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Jiang, Chilun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, Wilson

    2012-11-01

    STM-IETS has been regarded as the ultimate tool to identify and characterize single molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with atomic spatial resolution. With the improvement of the energy resolution obtained at ˜600 mK, STM-IETS is able to reveal subtle interactions between the molecule and its environment which was previously not possible at higher temperatures. Here we demonstrate the capability of sub-Kelvin STM on detecting the influence of the tip as well as the anisotropy of the reconstructed Au(110) surface on the low energy hindered vibrational motions of single adsorbed CO molecule. In the case of acetylene, more vibrational modes are resolved due to the enhanced spectral resolution. Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with atomic scale spatial resolution opens new possibilities to probe molecular interactions with high spectral resolution.

  5. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Choi, P; Goto, S; Borchers, C; Raabe, D; Kirchheim, R

    2013-09-01

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic-Scale Structure and Local Chemistry of CoFeB-MgO Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; McKenna, Keith P; Fukami, Shunsuke; Sato, Hideo; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-03-09

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) constitute a promising building block for future nonvolatile memories and logic circuits. Despite their pivotal role, spatially resolving and chemically identifying each individual stacking layer remains challenging due to spatially localized features that complicate characterizations limiting understanding of the physics of MTJs. Here, we combine advanced electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations to obtain a direct structural and chemical imaging of the atomically confined layers in a CoFeB-MgO MTJ, and clarify atom diffusion and interface structures in the MTJ following annealing. The combined techniques demonstrate that B diffuses out of CoFeB electrodes into Ta interstitial sites rather than MgO after annealing, and CoFe bonds atomically to MgO grains with an epitaxial orientation relationship by forming Fe(Co)-O bonds, yet without incorporation of CoFe in MgO. These findings afford a comprehensive perspective on structure and chemistry of MTJs, helping to develop high-performance spintronic devices by atomistic design.

  7. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  8. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  9. Atomic-scale characterization of the equilibrium β phase in Mg-Nd-Y alloy by means of HAADF-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingxu; Chen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    The β phase in Mg-Nd-Y alloy, which forms during isothermal ageing, is proved to be Mg41 Nd5 by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results as compositional evidence and by atomic-scaled high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) direct images from [001]β , [111¯]β, and [3¯11]β as structural evidence. SCANNING 38:743-746, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A perfect wetting of Mg monolayer on Ag(111) under atomic scale investigation: First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaou, Amani; Sarpi, Brice; Guiltat, Mathilde; Payen, Kevin; Daineche, Rachid; Landa, Georges; Vizzini, Sébastien; Hémeryck, Anne

    2016-05-01

    First principles calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy experiments of the adsorption of Mg on Ag(111) substrate are conducted. This detailed study reveals that an atomic scale controlled deposition of a metallic Mg monolayer perfectly wets the silver substrate without any alloy formation at the interface at room temperature. A liquid-like behavior of the Mg species on the Ag substrate is highlighted as no dot formation is observed when coverage increases. Finally a layer-by-layer growth mode of Mg on Ag(111) can be predicted, thanks to density functional theory calculations as observed experimentally.

  11. The atomic-scale mechanism for the enhanced glass-forming-ability of a Cu-Zr based bulk metallic glass with minor element additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Liu, C T; Yang, Y; Liu, J B; Dong, Y D; Lu, J

    2014-04-11

    It is known that the glass forming-ability (GFA) of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be greatly enhanced via minor element additions. However, direct evidence has been lacking to reveal its structural origin despite different theories hitherto proposed. Through the high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, here we show that the content of local crystal-like orders increases significantly in a Cu-Zr-Al BMG after a 2-at% Y addition. Contrasting the previous studies, our current results indicate that the formation of crystal-like order at the atomic scale plays an important role in enhancing the GFA of the Cu-Zr-Al base BMG.

  12. Diamond-like atomic-scale composite films: Surface properties and stability studied by STM and AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfman, B.; Abraizov, M. [SUNY, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Pollak, F.H. [CUNY, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Eby, R. [TopoMetrix, Bedminster, NJ (United States); Rong, Z.Y. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Strongin, M.; Yang, X.Q. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Amorphous ``diamond-like/quartz-like`` composites a-(C:H/Si:O) and metal containing a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) constitute a novel class of diamond-related materials with a number of unique bulk and surface properties. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the surface properties and stability of these solids we have performed a scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy investigation of both a-(C:H/Si:O) and a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) films, including the effects of ion bombardment and annealing.

  13. Towards an understanding of microstructure of patterned FePt dots by magnetometry using pulse fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Z.J., E-mail: yanzhj@lzu.edu.cn [VBL of Akita University, Gakuen Machi 1-1, Tegata, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Takahashi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishio, S. [VBL of Akita University, Gakuen Machi 1-1, Tegata, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Kondo, Y.; Ariake, J. [Akita Research Institute of Advanced Technology (AIT), 4-21 Sanuki, Araya, Akita 010-1623 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    FePt nanodot arrays are patterned and investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements and magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometry combined with pulse magnetic fields. The experimental results on varied timescale of the applied field are analyzed by Sharrock's formula, showing the emergence of hard and soft magnetic FePt grains with distinct perpendicular anisotropy. While the hard grains in L1{sub 0}-phase can construct the FePt dots with intrinsic perpendicular anisotropy fields around 90 kOe, the exchange coupling between the hard and soft grains in other dots degrades the dot perpendicular coercivity and widens the array switching field distribution, in both the 100 and 30 nm dot arrays. The dot size dependence of the proportion of the hard dot in the array demonstrates that the soft grains originate from the FePt grains of L1{sub 0}-phase with large c-axis misaligning and of fcc phase inside the dots, and the ion etching effects are insignificant. - Highlights: • Patterned FePt dot arrays are studied by XMCD and MOKE with pulse fields. • Results on varied timescale of the applied field indicate the dot microstructure. • Hard magnetic grains are in the L1{sub 0}-phase with perpendicular cell c-axis. • Hard magnetic dots with PMA fields around 90 kOe are found in the 100 and 30 nm dots. • Exchange coupling between the hard and soft grains degrades the soft dot coercivity.

  14. Atomic scale studies of La/Sr ordering in La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Roldan, Manuel

    2016-12-21

    Many fascinating properties of materials depend strongly on the local chemical environment. This is the case for many complex oxides, such as materials with colossal magnetoresistance, where small variations of composition at the atomic scale can affect drastically the macroscopic properties. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the local chemical composition with atomic resolution and to find out if any underlying chemical order is in any way connected to the magnetic properties of double perovskite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (LSMO) manganite oxides. For these compounds, charge and orbital ordering are observed for some doping values near x = 0.50 [1, 2]. For this purpose, we have use aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements and also theoretical simulations. We have compared different compositions within three distinct magnetic regions of the phase diagram: a ferromagnetic metallic sample with x=0.36, an insulating, antiferromagnetic (AF) x=0.56 and an additional AF x=0.50 sample which also exhibits charge ordering. High angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images, also known as Z-contrast, confirm that our single crystals exhibit high crystal quality. No secondary phases or defects are observed. Figure 1 displays an atomic resolution image obtained with the c-axis perpendicular to the electron beam of a x=0.50 sample. The perovskite (P)-like planes and the rock salt (R)-like planes are clearly observed, highlighted in green and red, respectively, on the image. The P-like planes exhibit a slightly high contrast, suggesting a possible La enrichment. EELS atomic resolution maps (inset) support a high degree of La segregation on those planes, while R-like planes are Sr rich. However, due to dechanneling of the beam, detailed image simulations are essential to accurately quantify the local chemical composition in an atomic column-by-atomic column fashion. For all our

  15. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  16. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  17. Very large-scale structures in sintered silica aerogels as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Marliere, C; Etienne, P; Woignier, T; Dieudonné, P; Phalippou, J

    2001-01-01

    During the last few years the bulk structure of silica aerogels has been extensively studied mainly by scattering techniques (neutrons, X-rays, light). It has been shown that small silica particles aggregate to constitute a fractal network. Its spatial extension and fractal dimension are strongly dependent on the synthesis conditions (e.g., pH of gelifying solutions). These typical lengths range from 1 to 10 nm. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments have been carried out on aerogels at different steps of densification. The results presented in this paper reveal the existence of a spatial arrangement of the solid part at a very large length scale. The evolution of this very large-scale structure during the densification process has been studied and reveals a contraction of this macro-structure made of aggregates of clusters. (16 refs).

  18. Large-scale analysis of high-speed atomic force microscopy data sets using adaptive image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake W. Erickson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern high-speed atomic force microscopes generate significant quantities of data in a short amount of time. Each image in the sequence has to be processed quickly and accurately in order to obtain a true representation of the sample and its changes over time. This paper presents an automated, adaptive algorithm for the required processing of AFM images. The algorithm adaptively corrects for both common one-dimensional distortions as well as the most common two-dimensional distortions. This method uses an iterative thresholded processing algorithm for rapid and accurate separation of background and surface topography. This separation prevents artificial bias from topographic features and ensures the best possible coherence between the different images in a sequence. This method is equally applicable to all channels of AFM data, and can process images in seconds.

  19. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  20. Measurement and deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dot using an atomic force microscope with a nanopipette probe in liquid condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, So; Yamazaki, Koji; Iwata, Futoshi

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we developed novel techniques of nanometer-scale measurement and deposition using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a nanopipette in liquid condition. The nanopipette, filled with CuSO4 electrolyte solution, was employed as the AFM probe. Observation and deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dots were carried out using the nanopipette probe. In order to avoid drying of the nanopipette solution and clogging of the probe-edge aperture, Cu dots were deposited and measured in liquid condition. As for the measurement of the surface, the nanopipette probe was glued on a tuning fork quartz crystal resonator (TF-QCR) to detect a probe oscillation and vertically oscillated to use a method of frequency modulation in tapping-mode AFM. With regard to the deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dot, an electrode wire inside the electrolyte-filled nanopipette and conductive surface of Au coated glass slide were employed as the anode and cathode, respectively. By utilizing the probe-surface distance control during the deposition, nanometerscale Cu dot were successfully deposited on Au surface without the diffusion. Then, the deposited dots were observed by using the nanopipette probe. This technique of the local deposition in the liquid would be applicable for various fields such as fabrication of micro/nanometer-scale devices and arrangement of biological samples.

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy Mechanical Mapping of Micropatterned Cells Shows Adhesion Geometry-Dependent Mechanical Response on Local and Global Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigato, Annafrancesca; Rico, Felix; Eghiaian, Frédéric; Piel, Mathieu; Scheuring, Simon

    2015-06-23

    In multicellular organisms, cell shape and organization are dictated by cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix adhesion interactions. Adhesion complexes crosstalk with the cytoskeleton enabling cells to sense their mechanical environment. Unfortunately, most of cell biology studies, and cell mechanics studies in particular, are conducted on cultured cells adhering to a hard, homogeneous, and unconstrained substrate with nonspecific adhesion sites, thus far from physiological and reproducible conditions. Here, we grew cells on three different fibronectin patterns with identical overall dimensions but different geometries (▽, T, and Y), and investigated their topography and mechanics by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The obtained mechanical maps were reproducible for cells grown on patterns of the same geometry, revealing pattern-specific subcellular differences. We found that local Young's moduli variations are related to the cell adhesion geometry. Additionally, we detected local changes of cell mechanical properties induced by cytoskeletal drugs. We thus provide a method to quantitatively and systematically investigate cell mechanics and their variations, and present further evidence for a tight relation between cell adhesion and mechanics.

  2. Atomic scale insight into the amorphous structure of Cu doped GeTe phase-change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linchuan; Sa, Baisheng; Zhou, Jian; Song, Zhitang; Sun, Zhimei

    2014-10-01

    GeTe shows promising application as a recording material for phase-change nonvolatile memory due to its fast crystallization speed and extraordinary amorphous stability. To further improve the performance of GeTe, various transition metals, such as copper, have been doped in GeTe in recent works. However, the effect of the doped transition metals on the stability of amorphous GeTe is not known. Here, we shed light on this problem for the system of Cu doped GeTe by means of ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Our results show that the doped Cu atoms tend to agglomerate in amorphous GeTe. Further, base on analyzing the pair correlation functions, coordination numbers and bond angle distributions, remarkable changes in the local structure of amorphous GeTe induced by Cu are obviously seen. The present work may provide some clues for understanding the effect of early transition metals on the local structure of amorphous phase-change compounds, and hence should be helpful for optimizing the structure and performance of phase-change materials by doping transition metals.

  3. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  4. Atomic scale insight into the amorphous structure of Cu doped GeTe phase-change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Linchuan; Sa, Baisheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhou, Jian; Sun, Zhimei, E-mail: zmsun@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Integrated Computational Materials Engineering, International Research Institute for Multidisciplinary Science, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Song, Zhitang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-System and Information Technology, CAS, 200050 Shanghai (China)

    2014-10-21

    GeTe shows promising application as a recording material for phase-change nonvolatile memory due to its fast crystallization speed and extraordinary amorphous stability. To further improve the performance of GeTe, various transition metals, such as copper, have been doped in GeTe in recent works. However, the effect of the doped transition metals on the stability of amorphous GeTe is not known. Here, we shed light on this problem for the system of Cu doped GeTe by means of ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Our results show that the doped Cu atoms tend to agglomerate in amorphous GeTe. Further, base on analyzing the pair correlation functions, coordination numbers and bond angle distributions, remarkable changes in the local structure of amorphous GeTe induced by Cu are obviously seen. The present work may provide some clues for understanding the effect of early transition metals on the local structure of amorphous phase-change compounds, and hence should be helpful for optimizing the structure and performance of phase-change materials by doping transition metals.

  5. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  6. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  7. Advances in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for investigating soil wettability states and soil organic matter (SOM) properties at the nano-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid; Van Keulen, Geertje; Matthews, Peter; Dudely, Edward; Whalley, Richard; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kathryn; Ashton, Rhys; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Many environmental processes that have a major impact at the field-scale are determined by events occurring at the micro- and nanometer scales. Due to technical challenges, soil has only relatively recently been the focus of nanoscale studies. Recent advances in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) now allow the characterization of natural soil samples both topographically, mechanically and chemically at the micro- to nanometer scale. To date AFM has been used for analysing materials that occur in soil ex-situ, such as minerals and organic matter as individual components; however its application to complete natural soil material has been very limited. Here we report on applications of AFM for mechanically and topographically characterising soil aggregates. Mechanical properties of interest are Young's modulus, surface deformation, adhesion and chemical mapping, all of which allow for gaining information on soil nano-mechanical properties that have implications for particle wettability. This presentation includes (i) a brief summary of recent advances in AFM capabilities and applications relevant to studying soil materials, and (ii) our latest findings in soil profiling for wettable and repellent soils, and the role of soil organic matter in affecting soil topographical and mechanical properties.

  8. Force dependence of energy barriers in atomic friction and single-molecule force spectroscopy: critique of a critical scaling relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneev, M; Reimann, P

    2015-04-01

    Friction force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy are experimental methods to explore multistable energy landscapes by means of a controlled reduction of the energy barriers between adjacent potential minima. This affects the system's interstate transition rates proportional to e(-ΔE(f)/kBT), with ΔE(f) being the barrier height, k(B)T the thermal energy, and f the elastic force applied. It is often assumed that, at large forces, the barrier height scales as (f(c) - f)(3/2), where f(c) is the critical force, at which the barrier vanishes. We show that, for the elastic forces produced by a pulling device of finite stiffness κ, this scaling relation is actually incorrect. Rather, the barrier is a double-valued function of force of the form E(f) ∝ (κ/κ(c) ±√1 − f/f(0))(3), where f(0) is the maximal force that the system potential can generate, and the characteristic stiffness κ(c) is not necessarily much larger than κ. In particular, for finite κ, the barrier vanishes at a certain force f(κ) force f0 can still be reached. We derive the relation between the most probable force at the moment of transition, fm, and the pulling velocity, v. The usually assumed scaling f(m) ∝ (ln v)(2/3) is recovered as the κ → 0 limit of our more general result, but becomes increasingly worse as κ grows. We introduce a new data analysis method that allows one to quantitatively characterize the system potential and evaluate the stiffness of the pulling device, κ, which is usually not known beforehand. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by analyzing the results of a numerical experiment based on the standard Prandtl-Tomlinson model of nanoscale friction.

  9. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gundappa, Mohan

    2013-07-01

    A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) by using Magnifying Loupes (ML) and dental operating microscope (DOM). A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided), Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i) evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii) presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii) elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD) and Chi-square test. Statistically significant (P Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  10. High-temperature operating 894.6nm-VCSELs with extremely low threshold for Cs-based chip scale atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhang, Jian; Ning, Yongqiang; Qin, Li; Wang, Lijun

    2015-06-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of 894.6nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with extremely low threshold at high temperatures, for use in chip-scale Cs atomic clocks. A new design method based on the analysis of the threshold gain and the desired carrier density for different active region structures was proposed to gain the low transparent current density. The increase of the threshold current at higher temperatures was successfully suppressed by introducing the large gain-cavity detuning of VCSEL. By detuning the gain-cavity mode to be -11nm, the minimum threshold current of only 0.23mA at 70 °C was achieved. The operating temperature for emitting the wavelength of 894.6nm was 110 °C, with the single mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of more than 25dB and the threshold current of only 0.32mA.

  11. Integrated evaluation of the geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, southernmost Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Leo A.; Savian, Jairo F., E-mail: leo.hartmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Lopes, William R. [Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Gerencia de Geologia e Mineracao

    2016-03-15

    An integrated evaluation of geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield is permitted by the advanced stage of understanding of the geology and geochronology of the southern Brazilian Shield and a 2010 airborne geophysical survey. Gamma rays are registered from the rocks near the surface and thus describe the distribution of major units in the shield, such as the Pelotas batholith, the juvenile São Gabriel terrane, the granulite-amphibolite facies Taquarembo terrane and the numerous granite intrusions in the foreland. Major structures are also observed, e.g., the Dorsal de Cangucu shear. Magnetic signals register near surface crustal compositions (analytic signal) and total crust composition (total magnetic signal), so their variation as measured indicates either shallow or whole crustal structures. The Cacapava shear is outstanding on the images as is the magnetic low along the N-S central portion of the shield. These integrated observations lead to the deepening of the understanding of the largest and even detailed structures of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, some to be correlated to field geology in future studies. Most significant is the presence of different provinces and their limits depending on the method used for data acquisition - geology, aero gamma spectrometry or aero magnetometry. (author)

  12. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  13. Effect of composition and pressure on the shear strength of sodium silicate glasses: An atomic scale simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Gergely; Ganster, Patrick; Tanguy, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The elastoplastic behavior of sodium silicate glasses is studied at different scales as a function of composition and pressure, with the help of quasistatic atomistic simulations. The samples are first compressed and then sheared at constant pressure to calculate yield strength and permanent plastic deformations. Changes occurring in the global response are then compared to the analysis of local plastic rearrangements and strain heterogeneities. It is shown that the plastic response results from the succession of well-identified localized irreversible deformations occurring in a nanometer-size area. The size and the number of these local rearrangements, as well as the amount of internal deviatoric and volumetric plastic deformation, are sensitive to the composition and to the pressure. In the early stages of the deformation, plastic rearrangements are driven by sodium mobility. Consequently, the elastic yield strength decreases when the sodium content increases, and the same when pressure increases. Finally, good correlation was found between global and local stress-strain relationships, reinforcing again the role of sodium ions as local initiators of the plastic behavior observed at larger scales.

  14. High attenuation in MgSiO3 post-perovskite due to [100] dislocation glide under D'' conditions: an atomic scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Carrez, P.

    2016-12-01

    Dislocation motion in crystalline materials represents one of the most efficient mechanisms to produce plastic shear, the key mechanism for CPO development. Previous atomistic simulations show that MgSiO3 ppv is characterized by remarkably low lattice friction opposed to the glide of straight [100] screw dislocations in (010), while glide in (001) requires one order of magnitude larger stress values [1]. At finite temperature, dislocation glide occurs through nucleation and propagation of kink-pairs, i.e. dislocation does not move as a straight line, but partly bows out over the Peierls potential. We propose a theoretical study of a kink-pair formation mechanism for [100] screw dislocations in MgSiO3 ppv employing the line tension (LT) model [2] in conjunction with ab-initio atomic-scale modeling. The dislocation line tension, which plays a key role in dislocation dynamics, is computed at atomic scale as the energy increase resulting from individual atomic displacements due to the nucleation of a bow out. The estimated kink-pair formation enthalpy gives an access to evolution of critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) with temperature. Our results clearly demonstrate that at the lower mantle conditions, lattice friction in ppv vanishes for temperatures above ca. 600 K, i.e. ppv deforms in the athermal regime in contrast to the high-lattice friction bridgmanite [3]. Moreover, in the Earth's mantle, high-pressure Mg-ppv can be expected to be as ductile as MgO. Our simulations demonstrate that ppv contributes to a weak layer at the base of the mantle which is likely to promote alignment of (010) planes. In addition to that, we show that the high mobility of [100] dislocations results in a decrease of the apparent shear modulus (up to 15%) which contributes to a decrease of the shear wave velocity of about 7% and suggest that ppv induces energy dissipation and strong seismic attenuation in the D" layer. References[1] Goryaeva A, Carrez Ph & Cordier P (2015) Modeling

  15. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    measurements. The results provide a platform for further development of microkinetic models of FTS on Fe and a basis for more precise modeling of FTS activity of Fe catalysts. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on various realistic models of industrial, Fe-based FTS catalysts. Close-packed, most stable Fe(110) facet was analyzed and subsequently carbide formation was found to be facile leading to the choice of the FeC(110) model representing a Fe facet with a sub-surface C atom. The Pt adatom (Fe{sup Pt}(110)) was found to be the most stable model for our studies into Pt promotion and finally the role of steps was elucidated by recourse to the defected Fe(211) facet. Binding Energies(BEs), preferred adsorption sites and geometries for all FTS relevant stable species and intermediates were evaluated on each model catalyst facet. A mechanistic model (comprising of 32 elementary steps involving 19 species) was constructed and each elementary step therein was fully characterized with respect to its thermochemistry and kinetics. Kinetic calculations involved evaluation of the Minimum Energy Pathways (MEPs) and activation energies (barriers) for each step. Vibrational frequencies were evaluated for the preferred adsorption configuration of each species with the aim of evaluating entropy-changes, pre exponential factors and serving as a useful connection with experimental surface science techniques. Comparative analysis among these four facets revealed important trends in their relative behavior and roles in FTS catalysis. Overall the First Principles Calculations afforded us a new insight into FTS catalysis on Fe and modified-Fe catalysts.

  16. Nano-scale Biophysical and Structural Investigations on Intact and Neuropathic Nerve Fibers by Simultaneous Combination of Atomic Force and Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Liashkovich, Ivan; Young, Peter; Shahin, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The links between neuropathies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), including Charcot-Marie-Tooth1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, and impaired biomechanical and structural integrity of PNS nerves remain poorly understood despite the medical urgency. Here, we present a protocol describing simultaneous structural and biomechanical integrity investigations on isolated nerve fibers, the building blocks of nerves. Nerve fibers are prepared from nerves harvested from wild-type and exemplary PNS neuropathy mouse models. The basic principle of the designed experimental approach is based on the simultaneous combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy. AFM is used to visualize the surface structure of nerve fibers at nano-scale resolution. The simultaneous combination of AFM and confocal microscopy is used to perform biomechanical, structural, and functional integrity measurements at nano- to micro-scale. Isolation of sciatic nerves and subsequent teasing of nerve fibers take ~45 min. Teased fibers can be maintained at 37°C in a culture medium and kept viable for up to 6 h allowing considerable time for all measurements which require 3–4 h. The approach is designed to be widely applicable for nerve fibers from mice of any PNS neuropathy. It can be extended to human nerve biopsies. PMID:28912683

  17. Nano-scale Biophysical and Structural Investigations on Intact and Neuropathic Nerve Fibers by Simultaneous Combination of Atomic Force and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Rosso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The links between neuropathies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, and impaired biomechanical and structural integrity of PNS nerves remain poorly understood despite the medical urgency. Here, we present a protocol describing simultaneous structural and biomechanical integrity investigations on isolated nerve fibers, the building blocks of nerves. Nerve fibers are prepared from nerves harvested from wild-type and exemplary PNS neuropathy mouse models. The basic principle of the designed experimental approach is based on the simultaneous combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM and confocal microscopy. AFM is used to visualize the surface structure of nerve fibers at nano-scale resolution. The simultaneous combination of AFM and confocal microscopy is used to perform biomechanical, structural, and functional integrity measurements at nano- to micro-scale. Isolation of sciatic nerves and subsequent teasing of nerve fibers take ~45 min. Teased fibers can be maintained at 37°C in a culture medium and kept viable for up to 6 h allowing considerable time for all measurements which require 3–4 h. The approach is designed to be widely applicable for nerve fibers from mice of any PNS neuropathy. It can be extended to human nerve biopsies.

  18. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  19. Coherence of the Geomagnetic Field and Implications for Noise Reduction Using Mesospheric Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    321 funded FASORtronics LLC to demonstrate the ability to measure high-altitude magnetic fields using ground - based laser-excitation of Sodium ions in...with the University of Arizona to demonstrate the ability to measure high-altitude magnetic fields using ground -based laser-excitation of Sodium ions...beam resonant with high-altitude Sodium atoms. A full description of the FASORtronics equipment, experimental setup, calibration, etc. is beyond the

  20. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  1. Atomic and Molecular Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    Atomic Quantum Memories in Nano-Scale Optical Circuits: Jeff Kimble, Oskar Painter (CalTech) • Demonstration of a nanofiber atom trap: A. Goban...et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 033603 (2012) • Cavity QED with atomic mirrors: D. Chang, et al, N. J. Phys. 14, 063003 (2012) • Fiber -coupled chip... PMMA -diamond hybrid cavities, coupling stable NV centers • Cavity Optomechanics with Cold Atoms: Dan Stamper-Kurn (UC Berkeley) • Squeezed light

  2. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  3. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  4. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  5. Disordered Nanohole Patterns in Metal-Insulator Multilayer for Ultra-broadband Light Absorption: Atomic Layer Deposition for Lithography Free Highly repeatable Large Scale Multilayer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Amir; Hajian, Hodjat; Dereshgi, Sina Abedini; Bozok, Berkay; Butun, Bayram; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2017-11-08

    In this paper, we demonstrate a facile, lithography free, and large scale compatible fabrication route to synthesize an ultra-broadband wide angle perfect absorber based on metal-insulator-metal-insulator (MIMI) stack design. We first conduct a simulation and theoretical modeling approach to study the impact of different geometries in overall stack absorption. Then, a Pt-Al2O3 multilayer is fabricated using a single atomic layer deposition (ALD) step that offers high repeatability and simplicity in the fabrication step. In the best case, we get an absorption bandwidth (BW) of 600 nm covering a range of 400 nm-1000 nm. A substantial improvement in the absorption BW is attained by incorporating a plasmonic design into the middle Pt layer. Our characterization results demonstrate that the best configuration can have absorption over 0.9 covering a wavelength span of 400 nm-1490 nm with a BW that is 1.8 times broader compared to that of planar design. On the other side, the proposed structure retains its absorption high at angles as wide as 70°. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced multilayer designs where a simple fabrication step can boost the overall device response without changing its overall thickness and fabrication simplicity.

  6. Photocatalytic mechanism of high-activity anatase TiO2 with exposed (001) facets from molecular-atomic scale: HRTEM and Raman studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Shi, Chentian; Zhang, Yupeng; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2017-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 with a variant percentage of exposed (001) facets was prepared under hydrothermal processes by adjusting the volume of HF, and the photocatalytic mechanism was studied from atomic-molecular scale by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy. It was revealed that: 1) From HRTEM observations, the surface of original TiO2 with exposed (001) facets was clean without impurity, and the crystal lattice was clear and completed; however, when mixed with methylene blue (MB) solution, there were many 1 nm molecular absorbed at the surface of TiO2; after the photocatalytic experiment, MB molecules disappeared and the TiO2 lattice image became fuzzy. 2) The broken path of the MB chemical bond was obtained by Raman spectroscopy, i.e., after the irradiation of the light, the vibrational mode of C-N-C disappeared due to the chemical bond breakage, and the groups containing C-N bond and carbon rings were gradually decomposed. Accordingly, we propose that the driving force for breaking the chemical bond and the disappearance of groups is from the surface lattice distortion of TiO2 during photocatalyzation.

  7. Atomic scale structure of the 5-fold surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal: A quantitative X-Ray photoelectron diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Huan, C.H.A.; Wee, A.T.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.; Shi, F.J.; Rotenberg, E.; Barman, S.R.; Paggel, J.J.; Horn, K.; Ebert, Ph.; Urban, K.

    2004-02-11

    The atomic scale structure of the 5-fold symmetric surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal is investigated quantitatively by comparing x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) simulations to experiment. The observed 5-fold symmetry of the diffraction patterns indicates that the surface is quasicrystalline with no hint of a reconstruction from the bulk structure. In analyzing the experimental data, many possible bulk terminations have been tested. Those few that fit best to the data have in common that they contain an Al-rich surface layer followed by a dense mixed Al/Pd/Mn layer. These best terminations, while not identical to each other, are suggested to form terraces coexisting on a real surface. Structural relaxations of the quasicrystal surface are also analyzed: mixing several best-fit terminations gives average best-fit interlayer spacing changes of Dd12 = -0.057 Angstrom, Dd24 = +0.159 Angstrom. These results are in good agreement with a prior structure determination by LEED on a sample that was prepared in a different manner.

  8. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Modern radio-optical methods in quantum magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Evgenii B.; Vershovskii, Anton K.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is an extension of a part of the talk delivered under the more general title "Narrow spectral lines in fundamental metrology: state of the art, prospects, and problems"' at the session of the 90th anniversary of Physics-Uspekhi. The talk reviewed past developments and the current status of the metrology of length, frequency/time, and magnetic fields. The measurement of these quantities currently relies on the high stability of energies of standard transitions between metastable atomic states. Because of space restrictions in the journal, all metrology topics other than the title one were omitted in the present review.

  9. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  10. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  11. A robust method for quantitative identification of ordered cores in an ensemble of biomolecular structures by non-linear multi-dimensional scaling using inter-atomic distance variance matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    Superpositioning of atoms in an ensemble of biomolecules is a common task in a variety of fields in structural biology. Although several automated tools exist based on previously established methods, manual operations to define the atoms in the ordered regions are usually preferred. The task is difficult and lacks output efficiency for multi-core proteins having complicated folding topology. The new method presented here can systematically and quantitatively achieve the identification of ordered cores even for molecules containing multiple cores linked with flexible loops. In contrast to established methods, this method treats the variance of inter-atomic distances in an ensemble as information content using a non-linear (NL) function, and then subjects it to multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) to embed the row vectors in the inter-atomic distance variance matrix into a lower dimensional matrix. The plots of the identified atom groups in a one or two-dimensional map enables users to visually and intuitively infer well-ordered atoms in an ensemble, as well as to automatically identify them by the standard clustering methods. The performance of the NL-MDS method has been examined for number of structure ensembles studied by nuclear magnetic resonance, demonstrating that the method can be more suitable for structural analysis of multi-core proteins in comparison to previously established methods.

  12. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  13. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  14. Separation of atomic-scale spin contrast on NiO(0 0 1) by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-10-01

    In magnetic exchange force microscopy, images contain the topographic contrast mixed with the spin contrast on the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance to extract only the spin contrast. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by ferromagnetic resonance to separate the spin contrast and topographic contrast. We succeeded in obtaining a spin image of Ni atoms on a NiO (0 0 1) surface. Furthermore, we successfully detected the superexchange interaction between the tip apex atom and the second layer of Ni atoms.

  15. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  16. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  17. Application of SQUIDs to low temperature and high magnetic field measurements—Ultra low noise torque magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F.; Naumann, M.; Lühmann, Th.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Hassinger, E.

    2018-02-01

    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque resolving powers in excess of 104 are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers via Wheatstone-type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 200 mK. By using a two-stage superconducting-quantum interference device as a null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of Δm = 4 × 10-15 J/T at maximal field and 700 mK, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO2, was used to show the superior performance of our setup.

  18. Vectorial magnetometry and anisotropy studies on thin Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films using MOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschel, Timo; Wollschlaeger, Joachim [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastr. 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a powerful tool to determine magnetic properties of thin magnetic films. In some cases this technique is only applied to detect magnetization curves qualitatively. In order to perform a quantitative analysis we present MOKE measurements with s- and p-polarized incident light, using an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the plane of incidence of light and different orientations of the crystalline substrate. The processing of the data includes vectorial magnetometry as well as studies of the anisotropy constants and magnetic axes. The investigated Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films o f 50 nm thickness on MgO(001) are prepared with different annealing temperatures (RT up to 400 C). On the one hand the films with lower annealing tempe ratures show typical magnetic reversal processes of samples with four-fold symmetry as expected for cubic crystal structures. On the other hand the film annealed at 400 C presents an additional strong in-plane anisotropy, which is discussed in context of a classical free energy approach.

  19. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Spemann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe3C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T – a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  20. Atomic scale high-angle annular dark field STEM analysis of the N configuration in dilute nitrides of GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, M. [University of California, Davis; Ramasse, Q. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Morgan, D. G. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Gonzalez, D. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Pizarro, J. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Yanez, A. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Galindo, P. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Garcia, R. [University of Cadiz, Spain; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL; Zhang, S. B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Hopkinson, M. [University of Sheffield; Browning, N. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2009-01-01

    While high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) has been successfully used for the analysis of heavy atoms in a lighter matrix, the detection of light atoms in a heavy matrix remains challenging. In this paper, we show that the combination of first-principles total-energy calculations with aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM experimental and simulated images can be used to overcome this problem. The application of this methodology to the analysis of dilute nitrides of GaAs points to the existence of a major proportion of (2N{sub As})nn in the alloy, which is a relatively stable configuration in GaAsN as revealed by our energetic calculations. Our study has allowed us to shed light in the effect of the local distortion of the lattice due to different configuration of atoms in HAADF-STEM imaging.

  1. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use...... of accelerators for producing intense positron pulses will be discussed in the context of atomic physics experiments....

  2. High dynamic range magnetometry with a single nuclear spin in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldherr, Gerald; Beck, Johannes; Neumann, Philipp; Nitsche, Matthias; Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Said, Ressa S. [Institut fuer Quanten-Informationsverarbeitung, Universitaet Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Twamley, Jason [Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Jelezko, Fedor [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Universitaet Ulm, 89073 Ulm (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Sensors based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond are being developed to measure weak magnetic and electric fields at nanoscale. However, such sensors rely on measurements of a shift in the Lamor frequency of the defect, so an accumulation of quantum phase causes the measurement signal to exhibit a periodic modulation. This means that the measurement time is either restricted to half of one oscillation period, which limits accuracy, or that the magnetic field range must be known in advance. Moreover, the precision increases only slowly, as T{sup -0.5}, with the measurement time T. We implement a quantum phase estimation algorithm on a single nuclear spin in diamond to combine both high sensitivity and high dynamic range. By achieving a scaling of the precision with time to T{sup -0.85}, we improve the sensitivity by a factor of 7.4, for an accessible field range of 16 mT, or alternatively, we improve the dynamic range by a factor of 130 for a sensitivity of 2.5 {mu}T/Hz{sup 0.5}. These methods are applicable to a variety of field detection schemes, and do not require entanglement.

  3. Three-dimensional atomic-scale investigation of ZnO-MgxZn1-xO m-plane heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Russo, E.; Mancini, L.; Moyon, F.; Moldovan, S.; Houard, J.; Julien, F. H.; Tchernycheva, M.; Chauveau, J. M.; Hugues, M.; Da Costa, G.; Blum, I.; Lefebvre, W.; Blavette, D.; Rigutti, L.

    2017-07-01

    The structural, compositional, and optical properties of ZnO/MgxZn1-xO m-plane heterostructures are investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy, laser-assisted atom probe tomography, and micro-photoluminescence. Coupled with electron tomography, atom probe tomography is currently the only technique providing a 3D reconstruction of the position of the atoms of a nanoscale specimen with their chemical nature. The multi-quantum well system investigated exhibits a V-groove grating profile along the a-axis accompanied by the formation of Zn- and Mg-enriched regions corresponding to the edges pointing towards the substrate and towards the upper surface, respectively. The optical signature of these heterostructures has been investigated by performing micro-photoluminescence on atom probe tip specimens. Effective mass calculations based on the 3D microscopy data indicate that the quantum well geometry and barrier composition yield a localization of hole states at the bottom of the V-groove.

  4. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  5. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-05-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures.

  6. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  7. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of ... method of producing radioactive isotopes, which are materials .... the sealing and the pressure balancing, all can be carried out ...

  8. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toofanny Rudesh D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Results Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster. For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster. Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36% was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. Conclusions The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery

  9. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  10. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  11. Measurement Error in Atomic-Scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy—Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) Mapping of a Model Oxide Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurgeon, Steven R.; Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2017-04-05

    Abstract

    With the development of affordable aberration correctors, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies of complex interfaces can now be conducted at high spatial resolution at laboratories worldwide. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in particular has grown in popularity, as it enables elemental mapping over a wide range of ionization energies. However, the interpretation of atomically resolved data is greatly complicated by beam–sample interactions that are often overlooked by novice users. Here we describe the practical factors—namely, sample thickness and the choice of ionization edge—that affect the quantification of a model perovskite oxide interface. Our measurements of the same sample, in regions of different thickness, indicate that interface profiles can vary by as much as 2–5 unit cells, depending on the spectral feature. This finding is supported by multislice simulations, which reveal that on-axis maps of even perfectly abrupt interfaces exhibit significant delocalization. Quantification of thicker samples is further complicated by channeling to heavier sites across the interface, as well as an increased signal background. We show that extreme care must be taken to prepare samples to minimize channeling effects and argue that it may not be possible to extract atomically resolved information from many chemical maps.

  12. Measurement Error in Atomic-Scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) Mapping of a Model Oxide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Steven R; Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A

    2017-06-01

    With the development of affordable aberration correctors, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies of complex interfaces can now be conducted at high spatial resolution at laboratories worldwide. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in particular has grown in popularity, as it enables elemental mapping over a wide range of ionization energies. However, the interpretation of atomically resolved data is greatly complicated by beam-sample interactions that are often overlooked by novice users. Here we describe the practical factors-namely, sample thickness and the choice of ionization edge-that affect the quantification of a model perovskite oxide interface. Our measurements of the same sample, in regions of different thickness, indicate that interface profiles can vary by as much as 2-5 unit cells, depending on the spectral feature. This finding is supported by multislice simulations, which reveal that on-axis maps of even perfectly abrupt interfaces exhibit significant delocalization. Quantification of thicker samples is further complicated by channeling to heavier sites across the interface, as well as an increased signal background. We show that extreme care must be taken to prepare samples to minimize channeling effects and argue that it may not be possible to extract atomically resolved information from many chemical maps.

  13. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of coupled dynamics of flow and glycocalyx: towards understanding atomic events on an endothelial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi Zhuo; Gong, Haipeng; Luo, Kai Hong; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2017-12-01

    The glycocalyx has a prominent role in orchestrating multiple biological processes occurring at the plasma membrane. In this paper, an all-atom flow/glycocalyx system is constructed with the bulk flow velocity in the physiologically relevant ranges for the first time. The system is simulated by molecular dynamics using 5.8 million atoms. Flow dynamics and statistics in the presence of the glycocalyx are presented and discussed. Complex dynamic behaviours of the glycocalyx, particularly the sugar chains, are observed in response to blood flow. In turn, the motion of the glycocalyx, including swing and swirling, disturbs the flow by altering the velocity profiles and modifying the vorticity distributions. As a result, the initially one-dimensional forcing is spread to all directions in the region near the endothelial cell surface. Furthermore, the coupled dynamics exist not only between the flow and the glycocalyx but also within the glycocalyx molecular constituents. Shear stress distributions between one-dimer and three-dimer cases are also conducted. Finally, potential force transmission pathways are discussed based on the dynamics of the glycocalyx constituents, which provides new insight into the mechanism of mechanotransduction of the glycocalyx. These findings have relevance in the pathologies of glycocalyx-related diseases, for example in renal or cardiovascular conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Microwave Digestion and Furnace Atomic Absorption Method for the Quantification of Nano-scale TiO2 in Aqueous Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many nanomaterials posses physical, and potentially biological, activity that is unique relative to their macro-scaled or soluble forms. One such property is surface plasmon resonance; a phenomenon that can generate or facilitate photoreactivity. Optimization of these properties ...

  15. Atomic scale simulations of hydrogen implantation defects in hydrogen implanted silicon - smart Cut technology; Simulations a l'echelle atomique des defauts de l'implantation de l'hydrogene en silicium - technologie smart Cut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilteanu, L.

    2010-12-15

    The topic of this thesis is related to the implantation step of the SmartCut{sup TM} technology. This technology uses hydrogen in order to transfer silicon layers on insulating substrates. The transfer is performed through a fracture induced by the formation of bidimensional defects well known in literature as 'platelets'. More exactly, we have studied within this thesis work the defects appearing in the post implant state and the evolution of the implantation damage towards a state dominated by platelets. The study is organised into two parts: in the first part we present the results obtained by atomic scale simulations while in the second part we present an infrared spectroscopy study of the evolution of defects concentrations after annealing at different temperatures. The atomic scale simulations have been performed within the density functional theory and they allowed us to compute the formation energies and the migration and recombination barriers. The defects included in our study are: the atomic and diatomic interstitials, the hydrogenated vacancies and multi-vacancies and the several platelets models. The obtained energies allowed us to build a stability hierarchy for these types of defects. This scheme has been confronted with some infrared analysis on hydrogen implanted silicon samples (37 keV) in a sub-dose regime which does not allow usually the formation of platelets during the implantation step. The analysis of the infrared data allowed the detailed description of the defects concentration based on the behaviour of peaks corresponding to the respective defects during annealing. The comparison between these evolutions and the energy scheme obtained previously allowed the validation of an evolution scenario of defects towards the platelet state. (author)

  16. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  17. Atomic-Scale Origin of the Quasi-One-Dimensional Metallic Conductivity in Strontium Niobates with Perovskite-Related Layered Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Yin, Deqiang; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Lichtenberg, Frank; Ma, Xiuliang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Bednorz, Johannes Georg

    2017-12-26

    The quasi-one-dimensional (1D) metallic conductivity of the perovskite-related SrnNbnO3n+2 compounds is of continuing fundamental physical interest as well as being important for developing advanced electronic devices. The SrnNbnO3n+2 compounds can be derived by introducing additional oxygen into the SrNbO3 perovskite. However, the physical origin for the transition of electrical properties from the three-dimensional (3D) isotropic conductivity in SrNbO3 to the quasi-1D metallic conductivity in SrnNbnO3n+2 requires more in-depth clarification. Here we combine advanced transmission electron microscopy with atomistic first-principles calculations to unambiguously determine the atomic and electronic structures of the SrnNbnO3n+2 compounds and reveal the underlying mechanism for their quasi-1D metallic conductivity. We demonstrate that the local electrical conductivity in the SrnNbnO3n+2 compounds directly depends on the configuration of the NbO6 octahedra in local regions. These findings will shed light on the realization of two-dimensional (2D) electrical conductivity from a bulk material, namely by segmenting a 3D conductor into a stack of 2D conducting thin layers.

  18. Characterization of surface oxides on water-atomized steel powder by XPS/AES depth profiling and nano-scale lateral surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasoglou, D.; Hryha, E.; Norell, M.; Nyborg, L.

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of oxide products on the surface of water-atomized steel powder is essential in order to determine the reducing conditions required for their removal during the sintering stage which in turn will result in improved mechanical properties. Pre-alloyed powder with 3 wt% Cr and 0.5 wt% Mo was chosen as the model material. Investigation of the powder surface characteristics with regard to composition, morphology, size and distribution of surface oxides was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. The analysis revealed that the powder is covered by a homogeneous (˜6 nm thick) Fe-oxide layer to ˜94% whereas the rest is covered by fine particulate features with the size below 500 nm. These particulates were further analyzed and were divided into three main categories (i) Cr-based oxides with simultaneous presence of nitrogen, (ii) Si-based oxides of "hemispherical" shape and (iii) agglomerates of the afore mentioned oxides.

  19. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  20. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  1. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, K.

    1979-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K shell of Ar, and electron capture by alpha particles from He are considered. Using the experimental data, a function of the capture cross section is formed. It is shown that when this function is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energies, at high energies a straight line is obtained. At lower energies the line is concave up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile and/or the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High-energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  2. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  3. Multiplicity of atomic reconfigurations in an electrochemical Pb single-atom transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, F.-Q.; Lin, X.-H.; Gross, A.; Evers, F.; Pauly, F.; Schimmel, Th.

    2017-05-01

    One focus of nanoelectronics research is to exploit the physical limits in size and energy efficiency. Here, we demonstrate a device in the form of a fully metallic atomic-scale transistor based on a lead (Pb) single-atom quantum point contact. The atomic configuration of the point contact determines the conductance of the Pb atomic-scale transistor. The conductance multiplicity of the Pb single-atom transistor has been confirmed by performing switching between an electrically nonconducting "off-state" and conducting "on-states" at 1 G0( G0=2 e2/h , where e is the electron charge, and h Planck's constant), 2.0 G0, 3.0 G0, 1.5 G0, 2.4 G0, 2.7 G0, 2.8 G0, and 5.4 G0, respectively. Our density-functional calculations for various ideal Pb single-atom contacts explain the atomic-configuration-related conductance multiplicity of the Pb single-atom transistor. The performance of the Pb single-atom transistors indicates that both the signatures of atomic valence and conductance quantization play roles in electron transport and bistable reconfiguration. The bistable reconfiguration of the electrode tips is an underlying mechanism in the switching of the Pb atomic-scale transistors. The absolute value of the electrochemical potential applied to the gate electrode is less than 30 mV. This merit suggests Pb [besides silver (Ag)] atomic-scale transistors as potential candidates for the development of electronic circuits with low power consumption. The dimension of the switching unit in the Pb single-atom transistor is in the range of 1 nm, which is much smaller than the projected scaling limit of the gate lengths in silicon transistors (5 nm). Therefore, the metallic single-atom transistors may provide perspectives for electronic applications beyond silicon.

  4. Atom Probe Tomography and Its Application to Refractory Metal Nuggets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P. A.; Forman, L. V.; Reddy, S. M.; Rickard, W. D. A.; Saxey, D. W.; La Fontaine, A.; Yang, L.; Trimby, P. W.; Cairney, J.; Ringer, S.; Schaefer, B. F.

    2016-08-01

    Atom probe tomography is capable of achieving atomic resolution. This allows us to accurately measure the chemistry of refractory metal nuggets in situ, revealing nanometre scale variations in their chemistry and the presence of sulphur in the alloy.

  5. Atom-by-Atom Construction of a Quantum Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Jason R

    2017-03-28

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) are conventionally used to probe surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent advances in STM include tunneling from spin-polarized and superconducting tips, time-domain spectroscopy, and the fabrication of atomically precise Si nanoelectronics. In this issue of ACS Nano, Tettamanzi et al. probe a single-atom transistor in silicon, fabricated using the precision of a STM, at microwave frequencies. While previous studies have probed such devices in the MHz regime, Tettamanzi et al. probe a STM-fabricated device at GHz frequencies, which enables excited-state spectroscopy and measurements of the excited-state lifetime. The success of this experiment will enable future work on quantum control, where the wave function must be controlled on a time scale that is much shorter than the decoherence time. We review two major approaches that are being pursued to develop spin-based quantum computers and highlight some recent progress in the atom-by-atom fabrication of donor-based devices in silicon. Recent advances in STM lithography may enable practical bottom-up construction of large-scale quantum devices.

  6. Teach us atom structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Suh Yeon

    2006-08-15

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  7. Clarifying atomic weights: A 2016 four-figure table of standard and conventional atomic weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Meyers, Fabienne; Holden, Norman E.

    2017-01-01

    To indicate that atomic weights of many elements are not constants of nature, in 2009 and 2011 the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) replaced single-value standard atomic weight values with atomic weight intervals for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium); for example, the standard atomic weight of nitrogen became the interval [14.00643, 14.00728]. CIAAW recognized that some users of atomic weight data only need representative values for these 12 elements, such as for trade and commerce. For this purpose, CIAAW provided conventional atomic weight values, such as 14.007 for nitrogen, and these values can serve in education when a single representative value is needed, such as for molecular weight calculations. Because atomic weight values abridged to four figures are preferred by many educational users and are no longer provided by CIAAW as of 2015, we provide a table containing both standard atomic weight values and conventional atomic weight values abridged to four figures for the chemical elements. A retrospective review of changes in four-digit atomic weights since 1961 indicates that changes in these values are due to more accurate measurements over time or to the recognition of the impact of natural isotopic fractionation in normal terrestrial materials upon atomic weight values of many elements. Use of the unit “u” (unified atomic mass unit on the carbon mass scale) with atomic weight is incorrect because the quantity atomic weight is dimensionless, and the unit “amu” (atomic mass unit on the oxygen scale) is an obsolete term: Both should be avoided.

  8. Control the fear atomic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Gwan [I and Book, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-15

    This book has a lot of explanation of nuclear energy with articles. Their titles are the bad man likes atomic, the secret of atom, nuclear explosion, NPT?, the secret of uranium fuel rod, nuclear power plant vs nuclear bomb, I hate atomic, keep plutonium in control, atomic in peace and find out alternative energy.

  9. A nanoscale quantum interface for single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecke, Tobias; Thompson, Jeff; Feist, Johannes; Yu, Chun; Akimov, Alexey; Chang, Darrick; Zibrov, Alexander; Vuletic, Vladan; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2012-02-01

    Neutral atoms are ideal quantum systems: they have long ground-state coherence times and strong optical cycling transitions that enable state detection and preparation. Building quantum networks of atoms interacting through photons is challenging, however, as many schemes for atom-photon interaction are inefficient or hard to scale. We propose a scheme to trap neutral atoms near silver nanowires, which are tightly confining waveguides for surface plasmons. The nanowire tip is used to generate a near-field optical trapping potential, and to enhance and efficiently collect spontaneous emission from the atom. We present experimental results on using the atom to sense the optical field at submicron distances from the wire and our current efforts towards loading the nanotrap.

  10. Atomic-Scale Principles of Combustion Nanocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Molecules", W. L. Whetten , J. Khoury, I. Vezmar, S. Murthy, C. L. Cleveland, W. D. Luedtke, U. Landman, Adv. Mater. 8, 428 (1996), that served as a guide...Yoon, R. N. Barnett, R. L. Whetten , U. Landman, and R. Jin “Total Structure of the Golden Nanocrystal Au36(SR)24 “, Angew. Chem. Int Ed. 51, 13114...2012). 10. I. Chakraborty, A. Govindarajan, J.Erusappan, A. Ghosh, T. Pradeep, B.Yoon, R. L. Whetten , and U. Landman “The Superstable 25-kDa

  11. Continuum Mechanics at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    stress is singular at t=o bu* also the stored elastic energy. For that reason we are forced to consider the Polution valid only in a hollow cylinder...Diego Dept. of Applied Mechanics Prof. W.D. Pilkey La Jolla, California 92037 University of Virginia Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Prof. William A...University of California, LA School of Engineering & Applied Science Prof. J,. D. Achenbach Los Angeles, California 90024 Northwestern University Dept. of

  12. Atomic iodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program.

  13. Weak Ferromagnetic Response of d Electrons and Antiferromagnetic Response of π Electrons in TPP[Mn(Pc)(CN)2]2 in Torque Magnetometry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torizuka, Kiyoshi; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yoshida, Gosuke; Kimata, Motoi; Tajima, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of TPP[Mn(Pc)(CN)2]2 by the cantilever magnetometry technique. This technique enables us to extract information on the magnetism even if the sample is very small (1 µg). The torque curve measured when the magnetic field (≤7 T) is rotated in a plane that includes the c-axis shows a signature that is characteristic of weak ferromagnetism. The electron responsible for this behavior should be the d electron of the Mn3+ ion. On the other hand, when the field is rotated in the ab-plane, the torque curve exhibits an antiferromagnetic signature. The electron responsible for this behavior should be the π electron. Taking the susceptibility data into account, we have proposed two models of the spin configuration for d electrons: canted antiferromagnetism, and the field-induced ferromagnetic alignment. We have pointed out that even in the canted antiferromagnetic case, the torque curve is the same as that in the ferromagnetic case if the anisotropy energy is very small. These models do not contradict the experimental observation that magnetoresistance is hardly seen in TPP[Mn(Pc)(CN)2]2 if the interaction between π and d electrons is weak.

  14. Reading and writing single-atom magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Willke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    The single-atom bit represents the ultimate limit of the classical approach to high-density magnetic storage media. So far, the smallest individually addressable bistable magnetic bits have consisted of 3-12 atoms. Long magnetic relaxation times have been demonstrated for single lanthanide atoms in molecular magnets, for lanthanides diluted in bulk crystals, and recently for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms supported on magnesium oxide (MgO). These experiments suggest a path towards data storage at the atomic limit, but the way in which individual magnetic centres are accessed remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of the magnetism of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over many hours. We read the Ho states using tunnel magnetoresistance and write the states with current pulses using a scanning tunnelling microscope. The magnetic origin of the long-lived states is confirmed by single-atom electron spin resonance on a nearby iron sensor atom, which also shows that Ho has a large out-of-plane moment of 10.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons on this surface. To demonstrate independent reading and writing, we built an atomic-scale structure with two Ho bits, to which we write the four possible states and which we read out both magnetoresistively and remotely by electron spin resonance. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single-atom magnetic memory is indeed possible.

  15. Atomic Precision in Nano-Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Douglas; Johnston, Danvers; Guiton, Beth; Lu, Ye; Datta, Sujit; Davies, Peter; Bonnell, Dawn; Johnson, Charlie

    2008-03-01

    One of the greatest challenges in developing molecular-scale devices is to fabricate and monitor their formation with atomic precision. Recently, we have developed an electromigration technique that employs feedback for controllably electromigrating a nano-scale electrode with atomic precision at room temperature [1]. We will discuss our recent progress advancing this technique towards atomically precise nano-electronics. This will include in-situ transmission electron microscopy which shows evidence for highly crystalline electrode formation and the parallel fabrication of nanogaps for scaling-up to very large-scale integrated-circuits. Our results have implications on the development of a wide range of novel molecular-scale devices. Funding provided by: NSF-NSEC/NBIC DMR-0425780, NSF-NIRT Grant No. 0304531, and MRSEC award No. DMR05-20020. [1] D. R. Strachan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 043109 (2005).

  16. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  17. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  18. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Klimov; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  19. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  20. Deep atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  1. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  2. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-12-24

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  3. Planar nanocontacts with atomically controlled separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kervennic, Y.V.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a technology to reproducibly make gaps with distance control on the single-atom scale. The gold contacts are flat on the nanometer scale and are fabricated on an oxidized aluminum film that serves as a gate. We show that these contacts are clean and can be stabilized via chemical

  4. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  5. Atomization characteristics of a prefilming airblast atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeru; Koito, Atsushi; Hishiki, Manabu

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of water test sprays generated by a prefilming airblast atomizer used for aeroengines was measured in swirling and non-swirling flows with the well established laser scattering particle sizing technique. Atomizing air velocity (or pressure difference) was varied in a range wider than the conditions of actual engines. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) decreased at approximately a 1.5 power of the atomizing air velocity, being a higher velocity index than the previously reported values of 1 to 1.2. It was unexpectedly found that the effect of the liquid/air flow ratio was small. Since swirling flow increased the SMD at lower air velocities yet decreased it at higher ones, it is suggested that the reverse flow near the nozzle pintle adversely affects atomization.

  6. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  7. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  8. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the Sheriff RMS and E-911 map rolls. Cover is painstakingly maintained interactively by GIS staff. All atom boundaries are snapped to the road centerline cover, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset current as of 2008. Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the...

  9. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Miniature Wide Band Atomic Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    current circuit is easiest to explain if we at first ignore the capacitors . The reference and the DAC output are combined by R401 and R402 to make...atomic magnetometer CSAC – Chip scale atomic clock DAC – Digital to Analog Converter DARPA – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DBR...Transform FPGA – Field Programmable Gate Array GHz – Gigahertz MEMS – Micro-Electro Mechanical System MF – z-component Magnetic Quantum Number, MF MFTFM

  11. Laser Technology in Commercial Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, R.

    2006-05-01

    Commercial atomic frequency standards (AFS) are deployed in diverse civilian, military, and aerospace applications, ranging from high-precision measurement and calibration to navigation, communications and, of course, timekeeping. Currently, commercially available AFS include magnetically-selected cesium beam frequency standards and hydrogen masers and lamp-pumped rubidium oscillators. Despite the revolution in atomic physics and laboratory-scale AFS brought about by the advent of the tunable laser in the early 1970s, commercial AFS invariably rely on more conventional atomic physics technology developed in the 1950s. The reason for this lack of advancement of commercial AFS technology is the relatively poor reliability and environmental sensitivity of narrow-linewidth single-mode laser sources at atomic resonance wavelengths. Over the past 8 years, Symmetricom, in collaboration with laser manufacturers, has developed specialized laser sources for commercial AFS applications. These laser devices, optimized for high spectral purity and long-term reliability, will enable a new generation of commercial AFS. This talk will briefly describe two laser-based atomic frequency standard development programs at Symmetricom. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock, two orders of magnitude smaller and lower power than any commercial AFS, will enable atomic timing accuracy in portable battery-powered applications. The Optically-Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard, under development for deployment onboard the GPS-III satellite constellation, will provide enhanced short-term stability and longer lifetime compared to magnetically-selected cesium beam AFS.

  12. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Liu, Ni; Liang, Jiu-Qing

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275118, 11404198, 91430109, 61505100, 51502189, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province (STIP) under Grant No. 2014102, and the Launch of the Scientific Research of Shanxi University under Grant No. 011151801004, and the National Fundamental Fund of Personnel Training under Grant No. J1103210. The Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province under Grant No. 2015011008

  13. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  14. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  15. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  16. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  17. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  18. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  19. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  20. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  2. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  3. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  4. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Atomicity in Electronic Commerce J. D. Tygar January 1996 CMU-CS-96-112 School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213...other research sponsor. Keywords: electronic commerce , atomicity, NetBill, IBIP, cryptography, transaction pro- cessing, ACID, franking, electronic ...goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work. Unfortunately, much of that work ignores traditional transaction

  5. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  6. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  7. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  8. [Atomic force microscopy involved in protein study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengjian; Chen, Guoping; Wang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy is a rather new type of nano microscopic technology. It has some advantages, such as high resolution (sub-nano scale); avoidance of special sample preparation; real-time detection of samples under nearly physiological environment; in situ study of samples under water environment; feasibility of investigating physical and chemical properties of samples at molecular level, etc. In recent years, the application of atomic force microscopy in protein study has brought about outstanding achievements. In this paper are introduced the principle and operation modes of atomic force microscopy, also presented are its application in protein imaging, adsorption, folding-and-unfolding, assembly, and single molecular recognition. Additionally, the future application of atomic force microscopy in protein study is prospected.

  9. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  10. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  11. Nanoscale magnetic atom chips for quantum simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Rooij, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of five chapters that describe the different things that I have done in the past few years which all concern my effort to create lattices of ultracold gaseous atoms at length-scales of approximately 100 nano-meters (a millionth of a decimeter, or 200 times smaller than the

  12. Newtonian noise limit in atom interferometers for gravitational wave detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetrano, Flavio; Vicere, Andrea [Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' ' Carlo Bo' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Fondamenti - DiSBeF, Urbino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    In this work we study the influence of the Newtonian noise on atom interferometers applied to the detection of gravitational waves, and we compute the resulting limits to the sensitivity in two different configurations: a single atom interferometer, or a pair of atom interferometers operated in a differential configuration. We find that for the instrumental configurations considered, and operating in the frequency range [0.1-10] Hz, the limits would be comparable to those affecting large scale optical interferometers. (orig.)

  13. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razmi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: razmi@qom.ac.ir; Abdollahi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mah.abdollahi@gmail.com

    2008-11-10

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock{exclamation_point}.

  15. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  16. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  17. Dalton's Atomic Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DOBBIN, LEONARD

    1896-01-01

    WITH reference to the communications from the authors and from the reviewer of the "New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory," published in NATURE for May 14, I beg leave to offer the following remarks...

  18. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  19. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  20. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  1. Atomic White-Out: Enabling Atomic Circuitry through Mechanically Induced Bonding of Single Hydrogen Atoms to a Silicon Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Taleana R; Labidi, Hatem; Rashidi, Mohammad; Koleini, Mohammad; Achal, Roshan; Salomons, Mark H; Wolkow, Robert A

    2017-09-26

    We report the mechanically induced formation of a silicon-hydrogen covalent bond and its application in engineering nanoelectronic devices. We show that using the tip of a noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM), a single hydrogen atom could be vertically manipulated. When applying a localized electronic excitation, a single hydrogen atom is desorbed from the hydrogen-passivated surface and can be transferred to the tip apex, as evidenced from a unique signature in frequency shift curves. In the absence of tunnel electrons and electric field in the scanning probe microscope junction at 0 V, the hydrogen atom at the tip apex is brought very close to a silicon dangling bond, inducing the mechanical formation of a silicon-hydrogen covalent bond and the passivation of the dangling bond. The functionalized tip was used to characterize silicon dangling bonds on the hydrogen-silicon surface, which was shown to enhance the scanning tunneling microscope contrast, and allowed NC-AFM imaging with atomic and chemical bond contrasts. Through examples, we show the importance of this atomic-scale mechanical manipulation technique in the engineering of the emerging technology of on-surface dangling bond based nanoelectronic devices.

  2. Atomic Clocks Research - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    magnet. Since atomic deflection in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is inversely proportional to the square of the atomic speed, the atomic velocity...purifier and controlled leak; an atomic source (i.e., the dissociator under 39 study); a dipole electromagnetic with pole pieces shaped to produce an...34Relaxation Magnetique d’Atomes de Rubidium sur des Parois Paraffines," J. Phys. (Paris) 24, 379 (1963). 21. S. Wexler, "Deposition of Atomic Beams

  3. Wave Atom Based Watermarking

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Ijaz; Nuhman-ul-Haq; Hyat, Khizar

    2013-01-01

    Watermarking helps in ensuring originality, ownership and copyrights of a digital image. This paper aims at embedding a Watermark in an image using Wave Atom Transform. Preference of Wave Atoms on other transformations has been due to its sparser expansion, adaptability to the direction of local pattern, and sharp frequency localization. In this scheme, we had tried to spread the watermark in an image so that the information at one place is very small and undetectable. In order to extract the...

  4. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  5. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  6. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation,...

  7. Atomic interferometry; Interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation {lambda} = h/(mv), where {lambda} is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  8. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  9. Enhanced Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete with Atomic Polymer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The atomic polymer technology in form of mesoporous inorganic polymer (MIP) can effectively improve material durability and performance of concrete by dramatically increase inter/intragranular bond strength of concrete at nano-scale. The strategy of ...

  10. Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms illustrates the use of control and control systems as an essential part of functioning integrated miniaturized systems. The book is organized according to the dimensional scale of the problem, starting with microscale systems and ending with atomic-scale systems. Similar to macroscale machines and processes, control systems can play a major role in improving the performance of micro- and nanoscale systems and in enabling new capabilities that would otherwise not be possible. The majority of problems at these scales present many new challenges that go beyond the current state-of-the-art in control theory and engineering. This is a result of the multidisciplinary nature of micro/nanotechnology, which requires the merging of control engineering with physics, biology and chemistry. This book: Shows how the utilization of feedback control in nanotechnology instrumentation can yield results far better than passive systems can Discusses the application of control systems to problems...

  11. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  12. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  13. Toggling bistable atoms via mechanical switching of bond angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Adam; Jarvis, Sam; Danza, Rosanna; Bamidele, Joseph; Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Shaw, Gordon A; Kantorovich, Lev; Moriarty, Philip

    2011-04-01

    We reversibly switch the state of a bistable atom by direct mechanical manipulation of bond angle using a dynamic force microscope. Individual buckled dimers at the Si(100) surface are flipped via the formation of a single covalent bond, actuating the smallest conceivable in-plane toggle switch (two atoms) via chemical force alone. The response of a given dimer to a flip event depends critically on both the local and nonlocal environment of the target atom-an important consideration for future atomic scale fabrication strategies. © 2011 American Physical Society

  14. Atomic resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy of clean metal oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, J V; Reichling, M

    2010-07-07

    In the last two decades the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become the premier tool for topographical analysis of surface structures at the nanometre scale. In its ultimately sensitive implementation, namely dynamic scanning force microscopy (SFM) operated in the so-called non-contact mode (NC-AFM), this technique yields genuine atomic resolution and offers a unique tool for real space atomic-scale studies of surfaces, nanoparticles as well as thin films, single atoms and molecules on surfaces irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. Recent advances in NC-AFM have paved the way for groundbreaking atomic level insight into insulator surfaces, specifically in the most important field of metal oxides. NC-AFM imaging now strongly contributes to our understanding of the surface structure, chemical composition, defects, polarity and reactivity of metal oxide surfaces and related physical and chemical surface processes. Here we review the latest advancements in the field of NC-AFM applied to the fundamental atomic resolution studies of clean single crystal metal oxide surfaces with special focus on the representative materials Al(2)O(3)(0001), TiO(2)(110), ZnO(1000) and CeO(2)(111). © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  15. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  16. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  17. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atom from Highly Oriented Poly (tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.,; Paley, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.70 A and 0.54 A respectively.

  18. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  19. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atoms from Highly Oriented Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure, and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction-transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.7 and 0.54 A respectively.

  20. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  1. Revealing and exploiting hierarchical material structure through complex atomic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Grant, William P.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2017-08-01

    One of the great challenges of modern science is to faithfully model, and understand, matter at a wide range of scales. Starting with atoms, the vastness of the space of possible configurations poses a formidable challenge to any simulation of complex atomic and molecular systems. We introduce a computational method to reduce the complexity of atomic configuration space by systematically recognising hierarchical levels of atomic structure, and identifying the individual components. Given a list of atomic coordinates, a network is generated based on the distances between the atoms. Using the technique of modularity optimisation, the network is decomposed into modules. This procedure can be performed at different resolution levels, leading to a decomposition of the system at different scales, from which hierarchical structure can be identified. By considering the amount of information required to represent a given modular decomposition we can furthermore find the most succinct descriptions of a given atomic ensemble. Our straightforward, automatic and general approach is applied to complex crystal structures. We show that modular decomposition of these structures considerably simplifies configuration space, which in turn can be used in discovery of novel crystal structures, and opens up a pathway towards accelerated molecular dynamics of complex atomic ensembles. The power of this approach is demonstrated by the identification of a possible allotrope of boron containing 56 atoms in the primitive unit cell, which we uncover using an accelerated structure search, based on a modular decomposition of a known dense phase of boron, γ-B28.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  3. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  4. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  5. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  6. From Atoms to Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-31

    Honea. M.L. Homer, J.L. Persson, R.L. Whetten , Chem. atoms Phys. Lett. 171 (1990) 147. [17] M.R. Hoare, Adv. Chem. Phys. 40 (1979) 49. Two types of...Persson, M.E. LaVilla, R.L. tal conditions, the clusters become rigid. Thereafter, Whetten , J. Phys. Chem. 93 (1989) 2869. each newly added atom condenses...106 (1981) 265. M. Broyer, Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 6056. [9] W. Ekardt, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 289. [38] R.L. Whetten , private

  7. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  8. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Masao; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Matsuo, Tatsuki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Characteristic features of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for CML in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic for atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. In the distribution of AML subtypes of FAB classification, there was no M3 cases in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral blood of proximal survivors. (author).

  9. Atomic coordination reflects peptide immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that the immunological identity of variant peptides may be accurately predicted on the basis of atomic coordination of both unprotonated and protonated tertiary structures, provided that the structure of the native peptide (index is known. The metric which was discovered to account for this discrimination is the coordination difference between the variant and the index; we also showed that increasing coordination difference in respect to the index was correlated to a correspondingly weakening immunological outcome of the variant. Additionally, we established that this metric quickly seizes to operate beyond the peptide scale, e.g. over a coordination shell inclusive of atoms up to a distance of 7 Å away from the peptide or over the entire pMHC-TCR complex. Analysis of molecular orbital interactions over a range of formal charges further revealed that the N-terminus of the agonists was always able to sustain a stable ammonium (NH3+ group which was consistently absent in antagonists. We deem that the presence of NH3+ constitutes a secondary observable with a biological consequence, signifying a change in T cell activation. While our analysis of protonated structures relied on the quantum chemical relaxation of the H species, the results were consistent over a wide range of peptide charge and spin polarization conditions.

  10. Single Atoms in Nearly Concentric Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, Adrian Nugraha; Nguyen, Chi Huan; Lewty, Nick; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Quantum Optics Group Team

    2017-04-01

    Strong interaction between photons and neutral single atoms are usually observed in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) systems with high finesse mirrors and small physical volume. We demonstrate another approach that employs a near concentric cavity with relatively low finesse mirrors ( 100) and large physical separation between mirrors ( 10 mm). The transmission spectrum of our CQED system with trapped single atoms is observed to exhibit two resolved normal mode peaks, in which the single atom cooperativity is estimated to be around 0.4. The cooperativity of the system can be improved further by increasing the finesse of the mirrors or moving the cavity closer to the concentric point. The successful realization of concentric CQED systems will open opportunities for scaling up with applications in quantum computing. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation and Ministry of Education, Singapore.

  11. A Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Taylor, Stephen F; Turner, Richard W; Lev, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity, high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented DC-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides a 100x improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity over previous atomic scanning probe magnetometers. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnet...

  12. High resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Campos, J D; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the optical imaging of a single atom with nanometer resolution using an adaptive optical alignment technique that is applicable to general optical microscopy. By decomposing the image of a single laser-cooled atom, we identify and correct optical aberrations in the system and realize an atomic position sensitivity of $\\approx$ 0.5 nm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom, and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus 3D particle tracking, imaging of atoms in 3D optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10$^{-24}$ N) scale.

  13. Dislocation glide in Ni-Al solid solutions from the atomic scale up: a molecular dynamics study; Etude du glissement des dislocations dans la solution solide Ni-Al par simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodary, E

    2003-01-01

    The glide of an edge dislocation in solid solutions is studied by molecular dynamics, at fixed temperature and imposed external stress. We have optimized an EAM potential for Ni(1 a 8% A1): it well reproduces the lattice expansion, local atomic order, stacking fault energy as a function of composition, as well as the elastic properties of the {gamma}' phase with L1{sub 2} structure. On increasing the stress, the dislocation is first immobile, then glides with a velocity proportional to the stress and the velocity saturates on reaching the transverse sound velocity. However, only beyond a static threshold stress, {sigma}{sub s}, does the dislocation glide a distance large enough to allow macroscopic shear; the linear part of the velocity-stress curve extrapolates to zero at a dynamical threshold stress, {sigma}{sub d}, The friction coefficient, and the threshold stresses ({sigma}{sub s} and {sigma}{sub d}), increase with the A1 concentration and decrease with temperature (300 and 500 K). Close to the critical shear stress, {sigma}{sub s}, the dislocation glide is analysed with a 'stop and go' model. The latter yields the flight velocity between obstacles, the mean obstacle density and the distribution of the waiting time on each obstacle as a function of stress, composition and temperature. The obstacle to the glide is proposed to be the strong repulsion between Al atoms brought into nearest neighbour position by the glide process, and not the dislocation-solute interaction. The microscopic parameters so defined are introduced into a micro-mechanical model, which well reproduces the known behaviour of nickel base solid solutions. (author)

  14. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    OpenAIRE

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of...

  15. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  16. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  17. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  18. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  20. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  1. Plastic deformation: Shearing mountains atom by atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müllner, Peter, E-mail: petermullner@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Rocks, wood, ceramics, semiconductors, and metals all deform in the same way, namely by heterogeneous shear banding via hierarchical orthogonal shear modes. ► While the governing principles of deformation are the same for rocks, wood, ceramics, semiconductors, and metals, these materialsdiffer in their microscopic deformation mechanisms and in the width of the shear band, which covers twelve orders of magnitude from angstroms to hundreds of meters. ► Microscopic deformation mechanisms couple to macroscopic deformation mechanisms, i.e. shear banding, through the collective properties of defect groups on the mesoscale. -- Abstract: Conventional wisdom established atomistic defects, dislocations, as agents of plastic deformation. On macroscopic scale, rock, wood, steel, tough ceramics, fiber reinforced composites, and silicon all deform in the same way and produce the same pattern; shear bands. The argumentation presented here, starts on the largest length scale of the problem at hand and leads through a number of hierarchical levels down to the atomistic mechanism. Shear bands develop discontinuously by the motion of a process zone. Locally, i.e. in the process zone, deformation proceeds perpendicularly to the macroscopic shear, in combination with a rotation. The microscopic shear itself may occur again in a discontinuous manner and again orthogonally to the intermediate level and so on at ever smaller scale. Material properties come into play at the highest hierarchical level, i.e. at the smallest length scale where they control the well-known micromechanisms.

  2. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  3. Mining information from atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairney, Julie M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rajan, Krishna [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Haley, Daniel [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Choi, Pyuck-Pa [Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Felfer, Peter J.; Ringer, Simon P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Marceau, Ross K.W. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Technology Precinct, 75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial–chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or “mine” fundamental materials science information from that data. - Highlights: • Overview of the newest developments in techniques to extract information from atom probe data. • As well as reviewing existing approaches, improvements and new approaches are presented. • Techniques covered include tests for randomness, short range order and crystallography. • Methods for interfacial excess mapping and spectral decomposition are also covered.

  4. Atomic level characterization in corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Philippe; Maurice, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Atomic level characterization brings fundamental insight into the mechanisms of self-protection against corrosion of metals and alloys by oxide passive films and into how localized corrosion is initiated on passivated metal surfaces. This is illustrated in this overview with selected data obtained at the subnanometre, i.e. atomic or molecular, scale and also at the nanometre scale on single-crystal copper, nickel, chromium and stainless steel surfaces passivated in well-controlled conditions and analysed in situ and/or ex situ by scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A selected example of corrosion modelling by ab initio density functional theory is also presented. The discussed aspects include the surface reconstruction induced by hydroxide adsorption and formation of two-dimensional (hydr)oxide precursors, the atomic structure, orientation and surface hydroxylation of three-dimensional ultrathin oxide passive films, the effect of grain boundaries in polycrystalline passive films acting as preferential sites of passivity breakdown, the differences in local electronic properties measured at grain boundaries of passive films and the role of step edges at the exposed surface of oxide grains on the dissolution of the passive film. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  5. Saturated-absorption spectroscopy revisited: atomic transitions in strong magnetic fields (>20  mT) with a micrometer-thin cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, A; Tonoyan, A; Mirzoyan, R; Sarkisyan, D; Wojciechowski, A M; Stabrawa, A; Gawlik, W

    2014-04-15

    The existence of crossover resonances makes saturated-absorption (SA) spectra very complicated when external magnetic field B is applied. It is demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the use of micrometric-thin cells (MTCs, L≈40  μm) allows application of SA for quantitative studies of frequency splitting and shifts of the Rb atomic transitions in a wide range of external magnetic fields, from 0.2 up to 6 kG (20-600 mT). We compare the SA spectra obtained with the MTC with those obtained with other techniques and present applications for optical magnetometry with micrometer spatial resolution and a broadly tunable optical frequency lock.

  6. Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of Atoms and Atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of. Atoms and Atomic Clusters into Carbon. Nanotubes: Insights from Analytical Approaches. R. S. Swathi. School of Chemistry. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research. Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India ...

  7. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  8. Dislocation nucleation facilitated by atomic segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lianfeng; Yang, Chaoming; Lei, Yinkai; Zakharov, Dmitri; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Su, Dong; Yin, Qiyue; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Zhenyu; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Qi, Liang; Wang, Guofeng; Zhou, Guangwen

    2018-01-01

    Surface segregation--the enrichment of one element at the surface, relative to the bulk--is ubiquitous to multi-component materials. Using the example of a Cu-Au solid solution, we demonstrate that compositional variations induced by surface segregation are accompanied by misfit strain and the formation of dislocations in the subsurface region via a surface diffusion and trapping process. The resulting chemically ordered surface regions acts as an effective barrier that inhibits subsequent dislocation annihilation at free surfaces. Using dynamic, atomic-scale resolution electron microscopy observations and theory modelling, we show that the dislocations are highly active, and we delineate the specific atomic-scale mechanisms associated with their nucleation, glide, climb, and annihilation at elevated temperatures. These observations provide mechanistic detail of how dislocations nucleate and migrate at heterointerfaces in dissimilar-material systems.

  9. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  10. How grain boundaries affect the efficiency of poly-CdTe solar-cells: A fundamental atomic-scale study of grain boundary dislocation cores using CdTe bi-crystal thin films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klie, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-10-25

    It is now widely accepted that grain boundaries in poly-crystalline CdTe thin film devices have a detrimental effect on the minority carrier lifetimes, the open circuit voltage and therefore the overall solar-cell performance. The goal of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in CdTe on the carrier life-time, open-circuit voltage, Voc, and the diffusion of impurities. To achieve this goal, i) CdTe bi-crystals were fabricated with various misorientation angels, ii) the atomic- and electronic structures of the grain boundaries were characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and iii) first-principles density functional theory modeling was performed on the structures determined by STEM to predict the grain boundary potential. The transport properties and minority carrier lifetimes of the bi-crystal grain boundaries were measured using a variety of approaches, including TRPL, and provided feedback to the characterization and modeling effort about the effectiveness of the proposed models.

  11. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  12. Atomes et rayonnement

    OpenAIRE

    Dalibard, Jean; Haroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Matière et lumière sont intimement liées dans notre modélisation du monde physique. De l’élaboration de la théorie quantique à l’invention du laser, l’interaction entre atomes et rayonnement a joué un rôle central dans le développement de la science et de la technologie d’aujourd’hui. La maîtrise de cette interaction permet désormais d’atteindre les plus basses températures jamais mesurées. Le refroidissement de gaz d’atomes par la lumière d’un laser conduit à une « matière quantique » aux pr...

  13. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  14. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  15. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    stability of the design and will be measured at a future time. Angle random walk can be calculated from first principles from the shot-noise limited...interferometer cannot distinguish between the two sources of phase shifts. We describe a design for a dual atom interferometer to simultaneously...stability. This paper is organized as follows: we first describe the basic building blocks of the interferometer: beam splitters and mirrors. We then

  16. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  17. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

  18. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  19. Silica fractal atomic clusters saturated with OH

    CERN Document Server

    Olivi-Tran, N

    2003-01-01

    We constructed regular fractal SiOH atomic clusters which pending bonds are saturated with OH molecules. We calculated the binding energies of these clusters as well as for sp sup 2 hybridization as for sp sup 3 hybridizations. The result are the following: for the two hybridizations, the total binding energies have a linear dependence on the size of the fractal cluster, which comes directly from the scaling law of the fractal characteristic of the building of the cluster. We related by a scaling law, the number of electronic bonds and the total bonding energy.

  20. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...

  1. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  2. Breaking the atom with Samson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Väänänen, J.; Coecke, B.; Ong, L.; Panangaden, P.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence atom =(x,y) was introduced in [11]. Here x and y are finite sets of attributes (or variables) and the intuitive meaning of =(x,y) is that the attributes x completely (functionally) determine the attributes y. One may wonder, whether the dependence atom is truly an atom or whether it

  3. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  4. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lished the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly ellipti- cal. Keywords. Rydberg atom; quantum trajectory. PACS No. 03.65.Ge. 1. Introduction. Ever since the advent of quantum ...

  5. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  6. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  7. A Nanofiber-Based Optical Conveyor Belt for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Vetsch, Eugen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate optical transport of cold cesium atoms over millimeter-scale distances along an optical nanofiber. The atoms are trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a two-color evanescent field surrounding the nanofiber, far red- and blue-detuned with respect to the atomic transition. The blue-detuned field is a propagating nanofiber-guided mode while the red-detuned field is a standing-wave mode which leads to the periodic axial confinement of the atoms. Here, this standing wave is used for transporting the atoms along the nanofiber by mutually detuning the two counter-propagating fields which form the standing wave. The performance and limitations of the nanofiber-based transport are evaluated and possible applications are discussed.

  8. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brynle; Carew, Adam; Beica, Hermina; Vorozcovs, Andrejs; Pouliot, Alexander; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2016-06-01

    Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration $g$ and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency $\\omega_q$. Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure $\\omega_q$ with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb) on a time scale of $\\sim 50$ ms and $g$ with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  9. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  10. Atomic scale investigation of planar defects in 0.95Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}–0.05BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Lu [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Mi, Shao-Bo, E-mail: shaobo.mi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Cheng, Sheng; Liu, Ming [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jia, Chun-Lin [The School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Peter Grünberg Institute and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Thin films of lead-free piezoelectric 0.95Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}–0.05BaTiO{sub 3} (0.95NBT–0.05BT) are epitaxially grown on single crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates at 800 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C, respectively, by a high-pressure sputtering deposition technique. The microstructure of the thin films is investigated by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Planar defects are observed and the density of the defects increases with the increase of the film-growth temperature. Two types of planar defects in the films are studied at the atomic scale. One consists of groups of edge-sharing TiO{sub 6} octahedra with Bi atoms located between the TiO{sub 6} octahedral groups, and the other exists in the form of Na/Bi(Ba)−O{sub 2}−Na/Bi(Ba) layer parallel to the (010) plane of the films. Based on the structure feature of the planar defects, the propagation of the planar defects related to edge-sharing TiO{sub 6} octahedra within the films and from the film-substrate interface is discussed. Furthermore, the ordering of the planar defects is expected to form new structures. In comparison with the microstructure of 0.95NBT–0.05BT bulk materials, the appearance of the high-density planar defects observed within the films could be considered to be responsible for the difference in the physical properties between the bulk materials and the films. - Highlights: • NBT–BT films have been successfully prepared on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates. • Complex planar defects of zigzag-like and Aurivillius-type have been determined. • The propagation of the planar defects in the films has been characterized. • The intergrowth of planar faults with NBT–BT structure units results in the formation of new structures. • The NBT–BT/SrTiO{sub 3} interface structure has been determined at the atomic scale.

  11. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  12. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  13. Atomic mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A K

    1990-01-01

    This volume brings together some of the presently available theoretical techniques which will be useful in the design of solid-state materials. At present, it is impossible to specify the atomic composition of a material and its macroscopic physical properties. However, the future possibilities for such a science are being laid today. This is coming about due to the development of fast, cheap computers which will be able to undertake the calculations which are necessary.Since this field of science is fairly new, it is not yet quite clear which direction of analysis will eventually prov

  14. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  15. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  16. Lithiation-induced shuffling of atomic stacks

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2014-09-10

    In rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, understanding the atomic-scale mechanism of Li-induced structural evolution occurring at the host electrode materials provides essential knowledge for design of new high performance electrodes. Here, we report a new crystalline-crystalline phase transition mechanism in single-crystal Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires upon lithiation. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observed that stacks of atomic planes in an intermediate hexagonal (h-)LiZnSb phase are "shuffled" to accommodate the geometrical confinement stress arising from lamellar nanodomains intercalated by lithium ions. Such atomic rearrangement arises from the anisotropic lithium diffusion and is accompanied by appearance of partial dislocations. This transient structure mediates further phase transition from h-LiZnSb to cubic (c-)Li2ZnSb, which is associated with a nearly "zero-strain" coherent interface viewed along the [001]h/[111]c directions. This study provides new mechanistic insights into complex electrochemically driven crystalline-crystalline phase transitions in lithium-ion battery electrodes and represents a noble example of atomic-level structural and interfacial rearrangements.

  17. Quantum Simulation of a 2D Quasicrystal with Cold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Macé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a way to obtain a two-dimensional quasiperiodic tiling with eight-fold symmetry using cold atoms. One can obtain a series of such optical tilings, related by scale transformations, for a series of specific values of the chemical potential of the atoms. A theoretical model for the optical system is described and compared with that of the well-known cut-and-project method for the Ammann–Beenker tiling. The relation between the two tilings is discussed. This type of cold atom structure should allow the simulation of several important lattice models for interacting quantum particles and spins in quasicrystals.

  18. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius V Avizienis

    Full Text Available Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  19. Delay in atomic photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kheifets, A S

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence $ns$ and $np$ sub-shells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond XUV pulse. By solving the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and carefully examining the time evolution of the photoelectron wave packet, we establish the apparent "time zero" when the photoelectron leaves the atom. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the quantum phase of the dipole transition matrix element, the energy dependence of which defines the emission timing. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the $2s$ and $2p$ sub-shells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [{\\em Science} {\\bf 328}, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than a half of the measured time delay of $21\\pm5$~as. We argue that the XUV pulse alone cannot produce such a larg...

  20. Low-T magnetometry study of S = 1 Q2D [Ni(pyz)2(H2O)2](BF4)2 (pyz = pyrazine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manson, J. L. [Eastern Washington Univ., Cheney, WA (United States); Villa, D. Y. [Eastern Washington Univ., Cheney, WA (United States); Blackmore, W. J. A. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Brambleby, J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Goddard, P. A. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Singleton, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-13

    [Ni(pyz)2(H2O)2](BF4)2 (pyz = N2C4H4) was synthesized by a solvent-free technique and its structure solved by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction.1 The compound contains S = 1 Ni(II) ions and has tetragonal symmetry. Two-D [Ni(pyz)2(H2O)2]2+ square lattices propagate in the ab-plane and stack along the c-axis (Fig. 1). Water ligands occupy axial sites and form H-bonds with interlayer BF4- ions. SQUID magnetometry shows a possible transition to long-range magnetic order near 3 K. We measured the magnetization of [Ni(pyz)2(H2O)2](BF4)2 as a function of temperature to search for field-induced phase transitions and briefly report those findings here.

  1. Atomic-Resolution Spectrum Imaging of Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza R; Hage, Fredrik S; Lehmann, Sebastian; Ramasse, Quentin M; Dick, Kimberly A

    2017-11-13

    Over the past decade, III-V heterostructure nanowires have attracted a surge of attention for their application in novel semiconductor devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The functionality of such devices critically depends on the specific atomic arrangement at the semiconductor heterointerfaces. However, most of the currently available characterization techniques lack sufficient spatial resolution to provide local information on the atomic structure and composition of these interfaces. Atomic-resolution spectrum imaging by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a powerful technique with the potential to resolve structure and chemical composition with sub-angstrom spatial resolution and to provide localized information about the physical properties of the material at the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic-resolution EELS to understand the interface atomic arrangement in three-dimensional heterostructures in semiconductor nanowires. We observed that the radial interfaces of GaSb-InAs heterostructure nanowires are atomically abrupt, while the axial interface in contrast consists of an interfacial region where intermixing of the two compounds occurs over an extended spatial region. The local atomic configuration affects the band alignment at the interface and, hence, the charge transport properties of devices such as GaSb-InAs nanowire TFETs. STEM-EELS thus represents a very promising technique for understanding nanowire physical properties, such as differing electrical behavior across the radial and axial heterointerfaces of GaSb-InAs nanowires for TFET applications.

  2. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Ryo, E-mail: ishikawa@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lupini, Andrew R. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinuma, Yoyo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, 328 Ferris Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To fully understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation. - Highlights: • We theoretically demonstrate 3D near-atomic depth resolution imaging by large-angle illumination STEM. • This method can be useful to identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies within materials. • This method can be useful to determine reconstructed surface atomic structures.

  3. An atomic empire a technical history of the rise and fall of the British atomic energy programme

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C N

    2013-01-01

    Britain was the first country to exploit atomic energy on a large scale, and at its peak in the mid-1960s, it had generated more electricity from nuclear power than the rest of the world combined.The civil atomic energy programme grew out of the military programme which produced plutonium for atomic weapons. In 1956, Calder Hall power station was opened by the Queen. The very next year, one of the early Windscale reactors caught fire and the world's first major nuclear accident occurred.The civil programme ran into further difficulty in the mid-1960s and as a consequence of procrastination in

  4. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images...... as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  5. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  6. Entangled state fusion with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y. Q.; Dai, C. M.; Shao, X. Q.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-10-01

    We propose a scheme for preparation of large-scale entangled GHZ states and W states with neutral Rydberg atoms. The scheme mainly depends on Rydberg antiblockade effect, i.e., as the Rydberg-Rydberg interaction strength and the detuning between the atom transition frequency and the classical laser frequency satisfies some certain conditions, the effective Rabi oscillation between the two ground states and the two excitation Rydberg states would be generated. The prominent advantage is that both two multiparticle GHZ states and two multiparticle W states can be fused in this model, especially the success probability for fusion of GHZ states can reach unit. In addition, the imperfections induced by the spontaneous emission is also discussed through numerical simulation.

  7. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nieddu, Thomas; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed ...

  9. Trapping and moving metal atoms with a six-leg molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Leo; Rieder, Karl-Heinz; Moresco, Francesca; Stojkovic, Sladjana M.; Gourdon, André; Joachim, Christian

    2005-12-01

    Putting to work a molecule able to collect and carry adatoms in a controlled way on a surface is a solution for fabricating atomic structures atom by atom. Investigations have shown that the interaction of an organic molecule with the surface of a metal can induce surface reconstruction down to the atomic scale. In this way, well-defined nanostructures such as chains of adatoms, atomic trenches and metal-ligand compounds have been formed. Moreover, the progress in manipulation techniques induced by a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) has opened up the possibility of studying artificially built molecular-metal atomic scale structures, and allowed the atom-by-atom doping of a single C60 molecule by picking up K atoms. The present work goes a step further and combines STM manipulation techniques with the ability of a molecule to assemble an atomic nanostructure. We present a well-designed six-leg single hexa-t-butyl-hexaphenylbenzene (HB-HPB) molecule, which collects and carries up to six copper adatoms on a Cu(111) surface when manipulated with a STM tip. The `HB-HPB-Cu atoms' complex can be further manipulated, bringing its Cu freight to a predetermined position on the surface where the metal atoms can finally be released.

  10. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  11. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  12. Linear Atom Guides: Guiding Rydberg Atoms and Progress Toward an Atom Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Mallory A.

    In this thesis, I explore a variety of experiments within linear, two-wire, magnetic atom guides. Experiments include guiding of Rydberg atoms; transferring between states while keeping the atoms contained within the guide; and designing, constructing, and testing a new experimental apparatus. The ultimate goal of the atom guiding experiments is to develop a continuous atom laser. The guiding of 87Rb 59D5/2 Rydberg atoms is demonstrated. The evolution of the atoms is driven by the combined effects of dipole forces acting on the center-of-mass degree of freedom as well as internal-state transitions. Time delayed microwave and state-selective field ionization, along with ion detection, are used to investigate the evolution of the internal-state distribution as well as the Rydberg atom motion while traversing the guide. The observed decay time of the guided-atom signal is about five times that of the initial state. A population transfer between Rydberg states contributes to this lengthened lifetime, and also broadens the observed field ionization spectrum. The population transfer is attributed to thermal transitions and, to a lesser extent, initial state-mixing due to Rydberg-Rydberg collisions. Characteristic signatures in ion time-of-flight signals and spatially resolved images of ion distributions, which result from the coupled internal-state and center-of-mass dynamics, are discussed. Some groups have used a scheme to make BECs where atoms are optically pumped from one reservoir trap to a final state trap, irreversibly transferring those atoms from one trap to the other. In this context, transfer from one guided ground state to another is studied. In our setup, before the atoms enter the guide, they are pumped into the | F = 1, mF = --1> state. Using two repumpers, one tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 0 transition (R10) and the other tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 2 transition (R12), the atoms are pumped between these guided states. Magnetic reflections within the guide

  13. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Craig

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  15. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  16. Atom-surface studies with Rb Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical progress studying atom-surface interactions using rubidium Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms can be strongly coupled to surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes of a dielectric material. The coherent interaction between Rydberg atoms and SPhPs has potential applications for quantum hybrid devices. Calculations of TM-mode SPhPs on engineered surfaces of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) and lithium tantalate (PPLT) for different periodic domains and surface orientations, as well as natural materials such as quartz, are presented. Our SPhP calculations account for the semi-infinite anisotropic nature of the materials. In addition to theoretical calculations, we show experimental results of measurements of adsorbate fields and coupling of Rydberg atoms to SPhPs on quartz.

  17. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Bocvarski, V.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.

    2006-12-01

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 μm for He*, 1.2 μm for Ne*, 0.87 μm for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2μm-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to "vdW-Zeeman" transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  18. Distribution of quantum information between an atom and two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Bernhard

    2008-11-03

    The construction of networks consisting of optically interconnected processing units is a promising way to scale up quantum information processing systems. To store quantum information, single trapped atoms are among the most proven candidates. By placing them in high finesse optical resonators, a bidirectional information exchange between the atoms and photons becomes possible with, in principle, unit efficiency. Such an interface between stationary and ying qubits constitutes a possible node of a future quantum network. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the prospects of a quantum interface consisting of a single atom trapped within the mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. In a two-step process, we distribute entanglement between the stored atom and two subsequently emitted single photons. The long atom trapping times achieved in the system together with the high photon collection efficiency of the cavity make the applied protocol in principle deterministic, allowing for the creation of an entangled state at the push of a button. Running the protocol on this quasi-stationary quantum interface, the internal state of the atom is entangled with the polarization state of a single emitted photon. The entanglement is generated by driving a vacuum-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage between states of the coupled atom-cavity system. In a second process, the atomic part of the entangled state is mapped onto a second emitted photon using a similar technique and resulting in a polarization-entangled two-photon state. To verify and characterize the photon-photon entanglement, we measured a violation of a Bell inequality and performed a full quantum state tomography. The results prove the prior atom-photon entanglement and demonstrate a quantum information transfer between the atom and the two emitted photons. This reflects the advantages of a high-finesse cavity as a quantum interface in future quantum networks. (orig.)

  19. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dong-shan; Gao, Yu-ping; Zhao, Shu-hong

    2017-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observations are not evenly sampled, and the internals between two data points range from several hours to more than half a month. Further more, these data sets are sparse. All this makes it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, a cubic spline interpolation is used to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points uniform. Then, the Vondrak filter is employed to smooth the data set, and get rid of the high-frequency noises, and finally the weighted average method is adopted to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The newly released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set is used to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set includes the 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars observed by the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and the 305-meter Arecibo telescope. It is found that the algorithm used in this paper can reduce effectively the influence caused by the noises in pulsar timing residuals, and improve the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale. Results indicate that the long-term (> 1 yr) stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale is better than 3.4 × 10-15.

  20. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  1. The Stair-Step Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a model of a generic atom that is used to represent the movement of electrons from lower to higher levels and vice-versa due to excitation and de-excitation of the atom. As the process of de-excitation takes place, photons represented by colored ping-pong balls are emitted, indicating the emission of light. (MDH)

  2. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Unlike the previous theoretical results based on standard quantum mechanics that established the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly elliptical.

  3. The Atomic Bose Gas in Flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzibabic, Z.; Krüger, P.; Cheneau, M.; Battelier, B.; Dalibard, J.

    2006-11-01

    We describe a recent experiment performed with rubidium atoms (87Rb), aiming at studying the coherence properties of a two-dimensional gas of bosonic particles at low temperature. We have observed in particular a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) type crossover in the system, using a matter wave heterodyning technique. At low temperatures, the gas is quasi-coherent on the length scale set by the system size. As the temperature is increased, the loss of long-range coherence coincides with the onset of the proliferation of free vortices, in agreement with the microscopic BKT theory.

  4. Atomic force microscopy in biomaterials surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variola, Fabio

    2015-02-07

    Recent progress in surface science, nanotechnology and biophysics has cast new light on the correlation between the physicochemical properties of biomaterials and the resulting biological response. One experimental tool that promises to generate an increasingly more sophisticated knowledge of how proteins, cells and bacteria interact with nanostructured surfaces is the atomic force microscope (AFM). This unique instrument permits to close in on interfacial events at the scale at which they occur, the nanoscale. This perspective covers recent developments in the exploitation of the AFM, and suggests insights on future opportunities that can arise from the exploitation of this powerful technique.

  5. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  6. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    rest frame for the trapped atoms. While still in this moving-frame molasses, the laser frequencies are further detuned from the atomic resonance (while maintaining this relative frequency shift) to cool the atom cloud's temperature to 2 K or below, corresponding to an rms velocity of less than 2 cm/s. After launch, the cold atoms undergo further state and velocity selection to prepare for atom interferometry. The atom interferometers are then realized using laser-induced stimulated Raman transitions to perform the necessary manipulations of each atom, and the resulting interferometer phase is measured using laser-induced fluorescence for state-normalized detection. More than 20 laser beams with independent controls of frequency, phase, and intensity are required for this measurement sequence. This instrument can facilitate the study of Earth's gravitational field from surface and air vehicles, as well as from space by allowing gravity mapping from a low-cost, single spacecraft mission. In addition, the operation of atom interferometer-based instruments in space offers greater sensitivity than is possible in terrestrial instruments due to the much longer interrogation times available in the microgravity environment. A space-based quantum gravity gradiometer has the potential to achieve sensitivities similar to the GRACE mission at long spatial wavelengths, and will also have resolution similar to GOCE for measurement at shorter length scales.

  7. Atom mapping with constraint programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Nahar, Feras; Schnorr, Norah; Backofen, Rolf; Stadler, Peter F; Flamm, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions are rearrangements of chemical bonds. Each atom in an educt molecule thus appears again in a specific position of one of the reaction products. This bijection between educt and product atoms is not reported by chemical reaction databases, however, so that the "Atom Mapping Problem" of finding this bijection is left as an important computational task for many practical applications in computational chemistry and systems biology. Elementary chemical reactions feature a cyclic imaginary transition state (ITS) that imposes additional restrictions on the bijection between educt and product atoms that are not taken into account by previous approaches. We demonstrate that Constraint Programming is well-suited to solving the Atom Mapping Problem in this setting. The performance of our approach is evaluated for a manually curated subset of chemical reactions from the KEGG database featuring various ITS cycle layouts and reaction mechanisms.

  8. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  9. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  10. Magnetotransport on the nano scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Kotzott, Thomas; Pruschke, Thomas; Wenderoth, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Transport experiments in strong magnetic fields show a variety of fascinating phenomena like the quantum Hall effect, weak localization or the giant magnetoresistance. Often they originate from the atomic-scale structure inaccessible to macroscopic magnetotransport experiments. To connect spatial information with transport properties, various advanced scanning probe methods have been developed. Capable of ultimate spatial resolution, scanning tunnelling potentiometry has been used to determine the resistance of atomic-scale defects such as steps and interfaces. Here we combine this technique with magnetic fields and thus transfer magnetotransport experiments to the atomic scale. Monitoring the local voltage drop in epitaxial graphene, we show how the magnetic field controls the electric field components. We find that scattering processes at localized defects are independent of the strong magnetic field while monolayer and bilayer graphene sheets show a locally varying conductivity and charge carrier concentration differing from the macroscopic average.

  11. Atomic form factor for twisted vortex photons interacting with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrey, Pierson; Kaplan, Lev; McGuire, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The relatively new atomic form factor for twisted (vortex) beams, which carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), is considered and compared to the conventional atomic form factor for plane-wave beams that carry only spin angular momentum. Since the vortex symmetry of a twisted photon is more complex that that of a plane wave, evaluation of the atomic form factor is also more complex for twisted photons. On the other hand, the twisted photon has additional parameters, including the OAM quantum number, ℓ, the nodal radial number, p, and the Rayleigh range, zR, which determine the cone angle of the vortex. This Rayleigh range may be used as a variable parameter to control the interaction of twisted photons with matter. Here we address (i) normalization of the vortex atomic form factor, (ii) displacement of target atoms away from the center of the beam vortex, and (iii) formulation of transition probabilities for a variety of photon-atom processes. We attend to features related to experiments that can test the range of validity and accuracy of calculations of these variations of the atomic form factor. Using the absolute square of the form factor for vortex beams, we introduce a vortex factor that can be directly measured.

  12. Atomic Configuration and Conductance of Tantalum Single-Atom Contacts and Single-Atom Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Tokushi; Murata, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    The tensile deformation and successive fracture process of tantalum (Ta) nanocontacts (NCs) while applying various bias voltages was observed in situ by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy using a picometer-precision dual-goniometer nanotip manipulation technique. Simultaneously, the variation in the conductance of the contacts was measured. The NCs were thinned atom by atom during mechanical elongation, resulting in the formation of two types of single-atom cross-sectional contacts: single-atom contacts (SACs) and single-atom wires (SAWs), in which two electrodes, typically nanotips, are connected by a single shared atom or a one-line array of single atoms, respectively. When the bias voltage was 11 mV, Ta SACs were formed during tensile deformation; however, elongation of the single-atom cross-sectional part did not occur. In contrast, when the bias voltage was increased to 200 mV, Ta SACs were first formed during the tensile deformation, followed by elongation of the single-atom cross section up to a length of three atoms, i.e., the formation of SAWs. Thus, the present observation shows that Ta SAWs are stable even at such a high bias voltage. The conductance of the SACs was approximately 0.10G0 (G0 = 2e2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck’s constant), whereas the conductance of the three-atom-long SAWs ranged from 0.01G0 to 0.22G0. Lower conductances were observed for linear SAWs, whereas higher conductances resulted from kinked SAWs.

  13. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Foss-Feig, M; Wall, M L; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2015-11-12

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  14. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  15. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  16. Magneto-Structural Correlations in Pseudotetrahedral Forms of the [Co(SPh)4]2- Complex Probed by Magnetometry, MCD Spectroscopy, Advanced EPR Techniques, and ab Initio Electronic Structure Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suturina, Elizaveta A; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Liu, Junjie; Atanasov, Mihail; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Maganas, Dimitrios; Hill, Stephen; Schnegg, Alexander; Bill, Eckhard; Long, Jeffrey R; Neese, Frank

    2017-03-06

    The magnetic properties of pseudotetrahedral Co(II) complexes spawned intense interest after (PPh4)2[Co(SPh)4] was shown to be the first mononuclear transition-metal complex displaying slow relaxation of the magnetization in the absence of a direct current magnetic field. However, there are differing reports on its fundamental magnetic spin Hamiltonian (SH) parameters, which arise from inherent experimental challenges in detecting large zero-field splittings. There are also remarkable changes in the SH parameters of [Co(SPh)4]2- upon structural variations, depending on the counterion and crystallization conditions. In this work, four complementary experimental techniques are utilized to unambiguously determine the SH parameters for two different salts of [Co(SPh)4]2-: (PPh4)2[Co(SPh)4] (1) and (NEt4)2[Co(SPh)4] (2). The characterization methods employed include multifield SQUID magnetometry, high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR), variable-field variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (VTVH-MCD), and frequency domain Fourier transform THz-EPR (FD-FT THz-EPR). Notably, the paramagnetic Co(II) complex [Co(SPh)4]2- shows strong axial magnetic anisotropy in 1, with D = -55(1) cm-1 and E/D = 0.00(3), but rhombic anisotropy is seen for 2, with D = +11(1) cm-1 and E/D = 0.18(3). Multireference ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations enable interpretation of the remarkable variation of D and its dependence on the electronic structure and geometry.

  17. Optically polarized atoms understanding light-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Rochester, Simon M

    2010-01-01

    This book is addressed at upper-level undergraduate and graduate students involved in research in atomic, molecular, and optical Physics. It will also be useful to researchers practising in this field. It gives an intuitive, yet sufficiently detailed and rigorous introduction to light-atom interactions with a particular emphasis on the symmetry aspects of the interaction, especially those associated with the angular momentum of atoms and light. The book will enable readers to carryout practical calculations on their own, and is richly illustrated with examples drawn from current research topic

  18. Atoms, Light, and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    Up to now, the spatial properties of quantum particles played no more than a secondary role: we only needed the de Broglie relation (1.4) which gives the quantum particles wavelength, and our discussion of the quantum properties of photons was based mainly on their polarization, which is an internal degree of freedom of the photon. The probability amplitudes which we used did not involve the positions or velocities of the particles, which are spatial, or external degrees of freedom. In the present chapter, we shall introduce spatial dependence by defining probability amplitudes a(ěc r) that are functions of the position ěc r. In full generality, a(ěc r) is a complex number, but we shall avoid this complication and discuss only cases where the probability amplitudes may be taken real. For simplicity, we also limit ourselves to particles propagating along a straight line, which we take as the Ox axis: x will define the position of the particle and the corresponding probability amplitude will be a function of x, a(x). In our discussion, we shall need to introduce the so-called potential well, where a particle travels back and forth between two points on the straight line. One important particular case is the infinite well, where the particle is confined between two infinitely high walls over which it cannot pass. This example is not at all academic, and we shall meet it again in Chapter 6 when explaining the design of a laser diode! Furthermore, it will allow us to introduce the notion of energy level, to write down the Heisenberg inequalities, to understand the interaction of a light wave with an atom and finally to explain schematically the principles of the laser.

  19. Coupling a thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Strongly interacting atom-cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom-cavity systems.

  20. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.