WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic scale magnetometry

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  4. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  5. Towards a mechanical MPI scanner based on atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Tonyushkin, Alexey; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We report on our progress in the development of an atomic magnetometer (AM) based low-frequency X-space MPI scanner, expected to be free from SAR and PNS constraints. We address major challenges in coil and sensor design due to specificAMproperties. Compared to our previous workwe have changed the AM's mode of operation towards its implementation for detecting weak SPIO response fields in the presence of nearby-located strong drive/selection fields. We demonstrate that a pump-probe AM scheme in a buffer gas filled alkali vapour cell can tolerate mT/m gradients while maintaining a sensitivity in the one-digit pT/Hz^(1/2) range over a bandwidth from DC to several kHz. We give a detailed description of the drive/selection coils' geometry and their hardware implementations that will provide both field-free-line (FFL) and field-free-point (FFP) modes of operation, compatible with a best performance AM operation. We estimate the achievable field of view and spatial resolution of the scanner as well as its sensitivi...

  6. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  7. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  8. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  9. M(H) dependence and size distribution of SPIONs measured by atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quasistatic recording of the magnetic excitation function M(H) of superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (SPION) suspensions by an atomic magnetometer allows a precise determination of the sample's iron mass content mFe and the particle size distribution.

  10. Remote Nanodiamond Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Yinlan; Jeske, Jan; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Lau, Desmond W M; Ji, Hong; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; V., Shahraam Afshar; Hollenberg, Lloyd; Greentree, Andrew D; Monro, Tanya M; Gibson, Brant C

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres have transformed the way people interact with the world and now permeate many areas of science. Optical fibres are traditionally thought of as insensitive to magnetic fields, however many application areas from mining to biomedicine would benefit from fibre-based remote magnetometry devices. In this work, we realise such a device by embedding nanoscale magnetic sensors into tellurite glass fibres. Remote magnetometry is performed on magnetically active defect centres in nanodiamonds embedded into the glass matrix. Standard optical magnetometry techniques are applied to initialize and detect local magnetic field changes with a measured sensitivity of 26 micron Tesla/square root(Hz). Our approach utilizes straight-forward optical excitation, simple focusing elements, and low power components. We demonstrate remote magnetometry by direct reporting of the magnetic ground states of nitrogen-vacancy defect centres in the optical fibres. In addition, we present and describe theoretically an all-optica...

  11. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  12. The Swarm Magnetometry Package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Friis-Christensen, Eigil;

    2008-01-01

    The Swarm mission under the ESA's Living Planet Programme is planned for launch in 2010 and consists of a constellation of three satellites at LEO. The prime objective of Swarm is to measure the geomagnetic field with unprecedented accuracy in space and time. The magnetometry package consists...

  13. Magnetometry with Mesospheric Sodium

    CERN Document Server

    Higbie, J M; Patton, B; Holzlöhner, R; Calia, D Bonaccini; Budker, D

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic fields on the few-hundred-kilometer length scale is significant for a variety of geophysical applications including mapping of crustal magnetism and ocean-circulation measurements, yet available techniques for such measurements are very expensive or of limited accuracy. We propose a scheme for remote detection of magnetic fields using the naturally occurring atomic-sodium-rich layer in the mesosphere and existing high-power lasers developed for laser guide-star applications. The proposed scheme offers dramatic reduction in cost, opening the way to large-scale magnetic mapping missions.

  14. Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbie, James M.; Rochester, Simon M.; Patton, Brian; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic fields on the few 100-km length scale is significant for many geophysical applications including mapping of crustal magnetism and ocean circulation measurements, yet available techniques for such measurements are very expensive or of limited accuracy. We propose a method for remote detection of magnetic fields using the naturally occurring atomic sodium-rich layer in the mesosphere and existing high-power lasers developed for laser guide star applications. The proposed method offers a dramatic reduction in cost and opens the way to large-scale, parallel magnetic mapping and monitoring for atmospheric science, navigation, and geophysics. PMID:21321235

  15. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied. Ki...

  16. He I Vector Magnetometry of Field Aligned Superpenumbral Fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Schad, T A; Lin, Haosheng

    2013-01-01

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 angstroms in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) are paired with high-resolution observations of the Halpha 6563 angstroms and Ca II 8542 angstroms spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the "Hanle and Zeeman Light" (HAZEL) modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred ...

  17. Magnetic field and temperature sensing with atomic-scale spin defects in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H; Soltamov, V A; Fuchs, F; Simin, D; Sperlich, A; Baranov, P G; Astakhov, G V; Dyakonov, V

    2014-07-04

    Quantum systems can provide outstanding performance in various sensing applications, ranging from bioscience to nanotechnology. Atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide are very attractive in this respect because of the technological advantages of this material and favorable optical and radio frequency spectral ranges to control these defects. We identified several, separately addressable spin-3/2 centers in the same silicon carbide crystal, which are immune to nonaxial strain fluctuations. Some of them are characterized by nearly temperature independent axial crystal fields, making these centers very attractive for vector magnetometry. Contrarily, the zero-field splitting of another center exhibits a giant thermal shift of -1.1 MHz/K at room temperature, which can be used for thermometry applications. We also discuss a synchronized composite clock exploiting spin centers with different thermal response.

  18. Seebeck effect at the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eui-Sup; Cho, Sanghee; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2014-04-04

    The atomic variations of electronic wave functions at the surface and electron scattering near a defect have been detected unprecedentedly by tracing thermoelectric voltages given a temperature bias [Cho et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 913 (2013)]. Because thermoelectricity, or the Seebeck effect, is associated with heat-induced electron diffusion, how the thermoelectric signal is related to the atomic-scale wave functions and what the role of the temperature is at such a length scale remain very unclear. Here we show that coherent electron and heat transport through a pointlike contact produces an atomic Seebeck effect, which is described by the mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient multiplied by an effective temperature drop at the interface. The mesoscopic Seebeck coefficient is approximately proportional to the logarithmic energy derivative of local density of states at the Fermi energy. We deduced that the effective temperature drop at the tip-sample junction could vary at a subangstrom scale depending on atom-to-atom interaction at the interface. A computer-based simulation method of thermoelectric images is proposed, and a point defect in graphene was identified by comparing experiment and the simulation of thermoelectric imaging.

  19. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  20. Optomechanical magnetometry with a macroscopic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Changqiu; Sheridan, Eoin; McAuslan, David L; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Lam, Ping Koy; Zhang, Yundong; Bowen, Warwick P

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a centimeter-scale optomechanical magnetometer based on a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. The large size of the resonator allows high magnetic field sensitivity to be achieved in the hertz to kilohertz frequency range. A peak sensitivity of 131 pT per root Hz is reported, in a magnetically unshielded non-cryogenic environment and using optical power levels beneath 100 microWatt. Femtotesla range sensitivity may be possible in future devices with further optimization of laser noise and the physical structure of the resonator, allowing applications in high-performance magnetometry.

  1. Manipulating spins at the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyuk, Valeri

    2012-02-01

    The control over magnetic states down to a single atomic spin on a surface is of great importance for future spintronics devices. We present the state of the art ab initio studies of magnetic and transport properties of atomic-scale nanostructures on metal surfaces. We demonstrate that the spin direction of single adatoms can be controlled by a magnetic STM tip [1]. We reveal that applying an external electric field it is possible to switch small clusters on surfaces with magnetic bi-or multistability between their different magnetic states [2]. We show that a spin-polarization in atomic-scale nanostructures [3] could be manipulated at the atomic-scale by electric field [4]. Our studies give a clear evidence that transport properties of magnetic nanostructures can be tailored on an scale of 1 nm exploiting a spin-dependent quantum confinement [3,5]. [4pt] [1] K. Tao, V.S. Stepanyuk, W. Hergert, I. Rungger,S. Sanvito, P. Bruno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 057202 (2009).[0pt] [2] N. N. Negulyaev, V.S. Stepanyuk, W. Hergert, J. Kirschner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 037202 (2011).[0pt] [3] H. Oka, P.A. Ignatiev, S. Wedekind, G. Rodary, L. Niebergall, V.S. Stepanyuk, D. Sander, J. Kirschner, Science 327, 843 (2010).[0pt] [4] P.A. Ignatiev and V.S. Stepanyuk, Phys. Rev. B 84, 075421 (2011).[0pt] [5] H. Oka, K. Tao, S. Wedekind, G. Rodary, V.S. Stepanyuk, D. Sander, J. Kirschner, Phys. Rev. Lett.107, 187201 (2011).

  2. Direct measurement of intrinsic atomic scale magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoni, M P; Pascarelli, S; Grössinger, R; Turtelli, R Sato; Bormio-Nunes, C; Pettifer, R F

    2008-10-03

    Using differential x-ray absorption spectroscopy (DiffXAS) we have measured and quantified the intrinsic, atomic-scale magnetostriction of Fe81Ga19. By exploiting the chemical selectivity of DiffXAS, the Fe and Ga local environments have been assessed individually. The enhanced magnetostriction induced by the addition of Ga to Fe was found to originate from the Ga environment, where lambda;{gamma,2}( approximately (3/2)lambda_{100}) is 390+/-40 ppm. In this environment, 001 Ga-Ga pair defects were found to exist, which mediate the magnetostriction by inducing large strains in the surrounding Ga-Fe bonds. For the first time, intrinsic, chemically selective magnetostrictive strain has been measured and quantified at the atomic level, allowing true comparison with theory.

  3. Scalable Spin Squeezing for Quantum-Enhanced Magnetometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Linnemann, D.; Hume, D. B.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    A major challenge in quantum metrology is the generation of entangled states with a macroscopic atom number. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that atomic squeezing generated via nonlinear dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates, combined with suitable trap geometries, allows scaling to large ensemble sizes. We achieve a suppression of fluctuations by 5.3(5) dB for 12 300 particles, from which we infer that similar squeezing can be obtained for more than 107 atoms. With this resource, we demonstrate quantum-enhanced magnetometry by swapping the squeezed state to magnetically sensitive hyperfine levels that have negligible nonlinearity. We find a quantum-enhanced single-shot sensitivity of 310(47) pT for static magnetic fields in a probe volume as small as 90 μm3.

  4. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  5. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative humidi

  6. Plasmon resonances in atomic-scale gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kern, Johannes; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C; Hecht, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Gap modes in resonant plasmonic nanostructures exhibit optical fields whose spatial confinement and near-field enhancement strongly increases for smaller gaps[1]. In the context of augmented light-matter interaction, gap modes are of high interest for various applications such as single-emitter spectroscopy[2-4], quantum optics[5,6], extreme nonlinear optics[7,8], efficient optical switching[9], optical trapping10, and molecular opto-electronics[11]. By means of reproducible self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust gaps reaching well below 0.5 nm. For such atomic-scale gaps extreme splitting of the symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV is observed in white-light scattering experiments. Besides providing evidence for atomic-scale gap modes at visible wavelengths with correspondingly small mode volumes and strong field enhancement, our experimental results can serve as a benchmark for electromagnetic modeling beyond local Maxwell theory[12,...

  7. Nuclear reactor materials at the atomic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. Marquis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in nuclear energy, developing new materials able to respond to the stringent requirements of the next-generation fission and future fusion reactors has become a priority. An efficient search for such materials requires detailed knowledge of material behaviour under irradiation, high temperatures and corrosive environments. Minimizing the rates of materials degradation will be possible only if the mechanisms by which it occurs are understood. Atomic-scale experimental probing as well as modelling can provide some answers and help predict in-service behaviour. This article illustrates how this approach has already improved our understanding of precipitation under irradiation, corrosion behaviour, and stress corrosion cracking. It is also now beginning to provide guidance for the development of new alloys.

  8. Initial corrosion observed on the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, F U; Stierle, A; Dosch, H; Kolb, D M; Lee, T-L; Zegenhagen, J

    2006-02-09

    Corrosion destroys more than three per cent of the world's GDP. Recently, the electrochemical decomposition of metal alloys has been more productively harnessed to produce porous materials with diverse technological potential. High-resolution insight into structure formation during electrocorrosion is a prerequisite for an atomistic understanding and control of such electrochemical surface processes. Here we report atomic-scale observations of the initial stages of corrosion of a Cu3Au111 single crystal alloy within a sulphuric acid solution. We monitor, by in situ X-ray diffraction with picometre-scale resolution, the structure and chemical composition of the electrolyte/alloy interface as the material decomposes. We reveal the microscopic structural changes associated with a general passivation phenomenon of which the origin has been hitherto unclear. We observe the formation of a gold-enriched single-crystal layer that is two to three monolayers thick, and has an unexpected inverted (CBA-) stacking sequence. At higher potentials, we find that this protective passivation layer dewets and pure gold islands are formed; such structures form the templates for the growth of nanoporous metals. Our experiments are carried out on a model single-crystal system. However, the insights should equally apply within a crystalline grain of an associated polycrystalline electrode fabricated from many other alloys exhibiting a large difference in the standard potential of their constituents, such as stainless steel (see ref. 5 for example) or alloys used for marine applications, such as CuZn or CuAl.

  9. Nanocharacterization: Atomic Scale Visualization with Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbridge, Christine

    2007-10-01

    This workshop will include an overview presentation of nanotechnology and nanocharacterization tools (electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy) as well as examples of curricular components for middle and high school teachers. Tours/demonstrations of microscopy facilities in the IMS facility at UConn will be provided.

  10. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  11. Atomic-Scale Confinement of Resonant Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes; Großmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C.; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-01

    In the presence of matter there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically-defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically-confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically-resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultra-sensing, cavity optomechanics as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices.

  12. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range w

  13. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  14. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  15. Characterizing and imaging magnetic nanoparticles by optical magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A.; Colombo, S.; Dolgovskiy, V.; Grujić, Z. D.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    We review our ongoing work on deploying optical (atomic) magnetometry for measuring the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples, yielding MNP size distributions, and other sample parameters like Néel relaxation time τ, saturation magnetisation Ms , anisotropy constant K and magnetic susceptibility χ. We address magnetorelaxation (MRX) signals, in which the decaying magnetisation M(t) following a magnetising pulse is recorded by a single atomic magnetometer or by a novel magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing spatially resolved MRX studies of distributed MNP samples. We further show that optical magnetometers can be used for a direct measurement of the M(H) and dM/dH(H) dependencies of MNP samples, the latter forming the basis for an optical magnetometer implementation of the MPI (Magnetic Particle Imaging) method. All experiments are in view of developing biomedical imaging modalities.

  16. Indentation-formed nanocontacts: an atomic-scale perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Grütter, Peter

    2014-05-14

    One-to-one comparisons between indentation experiments and atomistic modelling have until recently been hampered by the discrepancy in length scales of the two approaches. Here, we review progress in atomic-scale nanoindentation experiments employing scanning probe techniques to achieve depth-sensing indentation and field ion microscopy to permit detailed indenter characterization. This perspective addresses both mechanical (dislocation nucleation, defect structures, adhesion, indenter effects) and electronic (interface, disorder, and vacancy scattering) properties of indentation-formed contacts.

  17. How predictable is plastic damage at the atomic scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Bucholz, E. W.; Peterson, G.; Reich, B. J.; Russ, J. C.; Brenner, D. W.

    2017-02-01

    The title of this letter implies two questions: To what degree is plastic damage inherently predictable at the atomic scale, and can this predictability be quantified? We answer these questions by combining image analysis with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to quantify similarities between atomic structures of plastic damage in a database of strained copper bi-crystals. We show that a manifold of different outcomes can originate ostensibly from the same initial structure, but that with this approach complex plastic damage within this manifold can be statistically connected to the initial structure. Not only does this work introduce a powerful approach for analyzing MD simulations of a complex plastic damage but also provides a much needed and critical framework for analyzing and organizing atomic-scale microstructural databases.

  18. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  19. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  20. Energy scaling of cold atom-atom-ion three-body recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Krükow, Artjom; Härter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2015-01-01

    We study three-body recombination of Ba$^+$ + Rb + Rb in the mK regime where a single $^{138}$Ba$^{+}$ ion in a Paul trap is immersed into a cloud of ultracold $^{87}$Rb atoms. We measure the energy dependence of the three-body rate coefficient $k_3$ and compare the results to the theoretical prediction, $k_3 \\propto E_{\\textrm{col}}^{-3/4}$ where $E_{\\textrm{col}}$ is the collision energy. We find agreement if we assume that the non-thermal ion energy distribution is determined by at least two different micro-motion induced energy scales. Furthermore, using classical trajectory calculations we predict how the median binding energy of the formed molecules scales with the collision energy. Our studies give new insights into the kinetics of an ion immersed into an ultracold atom cloud and yield important prospects for atom-ion experiments targeting the s-wave regime.

  1. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.

  2. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  3. DC Magnetometry at the $T_2$ Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoy, A; Cappellaro, P

    2016-01-01

    Sensing static or slowly varying magnetic fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution is critical to many applications in fundamental physics, bioimaging and materials science. Several versatile magnetometry platforms have emerged over the past decade, such as electronic spins associated with Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. However, their high sensitivity to external fields also makes them poor sensors of DC fields. Indeed, the usual method of Ramsey magnetometry leaves them prone to environmental noise, limiting the allowable interrogation time to the short dephasing time T2*. Here we introduce a hybridized magnetometery platform, consisting of a sensor and ancilla, that allows sensing static magnetic fields with interrogation times up to the much longer T2 coherence time, allowing significant potential gains in field sensitivity. While more generally applicable, we demonstrate the method for an electronic NV sensor and a nuclear ancilla. It relies on frequency upconversion of transverse DC...

  4. An ignition key for atomic-scale engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Daniel; Cunningham, Brian; Buchanan, Claire; Terasawa, Asako; Paxton, Anthony T; Todorov, Tchavdar N

    2012-10-10

    A current-carrying resonant nanoscale device, simulated by non-adiabatic molecular dynamics, exhibits sharp activation of non-conservative current-induced forces with bias. The result, above the critical bias, is generalized rotational atomic motion with a large gain in kinetic energy. The activation exploits sharp features in the electronic structure, and constitutes, in effect, an ignition key for atomic-scale motors. A controlling factor for the effect is the non-equilibrium dynamical response matrix for small-amplitude atomic motion under current. This matrix can be found from the steady-state electronic structure by a simpler static calculation, providing a way to detect the likely appearance, or otherwise, of non-conservative dynamics, in advance of real-time modelling.

  5. Molecular transport through capillaries made with atomic-scale precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, B.; Esfandiar, A.; Wang, F. C.; Rooney, A. P.; Gopinadhan, K.; Keerthi, A.; Mishchenko, A.; Janardanan, A.; Blake, P.; Fumagalli, L.; Lozada-Hidalgo, M.; Garaj, S.; Haigh, S. J.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Wu, H. A.; Geim, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    Nanometre-scale pores and capillaries have long been studied because of their importance in many natural phenomena and their use in numerous applications. A more recent development is the ability to fabricate artificial capillaries with nanometre dimensions, which has enabled new research on molecular transport and led to the emergence of nanofluidics. But surface roughness in particular makes it challenging to produce capillaries with precisely controlled dimensions at this spatial scale. Here we report the fabrication of narrow and smooth capillaries through van der Waals assembly, with atomically flat sheets at the top and bottom separated by spacers made of two-dimensional crystals with a precisely controlled number of layers. We use graphene and its multilayers as archetypal two-dimensional materials to demonstrate this technology, which produces structures that can be viewed as if individual atomic planes had been removed from a bulk crystal to leave behind flat voids of a height chosen with atomic-scale precision. Water transport through the channels, ranging in height from one to several dozen atomic planes, is characterized by unexpectedly fast flow (up to 1 metre per second) that we attribute to high capillary pressures (about 1,000 bar) and large slip lengths. For channels that accommodate only a few layers of water, the flow exhibits a marked enhancement that we associate with an increased structural order in nanoconfined water. Our work opens up an avenue to making capillaries and cavities with sizes tunable to ångström precision, and with permeation properties further controlled through a wide choice of atomically flat materials available for channel walls.

  6. Atomic and close-to-atomic scale manufacturing—A trend in manufacturing development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fengzhou

    2016-12-01

    Manufacturing is the foundation of a nation's economy. It is the primary industry to promote economic and social development. To accelerate and upgrade China's manufacturing sector from "precision manufacturing" to "high-performance and high-quality manufacturing", a new breakthrough should be found in terms of achieving a "leap-frog development". Unlike conventional manufacturing, the fundamental theory of "Manufacturing 3.0" is beyond the scope of conventional theory; rather, it is based on new principles and theories at the atomic and/or closeto- atomic scale. Obtaining a dominant role at the international level is a strategic move for China's progress.

  7. Atomic and close-to-atomic scale manufacturing—A trend in manufacturing development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fengzhou

    2016-10-01

    Manufacturing is the foundation of a nation's economy. It is the primary industry to promote economic and social development. To accelerate and upgrade China's manufacturing sector from "precision manufacturing" to "high-performance and high-quality manufacturing", a new breakthrough should be found in terms of achieving a "leap-frog development". Unlike conventional manufacturing, the fundamental theory of "Manufacturing 3.0" is beyond the scope of conventional theory; rather, it is based on new principles and theories at the atomic and/or closeto- atomic scale. Obtaining a dominant role at the international level is a strategic move for China's progress.

  8. Artificial charge-modulationin atomic-scale perovskite titanate superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, A; Muller, D A; Grazul, J L; Hwang, H Y

    2002-09-26

    The nature and length scales of charge screening in complex oxides are fundamental to a wide range of systems, spanning ceramic voltage-dependent resistors (varistors), oxide tunnel junctions and charge ordering in mixed-valence compounds. There are wide variations in the degree of charge disproportionation, length scale, and orientation in the mixed-valence compounds: these have been the subject of intense theoretical study, but little is known about the microscopic electronic structure. Here we have fabricated an idealized structure to examine these issues by growing atomically abrupt layers of LaTi(3+)O(3) embedded in SrTi(4+)O(3). Using an atomic-scale electron beam, we have observed the spatial distribution of the extra electron on the titanium sites. This distribution results in metallic conductivity, even though the superlattice structure is based on two insulators. Despite the chemical abruptness of the interfaces, we find that a minimum thickness of five LaTiO(3) layers is required for the centre titanium site to recover bulk-like electronic properties. This represents a framework within which the short-length-scale electronic response can be probed and incorporated in thin-film oxide heterostructures.

  9. Resonant magneto-optic rotation for magnetometry using autonomous frequency stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, S; Behera, R; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K

    2014-01-01

    The operation of a high sensitive atomic magnetometer using resonant elliptically polarized light is demonstrated. The experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser, thereby offers compact operation of the overall device. The magnetometry is based on measurement of the zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level system using polarimetric detection and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz1/2 @ 1 Hz.

  10. Atomic scale structure investigations of epitaxial Fe/Cr multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kąc, M., E-mail: malgorzata.kac@ifj.edu.pl [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science PAN, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Polit, A.; Zabila, Y.; Marszałek, M. [The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Fe/Cr multilayers were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on the MgO(1 0 0) substrate. Structural properties of the samples were analyzed by low energy electron diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), as well as by X-ray reflectivity, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and Auger electron spectroscopy. Investigations revealed multilayered system built of well-ordered Fe and Cr thin films with (1 0 0) orientation. A high geometrical perfection of the system, i.e. planar form of interfaces and reproducible thickness of layers, was also proven. Fe/Cr interface roughness was determined to be 2–3 atomic layers. CEMS studies allowed to analyze at atomic scale the structure of buried Fe/Cr interfaces, as well as to distinguish origin of interface roughness. Roughnesses resulting from interface corrugations and from the Fe–Cr interdiffusion at interfaces were observed. Fe/Cr multilayers showed strong antiferromagnetic coupling of Fe layers.

  11. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  12. Petascale computations for Large-scale Atomic and Molecular collisions

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, Brendan M

    2014-01-01

    Petaflop architectures are currently being utilized efficiently to perform large scale computations in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Collisions. We solve the Schroedinger or Dirac equation for the appropriate collision problem using the R-matrix or R-matrix with pseudo-states approach. We briefly outline the parallel methodology used and implemented for the current suite of Breit-Pauli and DARC codes. Various examples are shown of our theoretical results compared with those obtained from Synchrotron Radiation facilities and from Satellite observations. We also indicate future directions and implementation of the R-matrix codes on emerging GPU architectures.

  13. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  14. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  15. Symmetry-Breaking Zeeman-Coherence Parametric Wave Mixing Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Feng; Hagley, E W; Deng, L

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear magneto-optical effect has significantly impacted modern society with prolific applications ranging from precision mapping of the Earth's magnetic field to bio-magnetic sensing. Pioneering works on collisional spin-exchange effects have led to ultra-high magnetic field detection sensitivities at the level of $fT/\\sqrt{Hz}$ using a single linearly-polarized probe light field. Here we demonstrate a nonlinear Zeeman-coherence parametric wave-mixing optical-atomic magnetometer using room temperature rubidium vapor that results in more than a three-order-of-magnitude optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement for extremely weak magnetic field sensing. This unprecedented enhancement was achieved with nearly a two-order-of-magnitude reduction in laser power while preserving the sensitivity of the widely-used single-probe beam optical-atomic magnetometry method. This new method opens a myriad of applications ranging from bio-magnetic imaging to precision measurement of the magnetic properties of su...

  16. Shrinking light to allow forbidden transitions on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Kaminer, Ido; Zhen, Bo; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of light-matter interactions accessible to a system is limited by the small size of an atom relative to the wavelength of the light it emits, as well as by the small value of the fine-structure constant. We developed a general theory of light-matter interactions with two-dimensional systems supporting plasmons. These plasmons effectively make the fine-structure constant larger and bridge the size gap between atom and light. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions—such as extremely high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and singlet-triplet phosphorescence processes—can occur on very short time scales comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings may lead to new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, and broadband light generation, a potential testing ground for quantum electrodynamics (QED) in the ultrastrong coupling regime, and the ability to take advantage of the full electronic spectrum of an emitter.

  17. Atomic Scale Computer Simulation for Early Precipitation Process of Ni75Al6Vi9 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhong ZHAO; Hua HOU; Hong XU; Yongxin WANG; Zheng CHEN; Xiaodong SUN

    2003-01-01

    The atomic scale computer simulation for initial precipitation mechanism of Ni75Al6V19 alloy was carried out for the first time by employing the microscopic diffusion equation. The initial precipitation process was invest igated throughsimulating the atom

  18. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of th...

  19. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  20. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  1. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  2. Probing the conformal Calabrese-Cardy scaling with cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Unmuth-Yockey, J; Preiss, P M; Yang, Li-Ping; Tsai, S -W; Meurice, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that current experiments using cold bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices and designed to measure the second-order Renyi entanglement entropy S_2, can be used to verify detailed predictions of conformal field theory (CFT) and estimate the central charge c. We discuss the adiabatic preparation of the ground state at half-filling where we expect a CFT with c=1. This can be accomplished with a very small hoping parameter J, in contrast to existing studies with density one where a much larger J is needed. We provide two complementary methods to estimate and subtract the classical entropy generated by the experimental preparation and imaging processes. We compare numerical calculations for the classical O(2) model with a chemical potential on a 1+1 dimensional lattice, and the quantum Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian implemented in the experiments. S_2 is very similar for the two models and follows closely the Calabrese-Cardy scaling, (c/8)\\ln(N_s), for N_s sites with open boundary condi...

  3. Quantum metrology with cold atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Morgan W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum metrology uses quantum features such as entanglement and squeezing to improve the sensitivity of quantum-limited measurements. Long established as a valuable technique in optical measurements such as gravitational-wave detection, quantum metrology is increasingly being applied to atomic instruments such as matter-wave interferometers, atomic clocks, and atomic magnetometers. Several of these new applications involve dual optical/atomic quantum systems, presenting both new challenges and new opportunities. Here we describe an optical magnetometry system that achieves both shot-noise-limited and projection-noise-limited performance, allowing study of optical magnetometry in a fully-quantum regime [1]. By near-resonant Faraday rotation probing, we demonstrate measurement-based spin squeezing in a magnetically-sensitive atomic ensemble [2-4]. The versatility of this system allows us also to design metrologically-relevant optical nonlinearities, and to perform quantum-noise-limited measurements with interacting photons. As a first interaction-based measurement [5], we implement a non-linear metrology scheme proposed by Boixo et al. with the surprising feature of precision scaling better than the 1/N “Heisenberg limit” [6].

  4. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  5. Analysis and application of the scale effect of flood discharge atomization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of discharge atomization occurs as hydraulic structures discharging,which influences the safety of power station,electrical equipment and produces environmental pollution.A series of physical model tests and feedback analysis are adapted to preliminarily study the scale effect of discharge atomization model by use of the field observation data of discharge atomization.The effect of Re and We numbers of flow on the atomization intensity is analyzed.A conversion relationship of atomization intensity between prototype and model results and the similarity criteria of the atomization range are developed. The conclusion is that the surface tension of discharge atomization model could be ignored when the Weber number is larger than 500.Some case studies are given by use of the similitude criteria of the atomization model.

  6. Atomic scale behavior of oxygen-based radicals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlackt, C. C. W.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas in and in contact with liquids represent a growing field of research for various applications. Understanding the interactions between the plasma generated species and the liquid is crucial. In this work we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a quantum mechanical method, i.e. density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB), to examine the interactions of OH radicals and O atoms in bulk water. Our calculations reveal that the transport of OH radicals through water is not only governed by diffusion, but also by an equilibrium reaction of H-abstraction with water molecules. Furthermore, when two OH radicals encounter each other, they either form a stable cluster, or react, resulting in the formation of a new water molecule and an O atom. In addition, the O atoms form either oxywater (when in singlet configuration) or they remain stable in solution (when in triplet configuration), stressing the important role that O atoms can play in aqueous solution, and in contact with biomolecules. Our observations are in line with both experimental and ab initio results from the literature.

  7. Atomic-Scale Variations of the Mechanical Response of 2D Materials Detected by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, B; Ellner, M; Pou, P; Nicoara, N; Pérez, Rubén; Gómez-Rodríguez, J M

    2016-06-17

    We show that noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) is sensitive to the local stiffness in the atomic-scale limit on weakly coupled 2D materials, as graphene on metals. Our large amplitude AFM topography and dissipation images under ultrahigh vacuum and low temperature resolve the atomic and moiré patterns in graphene on Pt(111), despite its extremely low geometric corrugation. The imaging mechanisms are identified with a multiscale model based on density-functional theory calculations, where the energy cost of global and local deformations of graphene competes with short-range chemical and long-range van der Waals interactions. Atomic contrast is related with short-range tip-sample interactions, while the dissipation can be understood in terms of global deformations in the weakly coupled graphene layer. Remarkably, the observed moiré modulation is linked with the subtle variations of the local interplanar graphene-substrate interaction, opening a new route to explore the local mechanical properties of 2D materials at the atomic scale.

  8. Atomic-scale non-contact AFM studies of alumina supported nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Meinander, Kristoffer; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    ATOMIC-SCALE NON-CONTACT ATOMIC FORCE STUDIES OF ALUMINA SUPPORTED NANOPARTICLES Thomas N. Jensen, Kristoffer Meinander, Flemming Besenbacher and Jeppe V. Lauritsen Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark Heterogeneous catalysis plays a crucial role...... materials is a prerequisite for the synthesis of more sintering stable catalysts and the realizations of nanocatalysts implementing catalyst particles with a tailored size and morphology. In the last two decades the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become one of the premier tools for studying surfaces...... at the nanometre scale [1]. When operated in the so-called non-contact mode (nc-AFM), this technique yields genuine atomic resolution and offers a unique tool for atomic-scale studies of clean surfaces, as well as, nanoparticles and thin films on these surfaces irrespective of the substrate being electrically...

  9. The effect of atomic-scale defects and dopants on graphene electronic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Martinazzo, Rocco; Casolo, Simone; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2011-01-01

    Graphene, being one-atom thick, is extremely sensitive to the presence of adsorbed atoms and molecules and, more generally, to defects such as vacancies, holes and/or substitutional dopants. This property, apart from being directly usable in molecular sensor devices, can also be employed to tune graphene electronic properties. Here we briefly review the basic features of atomic-scale defects that can be useful for material design. After a brief introduction on isolated $p_z$ defects, we analy...

  10. Atomic scale imaging of hydroxyapatite and brushite in air by force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siperko, Lorraine M.; Landis, William J.

    1992-11-01

    A method for obtaining atomic scale images of powder samples by force microscopy has been used to determine surface structures of hydroxyapatite and brushite. From isolated hydroxyapatite crystal clusters, two crystal planes have been identified. The and spacings obtained agree well with published crystallographic values. Groups of brushite platelets yielded atomic spacings which are presumed to be those of the crystal plane.

  11. Direct observation of atomic-scale origins of local dissolution in Al-Cu-Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Wang, J.; Wu, B.; Oguzie, E. E.; Luo, K.; Ma, X. L.

    2016-12-01

    Atomistic chemical inhomogeneities are anticipated to induce dissimilarities in surface potentials, which control corrosion initiation of alloys at the atomic scale. Precise understanding of corrosion is therefore hampered by lack of definite information describing how atomistic heterogeneities regulate the process. Here, using high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques, we systematically analyzed the Al20Cu2Mn3 second phase of 2024Al and successfully observed that atomic-scale segregation of Cu at defect sites induced preferential dissolution of the adjacent zones. We define an “atomic-scale galvanic cell”, composed of zones rich in Cu and its surrounding matrix. Our findings provide vital information linking atomic-scale microstructure and pitting mechanism, particularly for Al-Cu-Mg alloys. The resolution achieved also enables understanding of dealloying mechanisms and further streamlines our comprehension of the concept of general corrosion.

  12. Deciphering Adsorption Structure on Insulators at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Feibelman, Peter J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Nanotechnologies

    2014-09-01

    We applied Scanning Probe Microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) to discover the basics of how adsorbates wet insulating substrates, addressing a key question in geochemistry. To allow experiments on insulating samples we added Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) capability to our existing UHV Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). This was accomplished by integrating and debugging a commercial qPlus AFM upgrade. Examining up-to-40-nm-thick water films grown in vacuum we found that the exact nature of the growth spirals forming around dislocations determines what structure of ice, cubic or hexagonal, is formed at low temperature. DFT revealed that wetting of mica is controlled by how exactly a water layer wraps around (hydrates) the K+ ions that protrude from the mica surface. DFT also sheds light on the experimentally observed extreme sensitivity of the mica surface to preparation conditions: K atoms can easily be rinsed off by water flowing past the mica surface.

  13. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kroger, J.; Berndt, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure...... of the surface electrode. Nonequilibrium Green's function calculations reproduce the trend of the conductance and visualize the current flow through the junction, which is guided through molecule-electrode chemical bonds....

  14. Elemental mapping at the atomic scale using low accelerating voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botton, Gianluigi A., E-mail: gbotton@mcmaster.ca [Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, Canada L8S 4M1 (Canada); Lazar, Sorin [Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, Canada L8S 4M1 (Canada); FEI Electron Optics, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dwyer, Christian [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    Atomic resolved elemental mapping is demonstrated at 80 keV with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope on specimens of SrTiO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}. The maps were acquired with acquisition times as short as 30 ms per pixel (limited by the spectrometer speed), and show very high signal-to-noise ratio and very good detection limits. The features in the elemental maps are interpreted with the help of elastic-inelastic multislice calculations, which show good agreement with experimental images. The elemental maps of Ti, Sr and Ba and their contrast at the interface between BaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} are discussed, following a comparison with calculations, assuming an atomically sharp interface. The features in the energy-filtered maps and the background intensities, and the influence of the energy position of the integration windows are discussed in terms of the origins of the signals and the features with respect to the details shown in the high-angle annular dark-field images. The benefits of elemental mapping at 80 keV as compared to 200 keV are also discussed in terms of electron beam damage. Finally, applications of elemental mapping to the detection of La atoms in solid solution in Ba{sub 3.25}La{sub 0.75}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} films are also shown.

  15. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  16. Mapping the Microscale Origins of MRI Contrast with Subcellular NV Diamond Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Hunter C; Bhatnagar, Aadyot; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Barry, John F; Glenn, David R; Walsworth, Ronald L; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used biomedical imaging modality that derives much of its contrast from microscale magnetic field gradients in biological tissues. However, the connection between these sub-voxel field patterns and MRI contrast has not been studied experimentally. Here, we describe a new method to map subcellular magnetic fields in mammalian cells and tissues using nitrogen vacancy diamond magnetometry and connect these maps to voxel-scale MRI contrast, providing insights for in vivo imaging and contrast agent design.

  17. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  18. Single-Spin Magnetometry with Multipulse Sensing Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.; Ristè, D.; Dobrovitski, V.V.; Hanson, R.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate single-spin magnetometry with multipulse sensing sequences. The use of multipulse sequences can greatly increase the sensing time per measurement shot, resulting in enhanced ac magnetic field sensitivity. We theoretically derive and experimentally verify the optimal num

  19. Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0166 Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal OxideS ASHLIE MARTINI UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED Final Report 06/01/2015...COVERED (From - To)      01-05-2012 to 30-04-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving...understand, at an atomic level, the material properties that influence the thermal, mechanical and tribological behavior of intrinsically layered binary

  20. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, K.; Johnson, H. T.; Freund, J. B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Mechanical Science and Engineering and Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 1206 West Green Street MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Focused ion beams provide a means of nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, which is used for applications such as forming nanometer-scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. We investigate such a configuration with Ga{sup +} bombardment of a Si thin-film target using molecular dynamics simulation. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A flow model with Marangoni forcing, based upon the temperature gradient and geometry from the atomistic simulation, indeed reproduces the flow and thus could be used to anticipate such flows and their influence in applications.

  1. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  2. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  3. Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R. [Climate and Environment Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-24

    The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superimposed at finite temperature. Nevertheless, the peak values of the lateral force, and the total energy losses, are expected to increase with the excitation amplitude, which may limit the practical relevance of this effect.

  4. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  5. Laser remote magnetometry using mesospheric sodium

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Thomas J; Denman, Craig A; Hart, Michael; Scott, R Phillip; Purucker, Michael E; Potashnik, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a remote magnetometer based on sodium atoms in the Earth's mesosphere, at a 106-kilometer distance from our instrument. A 1.33-watt laser illuminated the atoms, and the magnetic field was inferred from back-scattered light collected by a telescope with a 1.55-meter-diameter aperture. The measurement sensitivity was 162 nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$. The value of magnetic field inferred from our measurement is consistent with an estimate based on the Earth's known field shape to within a fraction of a percent. Projected improvements in optics could lead to sensitivity of 20 nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$, and the use of advanced lasers or a large telescope could approach 1-nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ sensitivity. All experimental and theoretical sensitivity values are based on a 60$^\\circ$ angle between the laser beam axis and the magnetic field vector; at the optimal 90$^\\circ$ angle sensitivity would be improved by about a factor of two.

  6. Influence of atomic force microscope tip-sample interaction on the study of scaling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aue, J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Images acquired with atomic force microscopy are based on tip-sample interaction. It is shown that using scanning probe techniques for determining scaling parameters of a surface leads to an underestimate of the actual scaling dimension, due to the dilation of tip and surface. How much we underestim

  7. Atomic force microscopy of atomic-scale ledges and etch pits formed during dissolution of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, A. J.; Manne, S.; Hansma, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    The processes involved in the dissolution and growth of crystals are closely related. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of faceted pits (called negative crystals) formed during quartz dissolution reveals subtle details of these underlying physical mechanisms for silicates. In imaging these surfaces, the AFM detected ledges less than 1 nm high that were spaced 10 to 90 nm apart. A dislocation pit, invisible to optical and scanning electron microscopy measurements and serving as a ledge source, was also imaged. These observations confirm the applicability of ledge-motion models to dissolution and growth of silicates; coupled with measurements of dissolution rate on facets, these methods provide a powerful tool for probing mineral surface kinetics.

  8. Atomic-scale thermocapillary flow in focused ion beam milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kallol; Johnson, Harley; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Focused ion beams (FIB) offer an attractive tool for nanometer-scale manufacturing and material processing, particularly because they can be focused to a few nanometer diameter spot. This motivates their use for many applications, such as sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), forming nanometer scale pores in thin films for DNA sequencing. Despite its widespread use, the specific mechanisms of FIB milling, especially at high ion fluxes for which significant phase change might occur, remains incompletely understood. Here we investigate the process of nanopore fabrication in thin Si films using molecular dynamics simulation where Ga+ ions are used as the focused ions. For a range of ion intensities in a realistic configuration, a recirculating melt region develops, which is seen to flow with a symmetrical pattern, counter to how it would flow were it is driven by the ion momentum flux. Such flow is potentially important for the shape and composition of the formed structures. Relevant stress scales and estimated physical properties of silicon under these extreme conditions support the importance thermocapillary effects. A continuum flow model with Marangoni forcing reproduces the flow.

  9. Implementation of Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software by N Scott Weingarten and James P Larentzos Approved for...0687 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Implementation of Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic /Molecular...Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena.

  11. Atomic Scale Mixing for Inertial Confinement Fusion Associated Hydro Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-26

    observe that the obvious step of RT validation using NIF or Omega laser data does not address themultimode, mode coupling RTgrowth stage, as the...ignition facility, Phys. Plasmas 18 (2011) 051001. [2] W. Goldstein, R. Rosner, Workshop on the Science of Fusion Ignition on NIF , Technical Report LLNL-TR...11 (2004) 339e491. [6] S.P. Regan, R. Epstein, B.A. Hammel, L.J. Suter, J. Ralph, et al., Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF , Phys

  12. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of a |M|=1 Rydberg barium atom in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Quan Wei; Shen Li; Yang Hai-Feng; Shi Ting-Yun; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We observe strong energy-dependent quantum defects in the scaled-energy Stark spectra for |M|=1 Rydberg states of barium atoms at three scaled energies: ε= -2.000, ε= -2.500 and ε=-3.000. In an attempt to explain the observations, theoretical calculations of closed orbit theory based on a model potential including core effect are performed for non-hydrogenic atoms. While such a potential has been uniformly successful for alkali atoms with a single valence electron, it fails to match experimental results for barium atoms in the 6snp Rydberg states with two valence electrons. Our study points out that this discrepancy is due to the strong perturbation from the 5d8p state, which voids the simple approximation for constant quantum defects of principle quantum number n.

  13. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  14. Fundamental Enabling Issues in Nanotechnology: Stress at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Foiles, Stephen Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hearne, Sean Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoyt, Jeffrey John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seel, Steven Craig [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emcore Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Edmund Blackburn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morales, Alfredo Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Zimmerman, Jonathan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-10-01

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also support the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g., continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in

  15. Prospects of solar magnetometry - from ground and in space

    CERN Document Server

    Kleint, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of observing facilities for solar research, which are planned or will come to operation in near future. We concentrate on facilities, which harbor specific potential for solar magnetometry. We describe the challenges and science goals of future magnetic measurements, the status of magnetic field measurements at different major solar observatories, and provide an outlook on possible upgrades of future instrumentation.

  16. Electronic friction at the atomic scale: Conduction, electrostatic and magnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5K) in the temperature range 65 - 293 K, to explore electronic contributions to friction at the atomic scale. The samples were prepared with oxygen-depleted surfaces, with thin semiconducting surface layers present atop the bulk. Below Tc, the friction coefficient was observed to be constant at 0.19 and exhibited no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces observed below Tc. The friction coefficient exhibited a change in slope within experimental error of Tc that increased progressively above Tc and reached 0.33 by room temperature. The results were analyzed within the context of underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction we conclude that contact electrification and static electricity play a significant role above Tc. Supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  17. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  18. Nanometer scale period sinusoidal atom gratings produced by a Stern-Gerlach beam splitter

    CERN Document Server

    Dubetsky, B

    2002-01-01

    An atom interferometer based on a Stern-Gerlach beam splitter is proposed. Atom scattering from a combination of magnetic quadrupole and homogeneous magnetic fields is considered. Using Raman transitions, atoms are coherently excited into and de-excited from sublevels having nonzero magnetic quantum numbers. The spatial regions in which the atoms are in such sublevels are small and have magnetic fields designed to have constant gradients. Therefore, the atoms experience position-independent accelerations, and the aberration of the coherently separated and recombined atomic beams remains small. We find that because of these properties it is possible to envision an apparatus producing atomic density gratings with nm-scale periods and large contrasts over 10-100 $\\mu $m. We use a new method of describing the atomic interaction with a pulsed spatially homogeneous field. In our detailed analysis, we calculate corrections caused by the non-linear part of the potential and the finite value of the de-Broglie wave len...

  19. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...... nanoparticles synthesized on Au(lll), and establishes a new picture of the active edge sires of the nanoclusters. The results demonstrate a way to get detailed atomic-scale information on catalysts in general....

  20. Current trends in ground based solar magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Continuous observations of the sun, over more than a century, have led to several important discoveries in solar astronomy. These include the discovery of the solar magnetism and its cyclic modulation, active region formation and decay and their role in energetic phenomena such as fares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), fine structure and dynamics of the sunspots and small-scale organization of the magnetic flux in the form of flux tubes and so forth. In this article we give a brief overview of advancements in solar observational techniques in recent decades and the results obtained from the such observations. These include techniques to achieve high angular resolution, high spectral and polarimetric sensitivity and innovative new detectors. A wide range of spatial, temporal and spectral domains exploited by solar astronomers to understand the solar phenomena are discussed. Many new upcoming telescopes and instruments that are designed to address different aspects of solar physics problems are briefly described. Finally, we discuss the advantages of observing from the ground and how they can complement space-based observations.

  1. [Constant scaled-energy spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in a static electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun-wen; Liu, Xiao-jun; Zhao, Zhi; Zhan, Ming-sheng

    2002-02-01

    In the past years, scaled energy spectroscopy is under active investigation because this method can simplify the analysis of atomic spectra in the external field based on classic mechanics. A fully computer-controlled experimental system to study the constant scaled-energy spectroscopy was established and described in this paper. The excitation energy E and the strength of the external electric field F were controlled synchronously to keep the scaled-energy epsilon = E/square root of F constant. With this system, constant scaled-energy spectra of Strontium Rydberg atoms at epsilon = -3.0 in a static electric field were successfully recorded for the first time, and the recurrence spectra were obtained by a Fourier transform.

  2. Engineering the magnetic anisotropy of atomic-scale nanostructure under electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanjiao; Ding, Hang-Chen; Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures are promising candidates for future information processing devices. Utilizing external electric field to manipulate their magnetic properties is an especially thrilling project. Here, by carefully identifying the different contributions of each atomic orbital to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the ferromagnetic metal films, we argue that it is possible to engineer both the MAE and the magnetic response to the electric field of atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures. Taking the iron monolayer as a matrix, we propose several interesting iron nanostructures with dramatically different magnetic properties. Such nanostructures could exhibit a strong magnetoelectric effect. Our work may open new avenues to the artificial design of electrically controlled magnetic devices.

  3. Time scaling with efficient time-propagation techniques for atoms and molecules in pulsed radiation fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hamido, Aliou; Madroñero, Javier; Mota-Furtado, Francisca; O'Mahony, Patrick; Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Piraux, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    We present an ab initio approach to solve the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation to treat electron and photon impact multiple ionization of atoms or molecules. It combines the already known time scaled coordinate method with a new high order time propagator based on a predictor-corrector scheme. In order to exploit in an optimal way the main advantage of the time scaled coordinate method namely that the scaled wave packet stays confined and evolves smoothly towards a stationary state the modulus square of which being directly proportional to the electron energy spectra in each ionization channel, we show that the scaled bound states should be subtracted from the total scaled wave packet. In addition, our detailed investigations suggest that multi-resolution techniques like for instance, wavelets are the most appropriate ones to represent spatially the scaled wave packet. The approach is illustrated in the case of the interaction of an one-dimensional model atom as well as atomic hydrogen with a strong osci...

  4. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  5. Scaled-Down Moderator Circulation Test Facility at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Tae Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI started the experimental research on moderator circulation as one of a the national research and development programs from 2012. This research program includes the construction of the moderator circulation test (MCT facility, production of the validation data for self-reliant computational fluid dynamics (CFD tools, and development of optical measurement system using the particle image velocimetry (PIV. In the present paper we introduce the scaling analysis performed to extend the scaling criteria suitable for reproducing thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a scaled-down CANDU- (CANada Deuterium Uranium- 6 moderator tank, a manufacturing status of the 1/4 scale moderator tank. Also, preliminary CFD analysis results for the full-size and scaled-down moderator tanks are carried out to check whether the moderator flow and temperature patterns of both the full-size reactor and scaled-down facility are identical.

  6. Atomic-scale imaging of few-layer black phosphorus and its reconstructed edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangjin; Yoon, Jun-Yeong; Scullion, Declan; Jang, Jeongsu; Santos, Elton J. G.; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Kwanpyo

    2017-03-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently emerged as an alternative 2D semiconductor owing to its fascinating electronic properties such as tunable bandgap and high charge carrier mobility. The structural investigation of few-layer BP, such as identification of layer thickness and atomic-scale edge structure, is of great importance to fully understand its electronic and optical properties. Here we report atomic-scale analysis of few-layered BP performed by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We establish the layer-number-dependent atomic resolution imaging of few-layer BP via TEM imaging and image simulations. The structural modification induced by the electron beam leads to revelation of crystalline edge and formation of BP nanoribbons. Atomic resolution imaging of BP clearly shows the reconstructed zigzag (ZZ) edge structures, which is also corroborated by van der Waals first principles calculations on the edge stability. Our study on the precise identification of BP thickness and atomic-resolution imaging of edge structures will lay the groundwork for investigation of few-layer BP, especially BP in nanostructured forms.

  7. DNA flexibility on short length scales probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K; Maaloum, Mounir

    2014-02-14

    Unusually high bending flexibility has been recently reported for DNA on short length scales. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solution to obtain a direct estimate of DNA bending statistics for scales down to one helical turn. It appears that DNA behaves as a Gaussian chain and is well described by the wormlike chain model at length scales beyond 3 helical turns (10.5 nm). Below this threshold, the AFM data exhibit growing noise because of experimental limitations. This noise may hide small deviations from the Gaussian behavior, but they can hardly be significant.

  8. Using ultrasonic atomization to produce an aerosol of micron-scale particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, T. D.; Hogan, J.; Mugler, A.; Schubmehl, M.; Schommer, N.; Bernoff, A. J.; Dasnurkar, S.; Ditmire, T.

    2005-11-01

    A device that uses ultrasonic atomization of a liquid to produce an aerosol of micron-scale droplets is described. This device represents a new approach to producing targets relevant to laser-driven fusion studies, and to rare studies of nonlinear optics in which wavelength-scale targets are irradiated. The device has also made possible tests of fluid dynamics models in a novel phase space. The distribution of droplet sizes produced by the device and the threshold power required for droplet production are shown to follow scaling laws predicted by fluid dynamics.

  9. Atomic-Scale Mechanism for Hydrogenation of o-Cresol on Pt Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Xue, Wenhua; Crossley, Steven; Jentoft, Friederike; Wang, Sanwu

    Biofuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass have received significant attention lately due to increasing environmental concerns. With first-principles density-functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations, we investigated the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) was found to involve two steps. The first step is the dehydrogenation, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group moves to the Pt surface. The second step is the hydrogenation, that is, the H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. The first step involves a smaller barrier, suggesting that dehydrogenation occurs first, followed by hydrogenation of the ring. In particular, tautomerization is found to occur via a two-step process over the catalyst. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) is produced through two paths. One is direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another pathway includes partial hydrogenation of the ring, dehydrogenation of -OH group, finally hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom. Our theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of NERSC, XSEDE, TACC.

  10. Construction of an E. Coli genome-scale atom mapping model for MFA calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikirthi, Prabhasa; Suthers, Patrick F; Maranas, Costas D

    2011-06-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has so far been restricted to lumped networks lacking many important pathways, partly due to the difficulty in automatically generating isotope mapping matrices for genome-scale metabolic networks. Here we introduce a procedure that uses a compound matching algorithm based on the graph theoretical concept of pattern recognition along with relevant reaction information to automatically generate genome-scale atom mappings which trace the path of atoms from reactants to products for every reaction. The procedure is applied to the iAF1260 metabolic reconstruction of Escherichia coli yielding the genome-scale isotope mapping model imPR90068. This model maps 90,068 non-hydrogen atoms that span all 2,077 reactions present in iAF1260 (previous largest mapping model included 238 reactions). The expanded scope of the isotope mapping model allows the complete tracking of labeled atoms through pathways such as cofactor and prosthetic group biosynthesis and histidine metabolism. An EMU representation of imPR90068 is also constructed and made available.

  11. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  12. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnohr, C. S., E-mail: c.schnohr@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As, GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x}, or CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  13. Atomic-scale study of transformation paths in unmixing and ordering reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D.; Pareige-Schmuck, C.; Danoix, F. [CNRS, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Fac. des Sci. de Rouen; Stiller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The tomographic atom-probe (TAP) is a new high resolution nanoanalytical microscope, which provides three-dimensional maps of chemical heterogeneities in a metallic material on a near-atomic scale. Application of the TAP to unmixing and ordering in metallic alloys is discussed and illustrated through various examples (spinodal decomposition in FeCr ferritic phases, nucleation and growth of LI{sub 2} ordered precipitates in nickel based alloys, precipitation in maraging steels). The role of the TAP in the investigation of transformation paths in these systems is discussed. (orig.). 17 refs.

  14. Finite Bias Calculations to Model Interface Dipoles in Electrochemical Cells at the Atomic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure t...... to satisfy the thermodynamic constraints imposed by the environment. This is captured by the generalized computational hydrogen electrode model, which enables us to make efficient first-principles calculations of atomic scale properties of the electrochemical interface.......The structure of an electrochemical interface is not determined by any external electrostatic field, but rather by external chemical potentials. This paper demonstrates that the electric double layer should be understood fundamentally as an internal electric field set up by the atomic structure...

  15. Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

    2003-04-01

    Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

  16. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schumann, F.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  17. Scale Factor Measurements for a Gyroscope Based on an Expanding Cloud of Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, Gregory; Pelle, Bruno; Riedl, Stefan; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    We present an atom interferometer that can simultaneously measure two-axis rotations and one-axis accelerations with a single cloud of atoms in an active evacuated volume of about 1 cm3. This is accomplished by extending the point-source interferometry technique (Dickerson et al. PRL, 111, 083001, 2013) to a compact regime. In this technique, the cloud of atoms is imaged after the interferometer sequence. Rotations cause spatial fringes to appear across the cloud. To realize a gyroscope with this method, it is necessary to know how the wave-vector of the spatial fringes, k, is related to the rotation rate, Ω. If the cloud is initially infinitesimally small, it can be shown that k = FΩ with a scale factor F determined by the time between interferometer pulses, the total free expansion time, and the wavelength of the interrogating laser. However, the point-source approximation is not appropriate in our case because the final size of the cloud in our experiment is between 1.4 and 5 times its initial size. We show experimentally that in this finite expansion regime the phase gradient is still well described by k = FΩ , but the scale factor F depends on the initial distribution of the atoms. We also present modeling that explains this dependence.

  18. An experimental study of micron-scale droplet aerosols produced via ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, T. D.; Hogan, J.; Mugler, A.; Schommer, N.; Schubmehl, M.; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Forrest, B.

    2004-08-01

    In the last 10 years, laser-driven fusion experiments performed on atomic clusters of deuterium have shown a surprisingly high neutron yield per joule of input laser energy. Results indicate that the optimal cluster size for maximizing fusion events should be in the 0.01-1 μm diameter range, but an appropriate source of droplets of this size does not exist. In an attempt to meet this need, we use ultrasonic atomization to generate micron-scale droplet aerosols of high average density, and we have developed and refined a reliable droplet sizing technique based on Mie scattering. Harmonic excitation of the fluid in the MHz range yields an aerosol of droplets with diameters of a few microns. The droplet diameter distribution is well-peaked and the relationship between average droplet size and forcing frequency follows an inviscid scaling law, predictable by dimensional analysis and consistent with the linear theory for Faraday excitation of an infinitely deep fluid.

  19. Sensitive measurement of forces at the micron scale using Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carusotto, I; Pitaevskii, L; Stringari, S; Modugno, G; Inguscio, M

    2005-08-26

    We show that Bloch oscillations of ultracold fermionic atoms in the periodic potential of an optical lattice can be used for a sensitive measurement of forces at the micrometer length scale, e.g., in the vicinity of a dielectric surface. In particular, the proposed approach allows us to perform a local and direct measurement of the Casimir-Polder force which is, for realistic experimental parameters, as large as 10(-4) gravity.

  20. Visualizing the large-$Z$ scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large $Z$, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualize the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly-varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models...

  1. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  2. Efficient route to high-bandwidth nanoscale magnetometry using single spins in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Graciana; Waldherr, Gerald; Neumann, Philipp; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-04-14

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising quantum metrology tool finding applications across disciplines. The spin sensor measures magnetic fields, electric fields and temperature with nano-scale precision and is fully operable under ambient conditions. Moreover, it achieves precision scaling inversely with total measurement time σB ∝ 1/T (Heisenberg scaling) rather than as the inverse of the square root of T, with σB = √T the Shot-Noise limit. This scaling can be achieved by means of phase estimation algorithms (PEAs), in combination with single-shot read-out. Despite their accuracy, the range of applicability of PEAs is limited to sensing single frequencies with negligible temporal fluctuations. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals from molecules often contain multifrequency components and sensing them using PEA is ruled out. Here we propose an alternative method for precision magnetometry in frequency multiplexed signals via compressive sensing (CS) techniques focusing on nanoscale NMR. We show that CS can provide for precision scaling approximately as σB ≈ 1/T, as well as for a 5-fold increase in sensitivity over dynamic-range gain, in addition to reducing the total number of resources required. We illustrate our method by taking model solid-state spectra of Glycine acquired under Magic Angle Spinning conditions.

  3. Ultrasensitive magnetometer using a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, I; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2014-01-01

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry scales as $1/\\sqrt {T_2}$ with the phase coherence time, $T_2$, of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending $T_2$ by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of $4$ pT Hz$^{-1/2}$ for an alternating-current (AC) magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tuneability from direct-current to the gigahertz range could be used for mag...

  4. Ultrasensitive Magnetometer using a Single Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, I; Cai, J-M; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2016-06-17

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers, often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry, scales as 1/sqrt[T_{2}] with the phase coherence time T_{2} of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending T_{2} by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of 4.6  pT/sqrt[Hz] for an alternating-current magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tunability from direct current to the gigahertz range could be used for magnetic imaging in as of yet inaccessible parameter regimes.

  5. Ultra-sensitive atomic spin measurements with a nonlinear interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sewell, R J; Behbood, N; Colangelo, G; Ciurana, F Martin; Mitchell, M W

    2013-01-01

    Quantum metrology studies and improves quantum-limited ultra-sensitive measurements. Both linear interferometers, e.g. gravitational wave observatories, and nonlinear interferometers, e.g. optical magnetometers, have been enhanced by quantum metrology. The sensitivities of nonlinear interferometers scale better with system size than even quantum-enhanced linear interferometers, so-called `super-Heisenberg scaling', but it is actively debated whether this scaling can lead to better absolute sensitivity. Here we demonstrate a nonlinear measurement that surpasses, through super-Heisenberg scaling, the best possible linear measurement of the same quantity. We use alignment-to-orientation conversion, a practical magnetometry technique, to make a quantum non-demolition measurement of the spin alignment of a sample of $^{87}$Rb atoms. We observe absolute sensitivity 9 dB beyond the best comparable linear measurement and measurement-induced spin squeezing. The results provide insight into ultra-sensitive magnetometer...

  6. Magnetic properties of cobalt microwires measured by piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosolini G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic characterization of cobalt wires grown by focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID and studied using static piezoresistive cantilever magnetometry. We have used previously developed high force sensitive submicron-thick silicon piezoresistive cantilevers. High quality polycrystalline cobalt microwires have been grown by FEBID onto the free end of the cantilevers using dual beam equipment. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the magnetic cobalt wires become magnetized, which leads to the magnetic field dependent static deflection of the cantilevers. We show that the piezoresistive signal from the cantilevers, corresponding to a maximum force of about 1 nN, can be measured as a function of the applied magnetic field with a good signal to noise ratio at room temperature. The results highlight the flexibility of the FEBID technique for the growth of magnetic structures on specific substrates, in this case piezoresistive cantilevers.

  7. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  8. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Rama K., E-mail: rvv@ornl.gov; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Gianfrancesco, Anthony G. [UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); UT/ORNL Bredesen Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  9. Large-scale chemical assembly of atomically thin transistors and circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mervin; Ye, Yu; Han, Yimo; Xia, Yang; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Siqi; Wang, Yuan; Muller, David A.; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation electronics calls for new materials beyond silicon, aiming at increased functionality, performance and scaling in integrated circuits. In this respect, two-dimensional gapless graphene and semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides have emerged as promising candidates due to their atomic thickness and chemical stability. However, difficulties with precise spatial control during their assembly currently impede actual integration into devices. Here, we report on the large-scale, spatially controlled synthesis of heterostructures made of single-layer semiconducting molybdenum disulfide contacting conductive graphene. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the single-layer molybdenum disulfide nucleates at the graphene edges. We demonstrate that such chemically assembled atomic transistors exhibit high transconductance (10 µS), on-off ratio (˜106) and mobility (˜17 cm2 V-1 s-1). The precise site selectivity from atomically thin conducting and semiconducting crystals enables us to exploit these heterostructures to assemble two-dimensional logic circuits, such as an NMOS inverter with high voltage gain (up to 70).

  10. Linear scaling coupled cluster and perturbation theories in the atomic orbital basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Ayala, Philippe Y.

    1999-11-01

    We present a reformulation of the coupled cluster equations in the atomic orbital (AO) basis that leads to a linear scaling algorithm for large molecules. Neglecting excitation amplitudes in a screening process designed to achieve a target energy accuracy, we obtain an AO coupled cluster method which is competitive in terms of number of amplitudes with the traditional molecular orbital (MO) solution, even for small molecules. For large molecules, the decay properties of integrals and excitation amplitudes becomes evident and our AO method yields a linear scaling algorithm with respect to molecular size. We present benchmark calculations to demonstrate that our AO reformulation of the many-body electron correlation problem defeats the "exponential scaling wall" that has characterized high-level MO quantum chemistry calculations for many years.

  11. Thin Film of Perovskite Oxide with Atomic Scale p-n Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bin; HUANG Ke-ke; HOU Chang-min; YUAN Hong-ming; PANG Guang-sheng; FENG Shou-hua

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of perovskite manganese oxide La0.66Ca0.29K0.05MnO3(LCKMO) on Au/ITO(ITO=indium tin oxide) substrates were prepared by off-axis radio frequency magnetron sputtering and characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) at room temperature.The thin films with thickness ranged from 100 nm to 300 nm basically show cubic structures with a=0.3886 nm,the same as that of the raw material used,but the structures are highly modulated.C-AFM results revealed that the atomic scale p-n junction feature of the thin films was the same as that of the single crystals.The preparation of the thin films thus further confirms the possibility of their application extending from micrometer-sized single crystals to macroscopic thin film.

  12. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  13. Visualization of atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors: Application to FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Peayush; Berlijn, T.; Kreisel, A.; Cao, C.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a simple method of calculating inhomogeneous, atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors which makes use of the wave function information traditionally discarded in the construction of tight-binding models used in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The method uses symmetry-based first-principles Wannier functions to visualize the effects of superconducting pairing on the distribution of electronic states over atoms within a crystal unit cell. Local symmetries lower than the global lattice symmetry can thus be exhibited as well, rendering theoretical comparisons with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data much more useful. As a simple example, we discuss the geometric dimer states observed near defects in superconducting FeSe.

  14. Experimental investigation of atomic collisions in time scales varying from nanosecond to microseconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Matherson, K J; Wallace, W; Sang, R T, E-mail: R.Sang@griffith.edu.a [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

    2010-02-01

    We present the results from two experiments investigating collisions that differ in time scale by three orders of magnitude. The first experiment enables the determination of absolute total collision cross sections using a technique that measures a change in the loss rate of trapped atoms from a magneto optical trap (MOT). We also investigate light assisted collision processes between cold metastable neon atoms in the {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable state within the MOT. A catalysis laser is scanned in frequency across the {sup 3}P{sub 2} - {sup 3}D{sub 3} cooling transition and the ionization rate was observed. Ionization spectra are obtained which demonstrate a dependence on the magnetic sublevels of the transition that the catalysis laser is exciting.

  15. Atomic scale control and understanding of cubic silicon carbide surface reconstructions, nanostructures and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Enriquez, Hanna B.

    2004-05-01

    The atomic scale ordering and properties of cubic silicon carbide (bgr-SiC) surfaces and nanostructures are investigated by atom-resolved room and high-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), synchrotron radiation-based valence band and core level photoelectron spectroscopy (VB-PES, CL-PES) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). In this paper, we review the latest results on the atomic scale understanding of (i) the structure of bgr-SiC(100) surface reconstructions, (ii) temperature-induced metallic surface phase transition, (iii) one dimensional Si(C) self-organized nanostructures having unprecedented characteristics, and on (iv) nanochemistry at SiC surfaces with hydrogen. The organization of these surface reconstructions as well as the 1D nanostructures' self-organization are primarily driven by surface stress. In this paper, we address such important issues as (i) the structure of the Si-rich 3 × 2, the Si-terminated c (4 × 2), the C-terminated c (2 × 2) reconstructions of the bgr-SiC(100) surface, (ii) the temperature-induced reversible {\\mathrm {c}}(4\\times 2) \\Leftrightarrow 2\\times 1 metallic phase transition, (iii) the formation of highly stable (up to 900 °C) Si atomic and vacancy lines, (iv) the temperature-induced sp to sp3 diamond like surface transformation, and (v) the first example of H-induced semiconductor surface metallization on the bgr-SiC (100) 3 × 2 surface. The results are discussed and compared to other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  16. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi (State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY)

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  17. Atomic-scale simulations of the mechanical deformation of nanocrystalline metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Vegge, Tejs; Di Tolla, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, i.e., metals in which the grain size is in the nanometer range, have a range of technologically interesting properties including increased hardness and yield strength. We present atomic-scale simulations of the plastic behavior of nanocrystalline copper. The simulations show...... leads to a hardening as the grain size is increased (reverse Hall-Fetch effect), implying a maximum in hardness for a grain size above the ones studied here. We investigate the effects of varying temperature, strain rate, and porosity, and discuss the relation to recent experiments. At increasing...

  18. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium \\|M\\|=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kips, Annemieke; Vassen, Wim; Hogervorst, Wim; Dando, Paul A.

    1998-10-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. \\|M\\|=1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 1S0 metastable state. Spectra were recorded for ɛ=-2.940(4), ɛ=-2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and ɛ=-1.760(4), above the saddle point. Closed-orbit theory was applied to interpret the spectra. A recent extension to closed-orbit theory, incorporating core effects, was used. This significantly improved agreement between experiment and theory.

  19. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  20. General Atomic Reprocessing Pilot Plant: engineering-scale dissolution system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, H.H.

    1979-04-01

    In February 1978, a dissolver-centrifuge system was added to the cold reprocessing pilot plant at General Atomic Company, which completed the installation of an HTGR fuel head-end reprocessing pilot plant. This report describes the engineering-scale equipment in the pilot plant and summarizes the design features derived from development work performed in the last few years. The dissolver operating cycles for both thorium containing BISO and uranium containinng WAR fissile fuels are included. A continuous vertical centrifuge is used to clarify the resultant dissolver product solution. Process instrumentation and controls for the system reflect design philosophy suitable for remote operation.

  1. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, Marjorie, E-mail: marjorie.bertolus@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Freyss, Michel; Dorado, Boris; Martin, Guillaume; Hoang, Kiet; Maillard, Serge; Skorek, Richard; Garcia, Philippe; Valot, Carole [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chartier, Alain; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Fossati, Paul [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grimes, Robin W.; Parfitt, David C.; Bishop, Clare L.; Murphy, Samuel T.; Rushton, Michael J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Staicu, Dragos; Yakub, Eugen; Nichenko, Sergii [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-07-15

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO{sub 2}, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels.

  2. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2016-08-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  3. Atomic-scale origin of dynamic viscoelastic response and creep in disordered solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkus, Rico; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Viscoelasticity has been described since the time of Maxwell as an interpolation of purely viscous and purely elastic response, but its microscopic atomic-level mechanism in solids has remained elusive. We studied three model disordered solids: a random lattice, the bond-depleted fcc lattice, and the fcc lattice with vacancies. Within the harmonic approximation for central-force lattices, we applied sum rules for viscoelastic response derived on the basis of nonaffine atomic motions. The latter motions are a direct result of local structural disorder, and in particular, of the lack of inversion symmetry in disordered lattices. By defining a suitable quantitative and general atomic-level measure of nonaffinity and inversion symmetry, we show that the viscoelastic responses of all three systems collapse onto a master curve upon normalizing by the overall strength of inversion-symmetry breaking in each system. Close to the isostatic point for central-force lattices, power-law creep G (t ) ˜t-1 /2 emerges as a consequence of the interplay between soft vibrational modes and nonaffine dynamics, and various analytical scalings, supported by numerical calculations, are predicted by the theory.

  4. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Sun; Yi-Zhou Qi; Wengen Ouyang; Xi-Qiao Feng; Qunyang Li

    2016-01-01

    Although atomic stick–slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competi-tion of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves nor-mally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effec-tively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  5. An assessment of the formation of electrodeposited scales using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizot, A. P.; Neville, A.; Taylor, J. D.

    2002-04-01

    The deposition of insoluble salts onto surfaces in process systems represents an important operational problem. Mineral scale formation (e.g. CaCO 3 and BaSO 4) can result from fluid streams becoming supersaturated when incompatible waters combine (e.g. in oil recovery) or can be formed when cathodic protection is applied and electrodeposition occurs. In this study, electrodeposition is studied on metal rotating disk electrodes (RDE) in artificial seawater under static conditions and under rotation at 400 rpm. Also, a Ca-free brine and a Mg-free brine of the same dissolved solids level were used in static tests. The focus of the study is the assessment of the electrochemical response of the system under potentiostatic control and correlation of the current versus time measurements to the characteristics of the scale determined via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis.

  6. Long-lived BLOCH oscillations with bosonic sr atoms and application to gravity measurement at the micrometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, G; Poli, N; Sorrentino, F; Tino, G M

    2006-08-11

    We report on the observation of Bloch oscillations on the unprecedented time scale of several seconds. The experiment is carried out with ultracold bosonic 88Sr atoms loaded into a vertical optical standing wave. The negligible atom-atom elastic cross section and zero angular momentum in the ground state makes 88Sr an almost ideal Bose gas, insensitive to typical mechanisms of decoherence due to thermalization and external stray fields. The small size of the system enables precision measurements of forces at micrometer scale. This is a challenge in physics for studies of surfaces, Casimir effects, and searches for deviations from Newtonian gravity predicted by theories beyond the standard model.

  7. Fabrication of large scale nanostructures based on a modified atomic force microscope nanomechanical machining system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z J; Yan, Y D; Zhao, X S; Gao, D W; Wei, Y Y; Wang, J H

    2011-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomechanical machining has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for fabricating complex 2D∕3D nanostructures. But the machining scale is very small, which holds back this technique severely. How to enlarge the machining scale is always a major concern for the researches. In the present study, a modified AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining system is established through combination of a high precision X-Y stage with the moving range of 100 mm × 100 mm and a commercial AFM in order to enlarge the machining scale. It is found that the tracing property of the AFM system is feasible for large scale machining by controlling the constant normal load. Effects of the machining parameters including the machining direction and the tip geometry on the uniform machined depth with a large scale are evaluated. Consequently, a new tip trace and an increasing load scheme are presented to achieve a uniform machined depth. Finally, a polymer nanoline array with the dimensions of 1 mm × 0.7 mm, the line density of 1000 lines/mm and the average machined depth of 150 nm, and a 20 × 20 polymer square holes array with the scale of 380 μm × 380 μm and the average machined depth of 250 nm are machined successfully. The uniform of the machined depths for all the nanostructures is acceptable. Therefore, it is verified that the AFM tip-based nanomechanical machining method can be used to machine millimeter scale nanostructures.

  8. Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Ahmet

    Cobalt oxides offer a rich ?eld for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of ful?lling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.

  9. Vectorized magnetometer for space applications using electrical readout of atomic scale defects in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Corey J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Anders, Mark A.; Lenahan, Patrick M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetometers are essential for scientific investigation of planetary bodies and are therefore ubiquitous on missions in space. Fluxgate and optically pumped atomic gas based magnetometers are typically flown because of their proven performance, reliability, and ability to adhere to the strict requirements associated with space missions. However, their complexity, size, and cost prevent their applicability in smaller missions involving cubesats. Conventional solid-state based magnetometers pose a viable solution, though many are prone to radiation damage and plagued with temperature instabilities. In this work, we report on the development of a new self-calibrating, solid-state based magnetometer which measures magnetic field induced changes in current within a SiC pn junction caused by the interaction of external magnetic fields with the atomic scale defects intrinsic to the semiconductor. Unlike heritage designs, the magnetometer does not require inductive sensing elements, high frequency radio, and/or optical circuitry and can be made significantly more compact and lightweight, thus enabling missions leveraging swarms of cubesats capable of science returns not possible with a single large-scale satellite. Additionally, the robustness of the SiC semiconductor allows for operation in extreme conditions such as the hot Venusian surface and the high radiation environment of the Jovian system.

  10. Vectorized magnetometer for space applications using electrical readout of atomic scale defects in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Corey J; Blacksberg, Jordana; Anders, Mark A; Lenahan, Patrick M

    2016-11-28

    Magnetometers are essential for scientific investigation of planetary bodies and are therefore ubiquitous on missions in space. Fluxgate and optically pumped atomic gas based magnetometers are typically flown because of their proven performance, reliability, and ability to adhere to the strict requirements associated with space missions. However, their complexity, size, and cost prevent their applicability in smaller missions involving cubesats. Conventional solid-state based magnetometers pose a viable solution, though many are prone to radiation damage and plagued with temperature instabilities. In this work, we report on the development of a new self-calibrating, solid-state based magnetometer which measures magnetic field induced changes in current within a SiC pn junction caused by the interaction of external magnetic fields with the atomic scale defects intrinsic to the semiconductor. Unlike heritage designs, the magnetometer does not require inductive sensing elements, high frequency radio, and/or optical circuitry and can be made significantly more compact and lightweight, thus enabling missions leveraging swarms of cubesats capable of science returns not possible with a single large-scale satellite. Additionally, the robustness of the SiC semiconductor allows for operation in extreme conditions such as the hot Venusian surface and the high radiation environment of the Jovian system.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of atomic-scale frictional behavior of corrugated nano-structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2012-07-01

    Surface morphology is one of the critical parameters that affect the frictional behavior of two contacting bodies in relative motion. It is important because the real contact area as well as the contact stiffness is dictated by the micro- and nano-scale geometry of the surface. In this regard, the frictional behavior may be controlled by varying the surface morphology through nano-structuring. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of contact area and structural stiffness of corrugated nano-structures on the fundamental frictional behavior at the atomic-scale. The nano-structured surface was modeled as an array of corrugated carbon atoms with a given periodicity. It was found that the friction coefficient of the nano-structured surface was lower than that of a smooth surface under specific contact conditions. The effect of applied load on the friction coefficient was dependent on the size of the corrugation. Furthermore, stiffness of the nano-structure was identified to be an important variable in dictating the frictional behavior.

  12. Atomic-scale investigations of the struct. and dynamics of complex catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl Sohlberg, Drexel University

    2007-05-16

    By some accounts, catalysis impacts ≥ 30% of GDP in developed countries [Maxwell, I. E. Nature 394, 325-326 (1998)]. Catalysis is the enabling technology for petroleum production, for control of gaseous emissions from petroleum combustion, and for the production of industrial and consumer chemicals. Future applications of catalysis are potentially even more far reaching. There is an ever-growing need to move the economy from a fossil-fuel energy base to cleaner alternatives. Hydrogen-based combustion systems and fuel cells could play a dominant role, given a plentiful and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Photocatalysis is the most promising clean technology for hydrogen production, relying solely on water and sunlight, but performance enhancements in photocatalysis are needed to make this technology economically competitive. Given the enormously wide spread utilization of catalysts, even incremental performance enhancements would have far-reaching benefits for multiple end-use sectors. In the area of fuel and chemical production, such improvements would translate into vast reductions in energy consumption. At the consumption end, improvements in the catalysts involved would yield tremendous reductions in pollution. In the area of photocatalysis, such efficiency improvements could finally render hydrogen an economically viable fuel. Prerequisite to the non-empirical design and refinement of improved catalysts is the identification of the atomic-scale structure and properties of the catalytically active sites. This has become a major industrial research priority. The focus of this research program was to combine atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy with first-principles density functional theory calculations to deliver an atomic-scale description of heterogeneous catalytic systems that could form the basis for non-empirical design of improved catalysts with greater energy efficiency.

  13. Comparative Criticality Analysis of Two Monte Carlo Codes on Centrifugal Atomizer: MCNPS and SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H-S; Jang, M-S; Kim, S-R [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, J-M; Kim, K-N [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are two well-known Monte Carlo codes for criticality analysis, MCNP5 and SCALE. MCNP5 is a general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code that can be used for neutron, photon, electron or coupled neutron / photon / electron transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical system as a main analysis code. SCALE provides a comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly tool set for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, radioactive source term characterization, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. SCALE was conceived and funded by US NRC to perform standardized computer analysis for licensing evaluation and is used widely in the world. We performed a validation test of MCNP5 and a comparative analysis of Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5 and SCALE, in terms of the critical analysis of centrifugal atomizer. In the criticality analysis using MCNP5 code, we obtained the statistically reliable results by using a large number of source histories per cycle and performing of uncertainty analysis.

  14. Inversion of potential field data : theory and applications in gravimetry and magnetometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirzaei, M.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis deals with the inversion of potential field data. Theoretical aspects and applications in gravimetry and magnetometry are treated. Inverse theory provides mathematical techniques to obtain useful infonnation about the earth based on measurements (data). These techniques estimate numerica

  15. Spin precession by pulsed inductive magnetometry in thin amorphous plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Alessandro; Bottauscio, Oriano; Caprile, Ambra; Celegato, Federica; Ferrara, Enzo; Fiorillo, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Broadband magnetic loss and damping behavior of Co-based amorphous ribbons and thin films have been investigated. The permeability and loss response of the transverse anisotropy ribbon samples in the frequency range DC to 1 GHz is interpreted in terms of combined and distinguishable contributions to the magnetization process by domain wall displacements and magnetization rotations. The latter alone are shown to survive at the highest frequencies, where the losses are calculated via coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations. Remarkably high values of the LLG damping coefficient α = 0.1-0.2 are invoked in this theoretical prediction. Direct measurements of α by pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry are thus performed, both in these laminae and in amorphous films of identical composition, obtaining about one order of magnitude increase of the α value upon the 100 nm÷10 μm thickness range. This confirms that dissipation by eddy currents enters the LLG equation via large increase of the damping coefficient.

  16. Vectorial magnetometry using magnetooptic Kerr effect including first- and second-order contributions for thin ferromagnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschel, T; Wilkens, H; Schubert, R; Wollschlaeger, J [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse 7, D-49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Bardenhagen, H [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Hamrle, J; Pistora, J, E-mail: joachim.wollschlaeger@uos.de [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Centre, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-06

    A new combination of different vectorial magnetometry techniques using magnetooptic Kerr effect is described. The processing of the experimental data contains the separation of linear and quadratic parts of the magnetization curves and determination of all three components of the magnetization vector in units of Kerr rotation without any normalization to the saturation values. The experimental procedure includes measurements with parallel and perpendicular polarized incident light and an external magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence of light. The determination of the complex Kerr amplitude and the theoretic description of the data processing in assumption of small angles of incidence and also for larger angles of incidence using adequate scaling to the mean saturation value validate this vectorial magnetometry method. In the case of an absent out-of-plane component of the magnetization vector, the complete reversal process can easily be reconstructed and interpreted by monodomain states and domain splitting. The measurement procedure and the processing of the data are demonstrated for an ultra-thin epitaxial Fe film on MgO(0 0 1).

  17. Propagation of Structural Disorder in Epitaxially Connected Quantum Dot Solids from Atomic to Micron Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitzky, Benjamin H; Hovden, Robert; Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2016-09-14

    Epitaxially connected superlattices of self-assembled colloidal quantum dots present a promising route toward exquisite control of electronic structure through precise hierarchical structuring across multiple length scales. Here, we uncover propagation of disorder as an essential feature in these systems, which intimately connects order at the atomic, superlattice, and grain scales. Accessing theoretically predicted exotic electronic states and highly tunable minibands will therefore require detailed understanding of the subtle interplay between local and long-range structure. To that end, we developed analytical methods to quantitatively characterize the propagating disorder in terms of a real paracrystal model and directly observe the dramatic impact of angstrom scale translational disorder on structural correlations at hundreds of nanometers. Using this framework, we discover improved order accompanies increasing sample thickness and identify the substantial effect of small fractions of missing epitaxial bonds on statistical disorder. These results have significant experimental and theoretical implications for the elusive goals of long-range carrier delocalization and true miniband formation.

  18. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  19. Stepwise self-assembly of C₆₀ mediated by atomic scale moiré magnifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruznev, D V; Matetskiy, A V; Bondarenko, L V; Utas, O A; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A; Chou, J P; Wei, C M; Lai, M Y; Wang, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of atoms or molecules on a crystal surface is considered one of the most promising methods to create molecular devices. Here we report a stepwise self-assembly of C₆₀ molecules into islands with unusual shapes and preferred sizes on a gold-indium-covered Si(111) surface. Specifically, 19-mer islands prefer a non-compact boomerang shape, whereas hexagonal 37-mer islands exhibit extraordinarily enhanced stability and abundance. The stepwise self-assembly is mediated by the moiré interference between an island with its underlying lattice, which essentially maps out the adsorption-energy landscape of a C₆₀ on different positions of the surface with a lateral magnification factor and dictates the probability for the subsequent attachment of C₆₀ to an island's periphery. Our discovery suggests a new method for exploiting the moiré interference to dynamically assist the self-assembly of particles and provides an unexplored tactic of engineering atomic scale moiré magnifiers to facilitate the growth of monodispersed mesoscopic structures.

  20. Dissecting the mechanism of martensitic transformation via atomic-scale observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-21

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) → ε(hcp) → α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ε/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ε martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  1. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  2. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  3. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg2+ ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth. PMID:27617291

  4. Atomic-Scale Observations of Catalyst Structures under Reaction Conditions and during Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Crozier, Peter A

    2016-03-23

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a chemical process performed at a solid-gas or solid-liquid interface. Direct participation of catalyst atoms in this chemical process determines the significance of the surface structure of a catalyst in a fundamental understanding of such a chemical process at a molecular level. High-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) have been used to observe catalyst structure in the last few decades. In this review, instrumentation for the two in situ/operando techniques and scientific findings on catalyst structures under reaction conditions and during catalysis are discussed with the following objectives: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of in situ/operando studies of catalysts; (2) to interpret the observed restructurings of catalyst and evolution of catalyst structures; (3) to explore how HP-STM and ETEM can be synergistically used to reveal structural details under reaction conditions and during catalysis; and (4) to discuss the future challenges and prospects of atomic-scale observation of catalysts in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This Review focuses on the development of HP-STM and ETEM, the in situ/operando characterizations of catalyst structures with them, and the integration of the two structural analytical techniques for fundamentally understanding catalysis.

  5. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth.

  6. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  7. Nanometer-scale lithography of ultrathin films with atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J C; Shin, Y W; Park, S W

    1998-01-01

    Ultrathin resist films have been prepared by both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly (SA) techniques. Nanometer-scale patterning of these thin films has been performed by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) as the exposing tool. The poly (methylphenylmethacrylate) (PMPMA) LB films were prepared and fabricated by AFM lithography. When the exposure was carried out at the bias voltage of -25V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions. The preoptimized LB films at various conditions exhibited 120 nm line resolution. An organosilane monolayer composed of octadecyldimethylsilyl groups was prepared on a Si substrate. It was then patterned through the localized degradation of the monolayer due to anodic reaction induced by an AFM tip. When the bias voltage was -30 V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions.

  8. An Atomic Scale Look at the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacampa, A.; Bartelt, M.; Orme, C.; Teng, H.; Dove, P.; De Yoreo, J.

    2001-12-01

    A common theme in biomineral growth is that biological systems use peptides and proteins to modify nucleation and growth of the inorganic phase. Developing a detailed physical picture of this process at the atomic-scale mechanisms naturally begins with an understanding of crystallization in the organic-free systems. Over the past eight years, atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the growth of a wide variety of crystals from solution including many relevant to mineralization in biological systems such as calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. The ability to observe growth in situ at molecular length scales using controlled solution compositions and conditions has led to significant advances in our understanding of crystal growth both in pure solutions and those containing organic additives that modify the growth morphology and kinetics. In many cases, the observed behavior has diverged significantly from that expected based on accepted atomistic models of growth. Here we use results of in situ AFM studies on calcite and brushite to illustrate aspects of our current understanding of mineralization that appear to be on a sound footing, and to highlight those areas where fundamental questions still remain unanswered. We examine three aspects of growth: step generation, step dynamics, and step kinetics. We find that analysis of the supersaturation dependence of step generation and kinetics call into question "rough step" models of growth that assume the applicability of the Gibbs-Thomson effect. We show that non-linear dependencies of step kinetics on supersturation are an immediate consequence of a "smooth step" model of growth. We use measurements of step edge fluctuations and terrace width distributions to determine the extent of step-step interactions and the pathways of mass transport at step edges. The significance of these results for understanding the role of organic modifiers will be discussed.

  9. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H., E-mail: nakano@nifs.ac.jp; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 5095292 (Japan); Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K. [Graduate school of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 0608628 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  10. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tekielak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok 15-424 Poland (Poland); Schäfer, R., E-mail: r.schaefer@ifw-dresden.de [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented.

  11. Tunneling Hamiltonian description of the atomic-scale 0-{pi} transition in superconductor/ferromagnetic-insulator junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, S., E-mail: s-kawabata@aist.go.jp [Nanosystem Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Golubov, A.A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Vasenko, A.S. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Kashiwaya, S. [Nanoelectronics Research Institute (NeRI), AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Asano, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Josephson transport in a superconductor/ferromagnetic-insulator(FI)/superconductor junction is investigated analytically. By using the tunneling Hamiltonian method, we found that the spin-dependent {pi}-phase shift of the electron wave function in a FI layer gives the atomic scale 0-{pi} transition. This observation is consistent with previous numerical results. We show a perturbation theory of the Josephson transport through ferromagnetic insulators (FIs). Recently we have found that the appearance of the atomic scale 0-{pi} transition in such junctions based on numerical calculations. In order to explore the mechanism of this anomalous transition, we have analytically calculated the Josephson current using the tunneling Hamiltonian theory and found that the spin dependent {pi}-phase shift in the FI barrier gives the atomic scale 0-{pi} transition.

  12. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  13. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  14. Soil hydrophobicity - relating effects at atomic, molecular, core and national scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Van Keulen, Geertje; Dudley, Ed; Francis, Lewis; Whalley, Richard; Gazze, Andrea; Hallin, Ingrid; Quinn, Gerry; Sinclair, Kat; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    The detrimental impacts of soil hydrophobicity include increased runoff, erosion and flooding, reduced biomass production, inefficient use of irrigation water and preferential leaching of pollutants. Its impacts may exacerbate flood risk associated with more extreme drought and precipitation events predicted with UK climate change scenarios. The UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) has therefore funded a major research programme to investigate soil hydrophobicity over length scales ranging from atomic through molecular, core and landscape scale. This presentation gives an overview of the findings to date. The programme is predicated on the hypothesis that changes in soil protein abundance and localization, induced by variations in soil moisture and temperature, are crucial driving forces for transitions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic conditions at soil particle surfaces. Three soils were chosen based on the severity of hydrophobicity that can be achieved in the field: severe to extreme (Cefn Bryn, Gower, Wales), intermediate to severe (National Botanical Garden, Wales), and subcritical (Park Grass, Rothamsted Research near London). The latter is already highly characterised so was also used as a control. Hydrophobic/ hydrophilic transitions were measured from water droplet penetration times. Scientific advances in the following five areas will be described: (i) the identification of these soil proteins by proteomic methods, using a novel separation method which reduces interference by humic acids, and allows identification by ESI and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry and database searches, (ii) the examination of such proteins, which form ordered hydrophobic ridges, and measurement of their elasticity, stickiness and hydrophobicity at nano- to microscale using atomic force microscopy adapted for the rough surfaces of soil particles, (iii) the novel use of a picoliter goniometer to show hydrophobic effects at a 1 micron diameter droplet level, which

  15. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  16. Nanometer-scale isotope analysis of bulk diamond by atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, R.; Raatz, N.; Meijer, J.; Markham, M.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) combines field emission of atoms with mass spectrometry to reconstruct three-dimensional tomograms of materials with atomic resolution and isotope specificity. Despite significant recent progress in APT technology, application to wide-bandgap materials with strong covalen

  17. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-cente

  18. Scaled-energy spectroscopy of helium vertical bar M vertical bar=1 Rydberg atoms in a static electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kips, A.; Vassen, W.; Hogervorst, W.; Dando, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    We present scaled-energy spectra on helium Rydberg atoms in a static electric field. /M/ = 1 states were studied in excitation from the 2 S-1(0) metastable state. Spectra were recorded for epsilon = -2.940(4), epsilon = -2.350(4), both below the saddle point, and epsilon = -1.760(4), above the saddl

  19. Atomic-scale insight into the origin of pyridine inhibition of MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temel, Burcin; Tuxen, Anders K.; Kibsgaard, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Basic nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyridine are well known to be inhibitors of the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction for the MoS2-based catalysts. From an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, atomic-scale insight...

  20. Atomic-scale analysis of plastic deformation in thin-film forms of electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath

    Nanometer-scale-thick films of metals and semiconductor heterostructures are used increasingly in modern technologies, from microelectronics to various areas of nanofabrication. Processing of such ultrathin-film materials generates structural defects, including voids and cracks, and may induce structural transformations. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of these small-volume structures is very different from that of bulk materials. Improvement of the reliability, functionality, and performance of nano-scale devices requires a fundamental understanding of the atomistic mechanisms that govern the thin-film response to mechanical loading in order to establish links between the films' structural evolution and their mechanical behavior. Toward this end, a significant part of this study is focused on the analysis of atomic-scale mechanisms of plastic deformation in freestanding, ultrathin films of face-centered cubic (fcc) copper (Cu) that are subjected to biaxial tensile strain. The analysis is based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Elementary mechanisms of dislocation nucleation are studied and several problems involving the structural evolution of the thin films due to the glide of and interactions between dislocations are addressed. These problems include void nucleation, martensitic transformation, and the role of stacking faults in facilitating dislocation depletion in ultrathin films and other small-volume structures of fcc metals. Void nucleation is analyzed as a mechanism of strain relaxation in Cu thin films. The glide of multiple dislocations causes shearing of atomic planes and leads to formation of surface pits, while vacancies are generated due to the glide motion of jogged dislocations. Coalescence of vacancy clusters with surface pits leads to formation of voids. In addition, the phase transformation of fcc Cu films to hexagonal-close packed (hcp) ones is studied. The resulting martensite phase nucleates at the film's free surface and

  1. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  2. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity.

  3. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2-δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  5. Limits to metallic conduction in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional silicon wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bent; Ryu, Hoon; Tan, Y-H Matthias; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-12-12

    The recent observation of ultralow resistivity in highly doped, atomic-scale silicon wires has sparked interest in what limits conduction in these quasi-1D systems. Here we present electron transport measurements of gated Si:P wires of widths 4.6 and 1.5 nm. At 4.6 nm we find an electron mobility, μ(el)≃60  cm²/V s, in excellent agreement with that of macroscopic Hall bars. Metallic conduction persists to millikelvin temperatures where we observe Gaussian conductance fluctuations of order δG∼e²/h. In thinner wires (1.5 nm), metallic conduction breaks down at G≲e²/h, where localization of carriers leads to Coulomb blockade. Metallic behavior is explained by the large carrier densities in Si:P δ-doped systems, allowing the occupation of all six valleys of the silicon conduction band, enhancing the number of 1D channels and hence the localization length.

  6. Shock wave propagation in semi-crystalline polyethylene: An atomic-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Yeh, In-Chul; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    Highly oriented polyethylene (PE) fibers are used in protection applications, therefore elucidation of their response under high strain-rate impact events is vital. Although PE fibers can have high crystallinity (>95%), they also contain defects such as amorphous domains. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate shock propagation through crystalline, amorphous, and semi-crystalline PE. We generate compressive shock waves of varying strength, quantify their dynamics, and characterize their effect on material properties at the atomic scale. In the semi-crystalline PE model, the differing density and molecular order of amorphous PE and crystalline PE result in differing shock impedances, which causes reflection and refraction of shock waves at interfaces between the phases. We quantify the properties (e.g. pressure, velocity) of the reflected and refracted waves, which differ from those of the incident wave, and compare with results from impedance matching. We also examine the reflection, absorption, and transmission of energy at the crystalline-amorphous interface. Depending on shock strength, amorphous defects can dissipate shock energy, which attenuates the shock and leads to effects such as localized heating.

  7. Nano-scale simulative measuring model for tapping mode atomic force microscopy and analysis for measuring a nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zone-Ching; Chou, Ming-Ho

    2010-07-01

    This study proposes to construct a nano-scale simulative measuring model of Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM), compare with the edge effect of simulative and measurement results. It combines with the Morse potential and vibration theory to calculate the tip-sample atomic interaction force between probe and sample. Used Silicon atoms (Si) arrange the shape of the rectangular cantilever probe and the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample atomic model. The simulative measurements are compared with the results for the simulative measurements and experimental measurement. It is found that the scan rate and the probe tip's bevel angle are the two reasons to cause the surface error and edge effect of measuring the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample by TM-AFM. And the bevel angle is about equal to the probe tip's bevel angle from the results of simulated and experimented on the vertical section of the sample edge. To compare with the edge effect between the simulation and experimental measurement, its error is small. It could be verified that the constructed simulative measuring model for TM-AFM in this article is reasonable.

  8. Assessing composition gradients in multifilamentary superconductors by means of magnetometry methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, T.; Hecher, J.; Bernardi, J.; Pfeiffer, S.; Senatore, C.; Eisterer, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present two magnetometry-based methods suitable for assessing gradients in the critical temperature and hence the composition of multifilamentary superconductors: AC magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy. The novelty of the former technique lies in the iterative evaluation procedure we developed, whereas the strength of the latter is the direct visualization of the temperature dependent penetration of a magnetic field into the superconductor. Using the example of a PIT Nb3Sn wire, we demonstrate the application of these techniques, and compare the respective results to each other and to EDX measurements of the Sn distribution within the sub-elements of the wire.

  9. Spin-Exchange-Relaxation-Free Magnetometry with Cs Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-13

    Larmor precession 6,7. In Ref. 5, sensitivity of 5 pG /Hz was achieved with the cell operating at 190 °C using potassium atoms. Estimates of the...cell containing a droplet of Cs metal, 600 Torr He buffer gas to reduce the rate at which atoms in the central part of the cell diffuse to the cell...broadening of Cs lines by helium 19, we extrapolate the FWHM of the D1 and D2 optical resonances to be =15.7 and 14.1 GHz, respectively. The cell was

  10. Magnetometry at the quantum limit of sensitivity and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Krauter, H; Renema, J J; Polzik, E S

    2009-01-01

    Ultimate sensitivity of metrology and sensing is defined by the fundamental principles of quantum physics. The quantum state of a system defines the magnitude of its quantum fluctuations. The optimal balance between the information about the system obtained during the measurement and the destructive back action of the measurement on the measured object is defined by the laws of quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate how the optimal quantum measurement strategy allows us to achieve the fundamental limit of sensitivity of the oscillating magnetic field measurement set by the quantum projection noise of atoms. Using techniques developed for quantum information processing [1-3] we apply an optimal sequence of state preparation, evolution, and the back-action evading measurement to achieve the atomic projection noise limited sensitivity of 2.1*$10^{-16}$ Tesla/Hz$^{1/2$} using 1.5*$10^{12}$ room temperature caesium atoms. This sensitivity is comparable with that of the current state-of-the-art atomic magnetometer ...

  11. Probing Structure and Composition of Nickel/Titanium Carbide Hybrid Interfaces at the Atomic Scale (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The transition in structure and composition across the titanium carbide /nickel hybrid interface has been determined at near atomic resolution by...coupling high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom probe tomography. The titanium carbide phase adopts a rocksalt-type

  12. Microstructural investigation of Sr-modified Al-15 wt%Si alloys in the range from micrometer to atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpel, M; Wanderka, N; Vinod Kumar, G S; Banhart, J

    2011-05-01

    Strontium-modified Al-15 wt%Si casting alloys were investigated after 5 and 60 min of melt holding. The eutectic microstructures were studied using complementary methods at different length scales: focused ion beam-energy selective backscattered tomography, transmission electron microscopy and 3D atom probe. Whereas the samples after 5 min of melt holding show that the structure of eutectic Si changes into a fine fibrous morphology, the increase of prolonged melt holding (60 min) leads to the loss of Sr within the alloy with an evolution of an unmodified eutectic microstructure displaying coarse interconnected Si plates. Strontium was found at the Al/Si eutectic interfaces on the side of the eutectic Al region, measured by 3D atom probe. The new results obtained using 3D atom probe shed light on the location of Sr within the Al-Si eutectic microstructure.

  13. Scaling properties of field ionization of Rydberg atoms in single-cycle THz pulses: 1D considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueny, H.; Chovancova, M.; Hansen, J. P.; Kocbach, L.

    2016-12-01

    In recent experiments of single-cycle field ionization of excited Na(nd) atoms with principal quantum number n\\in [6,15] (Li and Jones 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 143006) it was shown that the maximum field intensity necessary to ionize 10% of the atoms decreases with increasing n according to an {n}-3 power law dependence. This scaling property at the same ionization probability was confirmed in classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations. In this work we note that the scaling relation in the experiment is much more general, it is in fact valid for all ionization probabilities. When applied to the emitted electron energies it places a very wide distribution of electron momenta from different initial states onto a narrow range. These aspects are investigated in a one-dimensional model with a 3D hydrogen-like spectrum. Calculations confirm the general {n}-3 scaling relation for the ionization probability and that this particular scaling of the kinetic emission spectrum puts the ejected electron momenta on a narrow common scale. The ionization mechanism itself is identified as quantum mechanical tunneling and the nature of the tunneling process is the direct origin of the scaling law.

  14. In-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs ...

  15. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  16. Atomic-scale structure evolution in a quasi-equilibrated electrochemical process of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have proven to be extremely attractive candidates for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and smart grid in terms of energy density, power density, and service life. Further performance optimization to satisfy ever-increasing demands on energy storage of such applications is highly desired. In most of cases, the kinetics and stability of electrode materials are strongly correlated to the transport and storage behaviors of lithium ions in the lattice of the host. Therefore, information about structural evolution of electrode materials at an atomic scale is always helpful to explain the electrochemical performances of batteries at a macroscale. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows simultaneous imaging of light and heavy elements, providing an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nearly equilibrated local structure of electrode materials after electrochemical cycling at atomic resolution. Recent progress toward unraveling the atomic-scale structure of selected electrode materials with different charge and/or discharge state to extend the current understanding of electrochemical reaction mechanism with the ABF and high angle annular dark field STEM imaging is presented here. Future research on the relationship between atomic-level structure evolution and microscopic reaction mechanisms of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries is envisaged.

  17. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Atomic-Scale Energy Transport: From Heat Conduction to Thermal Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulation based on a plane wave/pseudopotential implementation of density functional theory is adopted to investigate atomic scale energy transport for semiconductors (silicon and germanium). By imposing thermostats to keep constant temperatures of the nanoscale thin layers, initial thermal non-equilibrium between the neighboring layers is established under the vacuum condition. Models with variable gap distances with an interval of lattice constant increment of the simulated materials are set up and statistical comparisons of temperature evolution curves are made. Moreover, the equilibration time from non-equilibrium state to thermal equilibrium state of different silicon or/and germanium layers combinations are calculated. The results show significant distinctions of heat transfer under different materials and temperatures combinations. Further discussions on the equilibrium time are made to explain the simulation results. As the first work of the atomic scale energy tra...

  18. Determining the quantum-coherent to semiclassical transition in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bent; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic-scale silicon wires, patterned by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and degenerately doped with phosphorus (P), have attracted significant interest owing to their exceptionally low resistivity and semiclassical Ohmic conduction at temperatures as low as T =4.2 K . Here, we investigate the transition from semiclassical diffusive to quantum-coherent conduction in a 4.6 nm wide wire as we decrease the measurement temperature. By analyzing the temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) and one-dimensional (1D) weak localization (WL)—fundamental manifestations of quantum-coherent transport in quasi-1D metals—we show that transport evolves from quantum coherent to semiclassical at T ˜4 K . Remarkably, our study confirms that universal concepts of mesoscopic physics such as UCF and 1D WL retain their validity in quasi-1D metallic conductors down to the atomic scale.

  19. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  20. Origin of the catalytic activity of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles determined from an atomic-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, L S R; Sakata, Osami; Kohara, Shinji; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-09

    The 3-dimensional (3D) atomic-scale structure of newly discovered face-centered cubic (fcc) and conventional hexagonal close packed (hcp) type ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles (NPs) of 2.2 to 5.4 nm diameter were studied using X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling. Atomic PDF based high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements show highly diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns for fcc- and hcp-type Ru NPs. We here report the atomic-scale structure of Ru NPs in terms of the total structure factor and Fourier-transformed PDF. It is found that the respective NPs have substantial structural disorder over short- to medium-range order atomic distances from the PDF analysis. The first-nearest-neighbor peak analyses show a significant size dependence for the fcc-type Ru NPs demonstrating the increase in the peak height due to an increase in the number density as a function of particle size. The bond angle and coordination number (CN) distribution for the RMC-simulated fcc- and hcp-type Ru NP models indicated inherited structural features from their bulk counterparts. The CN analysis of the whole NP and surface of each RMC model of Ru NPs show the low activation energy packing sites on the fcc-type Ru NP surface atoms. Finally, our newly defined order parameters for RMC simulated Ru NP models suggested that the enhancement of the CO oxidation activity of fcc-type NPs was due to a decrease in the close packing ordering that resulted from the increased NP size. These structural findings could be positively supported for synthesized low-cost and high performance nano-sized catalysts and have potential application in fuel-cell systems and organic synthesis.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide on Single-Layer Graphene: An Atomic-Scale Study toward Understanding Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of a hybrid nanomaterial based on titanium oxide and single-layer graphene (SLG) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is reported here. The morphology and crystallinity of the oxide layer on SLG can be tuned mainly with the deposition temperature, achieving either a uniform amorphous layer at 60 °C or ∼2 nm individual nanocrystals on the SLG at 200 °C after only 20 ALD cycles. A continuous and uniform amorphous layer formed on the SLG after 180 cycles at 60 °C can be converted to a polycrystalline layer containing domains of anatase TiO2 after a postdeposition annealing at 400 °C under vacuum. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), characterization of the structure and chemistry was performed on an atomic scale and provided insight into understanding the nucleation and growth. AC-TEM imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that rocksalt TiO nanocrystals were occasionally formed at the early stage of nucleation after only 20 ALD cycles. Understanding and controlling nucleation and growth of the hybrid nanomaterial are crucial to achieving novel properties and enhanced performance for a wide range of applications that exploit the synergetic functionalities of the ensemble.

  2. The effect of atomic-scale defects and dopants on phosphorene electronic structure and quantum transport properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro

    2016-01-20

    By means of a multi-scale first-principles approach, a description of the local electronic structure of 2D and narrow phosphorene sheets with various types of modifications is presented. Firtly, a rational argument based on the geometry of the pristine and modified P network, and supported by the Wannier functions formalism is introduced to describe a hybridization model of the P atomic orbitals. Ab initio calculations show that non-isoelectronic foreign atoms form quasi-bound states at varying energy levels and create different polarization states depending on the number of valence electrons between P and the doping atom. The quantum transport properties of modified phosphorene ribbons are further described with great accuracy. The distortions on the electronic bands induced by the external species lead to strong backscattering effects on the propagating charge carriers. Depending on the energy of the charge carrier and the type of doping, the conduction may range from the diffusive to the localized regime. Interstitial defects at vacant sites lead to homogeneous transport fingerprints across different types of doping atoms. We suggest that the relatively low values of charge mobility reported in experimental measurements may have its origin in the presence of defects.

  3. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  4. Electrohydrodynamic Atomization in the Simple-Jet Mode: Out-scaling and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostinho, L.L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic Atomization, often called electrospraying, is a way to disintegrate a liquid into droplets by exposing it to a strong electric field. Although William Gilbert has reported about the deformation of a liquid meniscus under the influence of an electric field already more than four c

  5. The origins of friction and the growth of graphene, investigated at the atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarle, van D.W.

    2016-01-01

    This work covers two closely related topics: a theoretical study on the origins of friction and an experimental study on the growth of graphene. Both fundamental studies are focusing on the atomic processes involved. The study on friction treats the dissipation that takes places at one single fricti

  6. Dynamical Gauge Effects and Holographic Scaling of Non-Equilibrium Motion in a Disordered and Dissipative Atomic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jianshi; Liu, Qi; Jacome, Louis; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a table-top realization of a non-equilibrium quantum system described by a dynamical gauge field propagating on an effectively curved space and time manifold. The system is formed by neutral atoms interacting with both a conservative disordered optical field and a dissipative pumping field. In the presence of a sufficiently dark state, we demonstrate non-equilibrium behavior reminiscent of the information paradox in black hole physics. At a well-defined transition point, the analog of gauge-boson mass is seen to vanish, inducing scale-invariant behavior as a Higgs-like mechanism is removed. The subsequent scaling behavior can be understood using the holographic principle with a tunable analog of the Planck length derived from the scaling of disorder. These effects suggest a range of new phenomena in weakly dissipative quantum systems, including the presence of analog forms of emergent gravitation.

  7. Current Density Imaging through Acoustically Encoded Magnetometry: A Theoretical Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Sheltraw, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The problem of determining a current density confined to a volume from measurements of the magnetic field it produces exterior to that volume is known to have non-unique solutions. To uniquely determine the current density, or the non-silent components of it, additional spatial encoding of the electric current is needed. In biological systems such as the brain and heart, which generate electric current associated with normal function, a reliable means of generating such additional encoding, on a spatial and temporal scale meaningful to the study of such systems, would be a boon for research. This paper explores a speculative method by which the required additional encoding might be accomplished, on the time scale associated with the propagation of sound across the volume of interest, by means of the application of a radially encoding pulsed acoustic spherical wave.

  8. In Situ Atomic Scale Visualization Of Surface Kinetics Driven Dynamics Of Oxide Growth On A Ni–Cr Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Zou, Lianfeng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Baer, Donald R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Zhou, Guangwen; Wang, Chong M.

    2016-01-20

    We report in situ atomic-scale visualization of the dynamical three-dimensional (3D) growth of NiO during initial oxidation of Ni-10at%Cr using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). Despite the thermodynamic preference for Cr2O3 formation, cubic NiO oxides nucleated and grew epitaxially as the dominating oxide phase on the Ni-Cr (100) surface during initial oxidation. The growth of NiO islands proceeds through step-by-step adatom mechanism in 3D, which is sustained by surface diffusion of Ni and O atoms. Although the shapes of oxide islands are controlled by strain energy between oxide and alloy substrate, local surface kinetic variations can lead to the change of surface planes of oxide islands. These results demonstrate that surface diffusion dominates initial oxidation of Ni-Cr in these test conditions.

  9. Estimation of length scale of RS II-$p$ braneworld model through perturbations in Helium's atom ground state energy

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, Nephtali

    2012-01-01

    We put to the test an effective three-dimensional electrostatic potential, obtained effectively by considering an electrostatic source inside a (5+$p$)-dimensional braneworld scenario with $p$ compact and one infinite spacial extra dimensions in the RS II-$p$ model, for $p=1$ and $p=2$. This potential is regular at the source and matches the standard Coulomb potential outside a neighborhood. We use variational and perturbative approximation methods to calculate corrections to the ground energy of the Helium atom modified by this potential, by making use of a 6 and 39-parameter trial wave function of Hylleraas type for the ground state. These corrections to the ground-state energy are compared with experimental data for Helium atom in order to set bounds for the extra dimensions length scale. We find that these bounds are less restrictive than the ones obtained by Morales et. al. through a calculation using the Lamb shift in Hydrogen.

  10. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants at liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interfaces from atomic-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya K.; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of pure liquid is a complex process involving different size- and time-scale phenomena. The appearance of the first nanobubble in the liquid at the bottom of a hot pan, the detachment of the bubble from the solid surface, its subsequent coalescence with other bubbles, all represent complex multiscale phenomena. Surfactants added to water increase the complexity of the process by contributing to the dynamic surface tension at the liquid-vapor and liquid-solid interfaces and thus affecting the heat and mass transfer at those interfaces. We apply molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption kinetics of anionic, cationic, and non-ionic surfactants at liquid/solid and liquid/vapor interfaces. The all-atom vs. united-atom approaches for the solid and surfactants are surveyed in view of their applicability at near boiling temperatures and a range of model water potentials is assessed for reproducing the thermal properties of water at boiling conditions.

  11. Spatio-temporal behaviour of atomic-scale tribo-ceramic films in adaptive surface engineered nano-materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G; Kovalev, A; Veldhuis, S; Yamamoto, K; Endrino, J L; Gershman, I S; Rashkovskiy, A; Aguirre, M H; Wainstein, D L

    2015-03-05

    Atomic-scale, tribo-ceramic films associated with dissipative structures formation are discovered under extreme frictional conditions which trigger self-organization. For the first time, we present an actual image of meta-stable protective tribo-ceramics within thicknesses of a few atomic layers. A mullite and sapphire structure predominates in these phases. They act as thermal barriers with an amazing energy soaking/dissipating capacity. Less protective tribo-films cannot sustain in these severe conditions and rapidly wear out. Therefore, a functional hierarchy is established. The created tribo-films act in synergy, striving to better adapt themselves to external stimuli. Under a highly complex structure and non-equilibrium state, the upcoming generation of adaptive surface engineered nano-multilayer materials behaves like intelligent systems - capable of generating, with unprecedented efficiency, the necessary tribo-films to endure an increasingly severe environment.

  12. Vector Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancies in 4 H -SiC Under Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, Matthias; Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Stenberg, Pontus; Kordina, Olof; Ohshima, Takeshi; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Point defects in solids promise precise measurements of various quantities. Especially magnetic field sensing using the spin of point defects has been of great interest recently. When optical readout of spin states is used, point defects achieve optical magnetic imaging with high spatial resolution at ambient conditions. Here, we demonstrate that genuine optical vector magnetometry can be realized using the silicon vacancy in SiC, which has an uncommon S =3 /2 spin. To this end, we develop and experimentally test sensing protocols based on a reference field approach combined with multifrequency spin excitation. Our work suggests that the silicon vacancy in an industry-friendly platform, SiC, has the potential for various magnetometry applications under ambient conditions.

  13. High-resolution vector microwave magnetometry based on solid-state spins in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Zhenheng; Huang, Pu; Rong, Xing; Wang, Mengqi; Xu, Xiangkun; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-03-23

    The measurement of the microwave field is crucial for many developments in microwave technology and related applications. However, measuring microwave fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution under ambient conditions remains elusive. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to measure both the strength and orientation of the microwave magnetic field by utilizing the quantum coherent dynamics of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. An angular resolution of 5.7 mrad and a sensitivity of 1.0 μT Hz(-1/2) are achieved at a microwave frequency of 2.6000 GHz, and the microwave magnetic field vectors generated by a copper wire are precisely reconstructed. The solid-state microwave magnetometry with high resolution and wide frequency range that can work under ambient conditions proposed here enables unique potential applications over other state-of-art microwave magnetometry.

  14. Applications of Miniaturized Atomic Magnetic Sensors in Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    exercising flight operations ( brushless DC motor running, tail avionics actuated, telemetry systems transmitting). We utilized a simple linear model to...80021 USA ABSTRACT A new generation of miniaturized ultra-high sensitivity atomic magnetometers is being developed and integrated into military...low frequency magnetometry are investigated through preliminary experimental data in addition to modeling and simulations. In particular, we discuss

  15. Magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of phosphine- and thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Estefanía; Muñoz-Márquez, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Camacho, A.; Crespo, P.; Hernando, Antonio, 1947-; Lucena, R; Conesa Cegarra, José Carlos

    2010-01-01

    In the last years, the number of studies performed by wholly independent research groups that confirm the permanent magnetism, first observed in our research lab, for thiol-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) has rapidly increased. Throughout the years, the initial magnetometry studies have been completed with element-specific magnetization measurements based on, for example, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique that have allowed the identification of gold as the magnetic moment carrier....

  16. JOSEPHSON EFFECTS IN CERAMIC SUPERCONDUCTORS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO SQUID MAGNETOMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Gough, C.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review is given of Josephson Effects in high-Tc superconductors with specific reference to ceramic material properties and device applications. The development of liquid-nitrogen cooled rf and dc SQUIDs for ultrasensitive magnetometry will be described. Field sensitivities of better than 10-12 T / √Hz have already been achieved but 1 / f -noise becomes important at low frequencies.

  17. Goethite (α-FeOOH) magnetic transition by ESR, Magnetometry and Mössbauer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valezi, D.F., E-mail: dfvalezi@uel.br [Laboratory of Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (LAFLURPE), Physics Department, CCE, State University of Londrina (UEL), 86057-970, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Piccinato, M.T. [Laboratory of Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (LAFLURPE), Physics Department, CCE, State University of Londrina (UEL), 86057-970, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Sarvezuk, P.W.C.; Ivashita, F.F.; Paesano, A. [Physics Department, CCE, State University of Maringá (UEM), 87020-900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Varalda, J.; Mosca, D.H. [Physics Department, Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Urbano, A. [Laboratory of Thin Films and Materials, Physics Department, CCE, State University of Londrina (UEL), 86057-970, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Guedes, C.L.B. [Laboratory of Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (LAFLURPE), Chemistry Department, CCE, State University of Londrina (UEL), 86057-970, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Di Mauro, E. [Laboratory of Fluorescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (LAFLURPE), Physics Department, CCE, State University of Londrina (UEL), 86057-970, Londrina, PR (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    A natural sample of the mineral goethite was characterized by X-band Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), vibrating sample Magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques, with the main objective of studying the magnetic transition from the antiferromagnetic to the paramagnetic state that this mineral undergoes upon reaching a certain critical temperature (Néel temperature). Although an ESR signal was not expected in goethite samples at room temperature, due to its antiferromagnetic arrangement, a resonance line was observed. This behavior was attributed to the existence of vacancies in the mineral structure. Increasing the temperature from RT to 352 K no significant change occurred in the ESR spectra. From 352 K, the goethite spectrum showed an additional ESR line, the intensity of this line grew until it stabilized at around 444 K. The appearance of this new resonance line, and its evolution with temperature, was attributed to two subsequent effects: firstly the spin flop effect from 352 to 372 K; and secondly, the transition to the paramagnetic state at T{sub N} = 372 K. Magnetometry and Mössbauer measurements corroborated this assumption and the transition temperature was identified by magnetometry as T{sub N} = 370 K. Simulations of the goethite ESR spectra in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states were performed by deconvolution of the resonance lines into two contributions, one from species with vacancies in their vicinity, and another with complete vicinity. - Highlights: • We studied a magnetic transition of a natural goethite sample. • It was observed by ESR the spin flop effect and the transition to the PM state. • Spectra simulations showed ESR lines of different spins interactions with vicinity. • T{sub N} was determined as 372 and 370 K by ESR and Magnetometry respectively.

  18. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  19. GRASP92: a package for large-scale relativistic atomic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpia, F. A.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    Program summaryTitle of program: GRASP92 Catalogue identifier: ADCU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCU_v1_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: no Programming language used: Fortran Computer: IBM POWERstation 320H Operating system: IBM AIX 3.2.5+ RAM: 64M words No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 65 224 No of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 409 198 Distribution format: tar.gz Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADCU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Prediction of atomic spectra—atomic energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative decay rates—using a 'fully relativistic' approach. Solution method: Atomic orbitals are assumed to be four-component spinor eigenstates of the angular momentum operator, j=l+s, and the parity operator Π=βπ. Configuration state functions (CSFs) are linear combinations of Slater determinants of atomic orbitals, and are simultaneous eigenfunctions of the atomic electronic angular momentum operator, J, and the atomic parity operator, P. Lists of CSFs are either explicitly prescribed by the user or generated from a set of reference CSFs, a set of subshells, and rules for deriving other CSFs from these. Approximate atomic state functions (ASFs) are linear combinations of CSFs. A variational functional may be constructed by combining expressions for the energies of one or more ASFs. Average level (AL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of all possible ASFs that may be constructed from a set of CSFs; the number of ASFs is then the same as the number, n, of CSFs. Optimal level (OL) functionals are weighted sums of energies of some subset of ASFs; the GRASP92 package is optimized for this latter class of functionals. The composition of an ASF in terms

  20. Nano-scale observations of tattoo pigments in skin by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Colin A; Twigg, Peter C; Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have shown how particles in carbon black tattoo ink accumulate in the human skin dermis using fine-resolution atomic force microscopy, with which a single ink particle in the collagenous network can be imaged. This information further demonstrates that tattoo inks are nano-particles. Further, we have deposited a commercially available tattoo ink on a glass slide and calculated a range of volumes for single ink particles.

  1. Scaled-Down Moderator Circulation Test Facility at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started the experimental research on moderator circulation as one of a the national research and development programs from 2012. This research program includes the construction of the moderator circulation test (MCT) facility, production of the validation data for self-reliant computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools, and development of optical measurement system using the particle image velocimetry (PIV). In the present paper we introduce the sc...

  2. Probing Electronic States of Magnetic Semiconductors Using Atomic Scale Microscopy & Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    N000140710348 Final Report as of December 2013 Objective: This project was focused on the application of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM...magnetic atoms on the surface of a superconductor can be used as a versatile platform for creating a topological superconductor . These initial...the application of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to understand the electronic structure of magnetically doped semiconductors and to develop

  3. Atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning in severely deformed Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, X. H., E-mail: anxianghai@gmail.com, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydenye.edu.au; Cao, Y.; Liao, X. Z., E-mail: anxianghai@gmail.com, E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydenye.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kawasaki, M. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ringer, S. P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Langdon, T. G. [Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1453 (United States); Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zhu, Y. T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2015-07-06

    We report an atomic-scale investigation of interface-facilitated deformation twinning behaviour in Ag-Cu nanolamellar composites. Profuse twinning activities in Ag supply partial dislocations to directly transmit across the Ag-Cu lamellar interface that promotes deformation twinning in the neighbouring Cu lamellae although the interface is severely deformed. The trans-interface twin bands change the local structure at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the orientation relationship and interfacial structure between neighbouring Ag-Cu lamellae play a crucial role in such special interface-facilitated twinning behaviour.

  4. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  5. Scaling of a driven atomic gas from the weakly-dressed to the quantum critical regime

    CERN Document Server

    Helmrich, S; Whitlock, S

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of correlations in complex many-body systems can be accompanied by unexpectedly simple scaling laws which signal new physical regimes or universal relations between otherwise very different physical systems. We demonstrate that non-equilibrium scaling laws can reveal the different regimes of strongly-interacting quantum systems driven to highly excited states. For weak or far off-resonant driving we find that the dependence of the excitation rate on coupling strength is well described by power laws characteristic of the dissipative or weakly-dressed regimes, while for strong near-resonant driving we observe a crossover to the quantum critical regime. For intermediate detunings we discover superlinear intensity scaling in a new regime, indicative of cooperative excitation processes, which extends the domain where scale-invariant behavior can be found in driven quantum systems.

  6. Exploring mesoscopic physics of vacancy-ordered systems through atomic scale observations of topological defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, A Y; Morozovska, A N; Kim, Young-Min; Leonard, D; Oxley, M P; Biegalski, M D; Eliseev, E A; Kalinin, S V

    2012-08-10

    Vacancy-ordered transition metal oxides have multiple similarities to classical ferroic systems including ferroelectrics and ferroelastics. The expansion coefficients for corresponding Ginzburg-Landau-type free energies are readily accessible from bulk phase diagrams. Here, we demonstrate that the gradient and interfacial terms can quantitatively be determined from the atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy data of the topological defects and interfaces in model lanthanum-strontium cobaltite. With this knowledge, the interplay between ordering, chemical composition, and mechanical effects at domain walls, interfaces and structural defects can be analyzed.

  7. Atomic-Scale Study of Mineral Luminescent Materials and Their Microstructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The aim of this thesis is to study the luminescence of fluorite: Eu3+ fluorite, Eu2+ and wollastonite: Ce3+, Tba+,to discuss crystal structures and defects using solid atomic images with high resolution transmission electron microscope,and to deal with the luminescent effect of mineral microscopic structure.In general, because of Eu3+ belongs to electric dipole transition, it is forbidden to free ion. But in fluorite, Eu3+system, Eu3+ is located at the nonsymmetrical center, and theparity selection rules are broken.

  8. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quasiparticle Interference on a Type-II Weyl Semimetal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Bian, Guang; Chang, Guoqing; Lu, Hong; Xu, Su-Yang; Wang, Guangqiang; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhang, Songtian; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Song, Fengqi; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-12-01

    We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mox W1 -xTe2 for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo0.66 W0.34 Te2 . In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.

  9. Atomic-scale structure of dislocations revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Morgenstern, K.; Schiøtz, Jakob;

    2002-01-01

    , the simulations can be used to determine dislocation structure and orientation in the near-surface region. In a similar way, the subsurface structure of other extended defects can be studied. The simulations show dislocations to reorient the partials in the surface region leading to an increased splitting width......The intersection between dislocations and a Ag(111) surface has been studied using an interplay of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics. Whereas the STM provides atomically resolved information about the surface structure and Burgers vectors of the dislocations...

  10. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J.; D'Angelo, Marie D.; Enriquez, Hanna B.; Silly, Mathieu G.

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  11. Large-scale quantum transport calculations for electronic devices with over ten thousand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenchang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Zhongcan; Hodak, Miro; Briggs, Emil; Bernholc, Jerry

    The non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) has been implemented in our massively parallel DFT software, the real space multigrid (RMG) code suite. Our implementation employs multi-level parallelization strategies and fully utilizes both multi-core CPUs and GPU accelerators. Since the cost of the calculations increases dramatically with the number of orbitals, an optimal basis set is crucial for including a large number of atoms in the ``active device'' part of the simulations. In our implementation, the localized orbitals are separately optimized for each principal layer of the device region, in order to obtain an accurate and optimal basis set. As a large example, we calculated the transmission characteristics of a Si nanowire p-n junction. The nanowire is along (110) direction in order to minimize the number dangling bonds that are saturated by H atoms. Its diameter is 3 nm. The length of 24 nm is necessary because of the long-range screening length in Si. Our calculations clearly show the I-V characteristics of a diode, i.e., the current increases exponentially with forward bias and is near zero with backward bias. Other examples will also be presented, including three-terminal transistors and large sensor structures.

  12. Atomic scale deformation in the solid surface induced by nanoparticle impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Luo, J. B.; Lu, X. C.; Wang, L. L.; Pan, G. S.; Wen, S. Z.

    2005-06-01

    Nanoparticle impacts on an ultra-smooth surface always occur in nano-machining processes, such as polishing of a monocrystalline silicon wafer, which is an important process in the manufacture of semiconductors. A fundamental understanding of nanoparticle impacts on a solid surface is important to control and prevent the deformation of the surface. In this study, a cylindrical liquid jet containing de-ionized water and SiO2 nanoparticles impacts obliquely on a single crystal silicon surface at a speed of 50 m s-1. The microstructure of the impacted surface was examined using a high resolution transmission electron microscope, an atomic force microscope, etc. Some crystal defects, lattice distortion, grain refinement and rotation of grains in the surface layer of the silicon wafer after exposure for 30 s have been observed. However, when the exposure time is extended to 10 min, an amorphous layer containing crystal grains is exhibited in the subsurface, and many craters, scratches and atom pileups can be found in the surface.

  13. Morphology and atomic-scale structure of single-layer WS2 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Henrik G; Tuxen, Anders K; Moses, Poul G; Topsøe, Henrik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Lauritsen, Jeppe V

    2013-10-14

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal (Mo and W) sulfides are attracting strong attention due to the unique electronic and optical properties associated with the material in its single-layer form. The single-layer MoS2 and WS2 are already in widespread commercial use in catalytic applications as both hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts. Consequently, characterization of the morphology and atomic structure of such particles is of utmost importance for the understanding of the catalytic active phase. However, in comparison with the related MoS2 system only little is known about the fundamental properties of single-layer WS2 (tungstenite). Here, we use an interplay of atom-resolved Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) studies of Au(111)-supported WS2 nanoparticles and calculated edge structures using Density Functional Theory (DFT) to reveal the equilibrium morphology and prevalent edge structures of single-layer WS2. The STM results reveal that the single layer S-W-S sheets adopt a triangular equilibrium shape under the sulfiding conditions of the synthesis, with fully sulfided edges. The predominant edge structures are determined to be the (101[combining macron]0) W-edge, but for the smallest nanoclusters also the (1[combining macron]010) S-edges become important. DFT calculations are used to construct phase diagrams of the WS2 edges, and describe their sulfur and hydrogen coordination under different conditions, and in this way shed light on the catalytic role of WS2 edges.

  14. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  15. Universal Scaling Law for Atomic Diffusion and Viscosity in Liquid Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Xu; LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The recently proposed scaling law relating the diffusion coefficient and the excess entropy of liquid[Samanta A et al. 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 145901; Dzugutov M 1996 Nature 381 137], and a quasi-universal relationship between the transport coefficients and excess entropy of dense fluids [Rosenfeld Y 1977 Phys. Rev. A 15 2545],are tested for diverse liquid metals using molecular dynamics simulations. Interatomic potentials derived from the glue potential and second-moment approximation of tight-binding scheme are used to study liquid metals.Our simulation results give sound support to the above-mentioned universal scaling laws. Following Dzugutov,we have also reached a new universal scaling relationship between the viscosity coefficient and excess entropy. The simulation results suggest that the reduced transport coefficients can be expressed approximately in terms of the corresponding packing density.

  16. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  17. Atomic-scale study of vapour growth morphology of crystalline urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.K. [Laser Materials Development and Devices Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India); Banerjee, A. [Laser Physics Applications Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2011-10-15

    The role of surface relaxation on habit controlling energetics and growth morphology are investigated within the framework of Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) and Hartman-Perdok (HP) models. The habit controlling energetics has been calculated using first principles method. The growth morphology obtained using BCF theory shows that the structural relaxation has considerable effect on growth morphology. The relaxed growth morphology obtained using BCF model match with the experimental result from vapour phase. On the other hand the shape obtained using HP model does not correspond with the experimental shape. Observed polar growth morphology of urea crystal has been discussed particularly in the context of different atomic environments of (111) and (111) faces. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO 2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Minimum threshold for incipient plasticity in the atomic-scale nanoindentation of Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter H

    2013-03-29

    The formation of the smallest permanent indentation in a Au(111) surface is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. The 9.5 nm radius W(111) indenter was characterized in situ by field ion microscopy. Elastic and plastic indentations are identified both in the residual impression image and by features in their force-displacement curves such as the sink-in depth, pop-ins, and hysteresis energy. Plasticity is best identified quantitatively in the force-displacement curves by the sink-in depth. The minimum of plastic damage producible in the substrate is associated with an energy budget of ∼70  eV.

  20. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W [Columbia University

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single

  1. Atomic-Scale Spectroscopy of Gated Monolayer MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kang, Kibum; Xie, Saien; Dadgar, Ali; Monahan, Nicholas R; Zhu, X-Y; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2016-05-11

    The electronic properties of semiconducting monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides can be tuned by electrostatic gate potentials. Here we report gate-tunable imaging and spectroscopy of monolayer MoS2 by atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Our measurements are performed on large-area samples grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques on a silicon oxide substrate. Topographic measurements of defect density indicate a sample quality comparable to single-crystal MoS2. From gate voltage dependent spectroscopic measurements, we determine that in-gap states exist in or near the MoS2 film at a density of 1.3 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2). By combining the single-particle band gap measured by STS with optical measurements, we estimate an exciton binding energy of 230 meV on this substrate, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulation. Grain boundaries are observed in these polycrystalline samples, which are seen to not have strong electronic signatures in STM imaging.

  2. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  3. Atomic-Scale Snapshots of the Formation and Growth of Hollow PtNi/C Nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattot, Raphaël; Asset, Tristan; Drnec, Jakub; Bordet, Pierre; Nelayah, Jaysen; Dubau, Laetitia; Maillard, Frédéric

    2017-03-30

    Determining the formation and growth mechanism of bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with atomic detail is fundamental to synthesize efficient "catalysts by design". However, an understanding of the elementary steps which take place during their synthesis remains elusive. Herein, we have exploited scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, operando wide angle and small-angle X-ray scattering, and electrochemistry to unveil the formation and growth mechanism of hollow PtNi/C NPs. Such NPs, composed of a PtNi shell surrounding a nanoscale void, catalyze efficiently and sustainably the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an acidic electrolyte. Our step-by-step study reveals that (i) Ni-rich/C NPs form first, before being embedded in a NixByOz shell, (ii) the combined action of galvanic displacement and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect then results in the sequential formation of Ni-rich core@Pt-rich/C shell and ultimately hollow PtNi/C NPs. The electrocatalytic properties for the ORR and the stability of the different synthesis intermediates were tested and structure-activity-stability relationships established both in acidic and alkaline electrolytes. Beyond its interest for the ORR electrocatalysis, this study also presents a methodology that is capable to unravel the formation and growth mechanism of various nanomaterials including preferentially shaped metal NPs, core@shell NPs, onion-like NPs, Janus NPs, or a combination of several of these structures.

  4. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  5. Elemental and Isotopic Tomography at Single-Atom-Scale in 4.0 and 2.4 Ga Zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, J. W.; Reinhard, D. A.; Snoeyenbos, D.; Lawrence, D.; Martin, I.; Kelly, T. F.; Ushikubo, T.; Strickland, A.; Cavosie, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Atom probe tomography can determine identity (mass/charge ratio) and 3-D position of individual atoms in minerals such as zircon. These data provide unique information for understanding the thermal history and mechanisms of mineral reaction and exchange, including radiation damage. Nine needle-shaped specimens ~100 nm in diameter (at the apex) were sampled from 2 zircons by FIB and analyzed with a local-electrode atom probe (LEAP), CAMECA LEAP 4000X HR. The LEAP uses pulsed-laser heating to field evaporate the tip of a zircon needle and accelerates the ions into a position-sensitive TOF-MS. With due care for complex isobaric interferences (molecules, multiple ionizations) and background correction, it is possible to individually identify up to 10E8 atoms/needle (36% detection efficiency) by mass/charge (MRP ~ 1000@ m/n=16Da) and position (X-Y-Z coordinates on 0.2 nm scale) (Kelly & Larson 2012). The 3-D distribution of Pb and Y differ at atom-scale in the 2 zircons. Zircon #1 (4007 Ma, Jack Hills, W. Australia, Cavosie 2005, Ushikubo et al. 2008, Bouvier et al. 2011) is homogeneous in Pb and Y. In contrast, incompatible elements, including Pb and Y, are concentrated in equant 5-10 nm dia. domains, spaced ~50 nm apart in zircon #2 (2438 Ma, Albion-Raft R-Grouse Ck core complex, Utah, Strickland et al. 2011). U is homogeneously distributed in both zircons. The analyzed domains suffered 4-8 x 10E15 α-decay events/mg due to U and Th decay and yet both zircons yield >97% concordant U-Pb ages by SIMS, suggesting annealing of radiation damage during the life of the zircons. The 207-Pb/206-Pb ratios for these nm-scale domains, as measured by LEAP, average 0.17 for the 2.4 Ga Zrc2 (3 needles) and 0.43 for the 4.0 Ga Zrc1 (5 needles). These ratios are less precise (±40% 2σ) due to ultra-small sample size, but are in excellent agreement with values measured by SIMS, 0.1684 and 0.4269, respectively. Thus Pb in both zircons is radiogenic. The Pb-Y-rich domains and lack of

  6. First order reversal curves (FORC) analysis of individual magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlit, Merlin; Eibisch, Paul; Akbari, Maryam; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Alongside the development of artificially created magnetic nanostructures, micro-Hall magnetometry has proven to be a versatile tool to obtain high-resolution hysteresis loop data and access dynamical properties. Here we explore the application of First Order Reversal Curves (FORC)—a technique well-established in the field of paleomagnetism for studying grain-size and interaction effects in magnetic rocks—to individual and dipolar-coupled arrays of magnetic nanostructures using micro-Hall sensors. A proof-of-principle experiment performed on a macroscopic piece of a floppy disk as a reference sample well known in the literature demonstrates that the FORC diagrams obtained by magnetic stray field measurements using home-built magnetometers are in good agreement with magnetization data obtained by a commercial vibrating sample magnetometer. We discuss in detail the FORC diagrams and their interpretation of three different representative magnetic systems, prepared by the direct-write Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) technique: (1) an isolated Co-nanoisland showing a simple square-shaped hysteresis loop, (2) a more complex CoFe-alloy nanoisland exhibiting a wasp-waist-type hysteresis, and (3) a cluster of interacting Co-nanoislands. Our findings reveal that the combination of FORC and micro-Hall magnetometry is a promising tool to investigate complex magnetization reversal processes within individual or small ensembles of nanomagnets grown by FEBID or other fabrication methods. The method provides sub-μm spatial resolution and bridges the gap of FORC analysis, commonly used for studying macroscopic samples and rather large arrays, to studies of small ensembles of interacting nanoparticles with the high moment sensitivity inherent to micro-Hall magnetometry.

  7. Microstructural investigation of Sr-modified Al-15 wt%Si alloys in the range from micrometer to atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timpel, M., E-mail: melanie.timpel@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Wanderka, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Vinod Kumar, G.S.; Banhart, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Technische Universitaet Berlin, Werkstoffwissenschaften und -Technologien, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Strontium-modified Al-15 wt%Si casting alloys were investigated after 5 and 60 min of melt holding. The eutectic microstructures were studied using complementary methods at different length scales: focused ion beam-energy selective backscattered tomography, transmission electron microscopy and 3D atom probe. Whereas the samples after 5 min of melt holding show that the structure of eutectic Si changes into a fine fibrous morphology, the increase of prolonged melt holding (60 min) leads to the loss of Sr within the alloy with an evolution of an unmodified eutectic microstructure displaying coarse interconnected Si plates. Strontium was found at the Al/Si eutectic interfaces on the side of the eutectic Al region, measured by 3D atom probe. The new results obtained using 3D atom probe shed light on the location of Sr within the Al-Si eutectic microstructure. -- Research highlights: {yields} Microstructural investigation of Sr-modified Al-15 wt%Si alloy after 5 and 60 min of melt holding using 3D microscopy techniques. {yields} FIB-EsB tomography: Fibrous eutectic modification of Si after 5 min of melt holding; unmodified eutectic microstructure after 60 min of melt holding. {yields} Structural and chemical analysis of Fe-rich intermetallic phases using TEM: Fe-rich {alpha}-phases are present in the eutectic microstructure after 60 min of melt holding; no Fe rich {alpha}-phases are observed within the modified fibrous network after 5 min of melt holding. {yields} 3D-AP analysis of specimens containing A/Si eutectic interfaces: enrichment of Sr is found at the Al/Si interface on the side of the eutectic Al region.

  8. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  9. The role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy centre-based magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising of a thin-film-based ferromagnetic hetero-structure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) with the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls for the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decre...

  10. First-Principles United Atom Force Field for the Ionic Liquid BMIM(+)BF4(-): An Alternative to Charge Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang Yun; McDaniel, Jesse G; Schmidt, J R; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-04-14

    Molecular dynamics study of ionic liquids (ILs) is a challenging task. While accurate fully polarizable atomistic models exist, they are computationally too demanding for routine use. Most nonpolarizable atomistic models predict diffusion constants that are much lower than experiment. Scaled charge atomistic models are cost-effective and give good results for single component ILs but are in qualitative error for the phase behavior of mixtures, due to inaccurate prediction of the IL cohesive energy. In this work, we present an alternative approach for developing computationally efficient models that importantly preserves both the correct dynamics and cohesive energy of the IL. Employing a "top-down" approach, a hierarchy of coarse-grained models for BMIM(+)BF4(-) are developed by systematically varying the polarization/atomic resolution of the distinct functional groups. Parametrization is based on symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations involving the homomolecular species; all cross interactions are obtained from mixing rules, and there are no adjustable parameters. We find that enhanced dynamics from a united-atom description counteracts the effect of reduced polarization, enabling computationally efficient models that exhibit quantitative agreement with experiment for both static and dynamic properties. We give explicit suggestions for reduced-description models that are computationally more efficient, more accurate, and more fundamentally sound than existing nonpolarizable atomistic models.

  11. Atomic and nano-scale characterization of a 50-year-old hydrated C3S paste

    KAUST Repository

    Geng, Guoqing

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the atomic and nano-scale structures of a 50-year-old hydrated alite paste. Imaged by TEM, the outer product C-S-H fibers are composed of particles that are 1.5-2 nm thick and several tens of nanometers long. 29Si NMR shows 47.9% Q1 and 52.1% Q2, with a mean SiO4 tetrahedron chain length (MCL) of 4.18, indicating a limited degree of polymerization after 50 years\\' hydration. A Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) study was conducted on this late-age paste and a 1.5 year old hydrated C3S solution. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) at Ca L3,2-edge indicates that Ca2 + in C-S-H is in an irregular symmetric coordination, which agrees more with the atomic structure of tobermorite than that of jennite. At Si K-edge, multi-scattering phenomenon is sensitive to the degree of polymerization, which has the potential to unveil the structure of the SiO44 - tetrahedron chain. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-scale synthesis of uniform hexagonal boron nitride films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hamin; Kim, Tae Keun; Cho, Sung Woo; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Sang Ick; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been previously manufactured using mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition methods, which make the large-scale synthesis of uniform h-BN very challenging. In this study, we produced highly uniform and scalable h-BN films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, which were characterized by various techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The film composition studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy corresponded to a B:N stoichiometric ratio close to 1:1, and the band-gap value (5.65 eV) obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy was consistent with the dielectric properties. The h-BN-containing capacitors were characterized by highly uniform properties, a reasonable dielectric constant (3), and low leakage current density, while graphene on h-BN substrates exhibited enhanced electrical performance such as the high carrier mobility and neutral Dirac voltage, which resulted from the low density of charged impurities on the h-BN surface.

  13. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Angstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Hartsock, R; Kozina, M; Minitti, M P; Nelson, S; Robinson, J; Sato, T; van Driel, T; Welch, G; Weninger, C; Zhi, D; Bucksbaum, P H

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with time and space resolution of $30~$fs and $0.3$ \\AA . The high spatial fidelity is due to interference between the moving excitation and the static initial charge distribution. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on \\AA ngstrom and femtosecond scales. Coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  14. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  15. Atomic scale analysis of phase formation and diffusion kinetics in Ag/Al multilayer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulfadl, Hisham; Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf; Mücklich, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Thin films generally exhibit unusual kinetics leading to chemical reactions far from equilibrium conditions. Binary metallic multilayer thin films with miscible elements show some similar behaviors with respect to interdiffusion and phase formation mechanisms. Interfacial density, lattice defects, internal stresses, layer morphologies and deposition conditions strongly control the mass transport between the individual layers. In the present work, Ag/Al multilayer thin films are used as a simple model system, in which the effects of the sputtering power and the bilayer period thickness on the interdiffusion and film reactions are investigated. Multilayers deposited by DC magnetron sputtering undergo calorimetric and microstructural analyses. In particular, atom probe tomography is extensively used to provide quantitative information on concentration gradients, grain boundary segregations, and reaction mechanisms. The magnitude of interdiffusion was found to be inversely proportional to the period thickness for the films deposited under the same conditions, and was reduced using low sputtering power. Both the local segregation at grain boundaries as well as pronounced non-equilibrium supersaturation effects play crucial roles during the early stages of the film reactions. For multilayers with small periods of 10 nm supersaturation of the Al layers with Ag precedes the polymorphic nucleation and growth of the hcp γ-Ag2Al phase. In larger periods the γ phase formation is triggered at junctions between grain boundaries and layers interfaces, where the pathway to heterogeneous nucleation is local supersaturation. Other Ag-rich phases also form as intermediate phases due to asymmetric diffusion rates of parent phases in the γ phase during annealing.

  16. Atomic scale engineering of HfO{sub 2}-based dielectrics for future DRAM applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Piotr

    2011-02-14

    Modern dielectrics in combination with appropriate metal electrodes have a great potential to solve many difficulties associated with continuing miniaturization process in the microelectronic industry. One significant branch of microelectronics incorporates dynamic random access memory (DRAM) market. The DRAM devices scaled for over 35 years starting from 4 kb density to several Gb nowadays. The scaling process led to the dielectric material thickness reduction, resulting in higher leakage current density, and as a consequence higher power consumption. As a possible solution for this problem, alternative dielectric materials with improved electrical and material science parameters were intensively studied by many research groups. The higher dielectric constant allows the use of physically thicker layers with high capacitance but strongly reduced leakage current density. This work focused on deposition and characterization of thin insulating layers. The material engineering process was based on Si cleanroom compatible HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on TiN metal electrodes. A combined materials science and dielectric characterization study showed that Ba-added HfO{sub 2} (BaHfO{sub 3}) films and Ti-added BaHfO{sub 3} (BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) layers are promising candidates for future generation of state-of-the-art DRAMs. In especial a strong increase of the dielectric permittivity k was achieved for thin films of cubic BaHfO{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}38) and BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (k{proportional_to}90) with respect to monoclinic HfO{sub 2} (k{proportional_to}19). Meanwhile the CET values scaled down to 1 nm for BaHfO{sub 3} and {proportional_to}0.8 nm for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} with respect to HfO{sub 2} (CET=1.5 nm). The Hf{sup 4+} ions substitution in BaHfO{sub 3} by Ti{sup 4+} ions led to a significant decrease of thermal budget from 900 C for BaHfO{sub 3} to 700 C for BaHf{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Future studies need to focus

  17. How Modelling of Crystal Defects at the Atomic Scale can Provide Information on Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Gouriet, K.; Hirel, P.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy represents one of the few sources of information about flow in the mantle that takes place at timescales that are barely accessible at human timescales. Seismic waves travelling through rocks at the speed of sound can reveal flow lines frozen in rocks over hundreds of million years. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy also needs to bridge length-scales since crystal defects are responsible for the plastic anisotropy that align crystals in a deforming rock thus revealing elastic anisotropy at the macroscopic scale. Knowing the easiest slip systems for a given crystal structure is thus the fundamental information needed. To obtain it we propose the following approach based on multiscale numerical modeling. As a first approach, we calculate generalized stacking faults which inform us about the easiest shear paths imposed by the crystal chemistry. This leads to a short list of potential slip systems for which lattice friction will be calculated. A further selection will be done by modeling the core structures of screw dislocations. The tendency for core spreading of screw dislocations impose a selection on potential glide planes which is further validated by modeling corresponding edge dislocations and their respective mobilities. Finally, we model the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate influence of stress and temperature using the kink-pair model which is based on the activation enthalpy of the critical configuration which allows a dislocation to glide from one stable position to the next. The output of this model is the so-called critical resolved shear stress which is the onset of plastic glide at a given temperature and strain rate. Comparison between slip systems provides constraints on the plastic anisotropy. Examples are presented among the major phases of the Earth's mantle.

  18. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  19. Small-scale properties of atomic gas in extended disks of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Momjian, Emmanuel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); York, Donald G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bowen, David V. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Yun, Min S.; Tripp, Todd M., E-mail: sanch@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We present high-resolution H I 21 cm observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for three H I rich galaxies in absorption against radio quasars. Our sample contains six sightlines with impact parameters from 2.6 to 32.4 kpc. We detected a narrow H I absorber of FWHM 1.1 km s{sup –1} at 444.5 km s{sup –1} toward SDSS J122106.854+454852.16 probing the dwarf galaxy UCG 7408 at an impact parameter of 2.8 kpc. The absorption feature was barely resolved and its width corresponds to a maximum kinetic temperature, T{sub k} ≈ 26 K. We estimate a limiting peak optical depth of 1.37 and a column density of 6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}. The physical extent of the absorber is 0.04 kpc{sup 2} and covers ∼25%-30% of the background source. A comparison between the emission and absorption strengths suggests the cold-to-total H I column density in the absorber is ∼30%. Folding in the covering fraction, the cold-to-total H I mass is ∼10%. This suggest that condensation of warm H I (T{sub s} ∼ 1000 K) to cold phase (T{sub s} < 100 K) is suppressed in UGC 7408. The unusually low temperature of the H I absorber also indicates inefficiency in condensation of atomic gas into molecular gas. The suppression in condensation is likely to be the result of low metal content in this galaxy. The same process might explain the low efficiency of star formation in dwarf galaxies despite their huge gas reservoirs. We report the non-detection of H I in absorption in five other sightlines. This indicates that either the cold gas distribution is highly patchy or the gas is much warmer (T{sub s} > 1000 K) toward these sightlines.

  20. On the thermodynamic efficiency of a multiferroic thermomagnetic generator: From bulk to atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Samuel Mancilla

    A unique multiferroic type of thermomagnetic generator is being investigated in order to establish its thermodynamic efficiency at different size scales. This device generates electricity when a magnetic material interacts with a thermal gradient by means of a spring-magnet mechanism. This unique technology is compared to other thermal-electric energy harvesting technologies to show that these devices have a similar goal of achieving a maximum theoretical efficiency of around 50% relative to Carnot. The first approach towards achieving improved performance relies on the analytical modeling, and experimental verification, of several subsystems stemming from the original design, which include the optimization of the magnetic force component, the optimization of the heat transfer process and the efficiency of the energy conversion process. The method to improve the magnetic force component is not recommended and neither is the method to improve the heat transfer process. Nevertheless, the energy conversion subsystem is successfully modeled and verified; thereby suggesting that an electromagnetic induction coil may be better suited for the energy conversion process over a ferroelectric transduction mechanism at bulk scale. A cascade design is also investigated as a method to improve device efficiency; though analysis reveals a design flaw, which leads to other methods for improving efficiency. Two models of thermomagnetic generator thermodynamic efficiency are developed, which are based on distinct approaches taken by Solomon and Brillouin in order to compare this unique system to a Carnot engine. The model based on a modified form of Solomon's approach results in a relative efficiency of 0.5%, which compares well with an estimate of efficiency based on provided data from the original design. This representative model of efficiency was then applied to a survey of pure elements for comparison, which confirms gadolinium as the best material for use as a working body with

  1. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  2. Magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of phosphine- and thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, E.; Muñoz-Márquez, M. A.; Fernández, A.; Crespo, P.; Hernando, A.; Lucena, R.; Conesa, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    In the last years, the number of studies performed by wholly independent research groups that confirm the permanent magnetism, first observed in our research lab, for thiol-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) has rapidly increased. Throughout the years, the initial magnetometry studies have been completed with element-specific magnetization measurements based on, for example, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique that have allowed the identification of gold as the magnetic moment carrier. In the research work here presented, we have focused our efforts in the evaluation of the magnetic behavior and iron impurities content in the synthesized samples by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry, respectively. As a result, hysteresis cycles typical of a ferromagnetic material have been measured from nominally iron-free gold NPs protected with thiol, phosphine, and chlorine ligands. It is also observed that for samples containing both, capped gold NPs and highly diluted iron concentrations, the magnetic behavior of the NPs is not affected by the presence of paramagnetic iron impurities. The hysteresis cycles reported for phosphine-chlorine-capped gold NPs confirm that the magnetic behavior is not exclusively for the metal-thiol system.

  3. Challenges in Atomic-Scale Characterization of High-k Dielectrics and Metal Gate Electrodes for Advanced CMOS Gate Stacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhua Zhu; Jianmin Zhu; Aidong Li; Zhiguo Liu; Naiben Ming

    2009-01-01

    The decreasing feature sizes in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor technology will require the replacement of SiO2 with gate dielectrics that have a high dielectric constant (high-k) because as the SiO2 gate thickness is reduced below 1.4 nm, electron tunnelling effects and high leakage currents occur in SiO2, which present serious obstacles to future device reliability.In recent years significant progress has been made on the screening and selection of high-k gate dielectrics, understanding their physical properties, and their integration into CMOS technology.Now the family of hafnium oxide-based materials has emerged as the leading candidate for high-k gate dielectrics due to their excellent physical properties.It is also realized that the high-k oxides must be implemented in conjunction with metal gate electrodes to get sufficient potential for CMOS continue scaling.In the advanced nanoscale Si-based CMOS devices, the composition and thickness of interfacial layers in the gate stacks determine the critical performance of devices.Therefore, detailed atomicscale understandings of the microstructures and interfacial structures built in the advanced CMOS gate stacks,are highly required.In this paper, several high-resolution electron, ion, and photon-based techniques currently used to characterize the high-k gate dielectrics and interfaces at atomic-scale, are reviewed.Particularly, we critically review the research progress on the characterization of interface behavior and structural evolution in the high-k gate dielectrics by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the related techniques based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), including high-angle annular darkfield (HAADF) imaging (also known as Z-contrast imaging), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), due to that HRTEM and STEM have become essential metrology tools for characterizing the dielectric

  4. In situ atomic scale mechanical microscopy discovering the atomistic mechanisms of plasticity in nano-single crystals and grain rotation in polycrystalline metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Wang, Lihua; Yue, Yonghai [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Zhang, Ze, E-mail: zezhang@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology (China); Department of Materials Science, National Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University (China)

    2015-04-15

    In this review, we briefly introduce our in situ atomic-scale mechanical experimental technique (ASMET) for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which can observe the atomic-scale deformation dynamics of materials. This in situ mechanical testing technique allows the deformation of TEM samples through a simultaneous double-tilt function, making atomic-scale mechanical microscopy feasible. This methodology is generally applicable to thin films, nanowires (NWs), tubes and regular TEM samples to allow investigation of the dynamics of mechanically stressed samples at the atomic scale. We show several examples of this technique applied to Pt and Cu single/polycrystalline specimens. The in situ atomic-scale observation revealed that when the feature size of these materials approaches the nano-scale, they often exhibit “unusual” deformation behaviours compared to their bulk counterparts. For example, in Cu single-crystalline NWs, the elastic–plastic transition is size-dependent. An ultra-large elastic strain of 7.2%, which approaches the theoretical elasticity limit, can be achieved as the diameter of the NWs decreases to ∼6 nm. The crossover plasticity transition from full dislocations to partial dislocations and twins was also discovered as the diameter of the single-crystalline Cu NWs decreased. For Pt nanocrystals (NC), the long-standing uncertainties of atomic-scale plastic deformation mechanisms in NC materials (grain size G less than 15 nm) were clarified. For larger grains with G<∼10 nm, we frequently observed movements and interactions of cross-grain full dislocations. For G between 6 and 10 nm, stacking faults resulting from partial dislocations become more frequent. For G<∼6 nm, the plasticity mechanism transforms from a mode of cross-grain dislocation to a collective grain rotation mechanism. This grain rotation process is mediated by grain boundary (GB) dislocations with the assistance of GB diffusion and shuffling. These in situ atomic-scale

  5. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  6. "Bottom-up" meets "top-down" : self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2009-04-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 102660 - 'Bottomup' meets 'top-down': Self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns - funded through the Strategic Partnerships investment area as part of the National Institute for Nano-Engineering (NINE) project.

  7. Low viscosity and high attenuation in MgSiO3 post-perovskite inferred from atomic-scale calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryaeva, Alexandra M.; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    This work represents a numerical study of the thermal activation for dislocation glide of the [100](010) slip system in MgSiO3 post-perovskite (Mg-ppv) at 120 GPa. We propose an approach based on a one-dimensional line tension model in conjunction with atomic-scale calculations. In this model, the key parameters, namely, the line tension and the Peierls barrier, are obtained from density functional theory calculations. We find a Peierls stress σp = 2.1 GPa and a line tension Γ = 9.2 eV/Å, which lead to a kink-pair enthalpy (under zero stress) of 2.69 eV. These values confirm that this slip system bears a very low lattice friction because it vanishes for temperatures above approximately 500 K under mantle conditions. In the Earth’s mantle, high-pressure Mg-ppv silicate is thus expected to become as ductile as ferropericlase. These results confirm the hypothesis of a weak layer in the D″ layer where Mg-ppv is present. Easy glide along [100](010) suggests strong preferred orientations with (010) planes aligned. Highly mobile [100] dislocations are also likely to respond to stresses related to seismic waves, leading to energy dissipation and strong attenuation.

  8. The Atomic to Molecular Transition and its Relation to the Scaling Properties of Galaxy Disks in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jian; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Krumholz, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    We extend existing semi-analytic models of galaxy formation to track atomic and molecular gas in disk galaxies. Simple recipes for processes such as cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, and chemical enrichment of the stars and gas are grafted on to dark matter halo merger trees derived from the Millennium Simulation. Each galactic disk is represented by a series of concentric rings. We assume that surface density profile of infalling gas in a dark matter halo is exponential, with scale radius r_d that is proportional to the virial radius of the halo times its spin parameter $\\lambda$. As the dark matter haloes grow through mergers and accretion, disk galaxies assemble from the inside out. We include two simple prescriptions for molecular gas formation processes in our models: one is based on the analytic calculations by Krumholz, McKee & Tumlinson (2008), and the other is a prescription where the H_2 fraction is determined by the kinematic pressure of the ISM. Motivated by the observational result...

  9. Magnetometry and transport data complement polarized neutron reflectometry in magnetic depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yi; He Xi; Mukherjee, T.; Binek, Ch. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Jorgenson Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0111 (United States); Fitzsimmons, M. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sahoo, S. [Seagate Technology, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exchange coupled magnetic hard layer/soft layer thin films show a variety of complex magnetization reversal mechanisms depending on the hierarchy of interaction strengths within and between the films. Magnetization reversal can include uniform rotation, soft layer biasing, as well as exchange spring behavior. We investigate the magnetization reversal of a CoPt/Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy heterostructure. Here, Stoner-Wohlfarth-type uniform magnetization rotation of the virtually free Permalloy layer and exchange spring behavior of the strongly pinned Permalloy layer are found in the same sample. We investigate the complex magnetization reversal by polarized neutron reflectometry, magnetometry, and magneto-transport. The synergy of combining these experimental methods together with theoretical modeling is key to obtain the complete quantitative depth resolved information of the magnetization reversal processes for a multilayer of mesoscopic thickness.

  10. Exchange coupling in hybrid anisotropy magnetic multilayers quantified by vector magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, C., E-mail: C.Morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Miles, J. J.; Thomson, T. [School of Computer Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Anh Nguyen, T. N. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Spintronics Research Group, Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT), VNU-HCM, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Fang, Y.; Dumas, R. K. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-05-07

    Hybrid anisotropy thin film heterostructures, where layers with perpendicular and in-plane anisotropy are separated by a thin spacer, are novel materials for zero/low field spin torque oscillators and bit patterned media. Here, we report on magnetization reversal and exchange coupling in a archetypal Co/Pd (perpendicular)-NiFe (in-plane) hybrid anisotropy system studied using vector vibrating sample magnetometry. This technique allows us to quantify the magnetization reversal in each individual magnetic layer, and measure of the interlayer exchange as a function of non-magnetic spacer thickness. At large (>1 nm) spacer thicknesses Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-like exchange dominates, with orange-peel coupling providing a significant contribution only for sub-nm spacer thickness.

  11. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  12. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter, E-mail: ptr@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  13. Nanoscale magnetometry through quantum control of nitrogen-vacancy centres in rotationally diffusing nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Maclaurin, D; Martin, A M; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    The confluence of quantum physics and biology is driving a new generation of quantum-based sensing and imaging technology capable of harnessing the power of quantum effects to provide tools to understand the fundamental processes of life. One of the most promising systems in this area is the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond - a natural spin qubit which remarkably has all the right attributes for nanoscale sensing in ambient biological conditions. Typically the nitrogen-vacancy qubits are fixed in tightly controlled/isolated experimental conditions. In this work quantum control principles of nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry are developed for a randomly diffusing diamond nanocrystal. We find that the accumulation of geometric phases, due to the rotation of the nanodiamond plays a crucial role in the application of a diffusing nanodiamond as a bio-label and magnetometer. Specifically, we show that a freely diffusing nanodiamond can offer real-time information about local magnetic fields and its own rotational beh...

  14. Magnetometry and Ground-Penetrating Radar Studies in the Sihuas Valley, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnicki, E.; Papadimitrios, K.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Quillcapampa la Antigua site in Peru's Sihuas Valley is a settlement from Peru's Middle Horizon (600-100 A.D.). Archaeological interest in the area stems from the question of whether ancient civilizations were able to have extensive state control of distant groups, or whether state influence occurred through less direct ties (e.g., marriage, religion, or trade). Our geophysical surveys are preliminary to archaeological digging in the area. Ground-penetrating radar and magnetometry attempt to locate areas of interest for focused archaeological excavation, characterize the design of architectural remains and burial mounds in the area, and allow archaeologists to interpret the amount of influence the Wari civilization had on the local residents.

  15. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of diamond NV centers

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, V M; Jarmola, A; Zipp, L J; Ledbetter, M P; Budker, D

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy (NV) ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 microns^3, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of integration and bandwidth from DC to a few MHz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration is demonstrated with a sensitivity of 7 nT_{rms} in one second of integration at ~110 Hz bandwidth.

  16. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  17. SQUID magnetometry for the cryoEDM experiment-Tests at LSBB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S; Kraus, H; Malek, M; Mikhailik, V B [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Waysand, G [Laboratoire Souterrain a Bas Bruit de Rustrel-Pays d' Apt (LSBB), Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, La Grande Combe, 84400 Rustrel (France)], E-mail: s.henry1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    High precision magnetometry is an essential requirement of the cryoEDM experiment at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. We have developed a SQUID system for this purpose, however tests done in Oxford have been limited by the noisy electromagnetic environment inside our laboratory, therefore we have tested a smaller version of our prototype system in the very low noise environment at LSBB, Rustrel, France. We have studied the crosstalk between an array of parallel pick-up loops-where the field generated by a current in one loop is detected by the others. We monitored the magnetic field in the LSBB for over twelve hours; and after correcting these data for SQUID resets, and crosstalk, we compare it to the published values from nearby geomagnetic observatories. We have also measured the noise spectrum of our system and studied the effect that heating one of the pick-up loops into its conducting state has on the other, parallel loops.

  18. The Atomic and Nuclear Physics of Atomic EDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Atomic Electric-Dipole-Moment (EDM) measurements employ low-energy atomic and precision-measurement techniques to measure the effects of elementary particle forces that affect the distribution of charge and mass in the nucleus, which is probed by the atomic electrons. Experiments and their interpretation strongly overlap atomic and nuclear physics in the experimental and theoretical problems presented. On the experimental side, the atomic EDM couples to electric fields while the magnetic dipole moment couples to magnetic fields requiring exquisite control and characerization of the magnetic fields. Measuring the tiny frequency shifts requires clock-comparisons and a large signal-to-noise ratio for frequency resolution much smaller than the linewidths, which are lmitied by observation times. To address the experimental challenges, I will discuss systematic effects related to magnetic fields and techniques of magnetometry and co-magntometery as well as optical pumping and related techniques that enhance signal-to-noise. I will also address the interpretation of atomic EDMs in terms of a set of low-energy parameters that relate to effective-field-theory coefficients, and I will empshaize the need for improved calculations from both atomic-theory and nuclear theory.

  19. Atomic-Scale Origin of Long-Term Stability and High Performance of p-GaN Nanowire Arrays for Photocatalytic Overall Pure Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Md Golam; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Wanli; Boukahil, Idris; Kong, Xianghua; Chowdhury, Faqrul Alam; Trudeau, Michel L; Ji, Wei; Guo, Hong; Himpsel, F J; Vayssieres, Lionel; Mi, Zetian

    2016-10-01

    The atomic-scale origin of the unusually high performance and long-term stability of wurtzite p-GaN oriented nanowire arrays is revealed. Nitrogen termination of both the polar (0001¯) top face and the nonpolar (101¯0) side faces of the nanowires is essential for long-term stability and high efficiency. Such a distinct atomic configuration ensures not only stability against (photo) oxidation in air and in water/electrolyte but, as importantly, also provides the necessary overall reverse crystal polarization needed for efficient hole extraction in p-GaN.

  20. A Separable Insertion Method to Calculate Atomic and Molecular Resonances on a FE-DVR Grid using Exterior Complex Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Brant Anthony

    The study of metastable electronic resonances, anion or neutral states of finite lifetime, in molecules is an important area of research where currently no theoretical technique is generally applicable. The role of theory is to calculate both the position and width, which is proportional to the inverse of the lifetime, of these resonances and how they vary with respect to nuclear geometry in order to generate potential energy surfaces. These surfaces are the basis of time-dependent models of the molecular dynamics where the system moves towards vibrational excitation or fragmentation. Three fundamental electronic processes that can be modeled this way are dissociative electronic attachment, vibrational excitation through electronic impact and autoionization. Currently, experimental investigation into these processes is being preformed on polyatomic molecules while theoreticians continue their fifty-year-old search for robust methods to calculate them. The separable insertion method, investigated in this thesis, seeks to tackle the problem of calculating metastable resonances by using existing quantum chemistry tools along with a grid-based method employing exterior complex scaling (ECS). Modern quantum chemistry methods are extremely efficient at calculating ground and (bound) excited electronic states of atoms and molecules by utilizing Gaussian basis functions. These functions provide both a numerically fast and analytic solution to the necessary two-electron, six-dimensional integrals required in structure calculations. However, these computer programs, based on analytic Gaussian basis sets, cannot construct solutions that are not square-integrable, such as resonance wavefunctions. ECS, on the other hand, can formally calculate resonance solutions by rotating the asymptotic electronic coordinates into the complex plane. The complex Siegert energies for resonances, Eres = ER - iGamma/2 where ER is the real-valued position of the resonance and Gamma is the width

  1. Adsorption of Synthetic Cationic Polymers on Model Phospholipid Membranes: Insight from Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A; Nesterenko, Alexey M; Gurtovenko, Andrey A

    2016-10-11

    Although synthetic cationic polymers represent a promising class of effective antibacterial agents, the molecular mechanisms behind their antimicrobial activity remain poorly understood. To this end, we employ atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations to explore adsorption of several linear cationic polymers of different chemical structure and protonation (polyallylamine (PAA), polyethylenimine (PEI), polyvinylamine (PVA), and poly-l-lysine (PLL)) on model bacterial membranes (4:1 mixture of zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) lipids). Overall, our findings show that binding of polycations to the anionic membrane surface effectively neutralizes its charge, leading to the reorientation of water molecules close to the lipid/water interface and to the partial release of counterions to the water phase. In certain cases, one has even an overcharging of the membrane, which was shown to be a cooperative effect of polymer charges and lipid counterions. Protonated amine groups of polycations are found to interact preferably with head groups of anionic lipids, giving rise to formation of hydrogen bonds and to a noticeable lateral immobilization of the lipids. While all the above findings are mostly defined by the overall charge of a polymer, we found that the polymer architecture also matters. In particular, PVA and PEI are able to accumulate anionic PG lipids on the membrane surface, leading to lipid segregation. In turn, PLL whose charge twice exceeds charges of PVA/PEI does not induce such lipid segregation due to its considerably less compact architecture and relatively long side chains. We also show that partitioning of a polycation into the lipid/water interface is an interplay between its protonation level (the overall charge) and hydrophobicity of the backbone. Therefore, a possible strategy in creating highly efficient antimicrobial polymeric agents could be in tuning these polycation's properties through proper

  2. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle; Modelisation a l'echelle atomique de materiaux nucleaires du cycle du combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-15

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  3. Atomic-Scale Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of {100}-Oriented Diamond Film Growth in C-H and C-H-Cl Systems by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安希忠; 张禹; 刘国权; 秦湘阁; 王辅忠; 刘胜新

    2002-01-01

    We simulate the { 100}-oriented diamond film growth of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) under different modelsin C-H and C-H-CI systems in an atomic scale by using the revised kinetic Monte Carlo method. The sirnulationresults show that: (1) the CVD diamond flm growth in the C-H system is suitable for high substrate temperature,and the flm surface roughness is very coarse; (2) the CVD diamond film can grow in the C-H-C1 system eitherat high temperature or at low temperature, and the film quality is outstanding; (3) atomic CI takes ala activerole for the growth of diamond film, especially at low temperatures. The concentration of atomic C1 should becontrolled in a proper range.

  4. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J C Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-05-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, J C, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because J C amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSe x Te1-x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or "columnar defects," plus a higher density of single atomic site "point" defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields.

  5. Effects of rock wool on the lungs evaluated by magnetometry and biopersistence test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yuichiro; Kotani, Makoto; Tomita, Masayuki; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Background Asbestos has been reported to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and its use has been banned all over the world. The related industries are facing an urgent need to develop a safer fibrous substance. Rock wool (RW), a kind of asbestos substitute, is widely used in the construction industry. In order to evaluate the safety of RW, we performed a nose-only inhalation exposure study in rats. After one-month observation period, the potential of RW fibers to cause pulmonary toxicity was evaluated based on lung magnetometry findings, pulmonary biopersistence, and pneumopathology. Methods Using the nose-only inhalation exposure system, 6 male Fischer 344 rats (6 to 10 weeks old) were exposed to RW fibers at a target fiber concentration of 100 fibers/cm3 (length [L] > 20 μm) for 6 hours daily, for 5 consecutive days. As a magnetometric indicator, 3 mg of triiron tetraoxide suspended in 0.2 mL of physiological saline was intratracheally administered after RW exposure to these rats and 6 unexposed rats (controls). During one second magnetization in 50 mT external magnetic field, all magnetic particles were aligned, and immediately afterwards the strength of their remanent magnetic field in the rat lungs was measured in both groups. Magnetization and measurement of the decay (relaxation) of this remanent magnetic field was performed over 40 minutes on 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after RW exposure, and reflected cytoskeleton dependent intracellular transport within macrophages in the lung. Similarly, 24 and 12 male Fisher 344-rats were used for biopersistence test and pathologic evaluation, respectively. Results In the lung magnetometric evaluation, biopersistence test and pathological evaluation, the arithmetic mean value of the total fiber concentration was 650.2, 344.7 and 390.7 fibers/cm3, respectively, and 156.6, 93.1 and 95.0 fibers/cm3 for fibers with L > 20 μm, respectively. The lung magnetometric evaluation revealed that impaired relaxation indicating cytoskeletal

  6. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  7. Effects of rock wool on the lungs evaluated by magnetometry and biopersistence test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Masayuki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asbestos has been reported to cause pulmonary fibrosis, and its use has been banned all over the world. The related industries are facing an urgent need to develop a safer fibrous substance. Rock wool (RW, a kind of asbestos substitute, is widely used in the construction industry. In order to evaluate the safety of RW, we performed a nose-only inhalation exposure study in rats. After one-month observation period, the potential of RW fibers to cause pulmonary toxicity was evaluated based on lung magnetometry findings, pulmonary biopersistence, and pneumopathology. Methods Using the nose-only inhalation exposure system, 6 male Fischer 344 rats (6 to 10 weeks old were exposed to RW fibers at a target fiber concentration of 100 fibers/cm3 (length [L] > 20 μm for 6 hours daily, for 5 consecutive days. As a magnetometric indicator, 3 mg of triiron tetraoxide suspended in 0.2 mL of physiological saline was intratracheally administered after RW exposure to these rats and 6 unexposed rats (controls. During one second magnetization in 50 mT external magnetic field, all magnetic particles were aligned, and immediately afterwards the strength of their remanent magnetic field in the rat lungs was measured in both groups. Magnetization and measurement of the decay (relaxation of this remanent magnetic field was performed over 40 minutes on 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after RW exposure, and reflected cytoskeleton dependent intracellular transport within macrophages in the lung. Similarly, 24 and 12 male Fisher 344-rats were used for biopersistence test and pathologic evaluation, respectively. Results In the lung magnetometric evaluation, biopersistence test and pathological evaluation, the arithmetic mean value of the total fiber concentration was 650.2, 344.7 and 390.7 fibers/cm3, respectively, and 156.6, 93.1 and 95.0 fibers/cm3 for fibers with L > 20 μm, respectively. The lung magnetometric evaluation revealed that impaired relaxation

  8. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  9. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  10. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Electrochemical Delithiation Induced Structure Evolution of LiCoO2 Cathode in a Working All-Solid-State Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yue; Zhang, Jienan; Jiang, Liwei; Shi, Jin-An; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Zou, Dongli; Wang, Jiangyong; Yu, Xiqian; Xiao, Ruijuan; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan

    2017-03-29

    We report a method for in situ atomic-scale observation of electrochemical delithiation in a working all-solid-state battery using a state-of-the-art chip based in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) holder and focused ion beam milling to prepare an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery sample. A battery consisting of LiCoO2 cathode, LLZO solid state electrolyte and gold anode was constructed, delithiated and observed in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope at atomic scale. We found that the pristine single crystal LiCoO2 became nanosized polycrystal connected by coherent twin boundaries and antiphase domain boundaries after high voltage delithiation. This is different from liquid electrolyte batteries, where a series of phase transitions take place at LiCoO2 cathode during delithiation. Both grain boundaries become more energy favorable along with extraction of lithium ions through theoretical calculation. We also proposed a lithium migration pathway before and after polycrystallization. This new methodology could stimulate atomic scale in situ scanning/TEM studies of battery materials and provide important mechanistic insight for designing better all-solid-state battery.

  11. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  12. Laterally patterned spin-valve superlattice: Magnetometry and polarized neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brüssing, F.; Devishvili, A.; Zabel, H. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Toperverg, B. P. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Theory Division, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Badini Confalonieri, G. A. [Department of Physics, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, E-28049 CSIC Madrid (Spain); Theis-Bröhl, K. [University of Applied Science, An der Karlstadt 8, 27568 Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    The magnetization reversal of magnetic multilayers with spin-valve like characteristics, patterned into an array of parallel stripes, was structurally and magnetically analyzed, in detail, via x-ray scattering, magnetometry, and polarized neutron reflectivity. Each stripe contains a multiple repetition of the layer sequence [Fe/Cr/Co/Cr]. X-ray and neutron scattering maps of the patterned multilayer show rich details resulting from the superposition of Bragg peaks representing the lateral in-plane periodicity and the out-of-plane multilayer period. Detailed analysis of specular and off-specular polarized neutron intensity was used to ascertain the antiparallel alignment of the Co and Fe magnetization within the kink region of their combined hysteresis loop between the coercive fields of Fe and Co layers. This includes also an examination of domain formation and inter- as well as intra-stripe correlation effects upon magnetization reversal. Our combined study shows that the shape induced anisotropy via patterning is capable of overriding the four-fold crystal anisotropy but is unable to eliminate the ripple domain state of the Co layers, already present in the continuous multilayer.

  13. A Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry study of magnetic multilayers and oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bland, J

    2002-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of thin films, multilayers and oxides has been performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The systems studied are DyFe sub 2 , HoFe sub 2 and YFe sub 2 cubic Laves Phase thin films, DyFe sub 2 /Dy and DyFe sub 2 /YFe sub 2 multilayers; Ce/Fe and U/Fe multilayers; and iron oxide powders and thin films. CEMS results at room temperature show a low symmetry magnetic easy axis for all of the Laves Phase samples studied. Analysis of the dipolar and contact hyperfine fields show that this axis is close to the [2-bar41] and [3-bar51] directions but cannot be fully determined. The spin moments lie out of plane in all samples by approximately 22 deg, indicating a significant magneto-elastic anisotropy. 2.5 kG inplane applied field measurements indicate a much larger magnitude of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the DyFe sub 2 system than in the YFe sub 2 system. In the DyFe sub 2 /YFe sub 2 multilayer samples the anisotropy is dominated by the dysprosium single-io...

  14. A handheld SPIO-based sentinel lymph node mapping device using differential magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, S.; Visscher, M.; Wildeboer, R. R.; Oderkerk, T. O. B.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; ten Haken, B.

    2016-11-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy has become a staple tool in the diagnosis of breast cancer. By replacing the morbidity-plagued axillary node clearance with removing only those nodes most likely to contain metastases, it has greatly improved the quality of life of many breast cancer patients. However, due to the use of ionizing radiation emitted by the technetium-based tracer material, the current sentinel lymph node biopsy has serious drawbacks. Most urgently, the reliance on radioisotopes limits the application of this procedure to small parts of the developed world, and it imposes restrictions on patient planning and hospital logistics. Magnetic alternatives have been tested in recent years, but all have their own drawbacks, mostly related to interference from metallic instruments and electromagnetic noise coming from the human body. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach that utilizes the unique nonlinear magnetic properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to eliminate the drawbacks of both the traditional gamma-radiation centered approach and the novel magnetic techniques pioneered by others. Contrary to many other nonlinear magnetic approaches however, field amplitudes are limited to 5 mT, which enables handheld operation without additional cooling. We show that excellent mass sensitivity can be obtained without the need for external re-balancing of the probe to negate any influences from the human body. Additionally, we show how this approach can be used to suppress artefacts resulting from the presence of metallic instruments, which are a significant dealbreaker when using conventional magnetometry-based approaches.

  15. Volumetric localization of epileptic activities in tuberous sclerosis using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zheng [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Xiang, Jing [Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hunjan, Amrita; Sharma, Rohit; Otsubo, Hiroshi [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a novel noninvasive technique for localizing epileptic zones. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is often associated with medically refractory epilepsy with multiple epileptic zones. Surgical treatment of TSC requires accurate localization of epileptogenic tubers. The objective of this study was to introduce a new MEG technique, synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM), to volumetrically localize irritable zones and clarify the correlations between SAM, dipole modeling and anatomical tubers. Eight pediatric patients with TSC confirmed by clinical and neuroimaging findings were retrospectively studied. MEG data were recorded using a whole-cortex CTF OMEGA system. Sleep deprivation was employed to provoke epileptiform activity. Irritable zones were localized using both dipole modeling and SAM. MRI detected 42 tubers in the eight patients. Dipole modeling localized 28 irritable zones, and 19 out of the 28 zones were near tubers (19/42, 45%). SAM found 51 irritable zones, and 31 out of the 51 zones were near tubers (31/42, 74%). Among the 51 irritable zones determined by SAM, thirty-five zones were in 1-35 Hz, nine zones were in 35-60 Hz, and seven zones were in 60-120 Hz. The new method, SAM, yielded very plausible equivalent sources for patients who showed anatomical tubers on MRI. Compared to conventional dipole modeling, SAM appeared to offer increased detection of irritable zones and beneficial volumetric and frequency descriptions. (orig.)

  16. Volumetric localization of somatosensory cortex in children using synthetic aperture magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Jing [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON (Canada); Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON (Canada); Holowka, Stephanie; Chuang, Sylvester [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sharma, Rohit; Hunjan, Amrita; Otsubo, Hiroshi [Department of Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    Magnetic signal from the human brain can be measured noninvasively by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). This study was designed to localize and reconstruct the neuromagnetic activity in the somatosensory cortex in children Twenty children were studied using a 151-channel MEG system with electrical stimulation applied to median nerves. Data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). A clear deflection (M1) was clearly identified in 18 children (90%, 18/20). Two frequency bands, 30-60 Hz and 60-120 Hz, were found to be related to somatosensory cortex. Magnetic activity was localized in the posterior bank of the central sulcus in 16 children. The extent of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity of the left hemisphere was significantly larger than that of the right hemisphere (P<0.01). Somatosensory cortex was accurately localized by using SAM. The extent of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity suggested that the left hemisphere was the dominant side in the somatosensory system in children. We postulate that the volumetric characteristics of the reconstructed neuromagnetic activity are able to indicate the functionality of the brain. (orig.)

  17. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  18. Precise atomic-scale investigations of material sputtering process by light gas ions in pre-threshold energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, A L

    2002-01-01

    Foundation and prospects of the new original technique of the sputtering yield determination of electro-conducting materials and sub-atomic layers on their surface by light gas ions the pre-threshold energy region (from 10 to 500 eV) are considered. The technique allows to identify individual surface vacancies, i.e., to count individual sputtered atoms directly. A short review of the original results obtained by using the developed techniques is given. Data are presented and analyzed concerning energy thresholds of the sputtering onset and energy dependences of sputtering yield in the threshold energy region for beryllium, tungsten, tungsten oxide, alternating tungsten-carbon layers, three carbon materials as well as for sub-atomic carbon layers on surface of certain metals at their bombardment by hydrogen, deuterium and/or helium ions

  19. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M., E-mail: p.m.koenraad@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ∼10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed.

  20. Atomic Scale coexistence of Periodic and quasiperiodic order in a2-fold A1-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Young; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Ribeiro,R.A.; Canfield, P.C.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.

    2005-11-14

    Decagonal quasicrystals are made of pairs of atomic planes with pentagonal symmetry periodically stacked along a 10-fold axis. We have investigated the atomic structure of the 2-fold surface of a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The surface consists of terraces separated by steps of heights 1.9, 4.7, 7.8, and 12.6{angstrom} containing rows of atoms parallel to the 10-fold direction with an internal periodicity of 4{angstrom}. The rows are arranged aperiodically, with separations that follow a Fibonacci sequence and inflation symmetry. The results indicate that the surfaces are preferentially Al-terminated and in general agreement with bulk models.

  1. Phonon transmission and reflection antiresonances at the interface between solids with impurities as interference phenomena in atomic-scale phononic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yury; Han, Haoxue; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically phonon transmission through the interface between two solid crystals, which contains heavy isotopic impurities and/or soft-force-constant defects. We perform analytical calculations of plane wave transmission and numerical molecular dynamics simulation of wave packet transmission, which give consistent with each other results. If the impurities do not fill completely the interface plane, longitudinal and transverse phonons have two passes to cross such interface, through the host and through the impurity atoms bonds. Destructive interference between these passes can result in total resonance reflection of the phonon. The phonon transmission antiresonance is followed by phonon reflection antiresonance at higher frequency. The random distribution of the defects at the interface and nonlinearity of atomic bonds do not deteriorate the reflection and transmission antiresonances. Such Fano-like phonon interference antiresonances can affect heat transport through interfaces and contacts between nanostructures with impurities. The antiresonances are realized in phonon transmission through a planar defect in Si crystal with segregated Ge atoms. The phonon antiresonances can be considered as interference phenomena in atomic-scale phononic metamaterials.

  2. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  3. Atomic scale simulations of pyrochlore oxides with a tight-binding variable-charge model: implications for radiation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattonnay, G; Tétot, R

    2014-02-05

    Atomistic simulations with new interatomic potentials derived from a tight-binding variable-charge model were performed in order to investigate the lattice properties and the defect formation energies in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores. The main objective was to determine the role played by the defect stability on the radiation tolerance of these compounds. Calculations show that the titanate has a more covalent character than the zirconate. Moreover, the properties of oxygen Frenkel pairs, cation antisite defects and cation Frenkel pairs were studied. In Gd2Ti2O7 the cation antisite defect and the Ti-Frenkel pair are not stable: they evolve towards more stable defect configurations during the atomic relaxation process. This phenomenon is driven by a decrease of the Ti coordination number down to five which leads to a local atomic reorganization and strong structural distortions around the defects. These kinds of atomic rearrangements are not observed around defects in Gd2Zr2O7. Therefore, the defect stability in A2B2O7 depends on the ability of B atoms to accommodate high coordination number (higher than six seems impossible for Ti). The accumulation of structural distortions around Ti-defects due to this phenomenon could drive the Gd2Ti2O7 amorphization induced by irradiation.

  4. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  5. Interaction networks in protein folding via atomic-resolution experiments and long-time-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Piana, Stefano;

    2015-01-01

    The integration of atomic-resolution experimental and computational methods offers the potential for elucidating key aspects of protein folding that are not revealed by either approach alone. Here, we combine equilibrium NMR measurements of thermal unfolding and long molecular dynamics simulation...

  6. Dynamic atomic scale in situ electron microscopy in the development of an efficient heterogeneous catalytic process for pharmaceutical NSAIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.R. Shiju; K. Yoshida; E.D. Boyes; D.R. Brown; P.L. Gai

    2011-01-01

    In heterogeneous catalysis the identification of the active site and crucially its location to prevent unwanted sintering and deactivation during the transformation of the precursor to active catalyst require the integration of dynamic in situ imaging at the atomic level and reactivity studies. We r

  7. A linear- and sublinear-scaling method for calculating NMR shieldings in atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Marina; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-05-07

    An atomic-orbital (AO) based formulation for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shieldings at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory level is introduced, which provides a basis for reducing the scaling of the computational effort with the molecular size from the fifth power to linear and for a specific nucleus to sublinear. The latter sublinear scaling in the rate-determining steps becomes possible by avoiding global perturbations with respect to the magnetic field and by solving for quantities that involve the local nuclear magnetic spin perturbation instead. For avoiding the calculation of the second-order perturbed density matrix, we extend our AO-based reformulation of the Z-vector method within a density matrix-based scheme. Our pilot implementation illustrates the fast convergence with respect to the required number of Laplace points and the asymptotic scaling behavior in the rate-determining steps.

  8. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H., E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, Y. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, F-14032 Caen (France); Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Schlathölter, T. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  9. Selective detection of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications using differential magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visscher, M.; Waanders, S.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Haken, B. ten, E-mail: b.tenhaken@utwente.nl

    2014-09-01

    The present study describes a new concept of magnetic detection that can be used for fast, selective measurements on magnetic nanoparticles and which is not influenced by the presence of materials with a linear magnetic susceptibility, like tissue. Using an alternating excitation field (f∼5kHz) with a sequence of static offset fields, the magnetometer is selectively sensitive for the nonlinear properties of magnetic nanoparticles in samples. The offset field sequence modulates the measured inductive response of nonlinear magnetic materials, in contrast to linear magnetic materials. We demonstrate a detection limit for superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the sub-microgram (iron) range. The mass sensitivity of the procedure increases with offset field amplitude and particle size. Compared to the sensitivity for particles in suspension, the sensitivity reduces for particles accumulated in lymph node tissue or immobilized by drying, which is attributed to a change in Brownian relaxation. The differential magnetometry concept is used as a tool to perform non-destructive analysis of magnetic nanoparticles in clinically relevant tissue samples at room temperature. In addition, the differential magnetometer can be used for fundamental quantitative research of the performance of magnetic nanoparticles in alternating fields. The method is a promising approach for in vivo measurements during clinical interventions, since it suppresses the linear contribution of the surrounding body volume and effectively picks out the nonlinear contribution of magnetic tracer. - Highlights: • Simple method for the analysis of magnetic nanoparticle content in biomedical samples. • Offset field sequence modulates nonlinear magnetization on AC excitation. • Contribution of linear magnetic surrounding media or tissue is eliminated. • Magnetic nanoparticles selectively detected with a high sensitivity (<1μg iron). • Tool for characterization of MNP performance in alternating

  10. An airborne magnetometry study across Zagros collision zone along Ahvaz-Isfahan route in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskooi, Behrooz; Abedi, Maysam

    2015-12-01

    Convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates formed the Zagros orogenic belt between Late Cretaceous and Pliocene as a relatively young and active fold-thrust belt in Iran. The structural geology along Ahvaz to Isfahan route across Zagros is investigated employing magnetic data in order to determine the crustal structure in the collision zone of the two Palaeo-continents. Airborne magnetometry data with a line space of survey of 7.5 km have been used to image the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility along this route. At first the airborne data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance subtle changes of the Earth's magnetic field. Then 3D inverse modeling of magnetic data was implemented, while the cross section of the magnetic susceptibility variations along the route was mapped down to a depth of 100 km. The acquired magnetic susceptibility model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data as well. In addition, the analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole magnetic data leading to the determination of active faults in Zagros fold-thrust belt (ZFTB) structural zone based upon the generated peaks. Some probable locations of fault events were also suggested in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The locations of faults correspond well to the magnetic susceptibility variations on the inverted section. Probable direction, slope and depth extension of these faults were also plotted on the magnetic susceptibility model, showing an intensively tectonized zone of the SSZ. The main difference between two domains is that the Eurasian plate seems to contain high magnetic susceptible materials compared to the Arabian plate. The recovered model of the apparent magnetic susceptibility values indicated that the average thickness of the non-magnetic sedimentary units is about 11 km and the Curie depth locates approximately at depth of 24 km for the whole studied area.

  11. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Kominis, I. K.

    2007-01-01

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to the current understanding, we show that even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivi...

  12. Atomic-Scale Observations of (010) LiFePO4 Surfaces Before and After Chemical Delithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Fisher, Craig A J; Kato, Takeharu; Ukyo, Yoshio; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-14

    The ability to view directly the surface structures of battery materials with atomic resolution promises to dramatically improve our understanding of lithium (de)intercalation and related processes. Here we report the use of state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques to probe the (010) surface of commercially important material LiFePO4 and compare the results with theoretical models. The surface structure is noticeably different depending on whether Li ions are present in the topmost surface layer or not. Li ions are also found to migrate back to surface regions from within the crystal relatively quickly after partial delithiation, demonstrating the facile nature of Li transport in the [010] direction. The results are consistent with phase transformation models involving metastable phase formation and relaxation, providing atomic-level insights into these fundamental processes.

  13. TWO STEPS CHEMICAL-MECHANICAL POLISHING OF RIGID DISK SUBSTRATE TO GET ATOM-SCALE PLANARIZATION SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hong; LUO Jianbin; LU Xinchun

    2006-01-01

    In order to get atomic smooth rigid disk substrate surface, ultra-fined alumina slurry and nanometer silica slurry are prepared, and two steps chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) of rigid disk substrate in the two slurries are studied. The results show that, during the first step CMP in the alumina slurry, a high material removal rate is reached, and the average roughness (Ra) and the average waviness (Wa) of the polished surfaces can be decreased from previous 1.4 nm and 1.6 nm to about 0.6 nm and 0.7 nm, respectively. By using the nanometer silica slurry and optimized polishing process parameters in the second step CMP, the Ra and the Wa of the polished surfaces can be further reduced to 0.038 nm and 0.06 nm, respectively. Atom force microscopy (AFM) analysis shows that the final polished surfaces are ultra-smooth without micro-defects.

  14. Atomic-Scale Structure and Local Chemistry of CoFeB-MgO Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; McKenna, Keith P; Fukami, Shunsuke; Sato, Hideo; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-03-09

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) constitute a promising building block for future nonvolatile memories and logic circuits. Despite their pivotal role, spatially resolving and chemically identifying each individual stacking layer remains challenging due to spatially localized features that complicate characterizations limiting understanding of the physics of MTJs. Here, we combine advanced electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations to obtain a direct structural and chemical imaging of the atomically confined layers in a CoFeB-MgO MTJ, and clarify atom diffusion and interface structures in the MTJ following annealing. The combined techniques demonstrate that B diffuses out of CoFeB electrodes into Ta interstitial sites rather than MgO after annealing, and CoFe bonds atomically to MgO grains with an epitaxial orientation relationship by forming Fe(Co)-O bonds, yet without incorporation of CoFe in MgO. These findings afford a comprehensive perspective on structure and chemistry of MTJs, helping to develop high-performance spintronic devices by atomistic design.

  15. Atomic-scale quantification of interdiffusion and dopant localization in GeSbTe-based memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, B.-G.; Seol, J.-B.; Song, J.-H.; Jung, W.-Y.; Hwang, H.; Park, C.-G.

    2016-09-01

    Fabrication of phase-change memory devices at modest or ambient temperatures leads to nanoscale compositional variations in phase-transition layers, where amorphous-polycrystalline phase change takes place via electrical switching, and can alter the device's performances. Here, by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we address that thermal annealing at 400 °C for 20 min induces an elemental interdiffusion in the devices consisting of TiN (top electrode), carbon-doped GeSbTe (phase-transition layer), and TiSiN (bottom heater). With respect to the employed annealing process, the Ge atoms of GeSbTe layer have diffused into TiSiN layer at a given sample volume, while the Ti atoms of TiSiN layer into GeSbTe layer. Furthermore, non-random nature of dopant distribution in the GeSbTe materials leads to a Ti-localization including dopants at the GeSbTe/TiSiN interfaces. Our findings have two important implications: First, the annealing-driven interdiffusion of Ge and Ti is a predominant mechanism responsible for nanoscale compositional variations in GeSbTe layer; second, such an interdiffusion and the resultant dopant localization play a crucial role on the driving force for amorphous-polycrystalline transition of GeSbTe-based memory devices.

  16. Atomic-scale computer simulation for early precipitation process of Ni75Al10V15 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yuhong; CHEN Zheng; WANG Yongxin; LU Yanli

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic model for a ternary system is introduced based on the microscopic diffusion form of the phase-field equations for a binary alloy. The equation is solved in the reciprocal space. This model is used to investigate the early precipitation process of Ni75-Al10V15 by simulating the atomic pictures of the two ordered phases and calculating the order parameters of γ′(Ni3Al) phase. Simulation results show that the γ′ ordered phases precipitate from the disordered matrix by a non-classical nucleation mechanism, and the nonstoichiometric γ′ ordered phase appears first and then transforms into the stoichiometric one. Clusters of V atoms appear at the γ′ phase boundaries followed by the formation of the nonstoichiometric θ ordered phase. The farther the location from γ′ phase boundary is, the lower the order degree of θ phase is. There exist two kinds of DO22 ordered domains: a horizontal one and a vertical one, related to their adjacent γ′ phase boundaries. The model could describe the atomic ordering and composition clustering simultaneously, and any a priori assumption about the new phase structure and precipitation mechanism etc. is unnecessary.

  17. Exterior time scaling with the stiffness-free Lanczos time propagator: Formulation and application to atoms interacting with strong midinfrared lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at efficient numerical treatment of tunneling ionization of atoms and molecules by midinfrared (IR) lasers, exterior time-scaling (ETS) theory is formulated as a generalization of the time-scaled coordinate approach. The key idea of ETS is the division of the spatial volume into a small region around the nucleus and its outside; the radial coordinates are time scaled only in the outer region. The continuum components of photoelectron wave packets are prevented from reaching the edge of the spatial simulation volume, enabling the long-time evolution of wave packets with a relatively small number of basis functions without concerns of electron reflections. On the other hand, the bound-state components are free from shrinking toward the origin because of non-time-scaling in the inner region. Hence, the equations of motion in ETS are less stiff than the ones in the original time-scaled coordinate approach in which the shrinking bound states make the equations of motion seriously stiff. For numerical implementation of ETS, the working equations are derived in terms of finite-element discrete-variable-representation functions. Furthermore, the stiffness-free Lanczos time propagator is introduced to remove any persistent stiffness in the treatment of mid-IR lasers due to the involvement of hundreds of angular momentum states. The test calculations for atomic hydrogen interacting with linearly polarized mid-IR pulses demonstrate the accuracy and numerical efficiency of this scheme and exhibit its special capability if there is no recollision with the parent ion. Hence, ETS will show its true potential for the detailed analysis of photoelectron wave-packet dynamics in circularly or near-circularly polarized mid-IR fields.

  18. Enhanced effect of diffused Ohmic contact metal atoms for device scaling in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Cheng, Aijie; Lin, Zhaojun; Cui, Peng; Liu, Yan; Fu, Chen; Lv, Yuanjie; Feng, Zhihong; Luan, Chongbiao

    2017-03-01

    Using measured capacitance-voltage and current-voltage curves for the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors with different source-drain spacing, the electron mobility under the gate region was obtained. By comparing mobility variation and analyzing polarization charge distribution, it is found that with device scaling, the effect of the diffused Ohmic contact metal atoms on the electron mobility is enhanced. Then, a theoretical calculation related to different scattering mechanisms was adopted and it was verified this enhanced effect is due to the enhanced polarization Coulomb field (PCF) scattering.

  19. Atomic-scale computer simulation for early precipitation process of Ni75AlxV25-x alloy with intermediate Al composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yuhong; JU Dongying; CHEN Zheng; HOU Hua

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic phase-field approach is applied to model the early precipitation process of Ni75AlxV25-x alloy. Without any prior assumptions, this model can be used to simulate the temporal evolution of arbitrary morphologies and microstructures on atomic scale. By simulating the atomic pictures, and calculating the order parameters and volume fraction of the θ (Ni3V) and γ'(Ni3Al) ordered phases, we study Ni75AlxV25-x alloys with Al composition of 0.05, 0. 053 and 0. 055 (atom fraction). Our calculated results show that,for these alloys, θ and γ' phases precipitate at the same time; with the increase of Al content, the amount of γ' phase increases and that of θ phase decreases; the precipitation characteristic of γ' phase transforms from Non-Classical Nucleation and Growth (NCNG) to Congruent Ordering + Spinodal Decomposition (CO + SD) gradually; otherwise, the precipitation characteristic of θ phase transforms from Congruent Ordering + Spinodal Decomposition (CO+ SD) to Non-Classical Nucleation and Growth (NCNG) mechanism gradually. Both θ and γ' phases have undergone the transition process of mixture precipitation mechanism characterized by both NCNG and CO + SD mechanisms. No incontinuous transition of precipitation mechanism has been found.

  20. An Atomic-Scale View of CO and H2 Oxidation on a Pt/Fe3 O4 Model Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliem, Roland; van der Hoeven, Jessi; Zavodny, Adam; Gamba, Oscar; Pavelec, Jiri; de Jongh, Petra E; Schmid, Michael; Diebold, Ulrike; Parkinson, Gareth S

    2015-11-16

    Metal-support interactions are frequently invoked to explain the enhanced catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles dispersed over reducible metal oxide supports, yet the atomic-scale mechanisms are rarely known. In this report, scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study a Pt1-6/Fe3O4 model catalyst exposed to CO, H2, O2, and mixtures thereof at 550 K. CO extracts lattice oxygen atoms at the cluster perimeter to form CO2, creating large holes in the metal oxide surface. H2 and O2 dissociate on the metal clusters and spill over onto the support. The former creates surface hydroxy groups, which react with the support, ultimately leading to the desorption of water, while oxygen atoms react with Fe from the bulk to create new Fe3O4(001) islands. The presence of the Pt is crucial because it catalyzes reactions that already occur on the bare iron oxide surface, but only at higher temperatures.

  1. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-14

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N(2.2) as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N(2.75) as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N(2.8), which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  2. Polarizabilities and van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes from an atomistic electrodynamics model: Anomalous scaling with number of carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Wissam A.; Norman, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The van der Waals C6 coefficients of fullerenes are shown to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the number of carbon atoms N such that C6 ∝ N2.2 as predicted using state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations based on fullerenes with small sizes, and N2.75 as predicted using a classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation of the fullerenes. We use an atomistic electrodynamics model where each carbon atom is described by a polarizable object to extend the quantum mechanical calculations to larger fullerenes. The parameters of this model are optimized to describe accurately the static and complex polarizabilities of the fullerenes by fitting against accurate ab initio calculations. This model shows that C6 ∝ N2.8, which is supportive of the classical-metallic spherical-shell approximation. Additionally, we show that the anomalous dependence of the polarizability on N is attributed to the electric charge term, while the dipole-dipole term scales almost linearly with the number of carbon atoms.

  3. Detection of atomic scale changes in the free volume void size of three-dimensional colorectal cancer cell culture using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axpe, Eneko; Lopez-Euba, Tamara; Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Merida, David; Garcia, Jose Angel; Plaza-Izurieta, Leticia; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Plazaola, Fernando; Bilbao, Jose Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) provides a direct measurement of the free volume void sizes in polymers and biological systems. This free volume is critical in explaining and understanding physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Moreover, PALS has been recently proposed as a potential tool in detecting cancer at early stages, probing the differences in the subnanometer scale free volume voids between cancerous/healthy skin samples of the same patient. Despite several investigations on free volume in complex cancerous tissues, no positron annihilation studies of living cancer cell cultures have been reported. We demonstrate that PALS can be applied to the study in human living 3D cell cultures. The technique is also capable to detect atomic scale changes in the size of the free volume voids due to the biological responses to TGF-β. PALS may be developed to characterize the effect of different culture conditions in the free volume voids of cells grown in vitro.

  4. Experimental verification of a one-parameter scaling law for the quantum and "classical" resonances of the atom-optics kicked rotor

    CERN Document Server

    Wimberger, S M; Parkins, S; Leonhardt, R; Wimberger, Sandro; Sadgrove, Mark; Parkins, Scott; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of the mean energy in the vicinity of the first and second quantum resonances of the atom optics kicked rotor for a number of different experimental parameters. Our data is rescaled and compared with the one parameter epsilon--classical scaling function developed to describe the quantum resonance peaks. Additionally, experimental data is presented for the ``classical'' resonance which occurs in the limit as the kicking period goes to zero. This resonance is found to be analogous to the quantum resonances, and a similar one-parameter classical scaling function is derived, and found to match our experimental results. The width of the quantum and classical resonance peaks is compared, and their Sub-Fourier nature examined.

  5. Atomic scale study of ball milled Ni-Fe2O3 using Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ravi Kumar; Govindaraj, R.; Vinod, K.; Kumar, P. A. Manoj; Amarendra, G.

    2016-05-01

    Evolution of hyperfine fields at Fe atoms has been studied in a detailed manner in a mixture of Ni and α-Fe2O3 subjected to high energy ball milling using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Mossbauer results indicate the dispersion of α-Fe2O3 particles in Ni matrix in the as ball milled condition. Evolution of α-Fe2O3 due to ball milling, reduction of the valence of associated Fe and possible interaction between the oxide particles with Ni in the matrix due to annealing treatments has been elucidated in the present study.

  6. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  7. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  8. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms in a parahydrogen matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jonathan; Arnott, W. Patrick; Christy, Tim; Hartzell, Chase; Kanagin, Andrew; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Upadhyay, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    Building on prior work with rubidium atoms in a cryogenic argon matrix, we have grown solid parahydrogen crystals doped with rubidium atoms. Typical rubidium densities are on the order of 1017 cm-3. We have demonstrated optical pumping of the atomic spin of the implanted rubidium atoms; the measured spin polarization signals are roughly one order of magnitude larger than what was achieved in argon matrices. The combination of high atomic densities and optical addressability make this a promising experimental platform for applications such as magnetometry and fundamental physics measurements. Spin lifetimes (T1) on the order of 1 second have been observed. Progress towards measuring coherence times (T2) will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1265905.

  9. Atomic-scale Modeling of the Structure and Dynamics of Dislocations in Complex Alloys at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Murray S.; Mills, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the progress made during the first year of the project. Most of the progress at this point has been on the theoretical and computational side. Here are the highlights: (1) A new code, tailored for high-end desktop computing, now combines modern Accelerated Dynamics (AD) with the well-tested Embedded Atom Method (EAM); (2) The new Accelerated Dynamics allows the study of relatively slow, thermally-activated processes, such as diffusion, which are much too slow for traditional Molecular Dynamics; (3) We have benchmarked the new AD code on a rather simple and well-known process: vacancy diffusion in copper; and (4) We have begun application of the AD code to the diffusion of vacancies in ordered intermetallics.

  10. Large-scale analysis of high-speed atomic force microscopy data sets using adaptive image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake W. Erickson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern high-speed atomic force microscopes generate significant quantities of data in a short amount of time. Each image in the sequence has to be processed quickly and accurately in order to obtain a true representation of the sample and its changes over time. This paper presents an automated, adaptive algorithm for the required processing of AFM images. The algorithm adaptively corrects for both common one-dimensional distortions as well as the most common two-dimensional distortions. This method uses an iterative thresholded processing algorithm for rapid and accurate separation of background and surface topography. This separation prevents artificial bias from topographic features and ensures the best possible coherence between the different images in a sequence. This method is equally applicable to all channels of AFM data, and can process images in seconds.

  11. Integrated evaluation of the geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, southernmost Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Leo A.; Savian, Jairo F., E-mail: leo.hartmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Lopes, William R. [Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Gerencia de Geologia e Mineracao

    2016-03-15

    An integrated evaluation of geology, aero gamma spectrometry and aero magnetometry of the Sul-Riograndense Shield is permitted by the advanced stage of understanding of the geology and geochronology of the southern Brazilian Shield and a 2010 airborne geophysical survey. Gamma rays are registered from the rocks near the surface and thus describe the distribution of major units in the shield, such as the Pelotas batholith, the juvenile São Gabriel terrane, the granulite-amphibolite facies Taquarembo terrane and the numerous granite intrusions in the foreland. Major structures are also observed, e.g., the Dorsal de Cangucu shear. Magnetic signals register near surface crustal compositions (analytic signal) and total crust composition (total magnetic signal), so their variation as measured indicates either shallow or whole crustal structures. The Cacapava shear is outstanding on the images as is the magnetic low along the N-S central portion of the shield. These integrated observations lead to the deepening of the understanding of the largest and even detailed structures of the Sul-Riograndense Shield, some to be correlated to field geology in future studies. Most significant is the presence of different provinces and their limits depending on the method used for data acquisition - geology, aero gamma spectrometry or aero magnetometry. (author)

  12. Understanding the Atomic Scale Mechanisms that Control the Attainment of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Carbon-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    all other materials . Diamond, the stiffest and hardest bulk material known, can be grown in a smooth nanocrystalline thin film form with equivalent... materials Robert Carpick TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Final Report 05/16/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF...Scale Mechanism that controls the attainment of ultralow friction and wear in carbon based materials 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER Grant

  13. Atomic-scale investigation of point defects and hydrogen-solute atmospheres on the edge dislocation mobility in alpha iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, M. A.; Solanki, K. N., E-mail: kiran.solanki@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Groh, S. [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg 09556 (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    In this study, we present atomistic mechanisms of 1/2 [111](11{sup ¯}0) edge dislocation interactions with point defects (hydrogen and vacancies) and hydrogen solute atmospheres in body centered cubic (bcc) iron. In metals such as iron, increases in hydrogen concentration can increase dislocation mobility and/or cleavage-type decohesion. Here, we first investigate the dislocation mobility in the presence of various point defects, i.e., change in the frictional stress as the edge dislocation interacts with (a) vacancy, (b) substitutional hydrogen, (c) one substitutional and one interstitial hydrogen, (d) interstitial hydrogen, (e) vacancy and interstitial hydrogen, and (f) two interstitial hydrogen. Second, we examine the role of a hydrogen-solute atmosphere on the rate of local dislocation velocity. The edge dislocation simulation with a vacancy in the compression side of the dislocation and an interstitial hydrogen atom at the tension side exhibit the strongest mechanical response, suggesting a higher potential barrier and hence, the higher frictional stress (i.e., ∼83% higher than the pure iron Peierls stress). In the case of a dislocation interacting with a vacancy on the compressive side, the vacancy binds with the edge dislocation, resulting in an increase in the friction stress of about 28% when compared with the Peierls stress of an edge dislocation in pure iron. Furthermore, as the applied strain increases, the vacancy migrates through a dislocation transportation mechanism by attaining a velocity of the same order as the dislocation velocity. For the case of the edge dislocation interacting with interstitial hydrogen on the tension side, the hydrogen atom jumps through one layer perpendicular to the glide plane during the pinning-unpinning process. Finally, our simulation of dislocation interactions with hydrogen show first an increase in the local dislocation velocity followed by a pinning of the dislocation core in the atmosphere, resulting in

  14. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  15. Atomic scale investigation of non-equilibrium segregation of boron in a quenched Mo-free martensitic steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Ponge, D; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-12-01

    B-added low carbon steels exhibit excellent hardenability. The reason has been frequently attributed to B segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries, which prevents the austenite to ferrite transformation and favors the formation of martensite. The segregation behavior of B at prior austenite grain boundaries is strongly influenced by processing conditions such as austenitization temperatures and cooling rates and by alloying elements such as Mo, Cr, and Nb. Here an local electrode atom probe was employed to investigate the segregation behavior of B and other alloying elements (C, Mn, Si, and Cr) in a Cr-added Mo-free martensitic steel. Similar to our previous results on a Mo-added steel, we found that in both steels B is segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries with similar excess values, whereas B is neither detected in the martensitic matrix nor at martensite-martensite boundaries at the given cooling rate of 30K/s. These results are in agreement with the literature reporting that Cr has the same effect on hardenability of steels as Mo in the case of high cooling rates. The absence of B at martensite-martensite boundaries suggests that B segregates to prior austenite grain boundaries via a non-equilibrium mechanism. Segregation of C at all boundaries such as prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite-martensite boundaries may occur by an equilibrium mechanism.

  16. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Bradshaw, James A [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  17. High-sensitivity optical Faraday magnetometry with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Sun, Hui; Fan, Shuangli; Guo, Hong

    2016-12-01

    We suggest a multiatom cavity quantum electrodynamics system for the detection of a weak magnetic field, based on Faraday rotation with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency. Our study demonstrates that the collective coupling between the cavity modes and the atomic ensemble can be used to improve the sensitivity. With single-probe photon input, the sensitivity is inversely proportional to the number of atoms, and a sensitivity of 2.45 nT Hz-1/2 could be attained. With multiphoton measurement, our numerical calculations show that the magnetic field sensitivity can be improved to 105.6 aT Hz-1/2 with realistic experimental conditions.

  18. Atomic scale modelling of nanosize Ni sub 3 Al cluster beam deposition on Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kharlamov, V S; Hou, M

    2002-01-01

    The slowing down of Ni sub 3 Al clusters on a Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces is studied by atomic scale modelling. The semi-grand canonical metropolis Monte Carlo is used for the preparation of isolated clusters at thermodynamic equilibrium. The cluster deposition on the surface is studied in detail by classical Molecular Dynamics simulations that include a model to account for electron-phonon coupling. Long- and short-range orders in the cluster are evaluated as functions of temperature in an impact energy range between 0 and 1.5 eV/atom. The interaction between the Ni sub 3 Al cluster and an Al surface is characterised low short range (chemical) disorder. No sizeable epitaxy is found, subsequent to the impact. In contrast, in the case of Ni and Ni sub 3 Al substrates, which are harder materials than aluminium, the chemical disorder is higher and epitaxial accommodation is possible. With these substrates, chemical disorder in the cluster is an increasing function of the impact energy, as well as of ...

  19. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  20. A comprehensive picture in the view of atomic scale on piezoelectricity of ZnO tunnel junctions: The first principles simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genghong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectricity is closely related with the performance and application of piezoelectric devices. It is a crucial issue to understand its detailed fundamental for designing functional devices with more peculiar performances. Basing on the first principles simulations, the ZnO piezoelectric tunnel junction is taken as an example to systematically investigate its piezoelectricity (including the piezopotential energy, piezoelectric field, piezoelectric polarization and piezocharge and explore their correlation. The comprehensive picture of the piezoelectricity in the ZnO tunnel junction is revealed at atomic scale and it is verified to be the intrinsic characteristic of ZnO barrier, independent of its terminated surface but dependent on its c axis orientation and the applied strain. In the case of the ZnO c axis pointing from right to left, an in-plane compressive strain will induce piezocharges (and a piezopotential energy drop with positive and negative signs (negative and positive signs emerging respectively at the left and right terminated surfaces of the ZnO barrier. Meanwhile a piezoelectric polarization (and a piezoelectric field pointing from right to left (from left to right are also induced throughout the ZnO barrier. All these piezoelectric physical quantities would reverse when the applied strain switches from compressive to tensile. This study provides an atomic level insight into the fundamental behavior of the piezoelectricity of the piezoelectric tunnel junction and should have very useful information for future designs of piezoelectric devices.

  1. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    Efforts during this second year focused on four areas: (1) continued searching and summarizing of published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) investigation of CO adsorption/desorption and temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH) of carbonaceous species after FTS on unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts; (3) activity tests of alumina-supported iron catalysts in a fixed bed reactor; (4) sequential design of experiments, for the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor, and nonlinear-regression analysis to obtain kinetic parameters. Literature sources describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts were compiled in a review. Temperature-programmed desorption/reaction methods (the latter using mass-spectrometry detection and also thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)) were utilized to study CO adsorption/-desorption on supported and unsupported iron catalysts. Molecular and dissociative adsorptions of CO occur on iron catalysts at 25-150 C. The amounts adsorbed and bond strengths of adsorption are influenced by supports and promoters. That CO adsorbs dissociatively on polycrystalline Fe at temperatures well below those of FT reaction indicates that CO dissociation is facile and unlikely to be the rate-limiting step during FTS. Carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for only 5 minutes at 200 C were initially hydrogenated under mild, isothermal condition (200 C and 1 atm), followed by TPH to 800 C. During the mild, isothermal hydrogenation, only about 0.1-0.2 mL of atomic carbon is apparently removed, while during TPH to 800 C multilayer equivalents of atomic, polymeric, carbidic, and graphitic carbons are removed. Rates of CO conversion on alumina-supported iron catalysts at 220-260 C and 20 atm are correlated well by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be

  2. Imaging the fine-scale structure of the cellular actin cytoskeleton by Single Particle Tracking and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela

    It has been proposed that diffusion in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells it is compartmentalized due to the interaction with the underlying actin-based membrane skeleton that comes into close proximity to the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that maintains cell shape, enables cell motion, and plays important roles in both intra-cellular transport and cellular division. We show here the evidence of plasma membrane compartmentalization using Single Particle Tracking (SPT) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. SPT of Quantum dot labeled lipid in the plasma membrane of live normal rat kidney cells show compartments ranging from 325 nm to 391 nm depending on the sampling time. Using AFM imaging of live NRK cell in the presence of phalloidin, the membrane compartmentalization it is visible with the average size of the compartments of 325 +/- 10 nm (the main peak is centered at 260 nm). Further, the underlying membrane skeleton in fixed cells was directly imaged after partial removal of the plasma membrane to reveal size of the membrane skeleton meshwork of 339 +/- 10 nm. A new method of measuring the characteristics of the actin meshwork was proposed. Probing the local compliance of the plasma membrane through the deflection of a soft AFM cantilever we can expect that the stiffness of the membrane will be higher at locations directly above a cortical actin. This new method provided information about the structure of the skeletal meshwork of neuronal cell body predicting an average compartment size of about 132 nm. This was confirmed through SPT of QD-lipid incorporated into the neuronal cell membrane.

  3. Linear-scaling atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory by rigorous integral screening criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, Bernd; Lambrecht, Daniel S; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2009-02-14

    A Laplace-transformed second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) method is presented, which allows to achieve linear scaling of the computational effort with molecular size for electronically local structures. Also for systems with a delocalized electronic structure, a cubic or even quadratic scaling behavior is achieved. Numerically significant contributions to the atomic orbital (AO)-MP2 energy are preselected using the so-called multipole-based integral estimates (MBIE) introduced earlier by us [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 184102 (2005)]. Since MBIE provides rigorous upper bounds, numerical accuracy is fully controlled and the exact MP2 result is attained. While the choice of thresholds for a specific accuracy is only weakly dependent upon the molecular system, our AO-MP2 scheme offers the possibility for incremental thresholding: for only little additional computational expense, the numerical accuracy can be systematically converged. We illustrate this dependence upon numerical thresholds for the calculation of intermolecular interaction energies for the S22 test set. The efficiency and accuracy of our AO-MP2 method is demonstrated for linear alkanes, stacked DNA base pairs, and carbon nanotubes: e.g., for DNA systems the crossover toward conventional MP2 schemes occurs between one and two base pairs. In this way, it is for the first time possible to compute wave function-based correlation energies for systems containing more than 1000 atoms with 10 000 basis functions as illustrated for a 16 base pair DNA system on a single-core computer, where no empirical restrictions are introduced and numerical accuracy is fully preserved.

  4. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  5. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS{sub 2} films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Gene; Venkata Subbaiah, Y. P.; Prestgard, Megan C.; Tiwari, Ashutosh, E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns) was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001) substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10{sup −6} Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ablation of the MoS{sub 2} target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}) was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS{sub 2} as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} peaks were observed at 404.6 cm{sup −1} and 384.5 cm{sup −1} with a spacing of 20.1 cm{sup −1}, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV) and 615 nm (2.02 eV), with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS{sub 2} exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n) in the MoS{sub 2} films increases, the spacing between the A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} Raman peaks (Δf) increases following an empirical relation, Δf=26.45−(15.42)/(1+1.44 n{sup 0.9}) cm{sup −1}.

  6. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    measurements. The results provide a platform for further development of microkinetic models of FTS on Fe and a basis for more precise modeling of FTS activity of Fe catalysts. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on various realistic models of industrial, Fe-based FTS catalysts. Close-packed, most stable Fe(110) facet was analyzed and subsequently carbide formation was found to be facile leading to the choice of the FeC(110) model representing a Fe facet with a sub-surface C atom. The Pt adatom (Fe{sup Pt}(110)) was found to be the most stable model for our studies into Pt promotion and finally the role of steps was elucidated by recourse to the defected Fe(211) facet. Binding Energies(BEs), preferred adsorption sites and geometries for all FTS relevant stable species and intermediates were evaluated on each model catalyst facet. A mechanistic model (comprising of 32 elementary steps involving 19 species) was constructed and each elementary step therein was fully characterized with respect to its thermochemistry and kinetics. Kinetic calculations involved evaluation of the Minimum Energy Pathways (MEPs) and activation energies (barriers) for each step. Vibrational frequencies were evaluated for the preferred adsorption configuration of each species with the aim of evaluating entropy-changes, pre exponential factors and serving as a useful connection with experimental surface science techniques. Comparative analysis among these four facets revealed important trends in their relative behavior and roles in FTS catalysis. Overall the First Principles Calculations afforded us a new insight into FTS catalysis on Fe and modified-Fe catalysts.

  7. The Linear Inverse Problem of Gravimetry and Magnetometry with Iterative Formulas of Analogs of Wiener-Kalman Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Minenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the improved iterative methods of solution of the inversion linear problems of gravimetry and magnetometry based on analogs of Wiener-Kalman filters applied to two interpretation models obtained in result of subdivision of the field grid on two sub grids containing even and odd profiles respectively. The new iterative formulas provide stable and geologically true interpretation with arbitrary initial conditions and without usage of decisions preliminarily obtained with other methods. It gives two close decisions, independent of solutions of the inverse problem achieved with other methods. Examples of practical implementation of method for processing and interpretation of magnetic data obtained at the area of iron ore deposit, Ukraine, are given.

  8. Efficient plasma-enhanced method for layered LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathodes with sulfur atom-scale modification for superior-performance Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqian; Chen, Ning; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Shuangyin; Zhang, Han

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 as a lithium insertion positive electrode material, atom-scale modification was realized to obtain the layered oxysulfide LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx using a novel plasma-enhanced doping strategy. The structure and electrochemical performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx are investigated systematically, which confirms that the S doping can make the structure stable and benefit the electrochemical performance. The phys-chemical characterizations indicate that oxygen atoms in the initial LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 have been partially replaced by S atoms. It should be pointed out that the atom-scale modification does not significantly alter the intrinsic structure of the cathode. Compared to the pristine material, the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2-xSx shows a superior performance with a higher capacity (200.4 mA h g(-1)) and a significantly improved cycling stability (maintaining 94.46% of its initial discharge capacity after 100 cycles). Moreover, it has an excellent rate performance especially at elevated performance, which is probably due to the faster Li(+) transportation after S doping into the layered structure. All the results show that the atom-scale modification with sulfur atoms on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, which significantly improved the electrochemical performance, offers a novel anionic doping strategy to realize the atom-scale modification of electrode materials to improve their electrochemical performance.

  9. Atomic-scale microstructures, Raman spectra and dielectric properties of cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 dielectric ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2014-07-01

    Single-phase cubic pyrochlore-typed Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) dielectric ceramics were synthesized at temperatures of 1050-1200 °C by solid-state reaction method. Their atomic-scale microstructures and dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BMN ceramics had an average cubic pyrochlore structure, whereas the Raman spectra indicated that they had an essentially cubic symmetry with small local deviations at the A and O\\' sites of the cubic pyrochlore structure. This was confirmed by selected electron area diffraction (SAED) patterns, where the reflections of {442} (not allowed in the cubic pyrochlore with Fd3̄m symmetry) were clearly observed. SEM and TEM images revealed that the average grain size was increased with the sintering temperature, and an un-homogeneous grain growth was observed at high temperatures. HRTEM images and SAED patterns revealed the single-crystalline nature of the BMN ceramic grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping studies indicated that the compositional distributions of Bi, Mg, Nb and O elements in the ceramic grains were homogenous, and no elemental precipitation was observed at the grain boundary. Quantitative EDS data on ceramic grains revealed the expected cationic stoichiometry based on the initial composition of Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7. Dielectric constants of all the BMN samples exhibited almost frequency independent characteristic in the frequency range of 102-106 Hz, and the highest value was 195 for the BMN ceramics sintered at sintered at 1150 °C with the highest bulk density. The dielectric losses were stable and less than 0.002 in the frequency range of 102-105 Hz. The high dielectric constants of the present BMN samples can be ascribed to the local atomic deviations at the A and O\\' sites from the ideal atomic positions of the pyrochlore structure, which affect the different polarization mechanisms in the BMN ceramics, and which in turn enhance the dielectric

  10. CFD simulation for atomic layer deposition on large scale ceramic membranes%大尺寸陶瓷膜原子层沉积过程的CFD模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明; 汪勇

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic membranes are widely used in liquid filtration for their superior chemical resistance, temperature stability and mechanical robustness. Their performance can be further improved by surface modifications, such as liquid phase reactions, which are typically too complicated to control. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a deposition technique of self-limiting gas/solid phase chemical reactions for growing atomic scale thin films, has been extremely useful for precisely regulating nanoscale pore structures, especially modification and functionalization of porous separation membranes. Most existing ALD equipment are designed for silicon wafer substrate in semiconductor industry, thus design optimization on ALD processes of both precursor flow and surface reactions are needed for application in large-scale ceramic membranes. Computerized fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to investigate ALD process on 1-meter-long single-channeled ceramic membrane by considering both boundary conditions and surface chemical reactions of two precursors pulsed alternatively into the channel. The simulations fitted well with the experimental data at average difference of 1.69% and thus an ALD model for two-way alternatively pulsed rotation was proposed, which would be very helpful in equipment design and process optimization of ALD for large scale ceramic membranes.%陶瓷膜具有耐高温、耐酸碱、强度高等优点,在液体分离领域得到了广泛应用。对陶瓷膜进行表面改性,可进一步提升其性能,但基于表面化学反应的改性方法工艺过程复杂,难于控制。原子层沉积(atomic layer deposition,ALD)是基于表面自限制化学反应过程的气固相薄膜沉积技术,可以在纳米尺度精确调控孔道结构,特别适用于多孔分离膜的改性和功能化。目前尚无适用于大尺寸陶瓷膜的ALD设备,需要对ALD过程进行专门的优化设计。通过CFD模型对1 m长的单通道陶瓷膜的ALD

  11. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Modern radio-optical methods in quantum magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Evgenii B.; Vershovskii, Anton K.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is an extension of a part of the talk delivered under the more general title "Narrow spectral lines in fundamental metrology: state of the art, prospects, and problems"' at the session of the 90th anniversary of Physics-Uspekhi. The talk reviewed past developments and the current status of the metrology of length, frequency/time, and magnetic fields. The measurement of these quantities currently relies on the high stability of energies of standard transitions between metastable atomic states. Because of space restrictions in the journal, all metrology topics other than the title one were omitted in the present review.

  12. Origins of Ripples in CVD-Grown Few-layered MoS2 Structures under Applied Strain at Atomic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Namburu, Raju R.; Dubey, Madan; Dongare, Avinash M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the applicability of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) structures, in various electronics, optoelectronics, and flexible devices requires a fundamental understanding of the effects of strain on the electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Particularly important is the recent capability to grow large flakes of few-layered structures using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) wherein the top layers are relatively smaller in size than the bottom layers, resulting in the presence of edges/steps across adjacent layers. This paper investigates the strain response of such suspended few-layered structures at the atomic scales using classic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations suggest that the suspended CVD-grown structures are able to relax the applied in-plane strain through the nucleation of ripples under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. The presence of terraced edges in these structures is the cause for the nucleation of ripples at the edges that grow towards the center of the structure under applied in-plane strains. The peak amplitudes of ripples observed are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The study provides critical insights into the mechanisms of strain relaxation of suspended few-layered MoS2 structures that determine the interplay between the mechanical response and the electronic properties of CVD-grown structures.

  13. Effect of Atomic-Scale Differences on the Self-Assembly of Thiophene-based Polycatenars in Liquid Crystalline and Organogel States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Balaram; Vaisakh, V M; Nair, Geetha G; Rao, D S Shankar; Prasad, S Krishna; Sudhakar, Achalkumar Ammathnadu

    2016-12-05

    Two series of polycatenars are reported that contain a central thiophene moiety connected to two substituted oxadiazole or thiadiazole units. The number, position, and length of the peripheral chains connected to these molecules were varied. The oxadiazole-based polycatenars exhibited columnar phases with rectangular and hexagonal or oblique symmetry, whereas the thiadiazole-based polycatenars exhibited columnar phases with rectangular and/or hexagonal symmetry. All of the compounds exhibited bright emission in the solution and thin-film states. Two oxadiazole-based molecules and one thiadiazole-based molecule exhibited supergelation ability in hydrocarbon solvents, which is mainly supported by attractive π-π interactions. These gels showed aggregation-induced enhanced emission, which is of high technological importance for applications in solid-state emissive displays. X-ray diffraction studies of the xerogel fibers of oxadiazole-based polycatenars revealed a columnar rectangular organization, whereas a hexagonal columnar arrangement was observed for thiadiazole-based polycatenars. Rheological measurements carried out on the samples quantitatively confirmed the formation of gels and showed that these gels are mechanically robust. The impact of an atomic-scale difference (oxygen to sulfur, <2 % of the molecular weight) on the self-assembly and the macroscopic properties of those self-assembled structures are clearly visualized.

  14. Origins of Ripples in CVD-Grown Few-layered MoS2 Structures under Applied Strain at Atomic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Namburu, Raju R.; Dubey, Madan; Dongare, Avinash M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the applicability of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) structures, in various electronics, optoelectronics, and flexible devices requires a fundamental understanding of the effects of strain on the electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Particularly important is the recent capability to grow large flakes of few-layered structures using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) wherein the top layers are relatively smaller in size than the bottom layers, resulting in the presence of edges/steps across adjacent layers. This paper investigates the strain response of such suspended few-layered structures at the atomic scales using classic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations suggest that the suspended CVD-grown structures are able to relax the applied in-plane strain through the nucleation of ripples under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. The presence of terraced edges in these structures is the cause for the nucleation of ripples at the edges that grow towards the center of the structure under applied in-plane strains. The peak amplitudes of ripples observed are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The study provides critical insights into the mechanisms of strain relaxation of suspended few-layered MoS2 structures that determine the interplay between the mechanical response and the electronic properties of CVD-grown structures. PMID:28102351

  15. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  16. AAO-assisted synthesis of highly ordered, large-scale TiO2 nanowire arrays via sputtering and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Li, Yang; Kim, Nam-Young

    2015-01-01

    Highly ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were fabricated in oxalic acid under a constant voltage via a two-step anodization process. To investigate the high-aspect-ratio (7.5:1) filling process, both sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) were used to form TiO2 nanowires. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicated that mushroom-like TiO2 structures were sputtered onto the AAO template surface, and the ALD-coated TiO2 exhibited fine filling results and clear crystal grain boundaries. Large-scale and free-standing TiO2 nanowire arrays were liberated by selectively removing the aluminum substrate and AAO template via a wet etching process with no collapsing or agglomeration after the drying process. ALD-deposited TiO2 nanowire arrays that were 67 nm in diameter and 400 nm high were transferred from the AAO template. The ALD process enabled the rapid, simple synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanowire arrays with desired parameters such as diameter, density, and thickness determined using diverse AAO templates.

  17. Search for a Permanent Electric Dipole Moment in XENON-129 Using Simultaneous HELIUM-3 Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Eduardo Rafael

    This dissertation presents the first results of a new technique designed to search for a permanent electric dipole moment (PEDM) in ^{129} Xe. An observed non-zero PEDM in ^ {129}Xe would be direct evidence of time -reversal and parity symmetry violation. Unlike previous experiments which search for a PEDM, this one has used a second atomic species, ^3He, as an in situ magnetometer to reduce the possibility of observing a false PEDM caused by an artifact of the experiment. The measurement described in this work searches for a change in the ^{129}Xe precession frequency when ^{129}Xe spins are allowed to freely precess in an applied magnetic field and are subjected to an applied electric field which is alternately parallel or anti-parallel to the applied magnetic field. The ^3He spins also freely precess in the same test cell; they thus are used to detect any changes in the total magnetic field. The detected ^3He and ^ {129}Xe free precession signals were simultaneously processed by two different detection schemes. The null results of d_{129} = ( -2.51 +/- 11.1) cdot 10^{-26} e-cm and d_{129} = ( -4.81 +/- 11.0) cdot 10^{-26} e-cm were found for a PEDM in ^{129} Xe using the data collected by these two schemes. These values were derived from data collected during 33 hours out of a total of 132 hours of operation of the experiment; 99 hours were spent preparing the ^3He and ^{129}Xe spins. The precision of this measurement was chiefly limited by interactions between the ^3He and ^ {129}Xe atoms. The nature of these interactions is explained and ideas for improving this precision are presented.

  18. Vectorial magnetometry and anisotropy studies on thin Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films using MOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschel, Timo; Wollschlaeger, Joachim [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastr. 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a powerful tool to determine magnetic properties of thin magnetic films. In some cases this technique is only applied to detect magnetization curves qualitatively. In order to perform a quantitative analysis we present MOKE measurements with s- and p-polarized incident light, using an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the plane of incidence of light and different orientations of the crystalline substrate. The processing of the data includes vectorial magnetometry as well as studies of the anisotropy constants and magnetic axes. The investigated Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films o f 50 nm thickness on MgO(001) are prepared with different annealing temperatures (RT up to 400 C). On the one hand the films with lower annealing tempe ratures show typical magnetic reversal processes of samples with four-fold symmetry as expected for cubic crystal structures. On the other hand the film annealed at 400 C presents an additional strong in-plane anisotropy, which is discussed in context of a classical free energy approach.

  19. Atomic-scale segregation behavior of Sn/Ti and O atΣ3[11̄0](111) grain boundary in niobium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zenghui Liu; Jiaxiang Shang

    2016-01-01

    First-principle calculation was performed to illustrate the atomic arrangement and segregation behavior of Sn/Ti and O in Σ3 [11¯ 0] (111) grain boundary, and the interaction of oxygen interstitials with Sn/Ti atoms on the grain boundary was studied. The analyses on the segregation energies and geometric positions, and the electron densities show that Sn, Ti and O atoms segregate at the Σ3 grain boundary. And the preferred segregation sites of the impurities at Σ3 [11¯ 0] (111) were determined. When Sn seg-regates at grain boundary plane, the O atom prefers to the bulk-like site and shows no segregation tendency at grain boundary, whereas the segregated Ti atom can slightly enhance oxygen segregation at the grain boundary.

  20. Atomic scale investigations on Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots: Correlation between the composition and emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benallali, H., E-mail: hammouda.benallali@im2np.fr; Hoummada, K.; Mangelinck, D. [Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP-CNRS, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Cremel, T.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Kheng, K. [University of Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst. NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-08-04

    Atom probe tomography and photoluminescence spectroscopy have been used to study Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots embedded in a ZnSe layer grown on a (001) GaAs substrate. Atom probe tomography analyses show significant cadmium incorporation in the center of the dots surrounded by poor cadmium region. These measurements illustrate that the maximum cadmium concentration in the quantum dots is significantly higher than the concentration estimated by transmission electron microscopy. The composition and size of quantum dots obtained by atom probe tomography have been used to calculate the transition energies including excitonic and strain effects.

  1. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  2. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  3. High dynamic range magnetometry with a single nuclear spin in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldherr, Gerald; Beck, Johannes; Neumann, Philipp; Nitsche, Matthias; Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Said, Ressa S. [Institut fuer Quanten-Informationsverarbeitung, Universitaet Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Twamley, Jason [Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney (Australia); Jelezko, Fedor [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Universitaet Ulm, 89073 Ulm (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Sensors based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond are being developed to measure weak magnetic and electric fields at nanoscale. However, such sensors rely on measurements of a shift in the Lamor frequency of the defect, so an accumulation of quantum phase causes the measurement signal to exhibit a periodic modulation. This means that the measurement time is either restricted to half of one oscillation period, which limits accuracy, or that the magnetic field range must be known in advance. Moreover, the precision increases only slowly, as T{sup -0.5}, with the measurement time T. We implement a quantum phase estimation algorithm on a single nuclear spin in diamond to combine both high sensitivity and high dynamic range. By achieving a scaling of the precision with time to T{sup -0.85}, we improve the sensitivity by a factor of 7.4, for an accessible field range of 16 mT, or alternatively, we improve the dynamic range by a factor of 130 for a sensitivity of 2.5 {mu}T/Hz{sup 0.5}. These methods are applicable to a variety of field detection schemes, and do not require entanglement.

  4. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  5. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  6. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-02-06

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  7. Enhanced light-vapor interactions and all optical switching in a chip scale micro-ring resonator coupled with atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of atomic and photonic resonances serves as an important tool for enhancing light-matter interactions and enables the observation of multitude of fascinating and fundamental phenomena. Here, by exploiting the platform of atomic-cladding wave guides, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of rubidium vapor and an atomic cladding micro ring resonator. Specifically, we observed cavity-atom coupling in the form of Fano resonances having a distinct dependency on the relative frequency detuning between the photonic and the atomic resonances. Moreover, we were able to significantly enhance the efficiency of all optical switching in the V-type pump-probe scheme. The coupled system of micro-ring resonator and atomic vapor is a promising building block for a variety of light vapor experiments, as it offers a very small footprint, high degree of integration and extremely strong confinement of light and vapor. As such it may be used for important applications, such as all optical switching, disp...

  8. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  9. Atomic scale structure of amorphous aluminum oxyhydroxide, oxide and oxycarbide films probed by very high field (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L; Sarou-Kanian, V; Florian, P; Gleizes, A N; Massiot, D; Vahlas, C

    2017-03-15

    The atomic scale structure of aluminum in amorphous alumina films processed by direct liquid injection chemical vapor deposition from aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) and dimethyl isopropoxide (DMAI) is investigated by solid-state (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) using a very high magnetic field of 20.0 T. This study is performed as a function of the deposition temperature in the range 300-560 °C, 150-450 °C, and 500-700 °C, for the films processed from ATI, DMAI (+H2O), and DMAI (+O2), respectively. While the majority of the films are composed of stoichiometric aluminum oxide, other samples are partially or fully hydroxylated at low temperature, or contain carbidic carbon when processed from DMAI above 500 °C. The quantitative analysis of the SSNMR experiments reveals that the local structure of these films is built from AlO4, AlO5, AlO6 and Al(O,C)4 units with minor proportions of the 6-fold aluminum coordination and significant amounts of oxycarbides in the films processed from DMAI (+O2). The aluminum coordination distribution as well as the chemical shift distribution indicate that the films processed from DMAI present a higher degree of structural disorder compared to the films processed from ATI. Hydroxylation leads to an increase of the 6-fold coordination resulting from the trend of OH groups to integrate into AlO6 units. The evidence of an additional environment in films processed from DMAI (+O2) by (27)Al SSNMR and first-principle NMR calculations on Al4C3 and Al4O4C crystal structures supports that carbon is located in Al(O,C)4 units. The concentration of this coordination environment strongly increases with increasing process temperature from 600 to 700 °C favoring a highly disordered structure and preventing from crystallizing into γ-alumina. The obtained results are a valuable guide to the selection of process conditions for the CVD of amorphous alumina films with regard to targeted applications.

  10. Selective addressing of high-rank atomic polarization moments

    CERN Document Server

    Yashchuk, V V; Gawlik, W; Kimball, D F; Malakyan, Y P; Rochester, S M; Malakyan, Yu. P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method of selective generation and study of polarization moments of up to the highest rank $\\kappa=2F$ possible for a quantum state with total angular momentum $F$. The technique is based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light. Various polarization moments are distinguished by the periodicity of light-polarization rotation induced by the atoms during Larmor precession and exhibit distinct light-intensity and frequency dependences. We apply the method to study polarization moments of $^{87}$Rb atoms contained in a vapor cell with antirelaxation coating. Distinct ultra-narrow (1-Hz wide) resonances, corresponding to different multipoles, appear in the magnetic-field dependence of the optical rotation. The use of the highest-multipole resonances has important applications in quantum and nonlinear optics and in magnetometry.

  11. Domain topology of micro-scale, ferromagnetic pancakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedrossian, P. J., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    Planar, micron-scale ellipses patterned from 700A-thick Co films exhibit nearly complete suppression of hysteresis when magnetized in- plane along their short axes. Using a combination of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometry, we find that the suppression of hysteresis is associated with the continuous deformation of a dipole field configuration. The presence of hysteresis for in-plane, long-axis magnetization is associated with transitions between topologically inequivalent configurations.

  12. A kilobyte rewritable atomic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalff, F. E.; Rebergen, M. P.; Fahrenfort, E.; Girovsky, J.; Toskovic, R.; Lado, J. L.; Fernández-Rossier, J.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of devices based on single dopants, such as the single-atom transistor, the single-spin magnetometer and the single-atom memory, has motivated the quest for strategies that permit the control of matter with atomic precision. Manipulation of individual atoms by low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy provides ways to store data in atoms, encoded either into their charge state, magnetization state or lattice position. A clear challenge now is the controlled integration of these individual functional atoms into extended, scalable atomic circuits. Here, we present a robust digital atomic-scale memory of up to 1 kilobyte (8,000 bits) using an array of individual surface vacancies in a chlorine-terminated Cu(100) surface. The memory can be read and rewritten automatically by means of atomic-scale markers and offers an areal density of 502 terabits per square inch, outperforming state-of-the-art hard disk drives by three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the chlorine vacancies are found to be stable at temperatures up to 77 K, offering the potential for expanding large-scale atomic assembly towards ambient conditions.

  13. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and bulk magnetometry study of LaFe_(11.5)Si_(1.5) compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Jun-Ding; Li Wei; Shen Bao-Gen

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the microstructural and magnetic properties of LaFe_(11.5)Si_(1.5) compound by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscope and bulk magnetometry measurements. The crystalline structure is accompanied with the noncrystalline and nanocrystalline structures. This characteristic is the reflection of the crystalline process held by quenching. The inverse susceptibilities diverge and deviate from Curie-Weiss law under low applied magnetic fields. This paper proposes the possible mechanism between the anomalous susceptibilities and microstructtire, and offers a perspective on the magnetic properties of metastable intermetallic compounds.

  14. Anisotropy of superconducting single crystal SmFeAsO_(0.8)F_(0.2) studied by torque magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Weyeneth, S.; Puzniak, R.; Mosele, U.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; J. Karpinski; Kohout, S; Roos, J; Keller, H

    2008-01-01

    Single crystals of the oxypnictide superconductor SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 with T c≃45(1) K were investigated by torque magnetometry. The crystals of mass ≤0.1 μg were grown by a high-pressure cubic anvil technique. The use of a high-sensitive piezoresistive torque sensor made it possible to study the anisotropic magnetic properties of these tiny crystals. The anisotropy parameter γ was found to be field independent, but varies strongly with temperature ranging from γ≃8 at T≲T c to γ≃23 at T≃0.4T c....

  15. Atomic scale visualization of novel magnetic phase transitions in Fe-based superconductor Sr4V2O6Fe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seokhwan; Jang, Won-Jun; Ok, Jong Mok; Choi, Hyun Woo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jin Oh; Son, Dong Hyun; Suh, Hwan Soo; Kim, Jun Sung; Semertzidis, Yannis K.; Lee, Jhinhwan

    Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 consists of superconducting FeAs layers and Mott insulating Sr2VO3 layers, and exhibits superconductivity with Tc near 30 K despite being a parent compound material. Unlike normal Fe-based superconductors, the magnetism of Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 has complexity due to the presence of two magnetic atomic layers of V and Fe; therefore, the issue of magnetism has been actively debated. In this work, we studied the orbital and magnetic phase transitions in the range of 4 K to 180 K using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope. We directly observed the changes of charge density waves of V atomic layer related to the nematicity at 150 K, and spin density waves of V atomic layer resulting from spin ordering of underlying Fe atomic layer below 50 K. Moreover, controlling the sample bias voltage, the hysteresis of magnetic domain is observed at 4 K. Our results show key clues to solve controversy about the magnetism of Sr4V2O6Fe2As2.

  16. Atomic scale fabrication of dangling bond structures on hydrogen passivated Si(0 0 1) wafers processed and nanopackaged in a clean room environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolmer, Marek; Godlewski, Szymon; Zuzak, Rafal; Wojtaszek, Mateusz [Centre for Nanometer-Scale Science and Advanced Materials, NANOSAM, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta Str. 4, PL 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Rauer, Caroline; Thuaire, Aurélie; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Moriceau, Hubert [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, 17, Avenue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Joachim, Christian [Nanosciences Group and MANA Satellite, CEMES-CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Szymonski, Marek, E-mail: marek.szymonski@uj.edu.pl [Centre for Nanometer-Scale Science and Advanced Materials, NANOSAM, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta Str. 4, PL 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-01-01

    Specific surfaces allowing the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) creation of electronic interconnects and atomic nanostructures are required for the successful development of novel nanoscale electronic devices. Atomically flat and reconstructed Si(0 0 1):H surfaces are serious candidates for that role. In this work such Si:H surfaces were prepared in a cleanroom environment on 200 mm silicon wafers with a hydrogen bake and were subsequently bonded together to ensure the surface protection, and allow their transportation and storage for several months in air. Given the nature of the bonding, which was hydrophobic with weak van der Waals forces, we were then able to de-bond them in UHV. We show that the quality of the de-bonded Si:H surface enables the “at will” construction of sophisticated and complex dangling bond (DB) nanostructures by atomically precise scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip induced desorption of hydrogen atoms. The DB structures created on slightly doped Si:H samples were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) performed at 4 K. Our results demonstrate that DB nanostructures fabricated on UHV de-bonded Si(0 0 1):H wafers could be directly incorporated in future electronics as interconnects and parts of nanoscale logic circuits.

  17. Atomic scale fabrication of dangling bond structures on hydrogen passivated Si(0 0 1) wafers processed and nanopackaged in a clean room environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Marek; Godlewski, Szymon; Zuzak, Rafal; Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Rauer, Caroline; Thuaire, Aurélie; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Moriceau, Hubert; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Specific surfaces allowing the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) creation of electronic interconnects and atomic nanostructures are required for the successful development of novel nanoscale electronic devices. Atomically flat and reconstructed Si(0 0 1):H surfaces are serious candidates for that role. In this work such Si:H surfaces were prepared in a cleanroom environment on 200 mm silicon wafers with a hydrogen bake and were subsequently bonded together to ensure the surface protection, and allow their transportation and storage for several months in air. Given the nature of the bonding, which was hydrophobic with weak van der Waals forces, we were then able to de-bond them in UHV. We show that the quality of the de-bonded Si:H surface enables the "at will" construction of sophisticated and complex dangling bond (DB) nanostructures by atomically precise scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip induced desorption of hydrogen atoms. The DB structures created on slightly doped Si:H samples were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) performed at 4 K. Our results demonstrate that DB nanostructures fabricated on UHV de-bonded Si(0 0 1):H wafers could be directly incorporated in future electronics as interconnects and parts of nanoscale logic circuits.

  18. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  19. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  20. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature-Part II Simulation of CVD diamond film growth in C-H system and in Cl-containing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100}-oriented CVD diamond film under two modifications of J-B-H model at low substrate temperatures was simulated by using a revised KMC method at atomic scale. The results were compared both in Cl-containing systems and in C-H system as follows: (1) Substrate temperature can produce an important effect both on film deposition rate and on surface roughness; (2) Aomic Cl takes an active role for the growth of diamond film at low temperatures; (3) {100}-oriented diamond film cannot deposit under single carbon insertion mechanism, which disagrees with the predictions before; (4) The explanation of the exact role of atomic Cl is not provided in the simulation results.

  1. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  2. Optimized absorption imaging of mesoscopic atomic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessel, Wolfgang; Strobel, Helmut; Joos, Maxime; Nicklas, Eike; Stroescu, Ion; Tomkovič, Jiří; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the optimization of high-intensity absorption imaging for small Bose-Einstein condensates. The imaging calibration exploits the linear scaling of the quantum projection noise with the mean number of atoms for a coherent spin state. After optimization for atomic clouds containing up to 300 atoms, we find an atom number resolution of atoms, mainly limited by photon shot noise and radiation pressure.

  3. Microfabrication of gold wires for atom guides

    OpenAIRE

    Kukharenka, Elena; Moktadir, Zak; Kraft, Michael; Abdelsalam, M.E.; Bagnall, Darren; Vale, C.; Jones, M. P. A.; Hinds, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturised atom optics is a new field allowing the control of cold atoms in microscopic magnetic traps and waveguides. Using microstructures (hereafter referred to as atom chips), the control of cold atoms on the micrometer scale becomes possible. Applications range from integrated atom interferometers to the realisation of quantum gates. The implementation of such structures requires high magnetic field gradients.\\ud The motivation of this work was to develop a suitable fabrication process...

  4. A method for accurate electron-atom resonances: The complex-scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method for the $^2P\\, \\mbox{Be}^{-}$ shape resonance problem

    CERN Document Server

    Tsednee, Tsogbayar; Yeager, Danny L

    2015-01-01

    We propose and develop the complex scaled multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator (CMCSTEP) technique for theoretical determination of resonance parameters with electron-atom/molecule systems including open-shell and highly correlated atoms and molecules. The multiconfigurational spin-tensor electron propagator method (MCSTEP) developed and implemented by Yeager his coworkers in real space gives very accurate and reliable ionization potentials and attachment energies. The CMCSTEP method uses a complex scaled multiconfigurational self-consistent field (CMCSCF) state as an initial state along with a dilated Hamiltonian where all of the electronic coordinates are scaled by a complex factor. CMCSCF was developed and applied successfully to resonance problems earlier. We apply the CMCSTEP method to get $^2 P\\,\\mbox{Be}^{-}$ shape resonance parameters using $14s11p5d$, $14s14p2d$, and $14s14p5d$ basis sets with a $2s2p3d$\\,CAS. The obtained value of the resonance parameters are compared to previous res...

  5. Atomic scale study of CU clustering and pseudo-homogeneous Fe–Si nanocrystallization in soft magnetic FeSiNbB(CU) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradeep, K.G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Herzer, G. [Vacuumschmelze GmbH & Co. KG, Grüner Weg 37, 63450 Hanau (Germany); Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to trace the onset of Cu clustering followed by their coarsening and subsequent growth upon rapid (10 s) annealing of an amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 15.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}B{sub 7} alloy. It has been found that the clustering of Cu atoms introduces heterogeneities in the amorphous matrix, leading to the formation of Fe rich regions which crystallizes pseudo-homogeneously into Fe–Si nanocrystals upon annealing. In this paper, we present the data treatment method that allows for the visualization of these different phases and to understand their morphology while still quantifying them in terms of their size, number density and volume fraction. The crystallite size of Fe–Si nanocrystals as estimated from the atom probe data are found to be in good agreement with other complementary techniques like XRD and TEM, emphasizing the importance of this approach towards accurate structural analysis. In addition, a composition driven data segmentation approach has been attempted to determine and distinguish nanocrystalline regions from the remaining amorphous matrix. Such an analysis introduces the possibility of retrieving crystallographic information from extremely fine (2–4 nm sized) nanocrystalline regions of very low volume fraction (< 5 Vol%) thereby providing crucial in-sights into the chemical heterogeneity induced crystallization process of amorphous materials.

  6. Atom-by-atom assembly of defect-free one-dimensional cold atom arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Manuel; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R.; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-11-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a platform for the deterministic preparation of regular one-dimensional arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of more than 50 atoms in less than 400 milliseconds. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach may enable controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  7. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toofanny Rudesh D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Results Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster. For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster. Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36% was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. Conclusions The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery

  8. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  9. Atomic-scale Modeling of Interactions of Helium, Vacancies and Helium-vacancy Clusters with Screw Dislocations in Alpha-Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2010-05-01

    The interactions of He and vacancy defects with <111> screw dislocations in alpha-Fe are modeled using molecular statics, molecular dynamics and transition state energy determinations. The formation energies and binding energies of interstitial He atoms, vacancies and He-vacancy clusters near and within dislocations in alpha-Fe are determined at various locations relative to the dislocation core. Using the dimer transition state method the migration energies and trajectories of the He and vacancy defects near and within the screw dislocation are also determined. Both interstitial He atoms and single vacancies are attracted to and trapped in the dislocation core region, and they both migrate along the dislocation line with a migration energy of about 0.4 eV, which is about half the migration energy of vacancies in the perfect crystal and about five times the migration energy for interstitial He in the perfect crystal. Divacancies and He-divacancy complexes have migration properties within the dislocation core that are similar to those in the perfect crystal, although the stability of these defects within the dislocation may be somewhat less than in the perfect crystal.

  10. $T^3$-interferometer for atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, M; Roura, A; Schleich, W P; DeSavage, S A; Davis, J P; Srinivasan, A; Narducci, F A; Werner, S A; Rasel, E M

    2016-01-01

    The quantum mechanical propagator of a massive particle in a linear gravitational potential derived already in 1927 by Earle H. Kennard \\cite{Kennard,Kennard2} contains a phase that scales with the third power of the time $T$ during which the particle experiences the corresponding force. Since in conventional atom interferometers the internal atomic states are all exposed to the same acceleration $a$, this $T^3$-phase cancels out and the interferometer phase scales as $T^2$. In contrast, by applying an external magnetic field we prepare two different accelerations $a_1$ and $a_2$ for two internal states of the atom, which translate themselves into two different cubic phases and the resulting interferometer phase scales as $T^3$. We present the theoretical background for, and summarize our progress towards experimentally realizing such a novel atom interferometer.

  11. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  12. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  13. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  14. SQUID magnetometry combined with in situ cyclic voltammetry: A case study of tunable magnetism of [Formula: see text]-Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolovec, Stefan; Jerabek, Peter; Szabó, Dorothée Vinga; Krenn, Heinz; Würschum, Roland

    2013-03-01

    SQUID magnetometry combined with in situ cyclic voltammetry by means of a three-electrode chemical cell opens up novel potentials for studying correlations between electrochemical processes and magnetic behaviour. The combination of these methods shows that the charge-induced variation of the magnetic moment of nanocrystalline maghemite ([Formula: see text]-Fe2O3) of about 4% strongly depends on the voltage regime of charging. Upon positive charging, the charge-induced variation of the magnetic moment is suppressed due to adsorption layers. The pronounced charge-sensitivity of the magnetic moment in the regime of negative charging may either be associated with a redox reaction or with charge-induced variations of the magnetic anisotropy or magnetoelastic coupling.

  15. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A; Warr, Gregory G; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-07-21

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.

  16. Characterization of surface oxides on water-atomized steel powder by XPS/AES depth profiling and nano-scale lateral surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasoglou, D.; Hryha, E.; Norell, M.; Nyborg, L.

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of oxide products on the surface of water-atomized steel powder is essential in order to determine the reducing conditions required for their removal during the sintering stage which in turn will result in improved mechanical properties. Pre-alloyed powder with 3 wt% Cr and 0.5 wt% Mo was chosen as the model material. Investigation of the powder surface characteristics with regard to composition, morphology, size and distribution of surface oxides was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. The analysis revealed that the powder is covered by a homogeneous (˜6 nm thick) Fe-oxide layer to ˜94% whereas the rest is covered by fine particulate features with the size below 500 nm. These particulates were further analyzed and were divided into three main categories (i) Cr-based oxides with simultaneous presence of nitrogen, (ii) Si-based oxides of "hemispherical" shape and (iii) agglomerates of the afore mentioned oxides.

  17. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  18. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  19. Atomic-scale control of magnetic anisotropy via novel spin-orbit coupling effect in La2/3Sr1/3MnO3/SrIrO3 superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Zhang, Lipeng; Choi, Yongseong; Kim, Jong-Woo; Chen, Zuhuang; Clarkson, James D; Serrao, Claudy R; Arenholz, Elke; Ryan, Philip J; Xu, Haixuan; Birgeneau, Robert J; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2016-06-07

    Magnetic anisotropy (MA) is one of the most important material properties for modern spintronic devices. Conventional manipulation of the intrinsic MA, i.e., magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA), typically depends upon crystal symmetry. Extrinsic control over the MA is usually achieved by introducing shape anisotropy or exchange bias from another magnetically ordered material. Here we demonstrate a pathway to manipulate MA of 3d transition-metal oxides (TMOs) by digitally inserting nonmagnetic 5d TMOs with pronounced spin-orbit coupling (SOC). High-quality superlattices comprising ferromagnetic La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) and paramagnetic SrIrO3 (SIO) are synthesized with the precise control of thickness at the atomic scale. Magnetic easy-axis reorientation is observed by controlling the dimensionality of SIO, mediated through the emergence of a novel spin-orbit state within the nominally paramagnetic SIO.

  20. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    qubits. The availability of a strong long-range interaction that can be coherently turned on and off is an enabling resource for a wide range of quantum information tasks stretching far beyond the original gate proposal. Rydberg enabled capabilities include long-range two-qubit gates, collective encoding...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing.......Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...

  1. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  2. Atomic diffusion in metal poor stars. The influence on the Main Sequence fitting distance scale, subdwarfs ages and the value of Delta Y/ Delta Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaris, M.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Weiss, A.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of atomic diffusion on the Main Sequence (MS) of metal-poor low mass stars is investigated. Since diffusion alters the stellar surface chemical abundances with respect to their initial values, one must ensure - by calibrating the initial chemical composition of the theoretical models - that the surface abundances of the models match the observed ones of the stellar population under scrutiny. When properly calibrated, our models with diffusion reproduce well within the errors the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of Hipparcos subdwarfs with empirically determined T_eff values and high resolution spectroscopical [Fe/H] determinations. Since the observed surface abundances of subdwarfs are different from the initial ones due to the effect of diffusion, while the globular clusters stellar abundances are measured in Red Giants, which have practically recovered their initial abundances after the dredge-up, the isochrones to be employed for studying globular clusters and Halo subdwarfs with the same observational value of [Fe/H] are different and do not coincide. This is at odds with the basic assumption of the MS-fitting technique for distance determinations. However, the use of the rather large sample of Hipparcos lower MS subdwarfs with accurate parallaxes keeps at minimum the effect of these differences, for two reasons. First, it is possible to use subdwarfs with observed [Fe/H] values close to the cluster one; this minimizes the colour corrections (which are derived from the isochrones) needed to reduce all the subdwarfs to a mono-metallicity sequence having the same [Fe/H] than the cluster. Second, one can employ objects sufficiently faint so that the differences between the subdwarfs and cluster MS with the same observed value of [Fe/H] are small (they increase for increasing luminosity). We find therefore that the distances based on standard isochrones are basically unaltered when diffusion is taken properly into account. On the other hand, the absolute ages

  3. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  4. Manifestations of dark matter and variations of fundamental constants in atoms and astrophysical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of recent developments in the detection of light bosonic dark matter, including axion, pseudoscalar axion-like and scalar dark matter, which form either a coherently oscillating classical field or topological defects (solitons). We emphasise new high-precision laboratory and astrophysical measurements, in which the sought effects are linear in the underlying interaction strength between dark matter and ordinary matter, in contrast to traditional detection schemes for dark matter, where the effects are quadratic or higher order in the underlying interaction parameters and are extremely small. New terrestrial experiments include measurements with atomic clocks, spectroscopy, atomic and solid-state magnetometry, torsion pendula, ultracold neutrons, and laser interferometry. New astrophysical observations include pulsar timing, cosmic radiation lensing, Big Bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background measurements. We also discuss various recently proposed mechanisms for the inducti...

  5. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  6. Fracture of Cu Nanowire upon Stretch by Atomic Scale Molecular Dynamic Simulation%铜纳米线拉伸断裂过程的原子尺度分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈念科; 李贤斌

    2014-01-01

    基于经典力学势函数的分子动力学模拟方法研究铜纳米线的拉伸断裂过程,并分析断裂前应力、应变和位错行为的关系及断裂后的形貌演化。结果表明:纳米线两端的锥形结构可阻塞位错运动,从而提高其断裂强度;断裂后断口处尖锐的尖端结构形貌会发生自发的回缩和钝化,该过程是尖端上储存的弹性能和的高能结构(如孤立原子、孪晶界和表面弯折等)的自我修复,最终在表面上形成许多能量较低的(111)小平面所致;其物理机理是在温度激活下的能量最小化过程。%To explore the fracture mechanism of metal nanowires,a fracture process of Cu nanowire upon stretch was theoretically studied by molecular dynamic (MD)simulations based on embedded-atom method (EAM)potential.The relationship between stress,strain and dislocation before fracture as well as the morphology evolution after fracture was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the tips on the two ends of the nanowire can stuck the dislocation motion.Then the stacking fault by the first partial dislocation could be annihilated by a full dislocation formed by another partial dislocation.This process can thus enhance the fracture strength.The sharp structure after fracture can retract and become obtuse spontaneously.The atomic scale analysis of the morphology change demonstrates that the fracture is a process of eliminating the high energy structures,such as isolated atoms,twin boundary and surface kink.The surface of the fracture finally emerge many (111)facets with lower energies. Therefore the physical mechanism is attributed to the rule of energy minimization.

  7. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  8. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  9. Studies on Magnetometry and Samples used for an Experimental Search on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron using Solid-State Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Huffer, Craig; Karcz, Maciej; Liu, Chen-Yu; Reddy, Goverdhan

    2008-04-01

    A discovery of a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) at the current sensitivity level will imply new sources of CP violation beyond the standard model of particle physics. We are attempting to improve the experimental limit of the eEDM using a new technique employing solid-state systems at low temperatures. The experiment requires a system with a large magnetic response and the application of sensitive SQUID magnetometry. In this talk, I will present results in characterizing the magnetic properties of our solid-state sample, polycrystalline Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (GGG), and discuss preliminary results of systematic studies on our SQUID detectors. In our current setup, SQUID sensors record a non-zero change in magnetic flux with no GGG samples. This non-zero signals indicate sources of systematic effects which mimic EDM signals. We identified that several sources are responsible for producing systematic errors: the eddy current and the transient current. The dominant effect due to the eddy current can be reduced by using electrode material with a high resistivity, such as graphite..

  10. Microfabrication of MEMS alkali metal vapor cells for chip-scale atomic devices%芯片级原子器件MEMS碱金属蒸气腔室制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤政; 马波; 阮勇; 陈硕; 张高飞

    2013-01-01

    提出了基于两步低温阳极键合工艺的碱金属蒸气腔室制作方法,用于实现原子钟、原子磁力计及原子陀螺仪等器件的芯片级集成.由微机电系统(MEMS)体硅工艺制备了腔室结构.首先采用标准工艺将刻蚀有腔室的硅圆片与Pyrex玻璃阳极键合成预成型腔室,然后引入氮缓冲气体和由惰性石蜡包覆的微量碱金属铷或铯.通过两步阳极键合来密封腔室,键合温度低于石蜡燃点198℃.第一步键合预封装腔室,键合电压小于缓冲气体的击穿电压.第二步键合在大气氛围中进行,电压增至1 200 V来增强封装质量.通过高功率激光器局部加热释放碱金属,同时在腔壁上形成均匀的石蜡镀层以延长极化原子寿命.本文实现了160℃的低温阳极键合封装,键合率达到95%以上.封装的碱金属铷释放后仍具有金属光泽,实现的最小双腔室体积为6.5 mm×4.5 mm×2 mm.铷的吸收光谱表明铷有效地封装在腔室中,证明两步低温阳极键合工艺制作碱金属蒸气腔室是可行的.%This paper reported on the microfabrication of alkali metal vapor cells based on the two-step low temperature anodic bonding for the chip-scale integration of atomic clock,atomic magnetometer,atomic gyroscope and other atomic devices.Cell structures were fabricated by Micro-electromechanical System (MEMS) bulk silicon process,and the etched silicon with cells was firstly bonded to Pyrex glass to fabricate preformed chambers by the standard anodic bonding process.Then,nitrogen buffer gas and micro-scale alkali metal (rubidium or cesium) were introduced into the preformed cells.The two-step anodic bonding process was used to seal the cells at a temperature lower than the paraffin flash point (198 ℃).In the first step,bonding voltage was lower than the breakdown voltage of nitrogen buffer gas to pre-seal the cells.In the second step,the bonding was in air atmosphere,and the bonding voltage increased up to 1

  11. Atom-by-Atom Construction of a Quantum Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Jason R

    2017-03-28

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) are conventionally used to probe surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent advances in STM include tunneling from spin-polarized and superconducting tips, time-domain spectroscopy, and the fabrication of atomically precise Si nanoelectronics. In this issue of ACS Nano, Tettamanzi et al. probe a single-atom transistor in silicon, fabricated using the precision of a STM, at microwave frequencies. While previous studies have probed such devices in the MHz regime, Tettamanzi et al. probe a STM-fabricated device at GHz frequencies, which enables excited-state spectroscopy and measurements of the excited-state lifetime. The success of this experiment will enable future work on quantum control, where the wave function must be controlled on a time scale that is much shorter than the decoherence time. We review two major approaches that are being pursued to develop spin-based quantum computers and highlight some recent progress in the atom-by-atom fabrication of donor-based devices in silicon. Recent advances in STM lithography may enable practical bottom-up construction of large-scale quantum devices.

  12. Atomic-Scale Principles of Combustion Nanocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    in the analysis of experiments (particularly gas-phase catalysis in traps) and understanding of the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate...the efficient room temperature catalytic conversion of CO to CO2. Nanometal oxides are an important class of heterogeneous catalysts for various...nano-oxide-based catalytic materials for low temperature oxidation catalysis . (E) PUB 7 & 8. Catalytic oxidation on Pdn nanoclusters

  13. Atomic-Scale Factors of Combustion Nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    experiments (particularly gas-phase catalysis in traps) and understanding of the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of change with time of...temperature catalytic conversion of CO to CO2. Nanometal oxides are an important class of heterogeneous catalysts for various industrial processes...catalytic materials for low temperature oxidation catalysis . (E) PUB 7 & 8. Catalytic oxidation on Pdn nanoclusters (with n = 13 and 30

  14. Continuum Mechanics at the Atomic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    stress is singular at t=o bu* also the stored elastic energy. For that reason we are forced to consider the Polution valid only in a hollow cylinder...Underwater Weapons Center U.S. Naval Academy Pasadena Annex Annapolis, Maryland 21402 3202 E. Foothill Blvd. Pasadena, California 91107 Naval Air Systems...Mechanics UCS. Naval Civil Engr. Lab. Naval Air Development Center Code L3r Johnsville Port Hueneme, California 93041 Warminster, Pennsylvania 1897A

  15. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to the present understanding of this material and leading to some possible future work.

  16. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  17. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  18. Charge ordering in Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}: ESR and magnetometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, D.M.; Tovstolytkin, A.I. [Institute of Magnetism of NASU, 36b Vernadsky Boulevard, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Fertman, E.L.; Desnenko, V.A.; Kravchyna, O. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of NASU, 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine); Khalyavin, D.D. [ISIS Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Salak, A.N. [Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering/CICECO, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193 (Portugal); Anders, A.G. [V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody sq., Kharkiv 61000 (Ukraine); Feher, A. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P. J. Šafárik University in Košice, Park Angelinum 9, Košice 04154 (Slovakia)

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of magnetic and electric properties of the narrow-band manganite Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} was studied by the electron-spin resonance (ESR), static magnetic field (dc) and resistivity techniques in the temperature range of 100–380 K. It was found that below the charge ordering temperature, T{sub CO}≈212 K, the compound is a mixture of the charge ordered and charge disordered phases in varying proportions depending on the temperature. The exchange phase process, when the amount of the charge ordered phase increases under cooling, while the amount of the charge disordered phase decreases is the most intense between ∼220 K and 180 K. At low temperatures, T<160 K, the charge ordered to the charge disordered phase ratio is about 4:1, which is in excellent agreement with previous neutron diffraction data. Both a sharp decrease of the magnetic susceptibility and a huge resistivity increase are evident of the weakening of ferromagnetic correlations and suppression of the double exchange interaction across the charge ordering due to the localization of the charge carriers. - Highlights: • The electron spin resonance and magnetometry study of Nd{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} compound has been done. • Phase segregated state of the compound below the charge ordering temperature was revealed. • Charge ordered and charge disordered phases in varying proportions depending on the temperature are coexistent. • The exchange phase process is the most intense between ~220 K and 180 K. • At low temperatures the charge ordered to the charge disordered phase ratio is about 4:1.

  19. Clarifying atomic weights: A 2016 four-figure table of standard and conventional atomic weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Meyers, Fabienne; Holden, Norman E.

    2017-01-01

    To indicate that atomic weights of many elements are not constants of nature, in 2009 and 2011 the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) replaced single-value standard atomic weight values with atomic weight intervals for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium); for example, the standard atomic weight of nitrogen became the interval [14.00643, 14.00728]. CIAAW recognized that some users of atomic weight data only need representative values for these 12 elements, such as for trade and commerce. For this purpose, CIAAW provided conventional atomic weight values, such as 14.007 for nitrogen, and these values can serve in education when a single representative value is needed, such as for molecular weight calculations. Because atomic weight values abridged to four figures are preferred by many educational users and are no longer provided by CIAAW as of 2015, we provide a table containing both standard atomic weight values and conventional atomic weight values abridged to four figures for the chemical elements. A retrospective review of changes in four-digit atomic weights since 1961 indicates that changes in these values are due to more accurate measurements over time or to the recognition of the impact of natural isotopic fractionation in normal terrestrial materials upon atomic weight values of many elements. Use of the unit “u” (unified atomic mass unit on the carbon mass scale) with atomic weight is incorrect because the quantity atomic weight is dimensionless, and the unit “amu” (atomic mass unit on the oxygen scale) is an obsolete term: Both should be avoided.

  20. Impurity atoms on view in cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Séamus Davis

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Impurity atoms in a material are usually viewed as a problem because they can result in non-ideal properties. However, they can sometimes be used to advantage when attempting to understand new materials. This is because the interactions of an impurity atom with the material reveal detailed information on the local electronic environment. In this paper we discuss scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the atomic-scale effects of individual Ni and Zn impurity atoms on the cuprate high critical temperature superconductors.

  1. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  2. Atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb1.5O7 nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuan

    2013-12-24

    Here, we report the atomic-scale microstructural characterization and dielectric properties of crystalline cubic pyrochlore Bi1.5MgNb 1.5O7 (BMN) nanoparticles with mean size of 70 nm, which were synthesized by sol-gel method. The crystallinity, phase formation, morphology, and surface microstructure of the BMN nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), respectively. The phase evolution of the BMN nanoparticles investigated by XRD patterns showed that uniform cubic pyrochlore BMN nanoparticles were obtained after calcination at temperature of 800 C, and their structural information was revealed by Raman spectrum. TEM images demonstrated that the BMN nanoparticles had a spherical morphology with an average particle size of 70 nm, and their crystalline nature was revealed by HRTEM images. In addition, HRTEM images also demonstrate a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) surface structure at the edges of rough BMN nanoparticles, where the terrace was on the (100) plane, and the ledge on the (001) plane. The formation of such a TLK surface structure can be well explained by a theory of periodic bond chains. Due to the surface structural reconstruction in the BMN nanoparticles, the formation of a tetragonal structure in a rough BMN nanoparticle was also revealed by HRTEM image. The BMN nanoparticles exhibited dielectric constants of 50 at 100 kHz and 30 at 1 MHz, and the dielectric loss of 0.19 at 1 MHz. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  3. Variational electrodynamics of Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, Jayme

    2013-01-01

    We study extrema with velocity discontinuities for the variational electromagnetic two-body problem. Along $C^2$ segments, these broken extrema satisfy the Euler-Lagrange equations of the variational principle, which are neutral differential delay equations with state-dependent deviating arguments. At points where accelerations are not defined and velocities are discontinuous, broken extrema satisfy Weierstrass-Erdmann corner conditions that energies and momenta are continuous. Here we construct periodic broken extrema near the $C^{\\infty}$ two-body circular orbits, using piecewise-defined $C^2$ solutions of the neutral differential delay equations along regular segments and a variational approximation for the boundary-layer segments. Broken periodic extrema with an integer number of corner points bifurcate from a discrete set of circular orbits, with scales defined by the Weierstrass-Erdmann corner conditions. We consider the three cases of hydrogen, muonium and positronium atoms. In each case the broken ext...

  4. Reading and writing single-atom magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Willke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    The single-atom bit represents the ultimate limit of the classical approach to high-density magnetic storage media. So far, the smallest individually addressable bistable magnetic bits have consisted of 3–12 atoms. Long magnetic relaxation times have been demonstrated for single lanthanide atoms in molecular magnets, for lanthanides diluted in bulk crystals, and recently for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms supported on magnesium oxide (MgO). These experiments suggest a path towards data storage at the atomic limit, but the way in which individual magnetic centres are accessed remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of the magnetism of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over many hours. We read the Ho states using tunnel magnetoresistance and write the states with current pulses using a scanning tunnelling microscope. The magnetic origin of the long-lived states is confirmed by single-atom electron spin resonance on a nearby iron sensor atom, which also shows that Ho has a large out-of-plane moment of 10.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons on this surface. To demonstrate independent reading and writing, we built an atomic-scale structure with two Ho bits, to which we write the four possible states and which we read out both magnetoresistively and remotely by electron spin resonance. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single-atom magnetic memory is indeed possible.

  5. Reading and writing single-atom magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Willke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christopher P

    2017-03-08

    The single-atom bit represents the ultimate limit of the classical approach to high-density magnetic storage media. So far, the smallest individually addressable bistable magnetic bits have consisted of 3-12 atoms. Long magnetic relaxation times have been demonstrated for single lanthanide atoms in molecular magnets, for lanthanides diluted in bulk crystals, and recently for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms supported on magnesium oxide (MgO). These experiments suggest a path towards data storage at the atomic limit, but the way in which individual magnetic centres are accessed remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of the magnetism of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over many hours. We read the Ho states using tunnel magnetoresistance and write the states with current pulses using a scanning tunnelling microscope. The magnetic origin of the long-lived states is confirmed by single-atom electron spin resonance on a nearby iron sensor atom, which also shows that Ho has a large out-of-plane moment of 10.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons on this surface. To demonstrate independent reading and writing, we built an atomic-scale structure with two Ho bits, to which we write the four possible states and which we read out both magnetoresistively and remotely by electron spin resonance. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single-atom magnetic memory is indeed possible.

  6. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterus of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom-surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy,the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields.

  7. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  8. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  9. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  10. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  11. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  12. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  13. Scales, scales and more scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenhoffer, Andre M

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the nature, uses, and limitations of the large variety of existing, so-called, hypnosis scales; that is, instruments that have been proposed for the assessment of hypnotic behavior. Although the major aim of most of the scales ostensively seems to be to assess several aspects of hypnotic states, they are found generally to say little about these and much more about responses to suggestions. The greatest application of these scales is to be found in research, but they also have a limited place in clinical work.

  14. Similarity criterion of flood discharge atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hui; Wu Shiqiang; Chen Huiling; Zhou Jie; Wu Xiufeng

    2008-01-01

    By combining the results of prototype observation of flood discharge atomization at the Wujiangdu Hydropower Station, and by adopting the serial model test method, the model scale effect was examined, the influences of the Reynolds and Weber numbers of water flow on the rain intensity of flood discharge atomization were analyzed and a rain intensity conversion relation was established. It is demonstrated that the level of atomization follows the geometric similarity relations and it is possible to ignore the influence of the surface tension of the flow when the Weber number is greater than 500. Despite limitations such as incomplete data sets, it is undoubtedly helpful to study the scale effect of atomization flow, and it is beneficial to identify the rules of the model test results in order to extrapolate to prototype prediction.

  15. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  16. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  17. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  18. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Dandan; Kisielowski, Christian; Dou, Letian; Kornienko, Nikolay; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Wong, Andrew B; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2016-12-14

    The radiation-sensitive nature of halide perovskites has hindered structural studies at the atomic scale. We overcome this obstacle by applying low dose-rate in-line holography, which combines aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with exit-wave reconstruction. This technique successfully yields the genuine atomic structure of ultrathin two-dimensional CsPbBr3 halide perovskites, and a quantitative structure determination was achieved atom column by atom column using the phase information of the reconstructed exit-wave function without causing electron beam-induced sample alterations. An extraordinarily high image quality enables an unambiguous structural analysis of coexisting high-temperature and low-temperature phases of CsPbBr3 in single particles. On a broader level, our approach offers unprecedented opportunities to better understand halide perovskites at the atomic level as well as other radiation-sensitive materials.

  19. Electron collisions by metal atom vapours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, B.P. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia)]. E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@phy.bg.ac.yu; Pejcev, V. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Kragujevac (Serbia); Filipovic, D.M. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Sevic, D. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Milisavljevic, S. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Predojevic, B. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2007-03-15

    Differential cross sections (DCS) for the elastic electron scattering and electron excitation of metal atom vapours are presented and discussed. Absolute scale was obtained by normalization procedure where generalized oscillator strengths were fitted to terminate at forward scattering function which leads to optical oscillator strength at zero momentum transfer. DCSs are compared with other available experimental and theoretical results and their importance for our understanding of basic electron atom interactions is pointed out.

  20. A Miniature Wide Band Atomic Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    atomic magnetometer CSAC – Chip scale atomic clock DAC – Digital to Analog Converter DARPA – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DBR...Finally, the heater frequencies must not beat with the Laser servo’s modulation. Heater amplifiers This circuit is essentially an audio power...amplifier for the heater waveforms. The heater waveforms are made on the DAC board and then amplified in this circuit. The heater PCB consists of 4

  1. Atomic Storage States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凯戈; 朱诗尧

    2002-01-01

    We present a complete description of atomic storage states which may appear in the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The result shows that the spatial coherence has been included in the atomic collective operators and the atomic storage states. In some limits, a set of multimode atomic storage states has been established in correspondence with the multimode Fock states of the electromagnetic field. This gives a better understanding of the fact that, in BIT, the optical coherent information can be preserved and recovered.

  2. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  3. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  4. Deterministically Entangling Two Remote Atomic Ensembles via Light-Atom Mixed Entanglement Swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhong; Yan, Zhihui; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde

    2016-05-11

    Entanglement of two distant macroscopic objects is a key element for implementing large-scale quantum networks consisting of quantum channels and quantum nodes. Entanglement swapping can entangle two spatially separated quantum systems without direct interaction. Here we propose a scheme of deterministically entangling two remote atomic ensembles via continuous-variable entanglement swapping between two independent quantum systems involving light and atoms. Each of two stationary atomic ensembles placed at two remote nodes in a quantum network is prepared to a mixed entangled state of light and atoms respectively. Then, the entanglement swapping is unconditionally implemented between the two prepared quantum systems by means of the balanced homodyne detection of light and the feedback of the measured results. Finally, the established entanglement between two macroscopic atomic ensembles is verified by the inseparability criterion of correlation variances between two anti-Stokes optical beams respectively coming from the two atomic ensembles.

  5. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography.

  6. Simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability in a coherent atomic vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Jian-Qi

    2007-01-01

    A new quantum optical mechanism to realize simultaneously negative electric permittivity and magnetic permeability is suggested. In order to obtain a negative permeability, we choose a proper atomic configuration that can dramatically enhance the contribution of the magnetic-dipole allowed transition via the atomic phase coherence. It is shown that the atomic system chosen with proper optical parameters can give rise to striking electromagnetic responses (leading to a negative refractive index) and that the atomic vapour becomes a left-handed medium in an optical frequency band. Differing from the previous schemes of artificial composite metamaterials (based on classical electromagnetic theory) to achieve the left-handed materials, which consist of anisotropic millimetre-scale composite structure units, the left-handed atomic vapour presented here is isotropic and homogeneous at the atomic-scale level. Such an advantage may be valuable in realizing the superlens (and hence perfect image) with left-handed atomic vapour.

  7. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  8. Atomic-Scale Structure and Stability of the √31x√31R9° Surface of Al2O3(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jeppe Vang; Jensen, Mona Christine Robenhagen; Venkataramani, Krithika

    2009-01-01

    Through the interplay of noncontact atomic force microscopy studies and density functional theory calculations, an atomistic model for the Al2O3(0001)- × R9° surface reconstruction is revealed. The surface is found to consist of an Al adlayer on the Al2O3 substrate, and the driving force...

  9. A magnetic atomic laminate from thin film synthesis: (Mo{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}){sub 2}GaC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkian, R., E-mail: rahele.meshkian@liu.se; Ingason, A. S.; Lu, J.; Rosen, J. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Arnalds, U. B. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Magnus, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-516 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    We present synthesis and characterization of a new magnetic atomic laminate: (Mo{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}){sub 2}GaC. High quality crystalline films were synthesized on MgO(111) substrates at a temperature of ∼530 °C. The films display a magnetic response, evaluated by vibrating sample magnetometry, in a temperature range 3-300 K and in a field up to 5 T. The response ranges from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic with change in temperature, with an acquired 5T-moment and remanent moment at 3 K of 0.66 and 0.35 μ{sub B} per metal atom (Mo and Mn), respectively. The remanent moment and the coercive field (0.06 T) exceed all values reported to date for the family of magnetic laminates based on so called MAX phases.

  10. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  11. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  12. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  13. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  14. The Software Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  15. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  16. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  17. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  18. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers.

  19. Dephasing in an atom

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    When an atom in vacuum is near a surface of a dielectric the energy of a fluctuating electromagnetic field depends on a distance between them resulting, as known, in the force called van der Waals one. Besides this fluctuation phenomenon there is one associated with formation of a mean electric field which is equivalent to an order parameter. In this case atomic electrons are localized within atomic distances close to the atom and the total ground state energy is larger, compared to the bare ...

  20. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  1. Atomic-Level Sculpting of Crystalline Oxides: Toward Bulk Nanofabrication with Single Atomic Plane Precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; He, Qian; Lupini, Andrew R; Leonard, Donovan N; Oxley, Mark P; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Unocic, Raymond R; Tselev, Alexander; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pennycook, Stephen J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2015-11-25

    The atomic-level sculpting of 3D crystalline oxide nanostructures from metastable amorphous films in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is demonstrated. Strontium titanate nanostructures grow epitaxially from the crystalline substrate following the beam path. This method can be used for fabricating crystalline structures as small as 1-2 nm and the process can be observed in situ with atomic resolution. The fabrication of arbitrary shape structures via control of the position and scan speed of the electron beam is further demonstrated. Combined with broad availability of the atomic resolved electron microscopy platforms, these observations suggest the feasibility of large scale implementation of bulk atomic-level fabrication as a new enabling tool of nanoscience and technology, providing a bottom-up, atomic-level complement to 3D printing.

  2. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  3. Scaling properties of universal tetramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, M R; Yamashita, M T; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2011-09-23

    We evidence the existence of a universal correlation between the binding energies of successive four-boson bound states (tetramers), for large two-body scattering lengths (a), related to an additional scale not constrained by three-body Efimov physics. Relevant to ultracold atom experiments, the atom-trimer relaxation peaks for |a|→∞ when the ratio between the tetramer and trimer energies is ≃4.6 and a new tetramer is formed. The new scale is also revealed for a < 0 by the prediction of a correlation between the positions of two successive peaks in the four-atom recombination process.

  4. Nanoscale magnetic atom chips for quantum simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Rooij, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of five chapters that describe the different things that I have done in the past few years which all concern my effort to create lattices of ultracold gaseous atoms at length-scales of approximately 100 nano-meters (a millionth of a decimeter, or 200 times smaller than the diame

  5. Greek Atomic Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  6. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  7. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  8. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  9. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  10. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  11. The Future of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  12. Atomic and molecular manipulation with the scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroscio, J A; Eigler, D M

    1991-11-29

    The prospect of manipulating matter on the atomic scale has fascinated scientists for decades. This fascination may be motivated by scientific and technological opportunities, or from a curiosity about the consequences of being able to place atoms in a particular location. Advances in scanning tunneling microscopy have made this prospect a reality; single atoms can be placed at selected positions and structures can be built to a particular design atom-by-atom. Atoms and molecules may be manipulated in a variety of ways by using the interactions present in the tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope. Some of these recent developments and some of the possible uses of atomic and molecular manipulation as a tool for science are discussed.

  13. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  14. Intrinsic electric dipole moments of paramagnetic atoms : Rubidium and cesium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2008-01-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of paramagnetic atoms is sensitive to the intrinsic EDM contribution from that of its constituent electrons and a scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) electron-nucleus interaction. The electron EDM and the S-PS contributions to the EDMs of these atoms scale as approximate to Z

  15. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Master coverage of "atom" features used as a source to generate several derivative layers for the Sheriff RMS and E-911 map rolls. Cover is painstakingly maintained interactively by GIS staff. All atom boundaries are snapped to the road centerline cover, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County, Kansas.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  16. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  17. Noise characterization of an atomic magnetometer at sub-millihertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Zhivun, E; Budker, D; Wurm, D; Ramos-Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    Noise measurements have been carried out in the LISA bandwidth (0.1 mHz to 100 mHz) to characterize an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. This was done in order to assess if the technology can be used for space missions with demanding low-frequency requirements like the LISA concept. Magnetometry for low-frequency applications is usually limited by $1/f$ noise and thermal drifts, which become the dominant contributions at sub-millihertz frequencies. Magnetic field measurements with atomic magnetometers are not immune to low-frequency fluctuations and significant excess noise may arise due to external elements, such as temperature fluctuations or intrinsic noise in the electronics. In addition, low-frequency drifts in the applied magnetic field have been identified in order to distinguish their noise contribution from that of the sensor. We have found the technology suitable for LISA in terms of sensitivity, although further work must be done to characterize the low-fr...

  18. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun, E-mail: sxu7@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/{radical}Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 {mu}m with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 {mu}m, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  19. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  20. Atomic Structure Theory Lectures on Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Walter R

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Structure Theory is a textbook for students with a background in quantum mechanics. The text is designed to give hands-on experience with atomic structure calculations. Material covered includes angular momentum methods, the central field Schrödinger and Dirac equations, Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations, multiplet structure, hyperfine structure, the isotope shift, dipole and multipole transitions, basic many-body perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and correlation corrections to matrix elements. Numerical methods for solving the Schrödinger and Dirac eigenvalue problems and the (Dirac)-Hartree-Fock equations are given as well. B-spline basis sets are used to carry out sums arising in higher-order many-body calculations. Illustrative problems are provided, together with solutions. FORTRAN programs implementing the numerical methods in the text are included.

  1. On the nature of discrete space-time: The atomic theory of space-time and its effects on Pythagoras's theorem, time versus duration, inertial anomalies of astronomical bodies, and special relativity at the Planck scale

    CERN Document Server

    Crouse, David T

    2016-01-01

    In this work, resolutions will be given for commonly stated problems associated with a model that assumes that space and time are discretized (i.e., atomized). This model is in contrast to the continuous space-time model that is used in all common physical theories and equations -- a model that assumes that spatial coordinates and time are continuous variables. The resolutions to the problems are arrived at, not by proposing any new theories or postulates, but by strictly adhering to: Ernst Mach's principle of non-absolute space, the tenets of logical positivism, quantum mechanics and general relativity. The problems associated with discrete space-time addressed in this paper include: Lorentz contraction (time dilation) of the ostensibly smallest spatial (temporal) interval, maintaining isotropy, violations of causality, and conservation of energy and momentum. Importantly, this work yields modifications to the standard formulae for time dilation and length contraction, with these modifications preserving the...

  2. Dislocation glide in Ni-Al solid solutions from the atomic scale up: a molecular dynamics study; Etude du glissement des dislocations dans la solution solide Ni-Al par simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodary, E

    2003-01-01

    The glide of an edge dislocation in solid solutions is studied by molecular dynamics, at fixed temperature and imposed external stress. We have optimized an EAM potential for Ni(1 a 8% A1): it well reproduces the lattice expansion, local atomic order, stacking fault energy as a function of composition, as well as the elastic properties of the {gamma}' phase with L1{sub 2} structure. On increasing the stress, the dislocation is first immobile, then glides with a velocity proportional to the stress and the velocity saturates on reaching the transverse sound velocity. However, only beyond a static threshold stress, {sigma}{sub s}, does the dislocation glide a distance large enough to allow macroscopic shear; the linear part of the velocity-stress curve extrapolates to zero at a dynamical threshold stress, {sigma}{sub d}, The friction coefficient, and the threshold stresses ({sigma}{sub s} and {sigma}{sub d}), increase with the A1 concentration and decrease with temperature (300 and 500 K). Close to the critical shear stress, {sigma}{sub s}, the dislocation glide is analysed with a 'stop and go' model. The latter yields the flight velocity between obstacles, the mean obstacle density and the distribution of the waiting time on each obstacle as a function of stress, composition and temperature. The obstacle to the glide is proposed to be the strong repulsion between Al atoms brought into nearest neighbour position by the glide process, and not the dislocation-solute interaction. The microscopic parameters so defined are introduced into a micro-mechanical model, which well reproduces the known behaviour of nickel base solid solutions. (author)

  3. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  4. Atomic entanglement and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Claudiu

    The generation of entanglement in atomic systems plays a central topic in the fields of quantum information storage and processing. Moreover, a special category of entangled states of multi-atom ensembles, spin squeezed states, have been proven to lead to considerable improvement in the sensitivity of precision measurements compared to systems involving uncorrelated atoms. A treatment of entanglement in open systems is, however, incomplete without a precise description of the process of decoherence which necessarily accompanies it. The theory of entanglement and decoherence are the two main topics of this thesis. Methods are described for the generation of strong correlations in large atomic ensembles using either cavity quantum electrodynamics or measurement outcome conditioned quantum dynamics. Moreover, the description of loss of entanglement resulting from the coupling to a noise reservoir (electromagnetic vacuum) is explored. A spin squeezing parameter is used throughout this thesis as both a measure of entanglement strength and as an indication of the sensitivity improvement above the so-called standard quantum limit (sensitivity obtained with uncorrelated particles) in metrology. The first scheme considered consists of a single mode cavity field interacting with a collection of atoms for which spin squeezing is produced in both resonant and off-resonant regimes. In the resonant case, transfer of squeezing from a field state to the atoms is analyzed, while in the off-resonant regime squeezing is produced via an effective nonlinear interaction (one-axis twisting Hamiltonian). A second, more experimentally realistic case, is one involving the interaction of free space atoms with laser pulses; a projective measurement of a source field originating from atomic fluctuations provides a means of preparing atomic collective states such as spin squeezed and Schrodinger cat states. A new "unravelling" is proposed, that employs the detection of photon number in a single

  5. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  6. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  7. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  8. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Yu N; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Sakan, N M; Sreckovic, V A; Zakharov, M Yu; Bezuglov, N N; Klycharev, A N; 10.1016/j.newar.2009.07.003

    2012-01-01

    Elementary processes in astrophysical phenomena traditionally attract researchers attention. At first this can be attributed to a group of hemi-ionization processes in Rydberg atom collisions with ground state parent atoms. This processes might be studied as a prototype of the elementary process of the radiation energy transformation into electrical one. The studies of nonlinear mechanics have shown that so called regime of dynamic chaos should be considered as typical, rather than exceptional situation in Rydberg atoms collision. From comparison of theory with experimental results it follows that a such kind of stochastic dynamic processes, occurred during the single collision, may be observed.

  9. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  10. Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Feedback Control of MEMS to Atoms illustrates the use of control and control systems as an essential part of functioning integrated miniaturized systems. The book is organized according to the dimensional scale of the problem, starting with microscale systems and ending with atomic-scale systems. Similar to macroscale machines and processes, control systems can play a major role in improving the performance of micro- and nanoscale systems and in enabling new capabilities that would otherwise not be possible. The majority of problems at these scales present many new challenges that go beyond the current state-of-the-art in control theory and engineering. This is a result of the multidisciplinary nature of micro/nanotechnology, which requires the merging of control engineering with physics, biology and chemistry. This book: Shows how the utilization of feedback control in nanotechnology instrumentation can yield results far better than passive systems can Discusses the application of control systems to problems...

  11. Neutrino Spectroscopy with Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fukumi, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanjo, Hajime; Ohae, Chiaki; Sasao, Noboru; Tanaka, Minoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Uetake, Satoshi; Wakabayashi, Tomonari; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2012-01-01

    We give a comprehensive account of our proposed experimental method of using atoms or molecules in order to measure parameters of neutrinos still undetermined; the absolute mass scale, the mass hierarchy pattern (normal or inverted), the neutrino mass type (Majorana or Dirac), and the CP violating phases including Majorana phases. There are advantages of atomic targets, due to the closeness of available atomic energies to anticipated neutrino masses, over nuclear target experiments. Disadvantage of using atomic targets, the smallness of rates, is overcome by the macro-coherent amplification mechanism. The atomic or molecular process we use is a cooperative deexcitation of a collective body of atoms in a metastable level |e> emitting a neutrino pair and a photon; |e> -> |g> + gamma + nu_i nu_j where nu_i's are neutrino mass eigenstates. The macro-coherence is developed by trigger laser irradiation. We discuss aspects of the macro-coherence development by setting up the master equation for the target quantum st...

  12. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  13. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  14. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  15. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  16. Atomical Grothendieck categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Năstăsescu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of Gabriel dimension of a Grothendieck category, we introduce the concept of atomical Grothendieck category, which has only two localizing subcategories, and we give a classification of this type of Grothendieck categories.

  17. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  18. Atomic orbital self-energy and electronegativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In this work, atomic calculations were performed within the local-density and generalized-gradient approximations of exchange and correlation density functionals within density-functional theory to provide accurate periodic trends of first ionization energies and electron affinities of the atomic series from hydrogen to xenon. Electronegativities were determined directly from Mulliken's formula and were shown to be equivalently calculated rather by using Slater-Janak's transition state or by calculating the electrostatic self-energies of the orbitals involved in the transition to ions. Finally, comparisons were made with other theoretical and experimental results, including Mulliken-Jaff\\'e's electronegativity scale.

  19. Atom laser dynamics in a tight waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, A del; Lizuain, I; Muga, J G [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, UPV-EHU, Apartado. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Pons, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.I.T. de Minas y Obras Publicas, UPV-EHU, 48901 Barakaldo (Spain); Moshinsky, M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: adolfo.delcampo@ehu.es

    2008-02-15

    We study the transient dynamics that arise during the formation of an atom laser beam in a tight waveguide. The time dependent density profile develops a series of wiggles which are related to the diffraction in time phenomenon. The apodization of matter waves, which relies on the use of smooth aperture functions, allows to suppress such oscillations in a time interval, after which there is a revival of the diffraction in time. The revival time scale is directly related to the inverse of the harmonic trap frequency for the atom reservoir.

  20. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.