WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic resolution images

  1. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  2. Imaging Genetic Molecules At Atomic Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, L. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Proposed method of imaging informational polymeric biological molecules at atomic resolution enables determination of sequences of component monomers about 10 to the 3rd power to 10 to the 4th power times as fast as conventional methods do. Accelerates research on genetic structures of animals and plants. Also contributes significantly to imaging processes like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in cases in which necessary to locate or identify small specimens on relatively large backgrounds and subtract background images to obtain images of specimens in isolation. V-grooves on silicon wafer laid out in square pattern, intersections of which marked to identify coordinates. Specimen molecules held in grooves for reproducible positioning and scanning by AFM or STM.

  3. High resolution field imaging with atomic vapor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the development of imaging techniques in atomic vapor cells. This is a relatively unexplored area, despite the ubiquitous use of imaging in experiments with ultracold atoms. Our main focus is in high resolution imaging of microwave near fields, for which there is currently no satisfactory established technique. We detect microwave fields through Rabi oscillations driven by the microwave on atomic hyperfine transitions. The technique can be easily modified to also i...

  4. Volcano structure in atomic resolution core-loss images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alfonso, A.J.; Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia); Oxley, M.P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: lja@physics.unimelb.edu.au

    2008-06-15

    A feature commonly present in simulations of atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy images in the scanning transmission electron microscope is the volcano or donut structure. In the past this has been understood in terms of a geometrical perspective using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the dipole approximation for core-loss spectroscopy begins to break down as the probe forming aperture semi-angle increases, necessitating the inclusion of higher order terms for a quantitative understanding of volcano formation. Using such simulations we further investigate the mechanisms behind the formation of such structures in the single atom case and extend this to the case of crystals. The cubic SrTiO{sub 3} crystal is used as a test case to show the effects of nonlocality, probe channelling and absorption in producing the volcano structure in crystal images.

  5. Atom column indexing: atomic resolution image analysis through a matrix representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Oni, Adedapo A; LeBeau, James M

    2014-12-01

    Here, we report the development of an approach to map atomic resolution images into a convenient matrix representation. Through the combination of two-dimensional Gaussian fitting and the projective standard deviation, atom column locations are projected onto two noncollinear reference lattice vectors that are used to assign each a unique (i, j) matrix index. By doing so, straightforward atomic resolution image analysis becomes possible. Using practical examples, we demonstrate that the matrix representation greatly simplifies categorizing atom columns to different sublattices. This enables a myriad of direct analyses, such as mapping atom column properties and correlating long-range atom column pairs. MATLAB source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/subangstrom/aci.

  6. High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Campos, J. D.; Johnson, K. G.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are used extensively in the life and physical sciences because of their ability to non-invasively capture details on the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. Such systems are often limited by source or detector noise, image distortions and human operator misjudgement. Here, we report a general, quantitative method to analyse and correct these errors. We use this method to identify and correct optical aberrations in an imaging system for single atoms and realize an atomic position sensitivity of ˜0.5 nm Hz-1/2 with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus three-dimensional particle tracking, imaging of atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10-24 N) scale.

  7. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  8. Atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field STEM images of Si(011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kotaka, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Hashimoto, I.; Shiojiri, M.

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of [011]-orientated Si have been experimentally obtained by a through-focal series. Artificial bright spots appear at positions where no atomic columns exist along the electron beam, in some experimental images. Image simulation, based on the Bloch wave description by the Bethe method, reproduces the through-focal experimental images. It is shown that atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images, which are greatly influenced by the Bloch wave field depending on the incident electron beam probe, cannot always be interpreted intuitively as the projected atomic images. It is also found that the atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images can be simply explained using the relations to the probe functions without the need for complex dynamical simulations.

  9. High Resolution Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy: Contribution of short-range force to the imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Toyoaki; Kotone, Akiyama; Masanori, Ono; Toshio, Sakurai; Yukio, Hasegawa

    2003-03-01

    Recent developments in force detection technique have made us possible to obtain atomically resolved images of the Si(111)-(7x7) surface by AFM. Compared with STM, however, its spatial resolution remains limited. In this presentation, we demonstrate that with careful pretreatment and appropriate experimental parameters, the structure of the rest-atom layer can be imaged using AFM by detecting the short-range force due to the single chemical bonding. The detection of the short-range force is verified by analysis of the frequency-shift versus distance curve (force curve). This unprecedented high resolution is achieved by reducing background forces due to the long-range interactions with small oscillation amplitude of the cantilever and an atomically sharp tip. The high temperature annealing of the cantilever assists in obtaining a bare silicon tip on the cantilever without unwanted tip-blunting, and improving the Q-factor of the cantilever. This study implies that characterization of the AFM tip in nanometer scale, not only on the apex atoms but also its shape near the apex, is important and critical for AFM high resolution imaging.

  10. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy:The influence of the Electrostatic Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lit, J.; Cicco, F.; Hapala, P.; Jelinek, P.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules

  11. Atomic resolution imaging at 2.5 GHz using near-field microwave microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jonghee; Long, Christian J.; Yang, Haitao; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Atomic resolution imaging is demonstrated using a hybrid scanning tunneling/near-field microwave microscope (microwave-STM). The microwave channels of the microscope correspond to the resonant frequency and quality factor of a coaxial microwave resonator, which is built in to the STM scan head and coupled to the probe tip. We find that when the tip-sample distance is within the tunneling regime, we obtain atomic resolution images using the microwave channels of the microwave-STM. We attribute...

  12. Fluorine in shark teeth: its direct atomic-resolution imaging and strengthening function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Tohei, Tetsuya; Takano, Yoshiro; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-02-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging of beam-sensitive biominerals is extremely challenging, owing to their fairly complex structures and the damage caused by electron irradiation. Herein, we overcome these difficulties by performing aberration-corrected electron microscopy with low-dose imaging techniques, and report the successful direct atomic-resolution imaging of every individual atomic column in the complex fluorapatite structure of shark tooth enameloid, which can be of paramount importance for teeth in general. We demonstrate that every individual atomic column in shark tooth enameloid can be spatially resolved, and has a complex fluorapatite structure. Furthermore, ab initio calculations show that fluorine atoms can be covalently bound to the surrounding calcium atoms, which improves understanding of their caries-reducing effects in shark teeth.

  13. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of Molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy: The Influence of the Electrostatic Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lit, Joost; Di Cicco, Francesca; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-03-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules. Specifically, we image strongly polarized molecules with negatively and positively charged tips. A contrast inversion is observed above the polar groups. By taking into account the electrostatic forces between tip and molecule, the observed contrast differences can be reproduced using a molecular mechanics model. In addition, we analyze the height dependence of the various force components contributing to the high-resolution AFM contrast.

  14. Optimal experimental design for nano-particle atom-counting from high-resolution STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; De wael, A.; Gonnissen, J.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be

    2015-04-15

    In the present paper, the principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. Binary and multiple hypothesis testing have been investigated in order to determine the limits to the precision with which the number of atoms in a projected atomic column can be estimated. The probability of error has been calculated when using STEM images, scattering cross-sections or peak intensities as a criterion to count atoms. Based on this analysis, we conclude that scattering cross-sections perform almost equally well as images and perform better than peak intensities. Furthermore, the optimal STEM detector design can be derived for atom-counting using the expression for the probability of error. We show that for very thin objects LAADF is optimal and that for thicker objects the optimal inner detector angle increases.

  15. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  16. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging.

  17. Ab initio simulations of subatomic resolution images in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-03-01

    Direct imaging of polycyclic aromatic molecules with a subatomic resolution has recently been achieved with noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Specifically, nc-AFM employing a CO functionalized tip has provided details of the chemical bond in aromatic molecules, including the discrimination of bond order. However, the underlying physics of such high resolution imaging remains problematic. By employing new, efficient algorithms based on real space pseudopotentials, we calculate the forces between the nc-AFM tip and specimen. We simulate images of planar organic molecules with two different approaches: 1) with a chemically inert tip and 2) with a CO functionalized tip. We find dramatic differences in the resulting images, which are consistent with recent experimental work. Our work is supported by the DOE under DOE/DE-FG02-06ER46286 and by the Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources were provided by NERSC and XSEDE.

  18. Atomic force microscopy: a powerful tool for high-resolution imaging of spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Sen Prasenjit; Chaudhury Koel; Kumar Sunil; Guha Sujoy K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as the only technique capable of real-time imaging of the surface of a living cell at nano-resolution. Since AFM provides the advantage of directly observing living biological cells in their native environment, this technique has found many applications in pharmacology, biotechnology, microbiology, structural and molecular biology, genetics and other biology-related fields. AFM has also proved to be a valuable tool for reproductive biologists...

  19. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S; Holmegaard, L; Filsinger, F; Rouzée, A; Rudenko, A; Johnsson, P; Martin, A V; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; Coffee, R; Epp, S; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hartmann, R; Kimmel, N; Kühnel, K-U; Maurer, J; Messerschmidt, M; Rudek, B; Starodub, D; Thøgersen, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Stapelfeldt, H; Rolles, D; Chapman, H N; Küpper, J

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an X-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett.112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i.e., picometers and femtoseconds, using X-ray free-electron lasers. PMID:25415561

  20. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  1. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  2. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  3. High-resolution imaging of interfacial water by noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinbo; Guo, Jing; Hapala, Prokop; Cao, Duanyun; Jelínek, Pavel; Xu, Limei; Wang, Enge; Jiang, Ying; Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter Collaboration

    Resolving the hydrogen-bonding configuration of water on the solid surfaces with atomic-scale precision is crucial in water science yet it remains challenging. Recently we have shown the possibility of attacking this problem by STM based on the submolecular orbital imaging of water. However, STM mainly probes the spatial distribution of the density of states near the Fermi level, thus is not sensitive to the chemical structure of molecules. Here we report the ultrahigh resolution imaging of water molecules on a NaCl film by NC-AFM, which enables us to determine the topology of hydrogen-bonding network in unprecedented details. Comparison with the theoretical simulations reveals that the sharp features in the AFM images result from the relaxation of the tip apex mainly due to the electrostatic force between the tip and the water molecules. Our results shed new light on the underlying mechanism of the ultrahigh imaging with NC-AFM and highlight the importance of electrostatics in the imaging of polar molecules such as water. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Programs of China.

  4. 'Sub-atomic' resolution of non-contact atomic force microscope images induced by a heterogeneous tip structure: a density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbellova, Anna; Klapetek, Petr [Czech Metrology Institute, OkruznI 31, 638 00, Brno (Czech Republic); Ondracek, Martin; JelInek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Pou, Pablo; Perez, Ruben, E-mail: jelinekp@fzu.cz [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-22

    A Si adatom on a Si(111)-(7 x 7) reconstructed surface is a typical atomic feature that can rather easily be imaged by a non-contact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM) and can be thus used to test the atomic resolution of the microscope. Based on our first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that the structure of the termination of the AFM tip plays a decisive role in determining the appearance of the adatom image. We show how the AFM image changes depending on the tip-surface distance and the composition of the atomic apex at the end of the tip. We also demonstrate that contaminated tips may give rise to image patterns displaying so-called 'sub-atomic' features even in the attractive force regime.

  5. Achieving atomic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Spence

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the nanotube in 19915 by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM, following closely on the discovery of fullerenes, has initiated a new field of science known as nanoscience. (In fact the fullerene buckyball itself was first observed in 1980, by HREM1. While nanoscience now spans many disciplines, from molecular biology to quantum computing, for all of them, the HREM technique has become the indispensable tool for analyzing the atomic structure of individual bulk nanostructural elements. However this method has long been the technique of choice whenever questions of microstructural characterization arise in materials science.

  6. Understanding 2D atomic resolution imaging of the calcite surface in water by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Spijker, Peter; Miyata, Kazuki; Reischl, Bernhard; Federici Canova, Filippo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Fukuma, Takeshi; Foster, Adam S.

    2016-10-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) experiments were performed on the calcite (10\\bar{1}4) surface in pure water, and a detailed analysis was made of the 2D images at a variety of frequency setpoints. We observed eight different contrast patterns that reproducibly appeared in different experiments and with different measurement parameters. We then performed systematic free energy calculations of the same system using atomistic molecular dynamics to obtain an effective force field for the tip-surface interaction. By using this force field in a virtual AFM simulation we found that each experimental contrast could be reproduced in our simulations by changing the setpoint, regardless of the experimental parameters. This approach offers a generic method for understanding the wide variety of contrast patterns seen on the calcite surface in water, and is generally applicable to AFM imaging in liquids.

  7. Simultaneous atomic-resolution electron ptychography and Z-contrast imaging of light and heavy elements in complex nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Rutte, R. N.; Jones, L.; Simson, M.; Sagawa, R.; Ryll, H.; Huth, M.; Pennycook, T. J.; Green, M.L.H.; Soltau, H.; Kondo, Y.; Davis, B. G.; Nellist, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has emerged as a key tool for atomic resolution characterization of materials, allowing the use of imaging modes such as Z-contrast and spectroscopic mapping. The STEM has not been regarded as optimal for the phase-contrast imaging necessary for efficient imaging of light materials. Here, recent developments in fast electron detectors and data processing capability is shown to enable electron ptychography, to extend the capability of the STEM by allowing quantitative phase images to be formed simultaneously with incoherent signals. We demonstrate this capability as a practical tool for imaging complex structures containing light and heavy elements, and use it to solve the structure of a beam-sensitive carbon nanostructure. The contrast of the phase image contrast is maximized through the post-acquisition correction of lens aberrations. The compensation of defocus aberrations is also used for the measurement of three-dimensional sample information through post-acquisition optical sectioning. PMID:27561914

  8. Ghost Imaging with Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khakimov, R I; Shin, D K; Hodgman, S S; Dall, R G; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a technique -- first realized in quantum optics -- in which the image emerges from cross-correlation between particles in two separate beams. One beam passes through the object to a bucket (single-pixel) detector, while the second beam's spatial profile is measured by a high resolution (multi-pixel) detector but never interacts with the object. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. However, until now ghost imaging has only been demonstrated with photons. Here we report the first realisation of ghost imaging of an object using massive particles. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms, originating from two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) via $s$-wave scattering. We use the higher-order Kapitza-Dirac effect to generate the large number of correlated atom pairs required, enabling the creation of a ghost image with good visibility and sub-millimetre resolution. Future extensions could include ghost interfe...

  9. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  10. Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloyeau, D.; Oikawa, T.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C.

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  11. Atomic resolution imaging of the two-component Dirac-Landau levels in a gapped graphene monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Xiao; Yin, Long-Jing; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Cai, Tuocheng; Li, Si-Yu; Dou, Rui-Fen; Nie, Jia-Cai; Wu, Xiaosong; He, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The wave function of Dirac fermions is a two-component spinor. In graphene, a one-atom-thick film showing two-dimensional Dirac-like electronic excitations, the two-component representation, reflects the amplitude of the electron wave function on the A and B sublattices. This unique property provides unprecedented opportunities to image the two components of Dirac fermions spatially. Here, we report atomic resolution imaging of two-component Dirac-Landau levels in gapped graphene monolayers by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. A gap of about 20 meV, driven by inversion symmetry breaking by the substrate potential, is observed in the graphene sheets on both SiC and graphite substrates. Such a gap splits the n =0 Landau level (LL) into two levels, 0+ and 0-. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the wave function of the 0+ LL is mainly on the A sites and that of the 0- LL is mainly on the B sites of graphene, characterizing the internal structure of the spinor of the n =0 LL. This provides direct evidence of the two-component nature of Dirac fermions.

  12. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Structural Ordering in a Complex Metal Oxide Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-08-28

    The determination of the atomic structure of a functional material is crucial to understanding its "structure-to-property" relationship (e.g., the active sites in a catalyst), which is however challenging if the structure possesses complex inhomogeneities. Here, we report an atomic structure study of an important MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst that is potentially useful for the industrially relevant propane-based BP/SOHIO process. We combined aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with synchrotron powder X-ray crystallography to explore the structure at both nanoscopic and macroscopic scales. At the nanoscopic scale, this material exhibits structural and compositional order within nanosized "domains", while the domains show disordered distribution at the macroscopic scale. We proposed that the intradomain compositional ordering and the interdomain electric dipolar interaction synergistically induce the displacement of Te atoms in the Mo-V-O channels, which determines the geometry of the multifunctional metal oxo-active sites.

  13. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuaki Tsuruyama

    Full Text Available It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  14. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  15. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  16. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  17. Atomic resolution imaging of precipitate transformation from cubic TaN to tetragonal CrTaN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2012-01-01

    In 9–12% Cr creep-resistant steels Cr(V,Nb,Ta)N Z-phase is known to replace metastable (V,Nb,Ta)N MN precipitates at high temperatures. The precipitation process of Z-phase does not follow the classical nucleation theory, where dissolving MN particles provide constituents for Z-phase nucleation...... in the matrix. Using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy, the current work demonstrates that metastable cubic TaN precipitates in a complex steel gradually transform compositionally and crystallographically into stable tetragonal CrTaN precipitates under the influence of Cr indiffusion from...

  18. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested

  19. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, Timothy J., E-mail: tpennycook@gmail.com [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lupini, Andrew R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Yang, Hao [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Murfitt, Matthew F. [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Jones, Lewys [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D. [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested.

  20. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and manipulation of nanoscale matter. Unfortunately, standard AFM imaging requires a timescale on the order of seconds to minutes to acquire an image which makes it complicated to observe dynamic processes...

  1. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This is especially relevant for closely packed ensembles of atoms where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a m...

  2. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  3. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  4. Versatile compact atomic source for high resolution dual atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T; Gilowski, M; Jentsch, C; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2007-01-01

    We present a compact $^{87}$Rb atomic source for high precision dual atom interferometers. The source is based on a double-stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) design, consisting of a 2-dimensional (2D)-MOT for efficient loading of a 3D-MOT. The accumulated atoms are precisely launched in a horizontal moving molasses. Our setup generates a high atomic flux ($>10^{10}$ atoms/s) with precise and flexibly tunable atomic trajectories as required for high resolution Sagnac atom interferometry. We characterize the performance of the source with respect to the relevant parameters of the launched atoms, i.e. temperature, absolute velocity and pointing, by utilizing time-of-flight techniques and velocity selective Raman transitions.

  5. ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPY AND REAL ATOMIC-RESOLUTION - SIMPLE COMPUTER-SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOUTSOS, [No Value; MANIAS, E; TENBRINKE, G; HADZIIOANNOU, G

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its regis

  6. Spatial resolution in atom probe tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Baptiste; de Geuser, Frederic; La Fontaine, Alex; Stephenson, Leigh T; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses gaps in definitions and a lack of standard measurement techniques to assess the spatial resolution in atom probe tomography. This resolution is known to be anisotropic, being better in the depth than laterally. Generally the presence of atomic planes in the tomographic reconstruction is considered as being a sufficient proof of the quality of the spatial resolution of the instrument. Based on advanced spatial distribution maps, an analysis methodology that interrogates the local neighborhood of the atoms within the tomographic reconstruction, it is shown how both the in-depth and the lateral resolution can be quantified. The influences of the crystallography and the temperature are investigated, and models are proposed to explain the observed results. We demonstrate that the absolute value of resolution is specimenspecific.

  7. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction

  8. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  9. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjung [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Chelikowsky, James R. [Center for Computational Materials, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, and Departments of Physics and Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule.

  10. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  11. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) sampl...

  12. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  13. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  14. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  15. Atomic resolution in noncontact AFM by probing cantilever frequency shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yong Xie

    2007-01-01

    Rutile TiO2(001) quantum dots (or nano-marks) in different shapes were used to imitate uncleaved material surfaces or materials with rough surfaces. By numerical integration of the equation of motion of cantilever for silicon tip scanning along the [110] direction over the rutile TiO2 (001) quantum dots in ultra high vacuum (UHV), scanning routes were explored to achieve atomic resolution from frequency shift image. The tip-surface interaction forces were calculated from Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential by the Hamaker summation method. The calculated results showed that atomic resolution could be achieved by frequency shift image for TiO2 (001) surfaces of rhombohedral quantum dot scanning in a vertical route, and spherical cap quantum dot scanning in a superposition route.

  16. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  17. High viscosity environments: an unexpected route to obtain true atomic resolution with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in liquid environments, where true atomic resolution at the solid–liquid interface can now be routinely achieved. It is generally expected that AFM operation in more viscous environments results in an increased noise contribution from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, viscous fluids such as ionic and organic liquids have been generally avoided for high-resolution AFM studies despite their relevance to, e.g. energy applications. Here, we investigate the thermal noise limitations of dynamic AFM operation in both low and high viscosity environments theoretically, deriving expressions for the amplitude, phase and frequency noise resulting from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby defining the performance limits of amplitude modulation, phase modulation and frequency modulation AFM. We show that the assumption of a reduced SNR in viscous environments is not inherent to the technique and demonstrate that SNR values comparable to ultra-high vacuum systems can be obtained in high viscosity environments under certain conditions. Finally, we have obtained true atomic resolution images of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and mica surfaces, thus revealing the potential of high-resolution imaging in high viscosity environments. (paper)

  18. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the...

  19. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  20. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  1. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  2. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  3. Single-atom-sensitive fluorescence imaging of ultracold quantum gases

    CERN Document Server

    Bücker, R; Manz, S; Betz, T; Koller, Ch; Plisson, T; Rottmann, J; Schumm, T; Schmiedmayer, J

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel imaging system for ultracold quantum gases in expansion. After release from a confining potential, atoms fall through a sheet of resonant excitation laser light and the emitted fluorescence photons are imaged onto an amplified CCD camera using a high numerical aperture optical system. The imaging system reaches an extraordinary dynamic range, not attainable with conventional absorption imaging. We demonstrate single-atom detection for dilute atomic clouds with high efficiency where at the same time dense Bose-Einstein condensates can be imaged without saturation or distortion. The spatial resolution can reach the sampling limit as given by the 8 microns pixel size in object space. Pulsed operation of the detector allows for slice images and hence a 3D tomography of the measured object. The scheme can easily be implemented for any atomic species and all optical components are situated outside the vacuum system. As a first application we perform thermometry on rubidium Bose-Einstein condensat...

  4. High-resolution ophthalmic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Carrano, Carmen J.

    2007-12-04

    A system for providing an improved resolution retina image comprising an imaging camera for capturing a retina image and a computer system operatively connected to the imaging camera, the computer producing short exposures of the retina image and providing speckle processing of the short exposures to provide the improved resolution retina image. The system comprises the steps of capturing a retina image, producing short exposures of the retina image, and speckle processing the short exposures of the retina image to provide the improved resolution retina image.

  5. Single Image Super-Resolution via L0 Image Smoothing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Liu; Qi Huang; Jian Li; Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    We propose a single image super-resolution method based on a L0 smoothing approach. We consider a low-resolution image as two parts: one is the smooth image generated by the L0 smoothing method and the other is the error image between the low-resolution image and the smoothing image. We get an intermediate high-resolution image via a classical interpolation and then generate a high-resolution smoothing image with sharp edges by the L0 smoothing method. For the error image, a...

  6. Imaging atoms and molecules on surfaces by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review discusses nearly 30 years of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) work on high resolution imaging of numerous materials systems, giving a historical perspective on the field through the author's work. After a brief discussion of early STM and atomic force microscope (AFM) instrumentation development, the review discusses high resolution STM imaging on semiconductors, metals on semiconductors, Au(1 1 1), metal on metals including surface alloys, oxygen on metals, molecules adsorbed on metals, and AFM measurements of friction on graphite and mica.

  7. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  8. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms. Limita

  9. Observing gas-catalyst dynamics at atomic resolution and single-atom sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helveg, S; Kisielowski, C F; Jinschek, J R; Specht, P; Yuan, G; Frei, H

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an indispensable technique for studying heterogeneous catalysts. In particular, advancements of aberration-corrected electron optics and data acquisition schemes have made TEM capable of delivering images of catalysts with sub-Ångström resolution and single-atom sensitivity. Parallel developments of differentially pumped electron microscopes and of gas cells enable in situ observations of catalysts during the exposure to reactive gas environments at pressures of up to atmospheric levels and temperatures of up to several hundred centigrade. Here, we outline how to take advantage of the emerging state-of-the-art instrumentation and methodologies to study surface structures and dynamics to improve the understanding of structure-sensitive catalytic functionality. The concept of using low electron dose-rates in TEM in conjunction with in-line holography and aberration-correction at low voltage (80 kV) is introduced to allow maintaining atomic resolution and sensitivity during in situ observations of catalysts. Benefits are illustrated by exit wave reconstructions of TEM images of a nanocrystalline Co3O4 catalyst material acquired in situ during their exposure to either a reducing or oxidizing gas environment. PMID:25245867

  10. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  11. Ultrahigh Resolution 3-Dimensional Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop innovative instrumentation for the rapid, 3-dimensional imaging of biological tissues with cellular resolution. Our approach...

  12. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) - Aqua

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset represents multiple products archived at the multiple archive centers for the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard...

  13. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) - Terra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset represents multiple products archived at the multiple archive centers for the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard...

  14. High Resolution Image Reconstruction from Projection of Low Resolution Images DIffering in Subpixel Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple algorithm that projects low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithm is very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. used in projection yield comparable results. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum a posterior (MAP) algorithms. The algorithm is robust and is not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  15. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Florian, E-mail: florian.genz@physik.tu-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Niermann, Tore [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30 nm and a fringe spacing of 30 pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability. - Highlights: • Investigation of optimum biprism position implementation into state-of-the-art TEM. • Reduction of artefacts, especially vignetting in double-biprism electron holography. • Biprism vibration and most stable imaging conditions in double-biprism holography. • Demonstration of the optimized double-biprism setup using a thin GaN-foil.

  16. Effects of spatial resolution on image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Can; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the effect of spatial resolution on image registration. Based on the assumption of additive Gaussian noise on the images, the mean and variance of the distribution of the sum of squared differences (SSD) were estimated. Using these estimates, we evaluate a distance between the SSD distributions of aligned images and non-aligned images. The experimental results show that by matching the resolutions of the moving and fixed images one can get a better image registration result. The results agree with our theoretical analysis of SSD, but also suggest that it may be valid for mutual information as well.

  17. Polarization imaging with enhanced spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, A.; Lizana, A.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and the experimental implementation of a new imaging set-up, based on Liquid Crystal technology, able to obtain super-resolved polarimetric images of polarimetric samples when the resolution is detector limited. The proposed set-up is a combination of two modules. One of them is an imaging Stokes polarimeter, based on Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal cells, which is used to analyze the polarization spatial distribution of an incident beam. The other module is used to obtain high resolved intensity images of the sample in an optical system whose resolution is mainly limited by the CCD pixel geometry. It contains a calibrated Parallel Aligned Liquid Crystal on Silicon display employed to introduce controlled linear phases. As a result, a set of different low resolved intensity images with sub-pixel displacements are captured by the CCD. By properly combining these images and after applying a deconvolution process, a super-resolved intensity image of the object is obtained. Finally, the combination of the two different optical modules permits to employ super-resolved images during the polarimetric data reduction calculation, leading to a final polarization image with enhanced spatial resolution. The proposed optical set-up performance is implemented and experimentally validated by providing super-resolved images of an amplitude resolution test and a birefringent resolution test. A significant improvement in the spatial resolution (by a factor of 1.4) of the obtained polarimetric images, in comparison with the images obtained with the regular imaging system, is clearly observed when applying our proposed technique.

  18. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel;

    2010-01-01

    The reliable detection of single quantum particles has revolutionized the field of quantum optics and quantum information processing. For several years, researchers have aspired to extend such detection possibilities to larger-scale, strongly correlated quantum systems 1 , 2 in order to record...... in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution...... on the lattice and identify individual excitations with high fidelity. A comparison of the radial density and variance distributions with theory provides a precise in situ temperature and entropy measurement from single images. We observe Mott-insulating plateaus with near-zero entropy and clearly resolve...

  19. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  20. Convex Super-Resolution Detection of Lines in Images

    OpenAIRE

    Polisano, Kévin; Condat, Laurent; Clausel, Marianne; Perrier, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    International audience In this paper, we present a new convex formulation for the problem of recovering lines in degraded images. Following the recent paradigm of super-resolution, we formulate a dedicated atomic norm penalty and we solve this optimization problem by means of a primal–dual algorithm. This parsimonious model enables the reconstruction of lines from lowpass measurements, even in presence of a large amount of noise or blur. Furthermore, a Prony method performed on rows and co...

  1. Overview of techniques used for image resolution enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuri D Patil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Image resolution enhancement is one of the first steps in image processing. Image resolution enhancement is the process of manipulating an image so that resultant image is more suitable than the original one for specific application. Image enhancement can be done in various domains. For image resolution enhancement there are many methods, out of which image interpolation scheme is one of themost effective method. However, resolution is vital aspect of any image. Good quality image i.e. high resolution image produces better result in image processing applications. An interpolation is thetechnique to increase the resolution of the image by selecting new pixel from surrounding one. Image interpolation in complex wavelet transform is produces better results for any imaging application.DTCWT technique is used to improve the resolution of any satellite image. The paper focuses on the different techniques that are used to increase resolution of the images and their comparative results.

  2. Does resolution really increase image quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisse, Christel-Loïc; Guichard, Frédéric; Cao, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A general trend in the CMOS image sensor market is for increasing resolution (by having a larger number of pixels) while keeping a small form factor by shrinking photosite size. This article discusses the impact of this trend on some of the main attributes of image quality. The first example is image sharpness. A smaller pitch theoretically allows a larger limiting resolution which is derived from the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). But recent sensor technologies (1.75μm, and soon 1.45μm) with typical aperture f/2.8 are clearly reaching the size of the diffraction blur spot. A second example is the impact on pixel light sensitivity and image sensor noise. For photonic noise, the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) is typically a decreasing function of the resolution. To evaluate whether shrinking pixel size could be beneficial to the image quality, the tradeoff between spatial resolution and light sensitivity is examined by comparing the image information capacity of sensors with varying pixel size. A theoretical analysis that takes into consideration measured and predictive models of pixel performance degradation and improvement associated with CMOS imager technology scaling, is presented. This analysis is completed by a benchmarking of recent commercial sensors with different pixel technologies.

  3. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles. The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep. This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing. Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  4. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , {approximately} 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ``Sun-Earth Connections`` science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science.

  5. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , ∼ 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ''Sun-Earth Connections'' science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science

  6. Effect of hydration film on scanning images of atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A standard calibration grating was used for image scanning to investigate the effect of hydration films on imaging resolution by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The results showed that the hydration films greatly affect the imaging resolution for the tapping mode, but no evident effect on the contact mode. The possible reasons for the effect of hydration films on scanning images of AFM are also brought forward here.

  7. An alternative approach to determine attainable resolution directly from HREM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of resolution in high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) is the power to resolve neighboring atoms. Since the resolution is related to the width of the point spread function of the microscope, it could in principle be determined from the image of a point object. However, in electron microscopy there are no ideal point objects. The smallest object is an individual atom. If the width of an atom is much smaller than the resolution of the microscope, this atom can still be considered as a point object. As the resolution of the microscope enters the sub-Å regime, information about the microscope is strongly entangled with the information about the atoms in HREM images. Therefore, we need to find an alternative method to determine the resolution in an object-independent way. In this work we propose to use the image wave of a crystalline object in zone axis orientation. Under this condition, the atoms of a column act as small lenses so that the electron beam channels through the atom column periodically. Because of this focusing, the image wave of the column can be much more peaked than the constituting atoms and can thus be a much more sensitive probe to measure the resolution. Our approach is to use the peakiness of the image wave of the atom column to determine the resolution. We will show that the resolution can be directly linked to the total curvature of the atom column wave. Moreover, we can then directly obtain the resolution of the microscope given that the contribution from the object is known, which is related to the bounding energy of the atom. The method is applied on an experimental CaTiO3 image wave. - Highlights: • Microscope aberrations and the size of the atoms influence the resolution at the sub-Å level. • In channeling condition the atoms in the column focus the electron beam into a narrow peak at the exit face. • The shape of this peak can be used to determine the resolution in an object independent way. • This results in a

  8. Resolution of electro-holographic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Young; Chernyshov, Oleksii; Lee, Hyoung; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Park, Min-Chul

    2016-06-01

    The resolution of the reconstructed image from a hologram displayed on a DMD is measured with the light field images along the propagation direction of the reconstructed image. The light field images reveal that a point and line image suffers a strong astigmatism but the line focusing distance differences for lines with different directions. This will be astigmatism too. The focusing distance of the reconstructed image is shorter than that of the object. The two lines in transverse direction are resolved when the gap between them is around 16 pixels of the DMD's in use. However, the depth direction is difficult to estimate due to the depth of focus of each line. Due to the astigmatism, the reconstructed image of a square appears as a rectangle or a rhombus.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  10. Atomic Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Ashley; Alem, Nasim; Song, Chengyu; Ciston, Jim; Zettl, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Monolayer sheets of sp2-bonded materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been studied extensively due to their properties including high mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, stability, interesting electronic properties, and potential for integration into novel devices. Understanding the atomic scale structure of defects in these materials is important because defects can significantly affect the physical properties in these materials. In particular, understanding the dynamics of these defects explains much about the material's stability. We have synthesized h-BN and graphene using low pressure chemical vapor deposition and imaged defects using atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  12. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images. PMID:27475069

  13. MULTI-RESOLUTION SEAMLESS IMAGE DATABASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the basic concepts and principles,data structure and high efficient spatial index for multi-resolution image database.The database is characterized by arrangement of multi-resource image data and seamless mosaic,distribution-based storage and management,integration with other spatial database software such as GeoStar and GeoGrid developed by Wuhan Technical University of Surveying and Mapping.

  14. THz Detection and Imaging using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher; Sibalic, Nikola; Kondo, Jorge; de Melo, Natalia; Adams, Charles; Weatherill, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Atoms make excellent electromagnetic field sensors because each atom of the same isotope is identical and has well-studied, permanent properties allowing calibration to SI units. Thus far, atoms have not generally been exploited for terahertz detection because transitions from the atomic ground state are constrained to a limited selection of microwave and optical frequencies. In contrast, highly excited `Rydberg' states allow us access to many strong, electric dipole transitions from the RF to THz regimes. Recent advances in the coherent optical detection of Rydberg atoms have been exploited by a number of groups for precision microwave electrometry Here we report the demonstration of a room-temperature, cesium Rydberg gas as a THz to optical interface. We present two configurations: First, THz-induced fluorescence offers non-destructive and direct imaging of the THz field, providing real-time, single shot images. Second, we convert narrowband terahertz photons to infrared photons with 6% quantum efficiency allowing us to use nano-Watts of THz power to control micro-Watts of laser power on microsecond timescales. Exploiting hysteresis and a room-temperature phase transition in the response of the medium, we demonstrate a latching optical memory for sub pico-Joule THz pulses.

  15. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Ryo, E-mail: ishikawa@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lupini, Andrew R. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinuma, Yoyo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, 328 Ferris Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To fully understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation. - Highlights: • We theoretically demonstrate 3D near-atomic depth resolution imaging by large-angle illumination STEM. • This method can be useful to identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies within materials. • This method can be useful to determine reconstructed surface atomic structures.

  16. Fast Single Image Super Resolution Reconstruction via Image Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fast single image super resolution reconstruction (SRR approach via image separation has been proposed. Based on the assumption that the edges, corners, and textures in the image have different mathematical models, we apply different image SRR algorithms to process them individually. Thus, our approach is divided into three steps: 1 separating the given image into cartoon and texture subcomponent by nonlinear filter based image decomposition technique; 2 using improved local-self similarity model based algorithm to interpolate the cartoon subcomponent and the wavelet domain Hidden Markovian Tree (HMT model based algorithm to zoom the texture subcomponent; and 3 fusing the interpolated cartoon and texture subcomponents together to derive the recovered high-resolution images. Since the decomposition and super resolution algorithms in the proposed approach are mainly based on simple convolution and linear algebra computations, its efficiency can be guaranteed. Also, the simulated and real-life images experiments can validate the performance of our proposed algorithm when compared with some other state-of-the-art super-resolution approaches.

  17. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  18. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  19. Resolution enhancement in nonlinear photoacoustic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goy, Alexandre S.; Fleischer, Jason W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden St., Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Nonlinear processes can be exploited to gain access to more information than is possible in the linear regime. Nonlinearity modifies the spectra of the excitation signals through harmonic generation, frequency mixing, and spectral shifting, so that features originally outside the detector range can be detected. Here, we present an experimental study of resolution enhancement for photoacoustic imaging of thin metal layers immersed in water. In this case, there is a threshold in the excitation below which no acoustic signal is detected. Above threshold, the nonlinearity reduces the width of the active area of the excitation beam, resulting in a narrower absorption region and thus improved spatial resolution. This gain is limited only by noise, as the active area of the excitation can be arbitrarily reduced when the fluence becomes closer to the threshold. Here, we demonstrate a two-fold improvement in resolution and quantify the image quality as the excitation fluence goes through threshold.

  20. Super-resolution of facial images in forensics scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satiro, Joao; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Correia, Paulo;

    2015-01-01

    Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super-resolution......Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super...

  1. Imaging population transfer in atoms with ultrafast electron pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have made significant progress recently in investigating atomic-scale structural dynamics in gas-phase and condensed materials. With these advances, direct imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction is anticipated. We propose imaging a laser-driven coherent population transfer in lithium atoms by femtosecond ultrafast electron pulses. Valuable information and insight can be obtained from studying such a system in order to refine ultrafast electron techniques and to interpret experimental results. Adiabatic passage by level crossing is used to transfer the electron population from the 2 s to the 2 p state. Our simulations demonstrate the ability of ultrafast electron diffraction to image this population transfer, as the time-dependent diffraction images reflect the electronic motion in the scattering intensity and angular distribution. Furthermore, asymmetric diffraction patterns indicate that even the relative phases of the electronic wave function can be resolved, provided there is sufficient temporal resolution. This work has been supported in part by DOE Award No. DE-SC0012193 [H.-C.S.] and by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492 [A.F.S.].

  2. Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy through 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Demers, Hendrix; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride membranes can be used for windows of environmental chambers for in situ electron microscopy. We report that aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) achieved atomic resolution on gold nanoparticles placed on both sides of a 50-nm-thick silicon nitride membrane at 200 keV electron beam energy. Spatial frequencies of 1∕1.2 Å were visible for a beam semi-angle of 26.5 mrad. Imaging though a 100-nm-thick membrane was also tested. The achieved imaging c...

  3. Comparison of super-resolution benefits for downsampled images and real low-resolution data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Yuxi; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Gökberk, Berk; Veldhuis, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Recently, more and more researchers are exploring the benefits of super-resolution methods on low-resolution face recognition. However, often results presented are obtained on downsampled high-resolution face images. Because downsampled images are different from real images taken at low resolution,

  4. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Stolzenberg, U; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the $X$/$X_0$ imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of $X$/$X_0$ imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of ...

  5. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  6. Wavelet Domain Multidictionary Learning for Single Image Super-Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomin Wu; Jiulun Fan; Jian Xu; Yanzi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Image super-resolution (SR) aims at recovering the high-frequency (HF) details of a high-resolution (HR) image according to the given low-resolution (LR) image and some priors about natural images. Learning the relationship of the LR image and its corresponding HF details to guide the reconstruction of the HR image is needed. In order to alleviate the uncertainty in HF detail prediction, the HR and LR images are usually decomposed into 4 subbands after 1-level discrete...

  7. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.;

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  8. Imaging using lateral bending modes of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A.; Rabe, U.; Reinstädtler, M.; Turner, J. A.; Arnold, W.

    2004-12-01

    Using scanning probe techniques, surface properties such as shear stiffness and friction can be measured with a resolution in the nanometer range. The torsional deflection or buckling of atomic force microscope cantilevers has previously been used in order to measure the lateral forces acting on the tip. This letter shows that the flexural vibration modes of cantilevers oscillating in their width direction parallel to the sample surface can also be used for imaging. These lateral cantilever modes exhibit vertical deflection amplitudes if the cantilever is asymmetric in thickness direction, e.g., by a trapezoidal cross section.

  9. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm

  10. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  11. Computed tomography with selectable image resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computed tomography system x-ray detector has a central group of half-width detector elements and groups of full-width elements on each side of the central group. To obtain x-ray attenuation data for whole body layers, the half-width elements are switched effectively into paralleled pairs so all elements act like full-width elements and an image of normal resolution is obtained. For narrower head layers, the elements in the central group are used as half-width elements so resolution which is twice as great as normal is obtained. The central group is also used in the half-width mode and the outside groups are used in the full-width mode to obtain a high resolution image of a body zone within a full body layer. In one embodiment data signals from the detector are switched by electronic multiplexing and in another embodiment a processor chooses the signals for the various kinds of images that are to be reconstructed. (author)

  12. SINGLE IMAGE SUPER RESOLUTION IN SPATIAL AND WAVELET DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapan Naik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently single image super resolution is very important research area to generate high-resolution image from given low-resolution image. Algorithms of single image resolution are mainly based on wavelet domain and spatial domain. Filter’s support to model the regularity of natural images is exploited in wavelet domain while edges of images get sharp during up sampling in spatial domain. Here single image super resolution algorithm is presented which based on both spatial and wavelet domain and take the advantage of both. Algorithm is iterative and use back projection to minimize reconstruction error. Wavelet based denoising method is also introduced to remove noise.

  13. Resolution limits for wave equation imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-01

    Formulas are derived for the resolution limits of migration-data kernels associated with diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They are applicable to images formed by reverse time migration (RTM), least squares migration (LSM), and full waveform inversion (FWI), and suggest a multiscale approach to iterative FWI based on multiscale physics. That is, at the early stages of the inversion, events that only generate low-wavenumber resolution should be emphasized relative to the high-wavenumber resolution events. As the iterations proceed, the higher-resolution events should be emphasized. The formulas also suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low- and intermediate-wavenumber components of the velocity model not available in the primaries. Finally, diffractions can provide twice or better the resolution than specular reflections for comparable depths of the reflector and diffractor. The width of the diffraction-transmission wavepath is approximately λ at the diffractor location for the diffraction-transmission wavepath. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  15. Magnetospheric imaging with low-energy neutral atoms.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Global imaging of the magnetospheric charged particle population can be achieved by remote measurement of the neutral atoms produced when magnetospheric ions undergo charge exchange with cold exospheric neutral atoms. Previously suggested energetic neutral atom imagers were only able to measure neutral atoms with energies typically greater than several tens of keV. A laboratory prototype has been built and tested for a different type of space plasma neutral imaging instrument, which allows ne...

  16. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  17. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  18. Effects of spatial resolution ratio in image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Ehlers, M.; Usery, E.L.; Madden, M.

    2008-01-01

    In image fusion, the spatial resolution ratio can be defined as the ratio between the spatial resolution of the high-resolution panchromatic image and that of the low-resolution multispectral image. This paper attempts to assess the effects of the spatial resolution ratio of the input images on the quality of the fused image. Experimental results indicate that a spatial resolution ratio of 1:10 or higher is desired for optimal multisensor image fusion provided the input panchromatic image is not downsampled to a coarser resolution. Due to the synthetic pixels generated from resampling, the quality of the fused image decreases as the spatial resolution ratio decreases (e.g. from 1:10 to 1:30). However, even with a spatial resolution ratio as small as 1:30, the quality of the fused image is still better than the original multispectral image alone for feature interpretation. In cases where the spatial resolution ratio is too small (e.g. 1:30), to obtain better spectral integrity of the fused image, one may downsample the input high-resolution panchromatic image to a slightly lower resolution before fusing it with the multispectral image.

  19. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization. PMID:27310917

  20. The crystal structure of samarosporin I at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Axford, Danny; Evans, Gwyndaf; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2012-11-01

    The atomic resolution structures of samarosporin I have been determined at 100 and 293 K. This is the first crystal structure of a natural 15-residue peptaibol. The amino acid sequence in samarosporin I is identical to emerimicin IV and stilbellin I. Samarosporin is a peptide antibiotic produced by the ascomycetous fungus Samarospora rostrup and belongs to peptaibol subfamily 2. The structures at both temperatures are very similar to each other adopting mainly a 3₁₀-helical and a minor fraction of α-helical conformation. The helices are significantly bent and packed in an antiparallel fashion in the centered monoclinic lattice leaving among them an approximately 10-Å channel extending along the crystallographic twofold axis. Only two ordered water molecules per peptide molecule were located in the channel. Comparisons have been carried out with crystal structures of subfamily 2 16-residue peptaibols antiamoebin and cephaibols. The repercussion of the structural analysis of samarosporin on membrane function is discussed.

  1. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  2. Atomically resolved images of lithium purple bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinke, Melanie; Bienert, Robert; Waelsch, Michael; Podlich, Tatjana; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Jin, Rongying [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lousiana State University (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The lithium molybdenum purple bronze Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} is a quasi 1D metal at room temperature showing Luttinger liquid physics. The highly anisotropic conductivity runs along the crystallographic b axis where Mo-O chains, formed by the shared edges of the MoO{sub 6} octahedra, provide the electrical transport. Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} samples were investigated with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. By cleaving the samples at low temperatures (60 K) we obtained atomically resolved images of the surface. In these images the Mo-O chains are visible, which are covered by layers of MoO{sub 6} octahedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  3. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  4. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  5. Atomic-resolution studies of In2O3-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In2O3(ZnO)m (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In2O3(ZnO)30 were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of ∝1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In2O3(ZnO)30 were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In2O3(ZnO)m compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In3+ atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  6. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesh Kashyap; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha; B K Godwal

    2004-02-01

    X-ray holography is a new method of structure determination based on measurement of interference of a known reference wave with an unknown object wave (containing information on atomic sites scattering the reference wave) so that phase information is preserved. Unlike X-ray diffraction, it does not demand for translational periodicity in the material. It is based on the idea similar to that of optical holography and has been tested on crystals, quasicrystals, thin films and doped semiconductors for their structure determination. In order to analyse potentials and limitations of this technique, we have carried out theoretical simulation studies on simple structures. In this paper we describe the basic algorithm of hologram generation and reconstruction of atomic positions from generated data. We illustrate this technique using Fe (bcc) single crystal as sample case to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Simulations were carried out on the Cu (fcc) structure and on complex structure such as the Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal. Technical issues such as low signal to noise ratio, twin image problem etc have been discussed briefly to emphasize the need for high intensity X-ray source such as synchrotron for experiments and proper reconstruction algorithm. Finally the scope and potential of this technique have been discussed.

  7. Super-resolution photoacoustic fluctuation imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, Thomas; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    In deep tissue photoacoustic imaging, the spatial resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction. Moreover, as the ultrasound attenuation increases with frequency, resolution is often traded-off for penetration depth. Here we report on super-resolution photoacoustic imaging by use of multiple speckle illumination. Specifically, we show that the analysis of second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic images combined with image deconvolution enables resolving optically absorbing structures beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. A resolution increase of almost a factor 2 is demonstrated experimentally. Our method introduces a new framework that could potentially lead to deep tissue photoacoustic imaging with sub-acoustic resolution.

  8. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  9. High-resolution colorimetric imaging of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk; Cupitt, John; Saunders, David R.

    1993-05-01

    With the aim of providing a digital electronic replacement for conventional photography of paintings, a scanner has been constructed based on a 3000 X 2300 pel resolution camera which is moved precisely over a 1 meter square area. Successive patches are assembled to form a mosaic which covers the whole area at c. 20 pels/mm resolution, which is sufficient to resolve the surface textures, particularly craquelure. To provide high color accuracy, a set of seven broad-band interference filters are used to cover the visible spectrum. A calibration procedure based upon a least-mean-squares fit to the color of patches from a Macbeth Colorchecker chart yields an average color accuracy of better than 3 units in the CMC uniform color space. This work was mainly carried out as part of the VASARI project funded by the European Commission's ESPRIT program, involving companies and galleries from around Europe. The system is being used to record images for conservation research, for archival purposes and to assist in computer-aided learning in the field of art history. The paper will describe the overall system design, including the selection of the various hardware components and the design of controlling software. The theoretical basis for the color calibration methodology is described as well as the software for its practical implementation. The mosaic assembly procedure and some of the associated image processing routines developed are described. Preliminary results from the research will be presented.

  10. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  11. Gibbs artifact reduction for POCS super-resolution image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuangbai XIAO; Jing YU; Kaina SU

    2008-01-01

    The topic of super-resolution image reconstruc-tion has recently received considerable attention among the research community. Super-resolution image reconstruc-tion methods attempt to create a single high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution images (or a video sequence). The method of projections onto convex sets (POCS) for super-resolution image reconstruction attracts many researchers' attention. In this paper, we propose an improvement to reduce the amount of Gibbs artifacts pre-senting on the edges of the high-resolution image recon-structed by the POCS method. The proposed method weights the blur PSF centered at an edge pixel with an exponential function, and consequently decreases the coef-ficients of the PSF in the direction orthogonal to the edge. Experiment results show that the modification reduces effectively the visibility of Gibbs artifacts on edges and improves obviously the quality of the reconstructed high-resolution image.

  12. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation. PMID:27355699

  13. Sample preparation for atomic-resolution STEM at low voltages by FIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Miroslava, E-mail: mschaffer@SuperSTEM.org [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, George Holt Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Schaffer, Bernhard [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ramasse, Quentin [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, George Holt Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    While FIB sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy is a well established technique, few examples exist of samples of sufficient quality for atomic resolution imaging by aberration corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (STEM). In this work we demonstrate the successful preparation of such samples from five different materials and present the refined lift-out preparation technique, which was applied here. Samples with parallel surfaces and a general thickness between 20 and 40 nm over a range of several {mu}m were repeatedly prepared and analyzed by Cs-corrected STEM at 60 and 100 kV. Here, a novel 'wedge pre-milling' step helps to keep the protective surface layers intact during the whole milling process, allowing features close to or at the sample surface to be analyzed without preparation damage. Another example shows the cross-sectional preparation of a working thin film solar cell device to a final thickness of 10 to 20 nm over {mu}m sized areas in the region of interest, enabling atomic resolution imaging and elemental mapping across general grain boundaries without projection artefacts. All sample preparation has been carried out in modern Dual-Beam FIB microscopes capable of low-kV Ga{sup +} ion milling, but without additional preparation steps after the FIB lift-out procedure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suitability of stand-alone FIB preparation for atomic resolution STEM is shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reproducible preparation of 10-40 nm thick samples from 5 different materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-kV milling and adjusted procedure for crystalline, homogeneously thin specimen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wedge pre-milling to protect surface-near features.

  14. High resolution neutron imaging for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution neutron imaging system (NIS) is developed and tested on the OMEGA laser facility for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. This diagnostic uses a coded imaging technique with a high resolution neutron camera. Over the past few years, this detector was improved and neutron images can now be acquired on OMEGA with a 20 μm spatial resolution in the source plane and good signal to noise ratio with both a penumbral and an annular imaging technique. (authors)

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy of DNA: Atom-resolved imaging, general observations and possible contrast mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Youngquist, M. G.; Driscoll, R. J.; Coley, T. R.; Goddard, W. A.; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have shown that it is possible to image DNA with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), [R. J. Driscoll, M. G. Youngquist, and J. D. Baldeschwieler, Nature 346, 294 (1990)]. Here we describe that data together with our general observations on STM of DNA in ultrahigh vacuum. We also suggest a possible contrast mechanism for DNA imaging by STM based on wave function orthogonality requirements between a molecule and its substrate. Topographic images are presented which r...

  16. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, the same cloud can be imaged up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This paves the way towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  17. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  18. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  19. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  20. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, B.

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  1. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  2. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  3. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an instrument that collects remotely sensed data used by scientists for monitoring, modeling, and assessing the effects of natural processes and human actions on the Earth's surface. The continual calibration of the MODIS instruments, the refinement of algorithms used to create higher-level products, and the ongoing product validation make MODIS images a valuable time series (2000-present) of geophysical and biophysical land-surface measurements. Carried on two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites, MODIS acquires morning (EOS-Terra) and afternoon (EOS-Aqua) views almost daily. Terra data acquisitions began in February 2000 and Aqua data acquisitions began in July 2002. Land data are generated only as higher-level products, removing the burden of common types of data processing from the user community. MODIS-based products describing ecological dynamics, radiation budget, and land cover are projected onto a sinusoidal mapping grid and distributed as 10- by 10-degree tiles at 250-, 500-, or 1,000-meter spatial resolution. Some products are also created on a 0.05-degree geographic grid to support climate modeling studies. All MODIS products are distributed in the Hierarchical Data Format-Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS) file format and are available through file transfer protocol (FTP) or on digital video disc (DVD) media. Versions 4 and 5 of MODIS land data products are currently available and represent 'validated' collections defined in stages of accuracy that are based on the number of field sites and time periods for which the products have been validated. Version 5 collections incorporate the longest time series of both Terra and Aqua MODIS data products.

  4. Investigations of atomic configurations of 60° basal dislocations in wurtzite GaN film by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunjie; Wang, Yumei; Deng, Zhen; Chen, Hong; Ge, Binghui

    2016-04-01

    GaN epitaxial films grown on Si (111) substrates were observed using a 200 kV high-resolution (HR) transmission electron microscope. Both perfect and dissociated 60° basal dislocations were found in ? HR images. By utilizing the image deconvolution method, the HR images were transformed into structure maps with an improved resolution, and then the atomic configurations of perfect and partial dislocations were determined. Afterwards, the possible dissociation schemes for the dissociated dislocations were derived.

  5. Perceived Image Quality on Mobile Phones with Different Screen Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjie Zou; Jiarun Song; Fuzheng Yang

    2016-01-01

    The diverse display screen imposes significant challenges for assessing the perceptual media quality across different mobile devices. In this paper, the perceived image quality on different mobile phones is investigated. Firstly, subjective experiments for image quality evaluation are implemented on 9 popular mobile phones and a broadcast-quality monitor to evaluate the impact on perceived image quality regarding the screen resolution, screen size, image resolution, and image coding quality. ...

  6. Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Biedermann, C; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Graf, A; Gu, M F; Hill, K W; Barnsley, R

    2012-06-15

    The parameters of the ITER core plasmas will be measured using the Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), a high-resolution crystal spectrometer focusing on the L-shell spectra of highly ionized tungsten atoms. In order to correctly infer the plasma properties accurate atomic data are required. Here, some aspects of the underlying physics are discussed using experimental data and theoretical predictions from modeling.

  7. Single shot three-dimensional imaging of dilute atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sakmann, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    Light field microscopy methods together with three dimensional (3D) deconvolution can be used to obtain single shot 3D images of atomic clouds. We demonstrate the method using a test setup which extracts three dimensional images from a fluorescent $^{87}$Rb atomic vapor.

  8. Reproducing kernel hilbert space based single infrared image super resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangliang; Deng, Liangjian; Shen, Wei; Xi, Ning; Zhou, Zhanxin; Song, Bo; Yang, Yongliang; Cheng, Yu; Dong, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The spatial resolution of Infrared (IR) images is limited by lens optical diffraction, sensor array pitch size and pixel dimension. In this work, a robust model is proposed to reconstruct high resolution infrared image via a single low resolution sampling, where the image features are discussed and classified as reflective, cooled emissive and uncooled emissive based on infrared irradiation source. A spline based reproducing kernel hilbert space and approximative heaviside function are deployed to model smooth part and edge component of image respectively. By adjusting the parameters of heaviside function, the proposed model can enhance distinct part of images. The experimental results show that the model is applicable on both reflective and emissive low resolution infrared images to improve thermal contrast. The overall outcome produces a high resolution IR image, which makes IR camera better measurement accuracy and observes more details at long distance.

  9. Chemical Composition of Polymer Surfaces Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy and Complementary Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, G. Julius; Hillborg, Henrik; Schönherr, Holger

    2005-01-01

    In this article we review the recent developments in the field of high resolution lateral mapping of the surface chemical composition of polymers by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other complementary imaging techniques. The different AFM approaches toward nanometer scale mapping with chemical sen

  10. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microsc

  11. Sample Preparation and Imaging of Single Adenovirus Particle Using Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Yan; Li Chen, [Unknown; van Rosmalen, Mariska G M; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as a sophisticated imaging tool with nanoscale resolution, is widely used in virus research and the application of functional viral particles. To investigate single viruses by AFM in a physiologically relevant environment (liquid), an appropriate surface treatment to p

  12. Spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement of digital images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝鹏威; 徐冠华; 朱重光

    1999-01-01

    A general matrix formula is proposed for signal spectral aliasing of various or mutual resolution, the concept of spectral aliasing matrix is introduced, and some general spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement from multiframes of undersampled digital images are discussed. A simplified iterative method of parallel row-action projection for spectral de-aliasing is also given. The method can be applied to multiframe images with various spatial resolution,relative displacement, dissimilar point spread function, different image radiance, and additive random noise. Some experiments with a resolution test pattern and an image of vertical fin performed the convergence and the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  13. Active-Pixel Image Sensors With Programmable Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nakamura, Junichi; Matthies, Larry H.

    1996-01-01

    Active-pixel image sensors with programmable resolution proposed for use in applications in which speed and efficiency of processing of image data enhanced by providing those data at varying resolutions. Such applications include modeling of biological vision, stereoscopic range-finding, recognition of patterns, tracking targets, and progressive transmission of compressed images. In target-tracking application, sensor initially forms low-resolution image from which area of interest identified, then sensor set at high resolution for examination of identified area. Outputs of contiguous pixels combined. Sensor of this type made to act as though it comprised fewer and larger pixels.

  14. A simple model of molecular imaging with noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Curioni, Alessandro; Meyer, Gerhard

    2012-08-01

    Using functionalized tips, the atomic resolution of a single organic molecule can be achieved by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) operating in the regime of short-ranged repulsive Pauli forces. To theoretically describe the atomic contrast in such AFM images, we propose a simple model in which the Pauli repulsion is assumed to follow a power law as a function of the probed charge density. As the exponent in this power law is found to be largely independent of the sample molecule, our model provides a general method for simulating atomically resolved AFM images of organic molecules. For a single perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule imaged with a CO-terminated tip, we find excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our model eliminates the need to take into account the full tip and sample system and therefore reduces computational cost by three orders of magnitude.

  15. Imaging Atoms and Molecules with Strong Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Christopher

    We study multi-photon ionization of rare gas atoms and small molecules by infrared femtosecond laser pulses. We demonstrate that ionization is accurately described by a tunnelling model when many infrared photons are absorbed. By measuring photo-electron and photo-ion spectra, we show how the sub-Angstrom spatial resolution of tunnelling gives information about electron densities in the valence shell of atoms and molecules. The photo-electron and photo-ion momentum distributions are recorded with a velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer. We describe a tomographic method for imaging a 3-D momentum distribution of arbitrary symmetry using a 2-D VMI detector. We apply the method to measure the 3-D photo-electron distribution in elliptically polarized light. Using circularly polarized light, we show how the photo-electron momentum distribution can be used to measure the focused laser intensity with high precision. We demonstrate that the gradient of intensities present in a focused femtosecond pulse can be replaced by a single average intensity for a highly nonlinear process like multi-photon ionization. By studying photo-electron angular distributions over a range of laser parameters, we determine experimentally how the photon linear momentum is shared between the photo-electron, photo-ion and light field. We find the photo-electron carries only a portion of the total linear momentum absorbed. In addition we consider how angular momentum is shared in multi-photon ionization, and find the photo-electron receives all of the angular momentum absorbed. Our results demonstrate how optical and material properties influence the photo-electron spectrum in multi-photon ionization. These will have implications for molecular imaging using femtosecond laser pulses, and controlling the initial conditions of laser generated plasmas.

  16. Resolution and noise in ghost imaging with classical thermal light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jing; Han Shen-Sheng; Yan Yi-Jing

    2006-01-01

    The resolution and classical noise in ghost imaging with a classical thermal light are investigated theoretically. For ghost imaging with a Gaussian Schell model source, the dependences of the resolution and noise on the spatial coherence of the source and the aperture in the imaging system are discussed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations.The results show that an incoherent source and a large aperture will lead to a good image quality and small noise.

  17. Multiparametric atomic force microscopy imaging of single bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Trabelsi, Heykel; Soumillion, Patrice; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2013-01-01

    Force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool to simultaneously image the structure and map the biophysical properties of biological samples at the nanoscale. Traditionally, FD-based atomic force microscopy has been severely limited by its poor temporal and lateral resolutions. Here we report the use of advanced FD-based technology combined with biochemically sensitive tips to image filamentous bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria at unprecedented speed and resolution. Directly correlated multiparametric images of the structure, adhesion and elasticity of infected bacteria demonstrate that the sites of assembly and extrusion localize at the bacterial septum in the form of soft nanodomains surrounded by stiff cell wall material. The quantitative nano-bio-imaging method presented here offers a wealth of opportunities for mapping the physical properties and molecular interactions of complex biosystems, from viruses to tissues. PMID:24336094

  18. Multiparametric atomic force microscopy imaging of single bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Trabelsi, Heykel; Soumillion, Patrice; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool to simultaneously image the structure and map the biophysical properties of biological samples at the nanoscale. Traditionally, FD-based atomic force microscopy has been severely limited by its poor temporal and lateral resolutions. Here we report the use of advanced FD-based technology combined with biochemically sensitive tips to image filamentous bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria at unprecedented speed and resolution. Directly correlated multiparametric images of the structure, adhesion and elasticity of infected bacteria demonstrate that the sites of assembly and extrusion localize at the bacterial septum in the form of soft nanodomains surrounded by stiff cell wall material. The quantitative nano-bio-imaging method presented here offers a wealth of opportunities for mapping the physical properties and molecular interactions of complex biosystems, from viruses to tissues.

  19. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  20. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  1. Remote Sensing Image Resolution Enlargement Algorithm Based on Wavelet Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Azam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new image resolution enhancement algorithm based on cycle spinning and stationary wavelet subband padding. The proposed technique or algorithm uses stationary wavelet transformation (SWT to decompose the low resolution (LR image into frequency subbands. All these frequency subbands are interpolated using either bicubic or lanczos interpolation, and these interpolated subbands are put into inverse SWT process for generating intermediate high resolution (HR image. Finally, cycle spinning (CS is applied on this intermediate high resolution image for reducing blocking artifacts, followed by, traditional Laplacian sharpening filter is used to make the generated high resolution image sharper. This new technique has been tested on several satellite images. Experimental result shows that the proposed technique outperforms the conventional and the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error, entropy, as well as, visual perspective.

  2. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microscope enables a direct comparison between features observed in the fluorescence microscope and those observed in the images obtained with the AFM, in air or under liquid. The cracks in polymerized La...

  3. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in...

  4. Atomic resolution of nitrogen-doped graphene on Cu foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chundong; Schouteden, Koen; Wu, Qi-Hui; Li, Zhe; Jiang, Jianjun; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Atomic-level substitutional doping can significantly tune the electronic properties of graphene. Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the atomic-scale crystalline structure of graphene grown on polycrystalline Cu, the distribution of nitrogen dopants and their effect on the electronic properties of graphene were investigated. Both the graphene sheet growth and nitrogen doping were performed using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The results indicated that the nitrogen dopants preferentially sit at the grain boundaries of the graphene sheets and confirmed that plasma treatment is a potential method to incorporate foreign atoms into the graphene lattice to tailor the graphene’s electronic properties.

  5. Low temperature interdiffusion in the HgCdTe/CdTe system, studied at near-atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.; Ourmazd, A.; Feldman, R.D. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733 (US))

    1990-03-01

    By combining chemical lattice imaging and vector pattern recognition we determine, as a function of annealing temperature, the composition of individual atomic planes across each HgCdTe/CdTe interface of a multiquantum well stack. The resultant composition profiles, which directly reveal the chemical change across each interface at near atomic resolution, are analyzed in terms of linear and nonlinear diffusion theory, to deduce the interdiffusion coefficient and its activation energy. We find the interdiffusion coefficient to be nonlinear, and a sensitive function of the interface depth beneath the surface.

  6. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-09-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit.

  7. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  8. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F. [Danish National Research Foundation Center for Quantum Optics, Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-08-15

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  9. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds

  10. Improving spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy by super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Han; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Yun; Fan, Ying; Qiu, Lirong; Zhu, Ke

    2016-05-16

    A new super-resolution image restoration confocal Raman microscopy method (SRIR-RAMAN) is proposed for improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy. This method can recover the lost high spatial frequency of the confocal Raman microscopy by using Poisson-MAP super-resolution imaging restoration, thereby improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy and realizing its super-resolution imaging. Simulation analyses and experimental results indicate that the spatial resolution of SRIR-RAMAN can be improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm with the same confocal Raman microscopy system. This method can provide a new tool for high spatial resolution micro-probe structure detection in physical chemistry, materials science, biomedical science and other areas.

  11. Low-voltage coherent electron imaging based on a single-atom electron

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Wei-Tse; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Mu-Tung; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2015-01-01

    It has been a general trend to develop low-voltage electron microscopes due to their high imaging contrast of the sample and low radiation damage. Atom-resolved transmission electron microscopes with voltages as low as 15-40 kV have been demonstrated. However, achieving atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV is extremely difficult. An alternative approach is coherent imaging or phase retrieval imaging, which requires a sufficiently coherent source and an adequately small detection area on the sample as well as the detection of high-angle diffracted patterns with a sufficient resolution. In this work, we propose several transmission-type schemes to achieve coherent imaging of thin materials (less than 5 nm thick) with atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV. Experimental schemes of both lens-less and lens-containing designs are presented and the advantages and challenges of these schemes are discussed. Preliminary results based on a highly coherent single-atom electron source are presented. The ...

  12. Radiation damage free two-color X-ray ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Chapman, Henry; Shih, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) can enable diffractive structural determination of protein crystals or single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional X-ray analysis. However the electronic form factor could have been modified during the ultrashort X-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense X-ray pulse. For general X-ray imaging techniques, to minimize radiation damage effect is of major concern to ensure faithful reconstruction of the structure. Here we show that a radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with an atomic spatial resolution, by using X-ray parametric down-conversion (PDC), and two-color biphoton ghost imaging. We illustrate that formation of the diffractive patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that could be as fine as the lattice length scale of several Angstrom. Because the samples are illuminated by the optical photons of low energy, they can be free of radiation damage...

  13. Atomic-resolution STM structure of DNA and localization of the retinoic acid binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-molecule imaging by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) yields the atomic-resolution (0.6 A) structure of individual B-type DNA molecules. The strong correlation between these STM structures and those predicted from the known base sequence indicates that sequencing of single DNA molecules using STM may be feasible. There is excellent agreement between the STM and X-ray structures, but subtle differences exist due to radial distortions. We show that the interactions of other molecules with DNA, their binding configurations, and the structure of these complexes can be studied at the single-molecule level. The anti-cancer drug retinoic acid (RA) binds selectively to the minor groove of DNA with up to 6 RA molecules per DNA turn and with the plane of the RA molecule approximately parallel to the DNA symmetry axis. Similar studies for other drug molecules will be valuable in the a priori evaluation of the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs

  14. Light energy matching method in high-resolution image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Wang(王凌); Zhihai Xu(徐之海); Huajun Feng(冯华君); Ping Zhang(张平)

    2003-01-01

    Many approaches for high-resolution image reconstruction have been proposed in some literatures. One ofthe most commonly ways is to reconstruct a high-resolution image from a number of rotated and translatedimages with low resolution. In this process, the exposure difference among original images will decreasethe quality of the reconstructed image. In order to remove the influence of the exposure difference, alight energy matching method is proposed in this paper. The theoretical analysis is illustrated in details.Experimental results show that the theoretical analysis is correct and the proposed method is valid.

  15. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  16. Whole-animal imaging with high spatio-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2016-03-01

    We developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy in order to image fast cellular dynamics, such as cell movements in an entire developing embryo or neuronal activity throughput an entire brain or nervous system, with high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To achieve high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time, IsoView microscopy rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. In a post-processing step, these four views are then combined by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution to yield images with a system resolution of ≤ 450 nm in all three dimensions. Using IsoView microscopy, we performed whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila embryos and larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and at a temporal resolution of 2 Hz for up to 9 hours. We also performed whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish and multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across entire, gastrulating Drosophila embryos with isotropic, sub-cellular resolution. Compared with conventional (spatially anisotropic) light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, such as lattice lightsheet microscopy or diSPIM, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  17. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  18. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  19. Atomic resolution mapping of interfacial intermixing and segregation in InAs/GaSb superlattices: A correlative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Honggyu; Meng Yifei; Zuo Jianmin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA/INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, 19 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France); Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography (NUCAPT), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2013-03-14

    We combine quantitative analyses of Z-contrast images with composition analyses employing atom probe tomography (APT) correlatively to provide a quantitative measurement of atomic scale interfacial intermixing in an InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL). Contributions from GaSb and InAs in the Z-contrast images are separated using an improved image processing technique. Correlation with high resolution APT composition analyses permits an examination of interfacial segregation of both cations and anions and their incorporation in the short period InAs/GaSb SL. Results revealed short, intermediate, and long-range intermixing of In, Ga, and Sb during molecular beam epitaxial growth and their distribution in the SL.

  20. Atomic resolution tomography reconstruction of tilt series based on a GPU accelerated hybrid input-output algorithm using polar Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangwen; Gao, Wenpei; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yuan, Jiabin

    2015-02-01

    Advances in diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have greatly improved the prospect of three-dimensional (3D) structure reconstruction from two-dimensional (2D) images or diffraction patterns recorded in a tilt series at atomic resolution. Here, we report a new graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated iterative transformation algorithm (ITA) based on polar fast Fourier transform for reconstructing 3D structure from 2D diffraction patterns. The algorithm also applies to image tilt series by calculating diffraction patterns from the recorded images using the projection-slice theorem. A gold icosahedral nanoparticle of 309 atoms is used as the model to test the feasibility, performance and robustness of the developed algorithm using simulations. Atomic resolution in 3D is achieved for the 309 atoms Au nanoparticle using 75 diffraction patterns covering 150° rotation. The capability demonstrated here provides an opportunity to uncover the 3D structure of small objects of nanometers in size by electron diffraction.

  1. Nanoprobes for super-resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU ShangGuo; LIANG Le; DENG SuHui; CHEN JianFang; HUANG Qing; CHENG Ya; FAN ChunHai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with other imaging techniques,fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool to study cell biology due to its high compatibility with living cells.Owing to the resolution limit set by the diffraction of light,fluorescence microscopy could not resolve the nanostructures in the range of〈200 nm.Recently,many techniques have been emerged to overcome the diffraction barrier,providing nanometer spatial resolution.In the course of development,the progress in fluorescent probes has helped to promote the development of the high-resolution fluorescence nanoscopy.Here,we describe the contributions of the fluorescent probes to far-field super resolution imaging,focusing on concepts of the existing super-resolution nanoscopy based on the photophysics of fluorescent nanoprobes,like photoswitching,bleaching and blinking.Fluorescent probe technology is crucial in the design and implementation of super-resolution imaging methods.

  2. Multiframe Blind Super Resolution Imaging Based on Blind Deconvolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元伟; 张立毅

    2016-01-01

    As an ill-posed problem, multiframe blind super resolution imaging recovers a high resolution image from a group of low resolution images with some degradations when the information of blur kernel is limited. Note that the quality of the recovered image is influenced more by the accuracy of blur estimation than an advanced regularization. We study the traditional model of the multiframe super resolution and modify it for blind deblurring. Based on the analysis, we proposed two algorithms. The first one is based on the total variation blind deconvolution algorithm and formulated as a functional for optimization with the regularization of blur. Based on the alternating minimization and the gradient descent algorithm, the high resolution image and the unknown blur kernel are esti-mated iteratively. By using the median shift and add operator, the second algorithm is more robust to the outlier influence. The MSAA initialization simplifies the interpolation process to reconstruct the blurred high resolution image for blind deblurring and improves the accuracy of blind super resolution imaging. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority and accuracy of our novel algorithms.

  3. Super-resolution Restoration of Remote-sensing Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang-yang; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua; CHEN Hua; ZHANG Nan

    2006-01-01

    A novel image restoration scheme, which is super-resolution image restoration algorithm Poisson-maximum-afterword-probability based on Markvo constraint (MPMAP) combined with evaluating image detail parameter D, has been proposed. The advantage of super-resolution algorithm MPMAP incorporated with parameter D lies in the fact that super-resolution algorithm MPMAP model is discrete, which is in accordance with remote-sensing imaging model, and the algorithm MPMAP is proved applicable to linear and non-linear imaging models with a unique solution when noise is not severe. According to simulation experiments for practical images, super-resolution algorithm MPMAP can retain image details better than most of traditional restoration methods; at the same time, the proposed parameter D can help to identify real point spread function (PSF) value of degradation process. Processing result of practical remote-sensing images by MPMAP combined with parameter D are given, it illustrates that MPMAP restoration scheme combined PSF estimation has a better restoration result than that of Photoshop processing, based on the same original images. It is proved that the proposed scheme is helpful to offset the lack of resolution of the original remote-sensing images and has its extensive application foreground.

  4. Super-resolution Image Created from a Sequence of Images with Application of Character Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luiz de Almeida

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution techniques allow combine multiple images of the same scene to obtain an image with increased geometric and radiometric resolution, called super-resolution image. In this image are enhanced features allowing to recover important details and information. The objective of this work is to develop efficient algorithm, robust and automated fusion image frames to obtain a super-resolution image. Image registration is a fundamental step in combining several images that make up the scene. Our research is based on the determination and extraction of characteristics defined by the SIFT and RANSAC algorithms for automatic image registration. We use images containing characters and perform recognition of these characters to validate and show the effectiveness of our proposed method. The distinction of this work is the way to get the matching and merging of images because it occurs dynamically between elements common images that are stored in a dynamic matrix.

  5. Atomically Precise Surface Engineering for Producing Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    High-quality surface coatings, and techniques combining the atomic precision of molecular beam epitaxy and atomic layer deposition, to fabricate such high-quality surface coatings are provided. The coatings made in accordance with the techniques set forth by the invention are shown to be capable of forming silicon CCD detectors that demonstrate world record detector quantum efficiency (>50%) in the near and far ultraviolet (155 nm-300 nm). The surface engineering approaches used demonstrate the robustness of detector performance that is obtained by achieving atomic level precision at all steps in the coating fabrication process. As proof of concept, the characterization, materials, and exemplary devices produced are presented along with a comparison to other approaches.

  6. Temporal Super Resolution Enhancement of Echocardiographic Images Based on Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifani, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Haddadi, Farzan; Sani, Zahra Alizadeh; Shojaeifard, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    A challenging issue for echocardiographic image interpretation is the accurate analysis of small transient motions of myocardium and valves during real-time visualization. A higher frame rate video may reduce this difficulty, and temporal super resolution (TSR) is useful for illustrating the fast-moving structures. In this paper, we introduce a novel framework that optimizes TSR enhancement of echocardiographic images by utilizing temporal information and sparse representation. The goal of this method is to increase the frame rate of echocardiographic videos, and therefore enable more accurate analyses of moving structures. For the proposed method, we first derived temporal information by extracting intensity variation time curves (IVTCs) assessed for each pixel. We then designed both low-resolution and high-resolution overcomplete dictionaries based on prior knowledge of the temporal signals and a set of prespecified known functions. The IVTCs can then be described as linear combinations of a few prototype atoms in the low-resolution dictionary. We used the Bayesian compressive sensing (BCS) sparse recovery algorithm to find the sparse coefficients of the signals. We extracted the sparse coefficients and the corresponding active atoms in the low-resolution dictionary to construct new sparse coefficients corresponding to the high-resolution dictionary. Using the estimated atoms and the high-resolution dictionary, a new IVTC with more samples was constructed. Finally, by placing the new IVTC signals in the original IVTC positions, we were able to reconstruct the original echocardiography video with more frames. The proposed method does not require training of low-resolution and high-resolution dictionaries, nor does it require motion estimation; it does not blur fast-moving objects, and does not have blocking artifacts.

  7. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction with Spatiotemporal Resolution of Atomic Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Wen-Xi; ZHU Peng-Fei; WANG Xuan; NIE Shou-Hua; ZHANG Zhong-Chao; Clinite Rick; CAO Jian-Ming; SHENG Zheng-Ming; ZHANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a rapidly advancing technique capable of recording the atomic-detail structural dynamics in real time. We report the establishment of the first UED system in China. Employing this UED apparatus, both the coherent and the concurrent thermal lattice motions in an aluminium thin-film, trigged by ultrafast laser heating, have been observed. These results demonstrate its ability to directly measure a sub-milli-angstrom lattice spacing change on a sub-picosecond time scale.

  8. Image Resolution and Contrast Enhancement of Satellite Geographical Images with Removal of Noise using Wavelet Transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Prajakta P.; Manjare, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the technique for resolution and contrast enhancement of satellite geographical images based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and singular value decomposition (SVD) has been proposed. In this, the noise is added in the input low resolution and low contrast image. The median filter is used remove noise from the input image. This low resolution, low contrast image without noise is decomposed into four sub-bands by using DWT and SWT. The resol...

  9. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  10. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embyros (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) creates isotropic 3D imaging of tissue. Two approaches exist today: Wide-field OPT illuminates the entire sample and acquires projection images with a camera; Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) generates the projection with a moving laser beam and point detector. SLOT has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for tissue fluorescence imaging. Regardless the approach, traditional OPT has to compromise between the resolution and the depth of view. In traditional SLOT, the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging through a large volume specimen. We report using Bessel beam instead of Gaussian beam to perform SLOT. By illuminating samples with a narrow Bessel beam throughout an extended depth, high-resolution projection images can be measured in large volume. Under Bessel illumination, the projection image contains signal from annular-rings of the Bessel beam. Traditional inverse Radon transform of these projections will result in ringing artifacts in reconstructed imaging. Thus a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm is developed to perform tomography reconstructing of Bessel-illuminated projection images. The resulting 3D imaging is free of artifact and achieved cellular resolution in extended sample volume. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove Bessel SLOT a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  11. SUPER RESOLUTION FOR EGYPTSAT-1 IMAGES WITH ERRATIC SHIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Nasr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key point of the Super-Resolution (SR process is the accurate registration of the low resolution images, i.e., accurate measuring of the fixed shift between them, to obtain high resolution image. Due to certain malfunction, some Egyptsat-1 images have inconsistent sub-pixel shift. Therefore, in this study we propose a methodology to use this kind of shift for reconstructing a SR image of Egyptsat-1 from its low resolution bands. It is a trade-off between the capability of catching spatial details and the sensitivity to the erratic shift existed along the image. Firstly, this inconsistent shift between the bands is transformed into reliable shift. Then a SR method based on image fusion scheme with multi-resolution decomposition is performed. The fusion process is conducted in steerable wavelet domain using normalized convolution technique. It allows the recognition of objects with size approaching its limiting spatial resolution. Results show that the proposed methods make significant spatial resolution improvements from 7.8 to 4 m. Different quantitative measures of the proposed methodology were assessed and tested with some implemented commonly used SR methods. These methods are; nonparametric bayesian, POCS, iterative-interpolation, robust and iterated back projection. The visual and quantitative evaluations verify the usefulness and effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  12. Atomic resolution holography using advanced reconstruction techniques for two-dimensional detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, M; Szakal, A; Cser, L [Neutron Spectroscopy Department, Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Krexner, G [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schefer, J, E-mail: marko@szfki.h [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS), Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Atomic resolution holography is based on two concepts. Either the emitter of the radiation used is embedded in the sample (internal source concept) or, on account of the optical reciprocity law, the detector forms part of the sample (internal detector concept). In many cases, holographic objects (atoms and nuclei) simultaneously adopt the roles of both source and detector. Thus, the recorded image contains a mixture of both inside source and inside detector holograms. When reconstructing one type of hologram, the presence of the other hologram causes serious distortions. In the present work, we propose a new method, the so-called double reconstruction (DR), which not only suppresses the mutual distortions but also exploits the information content of the measured hologram more effectively. This novel approach also decreases the level of distortion arising from diffraction and statistical noise. The efficiency of the DR technique is significantly enhanced by employing two-dimensional (2D) area detectors. The power of the method is illustrated here by applying it to a real measurement on a palladium-hydrogen sample.

  13. Influence of imaging resolution on color fidelity in digital archiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchang; Toque, Jay Arre; Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Color fidelity is of paramount importance in digital archiving. In this paper, the relationship between color fidelity and imaging resolution was explored by calculating the color difference of an IT8.7/2 color chart with a CIELAB color difference formula for scanning and simulation images. Microscopic spatial sampling was used in selecting the image pixels for the calculations to highlight the loss of color information. A ratio, called the relative imaging definition (RID), was defined to express the correlation between image resolution and color fidelity. The results show that in order for color differences to remain unrecognizable, the imaging resolution should be at least 10 times higher than the physical dimension of the smallest feature in the object being studied.

  14. Heisenberg scaling of imaging resolution by coherent enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Yoder, Theodore J; Bruzewicz, Colin D; Chuang, Isaac L; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Classical imaging works by scattering photons from an object to be imaged, and achieves resolution scaling as $1/\\sqrt{t}$, with $t$ the imaging time. By contrast, the laws of quantum mechanics allow one to utilize quantum coherence to obtain imaging resolution that can scale as quickly as $1/t$ -- the so-called "Heisenberg limit." However, ambiguities in the obtained signal often preclude taking full advantage of this quantum enhancement, while imaging techniques designed to be unambiguous often lose this optimal Heisenberg scaling. Here, we demonstrate an imaging technique which combines unambiguous detection of the target with Heisenberg scaling of the resolution. We also demonstrate a binary search algorithm which can efficiently locate a coherent target using the technique, resolving a target trapped ion to within 3% of the $1/e^2$ diameter of the excitation beam.

  15. Imaging columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen with sub angstrom resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported that lattice imaging with a 300 kV field emission microscope in combination with numerical reconstruction procedures can be used to reach an interpretable resolution of about 80 pm for the first time. A retrieval of the electron exit wave from focal series allows for the resolution of single atomic columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at a projected nearest neighbor spacing down to 85 pm. Lens aberrations are corrected on-line during the experiment and by hardware such that resulting image distortions are below 80 pm. Consequently, the imaging can be aberration-free to this extent. The resolution enhancement results from increased electrical and mechanical stability's of the instrument coupled with a low spherical aberration coefficient of 0.595 + 0.005 mm

  16. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  17. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  18. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels;

    2013-01-01

    . The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static...

  19. Virtual microscope interface to high resolution histological images

    OpenAIRE

    Feit, Josef; Matyska, Luděk; Ulman, Vladimír; HEJTMÁNEK, Lukáš; Jedličková, Hana; Ježová, Marta; Moulis, Mojmír; Feitová, Věra

    2008-01-01

    The Hypertext atlas of Dermatopathology, the Atlas of Fetal and Neonatal Pathology and Hypertext atlas of Pathology (this one in Czech only) are available at . These atlases offer many clinical, macroscopic and microscopic images, together with short introductory texts. Most of the images are annotated and arrows pointing to the important parts of the image can be activated. The Virtual Microscope interface is used for the access to the histological images obtained in high resolution using au...

  20. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  1. Left-handed metamaterial coatings for subwavelength-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J; Pastor, David; Martínez, Luis E; Miret, Juan J

    2012-09-01

    We report on a procedure to improve the resolution of far-field imaging by using a neighboring high-index medium that is coated with a left-handed metamaterial. The resulting plot can also exhibit an enhanced transmission by considering proper conditions to retract backscattering. Based on negative refraction, geometrical aberrations are considered in detail since they may cause a great impact in this sort of diffraction-unlimited imaging by reducing its resolution power. We employ a standard aberration analysis to refine the asymmetric configuration of metamaterial superlenses. We demonstrate that low-order centrosymmetric aberrations can be fully corrected for a given object plane. For subwavelength-resolution imaging, however, high-order aberrations become of relevance, which may be balanced with defocus. Not only the point spread function but also numerical simulations based on the finite-element method support our theoretical analysis, and subwavelength resolution is verified in the image plane.

  2. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  3. Land Cover Semantic Annotation Derived from High Resolution SAR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Dumitru, Corneliu Octavian; Schwarz, Gottfried; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Users of remote sensing images analyzing land cover characteristics are very much interested in classification schemes that define a consistent set of target categories. Up to now, a number of established classification schemes are mainly being used by interpreters of medium-resolution optical satellite image focusing on large-scale land cover. In contrast, we concentrate in this publication on the definition of a new classification scheme for high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (S...

  4. Atomic torsional modal analysis for high-resolution proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirion, Monique M.; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a formulation for normal mode analyses of globular proteins that significantly improves on an earlier one-parameter formulation [M. M. Tirion, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1905 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.1905] that characterized the slow modes associated with protein data bank structures. Here we develop that empirical potential function that is minimized at the outset to include two features essential to reproduce the eigenspectra and associated density of states in the 0 to 300 cm-1 frequency range, not merely the slow modes. First, introduction of preferred dihedral-angle configurations via use of torsional stiffness constants eliminates anomalous dispersion characteristics due to insufficiently bound surface side chains and helps fix the spectrum thin tail frequencies (100-300 cm-1 ). Second, we take into account the atomic identities and the distance of separation of all pairwise interactions, improving the spectrum distribution in the 20 to 300 cm-1 range. With these modifications, not only does the spectrum reproduce that of full atomic potentials, but we obtain stable reliable eigenmodes for the slow modes and over a wide range of frequencies.

  5. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Rakhshan

    2014-01-01

    Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs.

  6. Marvels of enzyme catalysis at true atomic resolution: distortions, bond elongations, hidden flips, protonation states and atom identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Piotr; Tittmann, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Although general principles of enzyme catalysis are fairly well understood nowadays, many important details of how exactly the substrate is bound and processed in an enzyme remain often invisible and as such elusive. In fortunate cases, structural analysis of enzymes can be accomplished at true atomic resolution thus making possible to shed light on otherwise concealed fine-structural traits of bound substrates, intermediates, cofactors and protein groups. We highlight recent structural studies of enzymes using ultrahigh-resolution X-ray protein crystallography showcasing its enormous potential as a tool in the elucidation of enzymatic mechanisms and in unveiling fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. We discuss the observation of seemingly hyper-reactive, physically distorted cofactors and intermediates with elongated scissile substrate bonds, the detection of 'hidden' conformational and chemical equilibria and the analysis of protonation states with surprising findings. In delicate cases, atomic resolution is required to unambiguously disclose the identity of atoms as demonstrated for the metal cluster in nitrogenase. In addition to the pivotal structural findings and the implications for our understanding of enzyme catalysis, we further provide a practical framework for resolution enhancement through optimized data acquisition and processing.

  7. Preparation of cell membranes for high resolution imaging by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cell membrane structure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been limited because of the softness of cell membranes. Here, we utilize a new technique of sample preparation to lay red blood cell membranes on the top of a mica surface to obtain high resolution images by in-situ AFM on both sides of cell membranes. Our results indicate that the location of oligosaccharides and proteins in red blood cell membranes might be different from the current membrane model. The inner membrane leaflet is covered by dense proteins with fewer free lipids than expected. In contrast, the outer membrane leaflet is quite smooth; oligosaccharides and peptides supposed to protrude out of the outer membrane leaflet surface might be actually hidden in the middle of hydrophilic lipid heads; transmembrane proteins might form domains in the membranes revealed by PNGase F and trypsin digestion. Our result could be significant to interpret some functions about red blood cell membranes and guide to heal the blood diseases related to cell membranes.

  8. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related m...

  9. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  10. GravityCam: Higher Resolution Visible Wide-Field Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Craig; Steele, Iain

    2016-01-01

    The limits to the angular resolution achievable with conventional ground-based telescopes are unchanged over 70 years. Atmospheric turbulence limits image quality to typically ~1 arcsec in practice. We have developed a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument called GravityCam capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. The acquisition of visible images at high speed without significant noise penalty has been made possible by advances in optical and near IR imaging technologies. Images are recorded at high speed and then aligned before combination and can yield a 3-5 fold improvement in image resolution. Very wide survey fields are possible with widefield telescope optics. We describe GravityCam and detail its application to accelerate greatly the rate of detection of Earth size planets by gravitational microlensing. GravityCam will also improve substantially the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant...

  11. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  12. Quantifying and containing the curse of high resolution coronal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Delouille

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Future missions such as Solar Orbiter (SO, InterHelioprobe, or Solar Probe aim at approaching the Sun closer than ever before, with on board some high resolution imagers (HRI having a subsecond cadence and a pixel area of about (80 km2 at the Sun during perihelion. In order to guarantee their scientific success, it is necessary to evaluate if the photon counts available at these resolution and cadence will provide a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR.

    For example, if the inhomogeneities in the Quiet Sun emission prevail at higher resolution, one may hope to locally have more photon counts than in the case of a uniform source. It is relevant to quantify how inhomogeneous the quiet corona will be for a pixel pitch that is about 20 times smaller than in the case of SoHO/EIT, and 5 times smaller than TRACE.

    We perform a first step in this direction by analyzing and characterizing the spatial intermittency of Quiet Sun images thanks to a multifractal analysis. We identify the parameters that specify the scale-invariance behavior. This identification allows next to select a family of multifractal processes, namely the Compound Poisson Cascades, that can synthesize artificial images having some of the scale-invariance properties observed on the recorded images.

    The prevalence of self-similarity in Quiet Sun coronal images makes it relevant to study the ratio between the SNR present at SoHO/EIT images and in coarsened images. SoHO/EIT images thus play the role of "high resolution" images, whereas the "low-resolution" coarsened images are rebinned so as to simulate a smaller angular resolution and/or a larger distance to the Sun. For a fixed difference in angular resolution and in Spacecraft-Sun distance, we determine the proportion of pixels having a SNR preserved at high resolution given a particular increase in effective area. If scale-invariance continues to prevail at smaller scales, the conclusion reached

  13. Facial Image Super Resolution Using Weighted Patch Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Moallem

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A challenging field in image processing and computer graphics is to have higher frequency details by super resolving facial images. Unlike similar papers in this field, this paper introduces a practical face hallucinating approach with higher quality output images. The image reconstruction was based on a set of high and low resolution image pairs. Each image is divided into defined patches with overlapped regions. A patch from a defined location is removed from the low resolution (LR input image and is compared with the LR patches of the training images with the same location. Each defined LR patch has a defined high resolution (HR patch. Based on the Euclidean distance comparison, each patch of every single image in the training images database receives a specific weight. This weight is transferred to its relevant HR patch identically. The sum of the gained weights for one specific location of a patch is equal to unity. The HR output image is constructed by integrating the HR hallucinated patches.

  14. ATMAN: Atomic Torsional Modal Analysis for high-resolution proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Tirion, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a formulation for normal mode analyses of globular proteins that significantly improves on an earlier, 1-parameter formulation \\cite{tirion96} that characterized the slow modes associated with protein data bank structures. Here we develop that empirical potential function which is minimized at the outset to include two features essential to reproduce the eigenspectra and associated density of states over all frequencies, not merely the slow ones. First, introduction of preferred dihedral-angle configurations via use of torsional stiffness constants eliminates anomalous dispersion characteristics due to insufficiently bound surface sidechains. Second, we take into account the atomic identities and the distance of separation of all pairwise interactions. With these modifications we obtain stable, reliable eigenmodes over a wide range of frequencies.

  15. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  16. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  17. Spatial Resolution Characterization for AWiFS Multispectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the spatial resolution of the AWiFS multispectral images characterized by an estimation of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency. The contents include: 1) MTF Analysis; 2) Target Analysis; 3) "Pulse Target"; 4) "Pulse" Method; 5) Target Images; 6) Bridge Profiles; 7) MTF Calculation; 8) MTF Results; and 9) Results Summary.

  18. Image Super-Resolution Using Deep Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Loy, Chen Change; He, Kaiming; Tang, Xiaoou

    2016-02-01

    We propose a deep learning method for single image super-resolution (SR). Our method directly learns an end-to-end mapping between the low/high-resolution images. The mapping is represented as a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that takes the low-resolution image as the input and outputs the high-resolution one. We further show that traditional sparse-coding-based SR methods can also be viewed as a deep convolutional network. But unlike traditional methods that handle each component separately, our method jointly optimizes all layers. Our deep CNN has a lightweight structure, yet demonstrates state-of-the-art restoration quality, and achieves fast speed for practical on-line usage. We explore different network structures and parameter settings to achieve trade-offs between performance and speed. Moreover, we extend our network to cope with three color channels simultaneously, and show better overall reconstruction quality. PMID:26761735

  19. Image Super-Resolution Using Deep Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Loy, Chen Change; He, Kaiming; Tang, Xiaoou

    2016-02-01

    We propose a deep learning method for single image super-resolution (SR). Our method directly learns an end-to-end mapping between the low/high-resolution images. The mapping is represented as a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that takes the low-resolution image as the input and outputs the high-resolution one. We further show that traditional sparse-coding-based SR methods can also be viewed as a deep convolutional network. But unlike traditional methods that handle each component separately, our method jointly optimizes all layers. Our deep CNN has a lightweight structure, yet demonstrates state-of-the-art restoration quality, and achieves fast speed for practical on-line usage. We explore different network structures and parameter settings to achieve trade-offs between performance and speed. Moreover, we extend our network to cope with three color channels simultaneously, and show better overall reconstruction quality.

  20. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit. PMID:27640808

  1. Neutron radiography and its image resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron radiography (NR) is widely applied especially for non-destructive inspection of industrial products. An outline of NR technique is given in this report with few examples of industrial applications. The quality of a NR image depends on many factors. The values of L, D, and L/D are main factors to define a geometrical unsharpness of NR images. A device for accurate measurements of those parameters is proposed and fabricated. Degree of confidence is estimated for measurements of those parameters in detail. Values of L, D, and L/D are measured for our NR facilities with different geometrical conditions by use of the device and the values are compared to the designed values. The quality of the NR image also depends on an inherent unsharpness of its imaging device. The inherent unsharpness is measured as an edge spread function (ESF) and a modulation transfer function (MTF) is derived from the ESF with a technique of the discrete fast Fourier transform (DFFT). Results are compared to theoretically calculated MTF. (author)

  2. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  3. Edge Effects and Coupling Effects in Atomic Force Microscope Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiang-jun; MENGYong-gang; WENShi-zhu

    2004-01-01

    The AFM images were obtained by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and transformed from the deformation of AFM micro cantilever probe. However, due to the surface topography and surface forces applied on the AFM tip of sample, the deformation of AFM probe results in obvious edge effects and coupling effects in the AFM images. The deformation of AFM probe was analyzed,the mechanism of the edge effects and the coupling effects was investigated, and their results in the AFM images were studied. It is demanstrated by the theoretical analysis and AFM experiments that the edge effects make lateral force images more clear than the topography images, also make extraction of frictional force force from lateral force images mare complex and difficult. While the coupling effects make the comparison between topography images and lateral force images mare advantage to acquire precise topography information by AFM.

  4. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  5. Automatic Matching of High Resolution Satellite Images Based on RFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JI Shunping

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A matching method for high resolution satellite images based on RFM is presented.Firstly,the RFM parameters are used to predict the initial parallax of corresponding points and the prediction accuracy is analyzed.Secondly,the approximate epipolar equation is constructed based on projection tracking and its accuracy is analyzed.Thirdly,approximate 1D image matching is executed on pyramid images and least square matching on base images.At last RANSAC is imbedded to eliminate mis-matching points and matching results are obtained.Test results verified the method more robust and with higher matching rate,compared to 2D gray correlation method and the popular SIFT matching method,and the method preferably solved the question of high resolution satellite image matching with different stereo model,different time and large rotation images.

  6. High spectral resolution airborne short wave infrared hyperspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liqing; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    Short Wave InfraRed(SWIR) spectral imager is good at detecting difference between materials and penetrating fog and mist. High spectral resolution SWIR hyperspectral imager plays a key role in developing earth observing technology. Hyperspectral data cube can help band selections that is very important for multispectral imager design. Up to now, the spectral resolution of many SWIR hyperspectral imagers is about 10nm. A high sensitivity airborne SWIR hyperspectral imager with narrower spectral band will be presented. The system consists of TMA telescope, slit, spectrometer with planar blazed grating and high sensitivity MCT FPA. The spectral sampling interval is about 3nm. The IFOV is 0.5mrad. To eliminate the influence of the thermal background, a cold shield is designed in the dewar. The pixel number of spatial dimension is 640. Performance measurement in laboratory and image analysis for flight test will also be presented.

  7. An Effective Multi-Frame Super Resolution of Image from Blurry and Noisy Images Using PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati A. Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution are techniques aiming restoration of a high-resolution image from one or several low-resolution observation images, which offer the advantages overcoming some of the inherent resolution limitations of low-cost imaging sensors (e.g., satellite image, cell phone, camera’s or surveillance camera’s, and allow better utilization of the growing capability and noise free image of HR displays. Conventional image super-resolution approaches normally require multiple LR inputs of the same scene with sub-pixel motions. This paper attempts to undertake the study of the super-resolution restoration problem and improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy images. The super-resolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the filters such as Median Filter, Adaptive Wiener Filter, Gaussian Filter these different noise densities have been removed between 10% to 65%. The Principal Component analysis (PCA is the technique which is useful for improving the image sharpness after the process of de-blurring

  8. Texture analysis of high-resolution FLAIR images for TLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the texture information of high-resolution FLAIR images of the brain with the aim of determining the abnormality and consequently the candidacy of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery. Intensity and volume features of the hippocampus from FLAIR images of the brain have been previously shown to be useful in detecting the abnormal hippocampus in TLE. However, the small size of the hippocampus may limit the texture information. High-resolution FLAIR images show more details of the abnormal intensity variations of the hippocampi and therefore are more suitable for texture analysis. We study and compare the low and high-resolution FLAIR images of six epileptic patients. The hippocampi are segmented manually by an expert from T1-weighted MR images. Then the segmented regions are mapped on the corresponding FLAIR images for texture analysis. The 2-D wavelet transforms of the hippocampi are employed for feature extraction. We compare the ability of the texture features from regular and high-resolution FLAIR images to distinguish normal and abnormal hippocampi. Intracranial EEG results as well as surgery outcome are used as gold standard. The results show that the intensity variations of the hippocampus are related to the abnormalities in the TLE.

  9. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrate a quantum gas microscopy using the Faraday effect which has an inherently non-destructive nature. The observed Faraday rotation angle reaches 3.0(2) degrees for a single atom. We reveal the non-destructive feature of this Faraday imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal strength with that of the photon scattering rate. We determine the atom distribution with deconvolution analysis. We also demonstrate the absorption and the dark field Faraday imaging, and reveal the different shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by theoretical analysis. Our result is an important first step towards an ultimate quantum non-demolition site-resolved imaging and furthermore opens up the possibilities for quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with a single-site resolution.

  10. A True Multi-modality Approach for High Resolution Optical Imaging: Photo-Magnetic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Luk, Alex T.; Ha, Seunghoon; Nouizi, Farouk; Thayer, David; Lin, Yuting; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging leverages the competitive advantage of different imaging systems to improve the overall resolution and quantitative accuracy. Our new technique, Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI) is one of these true multi-modality imaging approaches, which can provide quantitative optical absorption map at MRI spatial resolution. PMI uses laser light to illuminate tissue and elevate its temperature while utilizing MR thermometry to measure the laser-induced temperature variation with high s...

  11. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively.

  12. High resolution surface plasmon microscopy for cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoul, F.; Monier, K.; Roland, T.; Elezgaray, J.; Berguiga, L.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new non-labeling high resolution microscopy method for cellular imaging. This method called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) pushes down the resolution limit of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) to sub-micronic scales. High resolution SPRi is obtained by the surface plasmon lauching with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The advantages of SPPM compared to other high resolution SPRi's rely on three aspects; (i) the interferometric detection of the back reflected light after plasmon excitation, (ii) the twodimensional scanning of the sample for image reconstruction, (iii) the radial polarization of light, enhancing both resolution and sensitivity. This microscope can afford a lateral resolution of - 150 nm in liquid environment and - 200 nm in air. We present in this paper images of IMR90 fibroblasts obtained with SSPM in dried environment. Internal compartments such as nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, cellular and nuclear membrane can be recognized without labelling. We propose an interpretation of the ability of SSPM to reveal high index contrast zones by a local decomposition of the V (Z) function describing the response of the SSPM.

  13. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions. PMID:27354178

  14. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as "Einstein Rings" in high resolution images. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope $\\gamma'$ of the...

  15. Super Resolution from Hyperview Image Stack by Spatial Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2016-09-01

    An image stack for a hyperview representation could contain millions of different perspective views with extreme image similarity. The recording of all views from a computational 3d model implicates a lateral displacement of the virtual camera. Because of the huge number of views, the offset in between two adjoining camera positions can be very minor. If such a virtual setup reproduces a real hyperview screen setup, the offset can be below the wavelength of the visible light. But even with such small changes, there is an intrinsic probability for a measurable difference in between two neighbour images. Such image dissimilarity can be proofed successfully also in very basic 3d scenes. By using a quantity of juxtapositional images from the hyperview image stack, the resolution of the rendered images can be considerably improved, which is commonly known as super resolution. The utilisation of super resolution images in hyperview could cut the necessity of full frame computing and will reduce the effective render time.

  16. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  17. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency.

  18. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rakhshan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs.

  19. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rakhshan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs.

  20. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs. PMID:25469352

  1. Photoelectron imaging, probe of the dynamics: from atoms... to clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concerns the study of the deexcitation of clusters and atoms by photoelectron imaging. The first part is dedicated to thermionic emission of a finite size system. A 3-dimensional imaging setup allows us to measure the time evolution of the kinetic energy spectrum of electrons emitted from different clusters (Wn-, Cn-, C60). Then we have a direct access to the fundamental quantities which characterize this statistical emission: the temperature of the finite heat bath and the decay rate. The second part concerns the ionization of atomic Rydberg states placed in a static electric field. We performed the first experiment of photoionization microscopy which allows us to obtain a picture which is the macroscopic projection of the electronic wave function. Then we have access to the detail of the photoionization and particularly to the quantum properties of the electron usually confined at the atomic scale. (author)

  2. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Terence T W; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Tang, Matthew Y H; Robles, Joseph D F; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C S; Tang, Anson H L; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Godfrey C F; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity- a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry- permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individu...

  3. Super-resolution imaging based on virtual Airy spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Guo, Cheng; Cui, Junning; Wu, Qun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the theoretical model of Airy spot, a method is proposed for improving the imaging speed from confocal microscopy. The virtual Airy spot is designed for obtaining the pattern on CCD at detecting plane. Here the size of the spot is determined by the parameters of imaging system and intensity data from point detector, which can receive data quicker than CCD. The treatment can improve the speed of imaging comparing with CCD at receiving end. The virtual structured detection is also utilized for generating high-resolution image. Some numerical simulation results are provided for demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  4. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces. PMID:26605698

  5. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm;

    2014-01-01

    work describes a method to automatically estimate the atomic structure in two-dimensional materials. As an example graphene is chosen, in which the positions of the carbon atoms are reconstructed. Lattice parameters are extracted in the frequency domain and an initial atom positioning is estimated....... Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  6. High Resolution Linear Polarimetric Imaging for the Event Horizon Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chael, Andrew A; Narayan, Ramesh; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Wardle, John F C; Bouman, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Images of the linear polarization of synchrotron radiation around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identify their projected magnetic field lines and provide key data for understanding the physics of accretion and outflow from supermassive black holes. The highest resolution polarimetric images of AGN are produced with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Because VLBI incompletely samples the Fourier transform of the source image, any image reconstruction that fills in unmeasured spatial frequencies will not be unique and reconstruction algorithms are required. In this paper, we explore extensions of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to linear polarimetric VLBI imaging. In contrast to previous work, our polarimetric MEM algorithm combines a Stokes I imager that uses only bispectrum measurements that are immune to atmospheric phase corruption with a joint Stokes Q and U imager that operates on robust polarimetric ratios. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique on 7- and 3-mm wavelength quasar observat...

  7. High Speed and High Resolution Table-Top Nanoscale Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, G K; Demmler, S; HÄdrich, S; Wahyutama, I; Steinert, M; Spielmann, C; ZÜrch, M; TÜnnermann, A; Limpert, J; Rothhardt, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a table-top coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiment based on high-order harmonics generated at 18 nm by a high average power femtosecond fiber laser system. The high photon flux, narrow spectral bandwidth and high degree of spatial coherence allow for ultra-high sub-wavelength resolution imaging at a high numerical aperture. Our experiments demonstrate a half-pitch resolution of 13.6 nm, very close to the actual Abbe-limit of 12.4 nm, which is the highest resolution achieved from any table-top XUV or X-ray microscope. In addition, 20.5 nm resolution was achieved with only 3 sec of integration time bringing live diffraction imaging and 3D tomography on the nanoscale one step closer to reality. The current resolution is solely limited by the wavelength and the detector size. Thus, table-top nanoscopes with only a few-nm resolutions are in reach and will find applications in many areas of science and technology.

  8. Demosaiced pixel super-resolution for multiplexed holographic color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yibo; Luo, Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize a holographic color image, one can sequentially take three holograms at different wavelengths, e.g., at red (R), green (G) and blue (B) parts of the spectrum, and digitally merge them. To speed up the imaging process by a factor of three, a Bayer color sensor-chip can also be used to demultiplex three wavelengths that simultaneously illuminate the sample and digitally retrieve individual set of holograms using the known transmission spectra of the Bayer color filters. However, because the pixels of different channels (R, G, B) on a Bayer color sensor are not at the same physical location, conventional demosaicing techniques generate color artifacts in holographic imaging using simultaneous multi-wavelength illumination. Here we demonstrate that pixel super-resolution can be merged into the color de-multiplexing process to significantly suppress the artifacts in wavelength-multiplexed holographic color imaging. This new approach, termed Demosaiced Pixel Super-Resolution (D-PSR), generates color images that are similar in performance to sequential illumination at three wavelengths, and therefore improves the speed of holographic color imaging by 3-fold. D-PSR method is broadly applicable to holographic microscopy applications, where high-resolution imaging and multi-wavelength illumination are desired. PMID:27353242

  9. Demosaiced pixel super-resolution for multiplexed holographic color imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yibo; Luo, Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize a holographic color image, one can sequentially take three holograms at different wavelengths, e.g., at red (R), green (G) and blue (B) parts of the spectrum, and digitally merge them. To speed up the imaging process by a factor of three, a Bayer color sensor-chip can also be used to demultiplex three wavelengths that simultaneously illuminate the sample and digitally retrieve individual set of holograms using the known transmission spectra of the Bayer color filters. However, because the pixels of different channels (R, G, B) on a Bayer color sensor are not at the same physical location, conventional demosaicing techniques generate color artifacts in holographic imaging using simultaneous multi-wavelength illumination. Here we demonstrate that pixel super-resolution can be merged into the color de-multiplexing process to significantly suppress the artifacts in wavelength-multiplexed holographic color imaging. This new approach, termed Demosaiced Pixel Super-Resolution (D-PSR), generates color images that are similar in performance to sequential illumination at three wavelengths, and therefore improves the speed of holographic color imaging by 3-fold. D-PSR method is broadly applicable to holographic microscopy applications, where high-resolution imaging and multi-wavelength illumination are desired.

  10. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  11. Towards an automatic tool for resolution evaluation of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, J. E. E. [FUMEC, Av. Alfonso Pena 3880, CEP 30130-009 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: juliae@fumec.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Quality of Mammographies from the Public and Private Services of the State. With an essentially educational character, an evaluation of the image quality is monthly held from a breast phantom in each mammographic equipment. In face of this, this work proposes to develop a protocol for automatic evaluation of image quality of mammograms so that the radiological protection and image quality requirements are met in the early detection of breast cancer. Specifically, image resolution will be addressed and evaluated, as a part of the program of image quality evaluation. Results show that for the fourth resolution and using 28 phantom images with the ground truth settled, the computer analysis of the resolution is promising and may be used as a tool for the assessment of the image quality. (Author)

  12. Towards an automatic tool for resolution evaluation of mammographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality of Mammographies from the Public and Private Services of the State. With an essentially educational character, an evaluation of the image quality is monthly held from a breast phantom in each mammographic equipment. In face of this, this work proposes to develop a protocol for automatic evaluation of image quality of mammograms so that the radiological protection and image quality requirements are met in the early detection of breast cancer. Specifically, image resolution will be addressed and evaluated, as a part of the program of image quality evaluation. Results show that for the fourth resolution and using 28 phantom images with the ground truth settled, the computer analysis of the resolution is promising and may be used as a tool for the assessment of the image quality. (Author)

  13. High resolution imaging with impulse based thermoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    Existing imaging modalities like microwave- or radiofrequency (RF) induced thermoacoustic tomography systems show the potential for resolving structures deep inside tissue due to the high penetration properties of RF. However, one of the major drawbacks of existing thermoacoustic tomography systems with pulse modulated carrier frequency excitation is the compromise between efficient signal generation and attainable spatial resolution. In order to overcome limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging methods, we herein present and experimentally validate our novel approach towards high resolution thermoacoustic tomography. Instead of carrier-frequency amplification, we utilize ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at nanosecond duration with near-field energy coupling, thus maintaining thermoacoustic signal strength without compromising spatial resolution. Preliminary experiments on highly absorbing objects, consisting of copper wires with characteristic sizes of ~100 μm, reveal the resolution performance which yields 160 μm. Furthermore, benefits like its cost effectiveness, simplicity and compactness with the potential application in small animal imaging as well as human body imaging show that thermoacoustic tomography with impulse excitation is a promising imaging modality which has a broad range of applications.

  14. Fractal image compression: A resolution independent representation for imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Alan D.

    1993-01-01

    A deterministic fractal is an image which has low information content and no inherent scale. Because of their low information content, deterministic fractals can be described with small data sets. They can be displayed at high resolution since they are not bound by an inherent scale. A remarkable consequence follows. Fractal images can be encoded at very high compression ratios. This fern, for example is encoded in less than 50 bytes and yet can be displayed at resolutions with increasing levels of detail appearing. The Fractal Transform was discovered in 1988 by Michael F. Barnsley. It is the basis for a new image compression scheme which was initially developed by myself and Michael Barnsley at Iterated Systems. The Fractal Transform effectively solves the problem of finding a fractal which approximates a digital 'real world image'.

  15. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  16. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  17. A New Instrument Design for Imaging Low Energy Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John W.; Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, Dennis; Rozmarynowski, Paul; Getty, Stephanie; Cooper, John F.; Smith, Billy

    2007-01-01

    The MidSTAR-2 satellite, to be built at the US Naval Academy as a follow-on to the successful MidSTAR-1 satellite (http://web.ew.usna.edu/midstar/), will launch in 2011 and carry three Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experiments developed under Goddard's Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program. One of these GSFC instruments, the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) builds on the heritage of the Goddard-developed Low-Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager launched on the IMAGE spacecraft in 2000. MINI-ME features a Venetian-blind conversion surface assembly that improves both light rejection and conversion efficiency in a smaller and lighter package than LENA making this an highly effective instrument for viewing solar wind charge exchange with terrestrial and planetary exospheres. We will describe the MINI-ME prototyping effort and its science targets.

  18. The development of high-resolution spectroscopic methods and their use in atomic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis discusses work performed during the last nine years in the field of atomic spectroscopy. Several high-resolution techniques, ranging from quantum beats, level crossings, rf-laser double resonances to nonlinear field atom interactions, have been employed. In particular, these methods have been adopted and developed to deal with fast accelerated atomic or ionic beams, allowing studies of problems in atomic-structure theory. Fine- and hyperfine-structure determinations in the He I and Li I isoelectronic sequences, in 51V I, and in 235U I, II have permitted a detailed comparison with ab initio calculations, demonstrating the change in problems when going towards heavier elements or higher ionization stage. The last part of the thesis is concerned with the fundamental question of obtaining very high optical resolution in the interaction between a fast accelerated atom or ion beam and a laser field, this problem being the core in the continuing development of atomic spectroscopy necessary to challenge the more precise and sophisticated theories advanced. (Auth.)

  19. Locomotion of microspheres for super-resolution imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Krivitsky, Leonid A.; Jia Jun Wang; Zengbo Wang; Boris Luk'yanchuk

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging using sub-diffraction field localization by micron sized transparent beads (microspheres) was recently demonstrated [1]. Practical applications in microscopy require control over the positioning of the microspheres. We present a simple method of positioning and controllable movement of a microsphere by using a glass micropipette. This allows sub-diffraction imaging at arbitrary points in three dimensions, as well as the ability to track moving objects. The results are...

  20. High spatial resolution X-UV Fresnel zone plates imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work is to study the capabilities of imaging of Fresnel zone plates in the 1.5. and 2 keV X-ray range for the imaging of laser-produced plasmas. The diagnostic is composed of a Fresnel zone plate with good imaging capabilities and a multilayer mirror to select the spectral emission bandwidth of the plasma we want to study. This diagnostic was evaluated at the Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton experiments to study spatial resolution with this kind of X-ray source. The images we obtained showed that there is no geometric aberrations over an object field of several millimetre. Fresnen zone plates are often used for monochromatic biological objects imaging in the water window around 400 eV but they offer large prospects for laser produced plasma imaging. (author)

  1. High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Duchin, Yuval; Ullberg, Christer; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with applying iterative image reconstruction, based on constrained total-variation minimization, to low-intensity X-ray CT systems that have a high sampling rate. Such systems pose a challenge for iterative image reconstruction, because a very fine image grid is needed to realize the resolution inherent in such scanners. These image arrays lead to under-determined imaging models whose inversion is unstable and can result in undesirable artifacts and noise patterns. There are many possibilities to stabilize the imaging model, and this work proposes a method which may have an advantage in terms of algorithm efficiency. The proposed method introduces additional constraints in the optimization problem; these constraints set to zero high spatial frequency components which are beyond the sensing capability of the detector. The method is demonstrated with an actual CT data set and compared with another method based on projection up-sampling.

  2. Using Progressive Resolution to Visualize large Satellite Image dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    ho, yuan; ramanmurthy, mohan

    2014-05-01

    Unidata's Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is a Java-based software application that provides new and innovative ways of displaying satellite imagery, gridded data, and surface, upper air, and radar data within a unified interface. Progressive Resolution (PR) is a advanced feature newly developed in the IDV. When loading a large satellite dataset with PR turned on, the IDV calculates the resolution of the view window, sets the magnification factors dynamically, and loads a sufficient amount of the data to generate an image at the correct resolution. A rubber band box (RBB) interface allows the user to zoom in/out or change the projection, forcing the IDV to recalculate the magnification factors and get higher/lower resolution data. This new feature improves the IDV memory usage significantly. In the preliminary test, loading 100 time steps of GOES-East 1 km 0.65 visible image data (100 X 10904 X 6928) with PR, both memory and CPU usage are comparable to generating a single time-step display at full resolution (10904 X 6928), and the quality of the resulting image is not compromised. The PR feature is currently available for both satellite imagery and gridded datasets, and will be expanded to other datasets. In this presentation we will present examples of PR usage with large satellite datasets for academic investigations and scientific discovery.

  3. Coregistration of high-resolution Mars orbital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    The systematic orbital imaging of the Martian surface started 4 decades ago from NASA's Viking Orbiter 1 & 2 missions, which were launched in August 1975, and acquired orbital images of the planet between 1976 and 1980. The result of this reconnaissance was the first medium-resolution (i.e. ≤ 300m/pixel) global map of Mars, as well as a variety of high-resolution images (reaching up to 8m/pixel) of special regions of interest. Over the last two decades NASA has sent 3 more spacecraft with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging: Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) having onboard the Mars Orbital Camera - Narrow Angle (MOC-NA), Mars Odyssey having onboard the Thermal Emission Imaging System - Visual (THEMIS-VIS) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) having on board two distinct high-resolution cameras, Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). Moreover, ESA has the multispectral High resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with resolution up to 12.5m since 2004. Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-resolution images, i.e. with resolution better than 100m and as fine as 25 cm/pixel. Notwithstanding the high spatial resolution of the available NASA orbital products, their accuracy of areo-referencing is often very poor. As a matter of fact, due to pointing inconsistencies, usually form errors in roll attitude, the acquired products may actually image areas tens of kilometers far away from the point that they are supposed to be looking at. On the other hand, since 2004, the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring stereo images through the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), with resolution that is usually 12.5-25 metres per pixel. The achieved coverage is more than 64% for images with resolution finer than 20 m/pixel, while for ~40% of Mars, Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have been produced with are co-registered with MOLA [Gwinner et al., 2010]. The HRSC images and DTMs

  4. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  5. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  6. Super-resolution Microscopy in Plant Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy methods dates back to 1994, relevant applications in plant cell imaging only started to emerge in 2010. Since then, the principal super-resolution methods, including structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), have been implemented in plant cell research. However, progress has been limited due to the challenging properties of plant material. Here we summarize the basic principles of existing super-resolution methods and provide examples of applications in plant science. The limitations imposed by the nature of plant material are reviewed and the potential for future applications in plant cell imaging is highlighted.

  7. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  8. Locomotion of microspheres for super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivitsky, Leonid A.; Wang, Jia Jun; Wang, Zengbo; Luk'yanchuk, Boris

    2013-12-01

    Super-resolution virtual imaging by micron sized transparent beads (microspheres) was recently demonstrated by Wang et al. Practical applications in microscopy require control over the positioning of the microspheres. Here we present a method of positioning and controllable movement of a microsphere by using a fine glass micropipette. This allows sub-diffraction imaging at arbitrary points in three dimensions, as well as the ability to track moving objects. The results are relevant to a broad scope of applications, including sample inspection, microfabrication, and bio-imaging.

  9. High-resolution Image Reconstruction by Neural Network and Its Application in Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua

    2005-01-01

    As digital image techniques have been widely used, the requirements for high-resolution images become increasingly stringent. Traditional single-frame interpolation techniques cannot add new high frequency information to the expanded images, and cannot improve resolution in deed. Multiframe-based techniques are effective ways for high-resolution image reconstruction, but their computation complexities and the difficulties in achieving image sequences limit their applications. An original method using an artificial neural network is proposed in this paper. Using the inherent merits in neural network, we can establish the mapping between high frequency components in low-resolution images and high-resolution images. Example applications and their results demonstrated the images reconstructed by our method are aesthetically and quantitatively (using the criteria of MSE and MAE) superior to the images acquired by common methods. Even for infrared images this method can give satisfactory results with high definition. In addition, a single-layer linear neural network is used in this paper, the computational complexity is very low, and this method can be realized in real time.

  10. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  11. Learning-based compressed sensing for infrared image super resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Sui, Xiubao; Chen, Qian; Wu, Shaochi

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an infrared image super-resolution method based on compressed sensing (CS). First, the reconstruction model under the CS framework is established and a Toeplitz matrix is selected as the sensing matrix. Compared with traditional learning-based methods, the proposed method uses a set of sub-dictionaries instead of two coupled dictionaries to recover high resolution (HR) images. And Toeplitz sensing matrix allows the proposed method time-efficient. Second, all training samples are divided into several feature spaces by using the proposed adaptive k-means classification method, which is more accurate than the standard k-means method. On the basis of this approach, a complex nonlinear mapping from the HR space to low resolution (LR) space can be converted into several compact linear mappings. Finally, the relationships between HR and LR image patches can be obtained by multi-sub-dictionaries and HR infrared images are reconstructed by the input LR images and multi-sub-dictionaries. The experimental results show that the proposed method is quantitatively and qualitatively more effective than other state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  13. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  14. Natural-pose hand detection in low-resolution images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyan Bo Bo1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Robust real-time hand detection and tracking in video sequences would enable many applications in areas as diverse ashuman-computer interaction, robotics, security and surveillance, and sign language-based systems. In this paper, we introducea new approach for detecting human hands that works on single, cluttered, low-resolution images. Our prototype system, whichis primarily intended for security applications in which the images are noisy and low-resolution, is able to detect hands as smallas 2424 pixels in cluttered scenes. The system uses grayscale appearance information to classify image sub-windows as eithercontaining or not containing a human hand very rapidly at the cost of a high false positive rate. To improve on the false positiverate of the main classifier without affecting its detection rate, we introduce a post-processor system that utilizes the geometricproperties of skin color blobs. When we test our detector on a test image set containing 106 hands, 92 of those hands aredetected (86.8% detection rate, with an average false positive rate of 1.19 false positive detections per image. The rapiddetection speed, the high detection rate of 86.8%, and the low false positive rate together ensure that our system is useable asthe main detector in a diverse variety of applications requiring robust hand detection and tracking in low-resolution, clutteredscenes.

  15. Enhancement of the low resolution image quality using randomly sampled data for multi-slice MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Yong; Yu, Baiying; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    Low resolution images are often acquired in in vivo MR applications involving in large field-of-view (FOV) and high speed imaging, such as, whole-body MRI screening and functional MRI applications. In this work, we investigate a multi-slice imaging strategy for acquiring low resolution images by using compressed sensing (CS) MRI to enhance the image quality without increasing the acquisition time. In this strategy, low resolution images of all the slices are acquired using multiple-slice imag...

  16. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  17. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  18. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert J. (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional imaging radar operating at high frequency e.g., 670 GHz, is disclosed. The active target illumination inherent in radar solves the problem of low signal power and narrow-band detection by using submillimeter heterodyne mixer receivers. A submillimeter imaging radar may use low phase-noise synthesizers and a fast chirper to generate a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) waveform. Three-dimensional images are generated through range information derived for each pixel scanned over a target. A peak finding algorithm may be used in processing for each pixel to differentiate material layers of the target. Improved focusing is achieved through a compensation signal sampled from a point source calibration target and applied to received signals from active targets prior to FFT-based range compression to extract and display high-resolution target images. Such an imaging radar has particular application in detecting concealed weapons or contraband.

  20. Developing terahertz imaging equation and enhancement of the resolution of terahertz images using deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces a novel reconstruction approach for enhancing the resolution of the terahertz (THz) images. For this purpose the THz imaging equation is derived. According to our best knowledge we are reporting the first THz imaging equation by this paper. This imaging equation is universal for THz far-field imaging systems and can be used for analyzing, describing and modeling of these systems. The geometry and behavior of Gaussian beams in far-field region imply that the FWHM of the THz beams diverge as the frequencies of the beams decrease. Thus, the resolution of the measurement decreases in lower frequencies. On the other hand, the depth of penetration of THz beams decreases as frequency increases. Roughly speaking beams in sub 1.5 THz, are transmitted into integrated circuit (IC) packages and the similar packaged objects. Thus, it is not possible to use the THz pulse with higher frequencies in order to achieve higher resolution inspection of packaged items. In this paper, after developing the 3-D THz point spread function (PSF) of the scanning THz beam and then the THz imaging equation, THz images are enhanced through deconvolution of the THz PSF and THz images. As a result, the resolution has been improved several times beyond the physical limitations of the THz measurement setup in the far-field region and sub-Nyquist images have been achieved. Particularly, MSE and SSIḾ have been increased by 27% and 50% respectively. Details as small as 0.2 mm were made visible in the THz images which originally reveals no details smaller than 2.2 mm. In other words the resolution of the images has been increased by 10 times. The accuracy of the reconstructed images was proved by high resolution X-ray images.

  1. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  2. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers (TWINS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) is a revolutionary new mission designed to stereoscopically image the magnetosphere in charge exchange neutral atoms for the first time. The authors propose to fly two identical TWINS instruments as a mission of opportunity on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination US Government spacecraft. Because the spacecraft are funded independently, TWINS can provide a vast quantity of high priority science observations (as identified in an ongoing new missions concept study and the Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap) at a small fraction of the cost of a dedicated mission. Because stereo observations of the near-Earth space environs will provide a particularly graphic means for visualizing the magnetosphere in action, and because of the dedication and commitment of the investigator team to the principles of carrying space science to the broader audience, TWINS will also be an outstanding tool for public education and outreach

  3. A Novel and Efficient Lifting Scheme based Super Resolution Reconstruction for Early Detection of Cancer in Low Resolution Mammogram Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyakathunisa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammography is the most effective method for early detection of breast diseases. However, thetypical diagnostic signs, such as masses and microcalcifications, are difficult to be detectedbecause mammograms are low contrast and noisy images. We concentrate on a special case ofsuper resolution reconstruction for early detection of cancer from low resolution mammogramimages. Super resolution reconstruction is the process of combining several low resolutionimages into a single higher resolution image. This paper describes a novel approach forenhancing the resolution of mammographic images. We are proposing an efficient lifting waveletbased denoising with adaptive interpolation for super resolution reconstruction. Under this framework, the digitized low resolution mammographic images are decomposed into many levels toobtain different frequency bands. We use Daubechies (D4 lifting schemes to decompose lowresolution mammogram images into multilevel scale and wavelet coefficients. Then our proposednovel soft thresholding technique is used to remove the noisy coefficients, by fixing optimumthreshold value. In order to obtain an image of higher resolution adaptive interpolation is applied.Our proposed lifting wavelet transform based restoration and adaptive interpolation preserves theedges as well as smoothens the image without introducing artifacts. The proposed algorithmavoids the application of iterative method, reduces the complexity of calculation and applies tolarge dimension low-resolution images. Experimental results show that the proposed approachhas succeeded in obtaining a high-resolution mammogram image with a high PSNR, ISNR ratioand a good visual quality.

  4. Noise Reduction in Magnetic Resonance Images using Wave Atom Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Rajeesh, R.S.Moni, S.Palanikumar, T.Gopalakrishnan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available De-noising is always a challenging problem in magnetic resonance imaging andimportant for clinical diagnosis and computerized analysis, such as tissueclassification and segmentation. It is well known that the noise in magneticresonance imaging has a Rician distribution. Unlike additive Gaussian noise,Rician noise is signal dependent, and separating signal from noise is a difficulttask. An efficient method for enhancement of noisy magnetic resonance imageusing wave atom shrinkage is proposed. The reconstructed MRI data have highSignal to Noise Ratio (SNR compared to the curvelet and wavelet domain denoisingapproaches.

  5. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  6. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  7. High resolution hyperspectral imaging with a high throughput virtual slit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Gunn, Thomas; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) device users often require both high spectral resolution, on the order of 1 nm, and high light-gathering power. A wide entrance slit assures reasonable étendue but degrades spectral resolution. Spectrometers built using High Throughput Virtual Slit™ (HTVS) technology optimize both parameters simultaneously. Two remote sensing use cases that require high spectral resolution are discussed. First, detection of atmospheric gases with intrinsically narrow absorption lines, such as hydrocarbon vapors or combustion exhaust gases such as NOx and CO2. Detecting exhaust gas species with high precision has become increasingly important in the light of recent events in the automobile industry. Second, distinguishing reflected daylight from emission spectra in the visible and NIR (VNIR) regions is most easily accomplished using the Fraunhofer absorption lines in solar spectra. While ground reflectance spectral features in the VNIR are generally quite broad, the Fraunhofer lines are narrow and provide a signature of intrinsic vs. extrinsic illumination. The High Throughput Virtual Slit enables higher spectral resolution than is achievable with conventional spectrometers by manipulating the beam profile in pupil space. By reshaping the instrument pupil with reflective optics, HTVS-equipped instruments create a tall, narrow image profile at the exit focal plane, typically delivering 5X or better the spectral resolution achievable with a conventional design.

  8. Spatial scales of pollution from variable resolution satellite imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provides daily global coverage, but the 10 km resolution of its aerosol optical depth (AOD) product is not adequate for studying spatial variability of aerosols in urban areas. Recently, a new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for MODIS which provides AOD at 1 km resolution. Using MAIAC data, the relationship between MAIAC AOD and PM2.5 as measured by the EPA ground monitoring stations was investigated at varying spatial scales. Our analysis suggested that the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD decreased significantly as AOD resolution was degraded. This is so despite the intrinsic mismatch between PM2.5 ground level measurements and AOD vertically integrated measurements. Furthermore, the fine resolution results indicated spatial variability in particle concentration at a sub-10 km scale. Finally, this spatial variability of AOD within the urban domain was shown to depend on PM2.5 levels and wind speed. - Highlights: ► The correlation between PM2.5 and AOD decreases as AOD resolution is degraded. ► High resolution MAIAC AOD 1 km retrieval can be used to investigate within-city PM2.5 variability. ► Low pollution days exhibit higher spatial variability of AOD and PM2.5 then moderate pollution days. ► AOD spatial variability within urban area is higher during the lower wind speed conditions. - The correlation between PM2.5 and AOD decreases as AOD resolution is degraded. The new high-resolution MAIAC AOD retrieval has the potential to capture PM2.5 variability at the intra-urban scale.

  9. Image Super-Resolution via Adaptive Regularization and Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feilong; Cai, Miaomiao; Tan, Yuanpeng; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that image patches can be well represented as a sparse linear combination of elements from an appropriately selected over-complete dictionary. Recently, single-image super-resolution (SISR) via sparse representation using blurred and downsampled low-resolution images has attracted increasing interest, where the aim is to obtain the coefficients for sparse representation by solving an l0 or l1 norm optimization problem. The l0 optimization is a nonconvex and NP-hard problem, while the l1 optimization usually requires many more measurements and presents new challenges even when the image is the usual size, so we propose a new approach for SISR recovery based on regularization nonconvex optimization. The proposed approach is potentially a powerful method for recovering SISR via sparse representations, and it can yield a sparser solution than the l1 regularization method. We also consider the best choice for lp regularization with all p in (0, 1), where we propose a scheme that adaptively selects the norm value for each image patch. In addition, we provide a method for estimating the best value of the regularization parameter λ adaptively, and we discuss an alternate iteration method for selecting p and λ . We perform experiments, which demonstrates that the proposed regularization nonconvex optimization method can outperform the convex optimization method and generate higher quality images.

  10. Detection of engineering vehicles in high-resolution monitoring images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun LIU; Yin ZHANG; San-yuan ZHANG; Ying WANG; Zhong-yan LIANG; Xiu-zi YE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel formulation for detecting objects with articulated rigid bodies from high-resolution monitoring images, particularly engineering vehicles. There are many pixels in high-resolution monitoring images, and most of them represent the background. Our method fi rst detects object patches from monitoring images using a coarse detection process. In this phase, we build a descriptor based on histograms of oriented gradient, which contain color frequency information. Then we use a linear support vector machine to rapidly detect many image patches that may contain object parts, with a low false negative rate and a high false positive rate. In the second phase, we apply a refi nement classifi cation to determine the patches that actually contain objects. In this stage, we increase the size of the image patches so that they include the complete object using models of the object parts. Then an accelerated and improved salient mask is used to improve the performance of the dense scale-invariant feature transform descriptor. The detection process returns the absolute position of positive objects in the original images. We have applied our methods to three datasets to demonstrate their effectiveness.

  11. Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Applied to Medical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for many diagnostic applications due to its real-time image reconstruction and low cost. Nonetheless, conventional ultrasound is not used in many applications because of limited spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Most commercial ultrasound systems reconstruct images using a simple delay-and-sum architecture on receive, which is fast and robust but does not utilize all information available in the raw data. Recently, more sophisticated image reconstruction methods have been developed that make use of far more information in the raw data to improve resolution and contrast. One such method is the Time-Domain Optimized Near-Field Estimator (TONE), which employs a maximum a priori estimation to solve a highly underdetermined problem, given a well-defined system model. TONE has been shown to significantly improve both the contrast and resolution of ultrasound images when compared to conventional methods. However, TONE's lack of robustness to variations from the system model and extremely high computational cost hinder it from being readily adopted in clinical scanners. This dissertation aims to reduce the impact of TONE's shortcomings, transforming it from an academic construct to a clinically viable image reconstruction algorithm. By altering the system model from a collection of individual hypothetical scatterers to a collection of weighted, diffuse regions, dTONE is able to achieve much greater robustness to modeling errors. A method for efficient parallelization of dTONE is presented that reduces reconstruction time by more than an order of magnitude with little loss in image fidelity. An alternative reconstruction algorithm, called qTONE, is also developed and is able to reduce reconstruction times by another two orders of magnitude while simultaneously improving image contrast. Each of these methods for improving TONE are presented, their limitations are explored, and all are used in concert to reconstruct in

  12. Versatile objective lenses for single atom trapping and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, J D; Saffman, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a pair of optimized objective lenses with long working distances of 117~mm and 65~mm respectively that offer diffraction limited performance for both Cs and Rb wavelengths when imaging through standard vacuum windows. The designs utilise standard catalog lens elements to provide a simple and cost-effective solution. Objective 1 provides $\\mathrm{NA}=0.175$ offering 3~$\\mu$m resolution whilst objective 2 is optimized for high collection efficiency with $\\mathrm{NA}=0.29$ and 1.8~$\\mu$m resolution. This flexible design can be further extended for use at shorter wavelengths by simply re-optimising the lens separations.

  13. Broadband line imaging with subwavelength resolution using plasmonic waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Podoliak, N.; Horak, P.; Prangsma, J.C.; Pinkse, P.W.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we design a high-resolution line imaging device allowing for broadband operation at near-infrared wavelengths ranging from 1 ?m to 2 ?m utilizing the advantage of subwavelength light confinement in plasmonic waveguides. The device consists of an array of air-guided plasmonic waveguides in gold with fanned-out geometry. In the main part of the device the separation between waveguides increases gradually from the input towards the output. High resolution is achieved on the input s...

  14. Scaling-up Transformation of Multisensor Images with Multiple Resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaohui; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tian, Jing; Xia, Jun

    2009-01-01

    For scaling up low resolution multispectral images (LRMIs) with high resolution panchromatic image (HRPI), intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) can produce satisfactory spatial enhancement but usually introduces spectral distortion in the fused high resolution multispectral images (HRMIs). In this paper, to minimize this problem, we present a generalized intensity modulation (GIM) by extending the IHS transform to an arbitrary number of LRMIs, which uses the information of the spectral response functions (SRFs) of the multispectral and panchromatic sensors. Before modulation, the generalized intensity is enhanced by injecting details extracted from the HRPI by means of empirical mode decomposition. After the enhanced generalized intensity is substituted for the old one, the HRMIs are obtained through the GIM. Quickbird images are used to illustrate the superiority of this proposed method. Extensive comparison results based on visual analysis and Wald's protocol demonstrate that the proposed method is more encouraging for scaling up the LRMIs with the HRPI spectrally and spatially than the tested fusion methods. PMID:22573959

  15. Scaling-up Transformation of Multisensor Images with Multiple Resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available For scaling up low resolution multispectral images (LRMIs with high resolution panchromatic image (HRPI, intensity-hue-saturation (IHS can produce satisfactory spatial enhancement but usually introduces spectral distortion in the fused high resolution multispectral images (HRMIs. In this paper, to minimize this problem, we present a generalized intensity modulation (GIM by extending the IHS transform to an arbitrary number of LRMIs, which uses the information of the spectral response functions (SRFs of the multispectral and panchromatic sensors. Before modulation, the generalized intensity is enhanced by injecting details extracted from the HRPI by means of empirical mode decomposition. After the enhanced generalized intensity is substituted for the old one, the HRMIs are obtained through the GIM. Quickbird images are used to illustrate the superiority of this proposed method. Extensive comparison results based on visual analysis and Wald’s protocol demonstrate that the proposed method is more encouraging for scaling up the LRMIs with the HRPI spectrally and spatially than the tested fusion methods.

  16. State of the art in atomic resolution off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linck, Martin, E-mail: mlinck@lbl.gov [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Freitag, Bert; Kujawa, Stephan [FEI Company, Eindhoven, Building AAE, Achtseweg Noord 5, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael; Niermann, Tore [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    As proposed by Hannes Lichte, to resolve structure-property relations not only the question 'Which atom is where?' but also the question 'Which fields are around?' has to be answered. High-resolution off-axis electron holography opens up an access to these key questions in that it allows accessing the complete exit-wave of the object provided within the information limit of the microscope, i.e. amplitude and phase including atomic details such as position and species, and moreover, information about large area electric potentials and magnetic fields, which a conventional transmission electron microscope is blind for-also when using a Cs-corrector. For an excellent object exit-wave reconstruction, special care has to be taken on the hologram quality, i.e. interference fringe contrast and electron dose. Severe restrictions are given to signal resolution by the limited brightness of the electron source. Utilizing a new high-brightness Schottky field electron emitter in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV, the phase signal resolution at atomic resolution can significantly be enhanced. An improvement by at least a factor of 2.88 compared to the most recently reported single hologram at atomic resolution is found. To proof the applicability of this setup to real materials science problems, a grain boundary of gold has been investigated holographically. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impact of the brightness on the reconstructed signal in electron holography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factor 2.8 gain in signal quality by setup with a high brightness electron gun. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of a grain boundary in gold with a state-of-the-art holography setup. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-posteriori aberration fine-tuning for true one Angstrom resolution in the object wave. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mistilt analysis on the atomic scale by numerical wave optics.

  17. Application of multi-resolution analysis in sonar image denoising

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sonar images have complex background, low contrast, and deteriorative edges; these characteristics make it difficult for researchers to dispose the sonar objects. The multi-resolution analysis represents the signals in different scales efficiently, which is widely used in image processing. Wavelets are successful in disposing point discontinuities in one dimension, but not in two dimensions. The finite Ridgelet transform (FRIT) deals efficiently with the singularity in high dimension. It presents three improved denoising approaches, which are based on FRIT and used in the sonar image disposal technique. By experiment and comparison with traditional methods, these approaches not only suppress the artifacts, but also obtain good effect in edge keeping and SNR of the sonar image denoising.

  18. Multi-resolution image segmentation based on Gaussian mixture model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yinggan; Liu Dong; Guan Xinping

    2006-01-01

    Mixture model based image segmentation method, which assumes that image pixels are independent and do not consider the position relationship between pixels, is not robust to noise and usually leads to misclassification. A new segmentation method, called multi-resolution Gaussian mixture model method, is proposed. First, an image pyramid is constructed and son-father link relationship is built between each level of pyramid. Then the mixture model segmentation method is applied to the top level. The segmentation result on the top level is passed top-down to the bottom level according to the son-father link relationship between levels. The proposed method considers not only local but also global information of image, it overcomes the effect of noise and can obtain better segmentation result. Experimental result demonstrates its effectiveness.

  19. Super-Resolution Real Imaging in Microsphere-Assisted Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Yi; Jia, Boliang; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-01-01

    Microsphere-assisted microscopy has received a lot of attention recently due to its simplicity and its capability to surpass the diffraction limit. However, to date, sub-diffraction-limit features have only been observed in virtual images formed through the microspheres. We show that it is possible to form real, super-resolution images using high-refractive index microspheres. Also, we report on how changes to a microsphere’s refractive index and size affect image formation and planes. The relationship between the focus position and the additional magnification factor is also investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. We demonstrate that such a real imaging mode, combined with the use of larger microspheres, can enlarge sub-diffraction-limit features up to 10 times that of wide-field microscopy’s magnification with a field-of-view diameter of up to 9 μm. PMID:27768774

  20. Defect structures in ZnO studied by high-resolution structural and spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of characteristic inversion domain structures in zinc oxide (ZnO) is triggered by the addition of trivalent Fe3+ or In3+ dopants. As-grown and inverted ZnO domains are separated by two types of inversion domain boundaries (IDBs): basal b-IDBs parallel to {0001}, and pyramidal p-IDBs parallel to {21¯1¯5} lattice planes in three equivalent variants. Cs-corrected analytical TEM/STEM is the method of choice for a comprehensive structural and compositional characterization of these materials. It is shown by electron and X-ray spectroscopic imaging in STEM that dopant species are essentially localized within both types of IDBs, whereas solid solubility of trivalent dopants within ZnO domains is rather low (50 nm. The structural inversion associated with a stacking fault as a consequence of the presence of octahedrally coordinated In3+ in the b-IDB is directly revealed by atomic resolution imaging. Column positions in atomic resolution ABF imaging in In2O3–ZnO nanorods show that the oxygen sub-lattice continues across the b-IDB with only marginal distortions, whereas the cation sub-lattice suffers a rigid shift relative to the oxygen lattice as a result of the coordination geometry of ZnO4 tetrahedrons sharing common oxygen ions with the InO6 coordination octahedrons

  1. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    other than the diffusion gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE and lead to a disrupted experimental design. Here, we introduce a simple compensation to the STEAM acquisition that avoids the orientational bias and disrupted experiment design...... angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM...

  2. Fast full resolution saliency detection based on incoherent imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang; Zhao, Jufeng; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2016-08-01

    Image saliency detection is widely applied in many tasks in the field of the computer vision. In this paper, we combine the saliency detection with the Fourier optics to achieve acceleration of saliency detection algorithm. An actual optical saliency detection system is constructed within the framework of incoherent imaging system. Additionally, the application of our system to implement the bottom-up rapid pre-saliency process of primate visual saliency is discussed with dual-resolution camera. A set of experiments over our system are conducted and discussed. We also demonstrate the comparisons between our method and pure computer methods. The results show our system can produce full resolution saliency maps faster and more effective.

  3. Super-Resolution for Traditional and Omnidirectional Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Nagy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a simple method on how to implement a super-resolutionbased video enhancement technique in .NET using the functions of the OpenCV library.First, we outline the goal of this project and after that, a short review of the steps of superresolutiontechnique is given. As a part of the discussion about the implementation itself,the general design aspects are detailed in short. Then, the different optical flow algorithmsare analyzed and the super-resolution calculation of omnidirectional image sequences isdiscussed. After all that, the achieved results can be seen and finally, a short generalconclusion can be read. This paper is a revision of our previous work [1]. In this edition,we focus on the super-resolution of omnidirectional image sequences rather than thetechnological issues that were discussed in our previous article. Further information aboutthe implementation and wrapper development can be found in [1 and 12].

  4. Fast full resolution saliency detection based on incoherent imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang; Zhao, Jufeng; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2016-05-01

    Image saliency detection is widely applied in many tasks in the field of the computer vision. In this paper, we combine the saliency detection with the Fourier optics to achieve acceleration of saliency detection algorithm. An actual optical saliency detection system is constructed within the framework of incoherent imaging system. Additionally, the application of our system to implement the bottom-up rapid pre-saliency process of primate visual saliency is discussed with dual-resolution camera. A set of experiments over our system are conducted and discussed. We also demonstrate the comparisons between our method and pure computer methods. The results show our system can produce full resolution saliency maps faster and more effective.

  5. The convergence of object dependent resolution in maximum likelihood based tomographic image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the maximum likelihood by EM algorithm (ML) with a reconstruction kernel equal to the intrinsic detector resolution and sieve regularization has demonstrated that any image improvements over filtered backprojection (FBP) are a function of image resolution. Comparing different reconstruction algorithms potentially requires measuring and matching the image resolution. Since there are no standard methods for describing the resolution of images from a nonlinear algorithm such as ML, the authors have defined measures of effective local Gaussian resolution (ELGR) and effective global Gaussian resolution (EGGR) and examined their behaviour in FBP images and in ML images using two different measurement techniques. (Author)

  6. Low-Resolution Vehicle Image Recognition Technology by Frame-Composition of Moving Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzawa, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Ohkawa, Takenao; Ito, Toshio

    Developing on-board automotive driver assistance systems aiming to alert drivers about driving environments, and possible collision with other vehicles has attracted a lot of attention lately. Especially, many researchers have suggested the forward vehicle recognition technology by a camera on vehicle. In the forward vehicle recognition, however, it is difficult to detect the features of vehicle from a distant vehicle image by conventional methods because the image is too low-resolution (LR). This paper presents vehicle image recognition technology for detecting of the features of a distant vehicle by frame-composition of moving images. To detect the vehicle features of a distant LR vehicle image, we use the moving images obtained from the camera on the vehicle, and utilize super-resolution (SR) image reconstruction. SR image reconstruction is to use signal processing techniques to obtain a high-resolution (or sequence) image from observed multiple LR images. Use of this technique on real road image, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  7. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  8. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  9. SPI: A high resolution imaging spectrometer for INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPI (Spectrometer for INTEGRAL) is a high spectral resolution gamma-ray telescope using cooled germanium detectors that will be flown on board the INTEGRAL mission in 2001. It consists of an array of 19 closely-packed germanium detectors surrounded by an active bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield. The instrument operates over the energy range 20 keV to 8 MeV with an energy resolution of 1-5 keV. A tungsten coded-aperture mask located 1.7 m from the detector array provides imaging over a 15 deg. fully-coded field-of-view with an angular resolution of ∼3 deg. The point source narrow-line sensitivity is estimated to be 3-7x10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 over most of the range of the instrument (E>200 keV) for a 106 s observation. With its combination of high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and imaging, SPI will improve significantly over the performance of previous instruments such as HEAO-3, OSSE, and Comptel. It can be expected to take a major step forward in experimental studies in nuclear astrophysics. The SPI instrument is being developed under the auspices of the European Space Agency by a large international team of scientists and engineers in both Europe and the United States

  10. Cryogenic microcalorimeter energy resolution measurements for multi-keV atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally investigated the kinetic energy resolution of an ∝ 10 mK magnetic microcalorimeter (MMC) detector for 12-150 keV atomic and molecular ion beams. The ion masses were varied from 1 amu (H+) to 58 amu (C3H6O+). The resulting FWHM energy resolutions were atomic ions and resolutions were similar for the neutral particles of the corresponding ions. The high resolving power in energy, the charge independence, and the optional position sensitivity all demonstrate the expected versatility of the MMC detectors for use in various mass spectrometry techniques. As a next step we implement the MMC detector for mass and position resolved fragment counting in the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The storage energies of ∝ 300 keV will allow 1 amu mass resolution for stored ions of up to ∝ 150 amu (assuming a separation of 2 FWHMs between peaks).

  11. Cryogenic microcalorimeter energy resolution measurements for multi-keV atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Savin, Daniel W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York (United States); Allgeier, Steffen; Gamer, Lisa; Hengstler, Daniel; Kempf, Sebastian; Pabinger, Andreas; Pies, Christian; Enss, Christian; Fleischmann, Andreas [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Krantz, Claude; Wolf, Andreas [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwalm, Dirk [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the kinetic energy resolution of an ∝ 10 mK magnetic microcalorimeter (MMC) detector for 12-150 keV atomic and molecular ion beams. The ion masses were varied from 1 amu (H{sup +}) to 58 amu (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sup +}). The resulting FWHM energy resolutions were atomic ions and resolutions were similar for the neutral particles of the corresponding ions. The high resolving power in energy, the charge independence, and the optional position sensitivity all demonstrate the expected versatility of the MMC detectors for use in various mass spectrometry techniques. As a next step we implement the MMC detector for mass and position resolved fragment counting in the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The storage energies of ∝ 300 keV will allow 1 amu mass resolution for stored ions of up to ∝ 150 amu (assuming a separation of 2 FWHMs between peaks).

  12. Correction of Migration Through Resolution Cell in ISAR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGZhenglin; XINGMengdao; BAOZheng

    2004-01-01

    For ISAR imaging-radar, after the translation motion compensated, the target can be changed to turntable and the R-D (Range-Doppler) algorithm usually adopted is based on small target flying steadily, with the assumption that all of the scatterers are not migrated through their range cells. But for maneuvering target this assumption is not satisfied, as the Doppler frequency is time varying. Actually, to obtain the cross-range resolution of dozens of centimeters for the large-scale or medium targets, especially for S or L wave band, with wave length so short, MTRC (the Migration through resolution cell)would occur on both fringes of the ISAR imaging. The Doppler migration is basically caused by nonuniform rotation of several parts of the target, so that the Doppler frequency of each scatterer is time varying, which can be accumulated coherently by the method of time-frequency analysis in order to get instant range-Doppler image. In this paper, the reason that causes migration through resolution cell is discussed, and a compensating algorithm is proposed. The method of time-frequency analysis to every range cell of scattererer is applied to estimate its instant frequency after range compressing and MTRC correcting,so that the quadratic term can be adjusted. Simulated data and real data prove that this method is effective.

  13. How does angular resolution affect diffusion imaging measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex D; Jahanshad, Neda; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Lee, Agatha D; Toga, Arthur W; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-01-15

    A key question in diffusion imaging is how many diffusion-weighted images suffice to provide adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for studies of fiber integrity. Motion, physiological effects, and scan duration all affect the achievable SNR in real brain images, making theoretical studies and simulations only partially useful. We therefore scanned 50 healthy adults with 105-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) at 4T. From gradient image subsets of varying size (6spherical angular distribution energy, we created SNR plots (versus gradient numbers) for seven common diffusion anisotropy indices: fractional and relative anisotropy (FA, RA), mean diffusivity (MD), volume ratio (VR), geodesic anisotropy (GA), its hyperbolic tangent (tGA), and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). SNR, defined in a region of interest in the corpus callosum, was near-maximal with 58, 66, and 62 gradients for MD, FA, and RA, respectively, and with about 55 gradients for GA and tGA. For VR and GFA, SNR increased rapidly with more gradients. SNR was optimized when the ratio of diffusion-sensitized to non-sensitized images was 9.13 for GA and tGA, 10.57 for FA, 9.17 for RA, and 26 for MD and VR. In orientation density functions modeling the HARDI signal as a continuous mixture of tensors, the diffusion profile reconstruction accuracy rose rapidly with additional gradients. These plots may help in making trade-off decisions when designing diffusion imaging protocols. PMID:19819339

  14. Observation of antisite domain boundaries in Cu2ZnSnS4 by atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, N. A.; Griffiths, I. J.; Cherns, D.; Fermín, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine antisite defects in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) kesterite crystals grown by a hot injection method. High angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging at sub-0.1 nm resolution, and lower magnification dark field imaging using reflections sensitive to cation ordering, are used to reveal antisite domain boundaries (ADBs). These boundaries, typically 5-20 nm apart, and extending distances of 100 nm or more into the crystals, lie on a variety of planes and have displacements of the type ½[110] or ¼[201], which translate Sn, Cu and Zn cations into antisite positions. It is shown that some ADBs describe a change in the local stoichiometry by removing planes of S and either Cu or Zn atoms, implying that these boundaries can be electrically charged. The observations also showed a marked increase in cation disorder in regions within 1-2 nm of the grain surfaces suggesting that growth of the ordered crystal takes place at the interface with a disordered shell. It is estimated that the ADBs contribute on average ~0.1 antisite defect pairs per unit cell. Although this is up to an order of magnitude less than the highest antisite defect densities reported, the presence of high densities of ADBs that may be charged suggests these defects may have a significant influence on the efficiency of CZTS solar cells.Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine antisite defects in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) kesterite crystals grown by a hot injection method. High angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging at sub-0.1 nm resolution, and lower magnification dark field imaging using reflections sensitive to cation ordering, are used to reveal antisite domain boundaries (ADBs). These boundaries, typically 5-20 nm apart, and extending distances of 100 nm or more into the crystals, lie on a variety of planes and have displacements of the type ½[110] or ¼[201], which translate Sn, Cu and Zn cations into antisite

  15. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  16. A New Instrument Design for Imaging Low Energy Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. W.; Collier, M. R.; Chornay, D.; Roz, P.; Getty, S.; Cooper, J. F.; Smith, B.

    2007-12-01

    The MidSTAR-2 satellite, to be built at the US Naval Academy as a follow-on to the successful MidSTAR-1 satellite, will launch in 2011 and carry three Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experiments developed under Goddard's Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program. One of these GSFC instruments, the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) builds on the heritage of the Goddard-developed Low-Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager launched on the IMAGE spacecraft in 2000. MINI- ME features a Venetian-blind conversion surface assembly that improves both light rejection and conversion efficiency in a smaller and lighter package than LENA making this an highly effective instrument for viewing solar wind charge exchange with terrestrial and planetary exospheres. We will describe the MINI-ME prototyping effort and its science targets, also including time variability of ENA fluxes and charge-exchange interactions in the upper atmosphere from the terrestrial ring current source.

  17. Black phosphorus photodetector for multispectral, high-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-11-12

    Black phosphorus is a layered semiconductor that is intensely researched in view of applications in optoelectronics. In this letter, we investigate a multilayer black phosphorus photodetector that is capable of acquiring high-contrast (V > 0.9) images both in the visible (λVIS = 532 nm) as well as in the infrared (λIR = 1550 nm) spectral regime. In a first step, by using photocurrent microscopy, we map the active area of the device and we characterize responsivity and gain. In a second step, by deploying the black phosphorus device as a point-like detector in a confocal microsope setup, we acquire diffraction-limited optical images with submicron resolution. The results demonstrate the usefulness of black phosphorus as an optoelectronic material for hyperspectral imaging applications.

  18. Detection of Barchan Dunes in High Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaoui, M. A.; Adnani, M.; El Belrhiti, H.; Chaouki, I. E.; Masmoudi, C.

    2016-06-01

    Barchan dunes are the fastest moving sand dunes in the desert. We developed a process to detect barchans dunes on High resolution satellite images. It consisted of three steps, we first enhanced the image using histogram equalization and noise reduction filters. Then, the second step proceeds to eliminate the parts of the image having a texture different from that of the barchans dunes. Using supervised learning, we tested a coarse to fine textural analysis based on Kolomogorov Smirnov test and Youden's J-statistic on co-occurrence matrix. As an output we obtained a mask that we used in the next step to reduce the search area. In the third step we used a gliding window on the mask and check SURF features with SVM to get barchans dunes candidates. Detected barchans dunes were considered as the fusion of overlapping candidates. The results of this approach were very satisfying in processing time and precision.

  19. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  20. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  1. Enhanced Landmine Detection from Low Resolution IR Image Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiesheng; Gu, Irene Yu-Hua; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    We deal with the problem of landmine field detection using low-resolution infrared (IR) image sequences measured from airborne or vehicle-borne passive IR cameras. The proposed scheme contains two parts: a) employ a multi-scale detector, i.e., a special type of isotropic bandpass filters, to detect landmine candidates in each frame; b) enhance landmine detection through seeking maximum consensus of corresponding landmine candidates over image frames. Experiments were conducted on several IR image sequences measured from airborne and vehicle-borne cameras, where some results are included. As shown in our experiments, the landmine signatures have been significantly enhanced using the proposed scheme, and automatic detection results are reasonably good. These methods can therefore be applied to assisting humanitarian demining work for landmine field detection.

  2. High-resolution EUV imaging tools for resist exposure and aerial image monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Brisco, O.; Brunton, A.; Cashmore, J.; Elbourn, P.; Elliner, G.; Gower, M.; Greuters, J.; Grunewald, P.; Gutierrez, R.; Hill, T.; Hirsch, J.; Kling, L.; McEntee, N.; Mundair, S.; Richards, P.; Truffert, V.; Wallhead, I.; Whitfield, M.; Hudyma, R.

    2005-05-01

    Key features are presented of two high-resolution EUV imaging tools: the MS-13 Microstepper wafer exposure and the RIM-13 reticle imaging microscope. The MS-13 has been developed for EUV resist testing and technology evaluation at the 32nm node and beyond, while the RIM-13 is designed for actinic aerial image monitoring of blank and patterned EUV reticles. Details of the design architecture, module layout, major subsystems and performance are presented for both tools.

  3. The optical microscopy with virtual image breaks a record: 50-nm resolution imaging is demonstrated

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chen, Zaichun; Hong, Minghui

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new 'microsphere nanoscope' that uses ordinary SiO2 microspheres as superlenses to create a virtual image of the object in near field. The magnified virtual image greatly overcomes the diffraction limit. We are able to resolve clearly 50-nm objects under a standard white light source in both transmission and reflection modes. The resolution achieved for white light opens a new opportunity to image viruses, DNA and molecules in real time.

  4. High resolution isotopic analysis of U- bearing particles via fusion of SIMS and EDS images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Garcia, Ben J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Willingham, David G.

    2016-05-20

    Image fusion of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) images and X-ray elemental maps from energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to facilitate the isolation and re-analysis of isotopically unique U-bearing particles where the highest precision SIMS measurements are required. Image registration, image fusion and particle micromanipulation were performed on a subset of SIMS images obtained from a large area pre-screen of a particle distribution from a sample containing several certified reference materials (CRM) U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850, as well as a standard reference material (SRM) 8704 (Buffalo River Sediment) to simulate particles collected on swipes during routine inspections of declared uranium enrichment facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In total, fourteen particles, ranging in size from 5 – 15 µm, were isolated and re-analyzed by SIMS in multi-collector mode identifying nine particles of CRM U129A, one of U150, one of U500 and three of U850. These identifications were made within a few percent errors from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified atom percent values for 234U, 235U and 238U for the corresponding CRMs. This work represents the first use of image fusion to enhance the accuracy and precision of isotope ratio measurements for isotopically unique U-bearing particles for nuclear safeguards applications. Implementation of image fusion is essential for the identification of particles of interests that fall below the spatial resolution of the SIMS images.

  5. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  6. Noise removal in nuclear medicine images by using multi resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel flexible and dynamic algorithm for noise removal in nuclear medicine images is proposed. The images have a very low signal-to-noise ratio and the total number of registered photons is relatively small. The algorithm removes the noise from both the images original spatial domain and from the wavelet transform domain. In the spatial domain it uses both the autocorrelation technique in order to remove the noise that appears in a from of isolated pixels around the objects of interest and the information that each image contains about the signal in its neighbouring images. In the transform domain the wavelet coefficients filtration is carried out with a filter bank which meets the near-perfect reconstruction condition and is adapted to the signal. In addition, the coefficients that correspond to noise and are about to be discarded are selected by using a non uniform threshold which is adapted to the spatial varying noise level. Criteria for selection of an optimal decomposition level for the NM images are defined. In order to suppress the noise, multi resolution characteristics of both the signal and noise are used.(Author)

  7. High resolution imaging of dynamic surface processes from the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Green, J. J.; De Jong, E. M.; Knight, R.; Bills, B.; Arrowsmith, R.

    Spaceborne persistent multi-angle imaging allows staring at selected targets during an orbit pass. From its vantage point on the International Space Station (ISS) a persistent Earth imaging telescope would provide hundreds of high-resolution images simultaneously. Observations could be in visible and SWIR bands as it stares at a scene of interest. These images provide rich multi-angle stereo views enabling understanding of rapidly changing Earth features with many applications to Earth science and disaster response. Current academic state-of-the-art is driven by single images taken with a near nadir view. Persistent imaging could address NASA's goal of understanding how and why the Earth's environment is changing, and could be used for forecasting and mitigating the effects of natural disasters. Specifically such a mission could be used to answer the questions: 1) How are Earth's vulnerable systems reflecting changes in climate? and 2) What processes and features characterize the magnitude and extent of disasters? A mission would meet geomorphologists' requirements observing changing features such as landslides, earthquakes, floods, volcanoes, and glaciers.

  8. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  9. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  10. High-resolution apertureless near-field optical imaging using gold nanosphere probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Zee Hwan; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-10-12

    An apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM) that utilizes the enhanced field around a gold nanosphere, which is attached to the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, is used to image the local dielectric constant of the patterned metallic surfaces and local electric field around plasmonic nanosphere samples. A colloidal gold nanosphere (approximately 50 nm diameter) is linked to the extremity of the conventional etched-silicon probe. The scattering of laser radiation (633 or 532 nm) is modulated by the oscillating nanosphere-functionalized silicon tip, and the scattered radiation is detected. The approach curve (scattering intensity as a function of the tip-sample distance), the polarization dependence (scattering intensity as a function of the excitation polarization direction), and ANSOM image contrast confirm that the spherical nanosphere attached to the silicon tip acts as a point dipole that interacts with the sample surface via a dipole-dipole coupling, in which the dipole created by the field at the tip interacts with its own image dipole in the sample. The image obtained with the nanoparticle functionalized tip provides a dielectric map of the sample surface with a spatial resolution better than 80 nm. In addition, we show that the functionalized tip is capable of imaging the local electric field distribution above the plasmonic nanosphere samples. Overall, the result shows that high-resolution ANSOM is possible without the aid of the lightning-rod effect. With an improved tip-fabrication method, we believe that the method can provide a versatile high-resolution chemical imaging that is not available from usual forms of ANSOM. PMID:17020365

  11. A conformation-dependent stereochemical library improves crystallographic refinement even at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A script was created to allow SHELXL to use the new CDL v.1.2 stereochemical library which defines the target values for main-chain bond lengths and angles as a function of the residue’s ϕ/ψ angles. Test refinements using this script show that the refinement behavior of structures at resolutions even better than 1 Å is substantially enhanced by the use of the new conformation-dependent ideal geometry paradigm. To utilize a new conformation-dependent backbone-geometry library (CDL) in protein refinements at atomic resolution, a script was written that creates a restraint file for the SHELXL refinement program. It was found that the use of this library allows models to be created that have a substantially better fit to main-chain bond angles and lengths without degrading their fit to the X-ray data even at resolutions near 1 Å. For models at much higher resolution (∼0.7 Å), the refined model for parts adopting single well occupied positions is largely independent of the restraints used, but these structures still showed much smaller r.m.s.d. residuals when assessed with the CDL. Examination of the refinement tests across a wide resolution range from 2.4 to 0.65 Å revealed consistent behavior supporting the use of the CDL as a next-generation restraint library to improve refinement. CDL restraints can be generated using the service at http://pgd.science.oregonstate.edu/cdl_shelxl/

  12. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  13. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, K.; Belthangady, C.; Zhang, H.; Bar-Gill, N.; Devience, S. J.; Cappellaro, P.; Yacoby, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond is a leading modality for nanoscale magnetic field imaging, as it provides single electron spin sensitivity, three-dimensional resolution better than 1 nm (ref. 5) and applicability to a wide range of physical and biological samples under ambient conditions. To date, however, NV-diamond magnetic imaging has been performed using ‘real-space’ techniques, which are either limited by optical diffraction to ˜250 nm resolution or require slow, point-by-point scanning for nanoscale resolution, for example, using an atomic force microscope, magnetic tip, or super-resolution optical imaging. Here, we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV-diamond. In analogy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we employ pulsed magnetic field gradients to phase-encode spatial information on NV electronic spins in wavenumber or ‘k-space’ followed by a fast Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field of view and compressed sensing speed-up.

  14. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  15. A High Resolution Color Image Restoration Algorithm for Thin TOMBO Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar A. El-Sallam

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a blind image restoration algorithm to reconstruct a high resolution (HR color image from multiple, low resolution (LR, degraded and noisy images captured by thin (< 1mm TOMBO imaging systems. The proposed algorithm is an extension of our grayscale algorithm reported in [1] to the case of color images. In this color extension, each Point Spread Function (PSF of each captured image is assumed to be different from one color component to another and from one imaging unit to the other. For the task of image restoration, we use all spectral information in each captured image to restore each output pixel in the reconstructed HR image, i.e., we use the most efficient global category of point operations. First, the composite RGB color components of each captured image are extracted. A blind estimation technique is then applied to estimate the spectra of each color component and its associated blurring PSF. The estimation process is formed in a way that minimizes significantly the interchannel cross-correlations and additive noise. The estimated PSFs together with advanced interpolation techniques are then combined to compensate for blur and reconstruct a HR color image of the original scene. Finally, a histogram normalization process adjusts the balance between image color components, brightness and contrast. Simulated and experimental results reveal that the proposed algorithm is capable of restoring HR color images from degraded, LR and noisy observations even at low Signal-to-Noise Energy ratios (SNERs. The proposed algorithm uses FFT and only two fundamental image restoration constraints, making it suitable for silicon integration with the TOMBO imager.

  16. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  17. High-resolution panoramic images with megapixel MWIR FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboucher, Vincent; Aubry, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    In the continuity of its current strategy, HGH maintains a deep effort in developing its most recent product family: the infrared (IR) panoramic 360-degree surveillance sensors. During the last two years, HGH optimized its prototype Middle Wave IR (MWIR) panoramic sensor IR Revolution 360 HD that gave birth to Spynel-S product. Various test campaigns proved its excellent image quality. Cyclope, the software associated with Spynel, benefitted from recent image processing improvements and new functionalities such as target geolocalization, long range sensor slue to cue and facilitated forensics analysis. In the frame of the PANORAMIR project sustained by the DGA (Délégation Générale de l'Armement), HGH designed a new extra large resolution sensor including a MWIR megapixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector (1280×1024 pixels). This new sensor is called Spynel-X. It provides outstanding resolution 360-degree images (with more than 100 Mpixels). The mechanical frame of Spynel (-S and -X) was designed with the collaboration of an industrial design agency. Spynel got the "Observeur du Design 2013" label.

  18. ICORE: Image Co-addition with Optional Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, Frank

    2013-01-01

    ICORE is a command-line driven co-addition, mosaicking and resolution enhancement (HiRes) tool for creating science quality products from image data in FITS format and with World Coordinate System information following the FITS-WCS standard. It includes preparatory steps such as image background matching, photometric gain-matching, and pixel-outlier rejection. Co-addition and/or HiRes'ing can be performed in either the inertial WCS, or in the rest frame of a moving object. Three interpolation methods are supported: overlap-area weighting, drizzle, and weighting by the detector Point Response Function (PRF). The latter enables the creation of matched-filtered products for optimal point-source detection, but most importantly allows for resolution enhancement using a spatially-dependent deconvolution method. This is a variant of the classic Richardson-Lucy algorithm with the added benefit to simultaneously register and co-add multiple images to optimize signal-to-noise and sampling of the instrumental PSF. It ca...

  19. Imaging protein interactions in vivo with sub-cellular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Raicu, Valerica; Fung, Russell; Melnichuk, Mike; Jansma, David B; Pisterzi, Luca; Fox, Michael; Wells, James W; Saldin, Dilano K

    2008-01-01

    Resonant Energy Transfer (RET) from an optically excited donor molecule (D) to a non-excited acceptor molecule (A) residing nearby is widely used to detect molecular interactions in living cells. Stoichiometric information, such as the number of proteins forming a complex, has been obtained so far for a handful of proteins, but only after exposing the sample sequentially to at least two different excitation wavelengths. During this lengthy process of measurement, the molecular makeup of a cellular region may change, and this has so far limited the applicability of RET to determination of cellular averages. Here we demonstrate a method for imaging protein complex distribution in living cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution, which relies on a spectrally-resolved two-photon microscope, a simple but competent theory, and a keen selection of fluorescent tags. This technology may eventually lead to tracking dynamics of macromolecular complex formation and dissociation with spatial resolution inside living cell...

  20. High-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo.

  1. MUSIC electromagnetic imaging with enhanced resolution for small inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the influence of the test dipole on the resolution of the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) imaging method applied to the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem of determining the locations of a collection of small objects embedded in a known background medium. Based on the analysis of the induced electric dipoles in eigenstates, an algorithm is proposed to determine the test dipole that generates a pseudo-spectrum with enhanced resolution. The amplitudes in three directions of the optimal test dipole are not necessarily in phase, i.e., the optimal test dipole may not correspond to a physical direction in the real three-dimensional space. In addition, the proposed test-dipole-searching algorithm is able to deal with some special scenarios, due to the shapes and materials of objects, to which the standard MUSIC does not apply

  2. MUSIC electromagnetic imaging with enhanced resolution for small inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xudong; Zhong, Yu

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the test dipole on the resolution of the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) imaging method applied to the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem of determining the locations of a collection of small objects embedded in a known background medium. Based on the analysis of the induced electric dipoles in eigenstates, an algorithm is proposed to determine the test dipole that generates a pseudo-spectrum with enhanced resolution. The amplitudes in three directions of the optimal test dipole are not necessarily in phase, i.e., the optimal test dipole may not correspond to a physical direction in the real three-dimensional space. In addition, the proposed test-dipole-searching algorithm is able to deal with some special scenarios, due to the shapes and materials of objects, to which the standard MUSIC does not apply.

  3. High-Resolution Photoassociation Spectroscopy of Ultracold Ytterbium Atoms by Using the Intercombination Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0-3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested

  4. High-resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold ytterbium atoms by using the intercombination transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masaaki; Enomoto, Katsunari; Kato, Yutaka; Takasu, Yosuke; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2006-04-21

    We observed high-resolution photoassociation spectra of laser-cooled ytterbium (Yb) atoms in the spin-forbidden 1S0 - 3P1 intercombination line. The rovibrational levels in the 0u+ state were measured for red detunings of the photoassociation laser ranging from 2.9 MHz to 1.97 GHz with respect to the atomic resonance. The rotational splitting of the vibrational levels near the dissociation limit were fully resolved due to the sub-MHz linewidth of the spectra in contrast to previous measurements using the spin-allowed singlet transition. In addition, from a comparison between the spectra of 174Yb and those of 176Yb, a d-wave shape resonance for 174Yb is strongly suggested. PMID:16712155

  5. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of ∼12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author)

  6. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, N.; Rupen, M.P.; Shapiro, I.I. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA)); Preston, R.A. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Rius, A. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Astronomia y Geodesia)

    1991-03-21

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of {similar to}12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author).

  7. A Frequency Domain Approach to Registration of Aliased Images with Application to Super-resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewalle Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution algorithms reconstruct a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution images of a scene. Precise alignment of the input images is an essential part of such algorithms. If the low-resolution images are undersampled and have aliasing artifacts, the performance of standard registration algorithms decreases. We propose a frequency domain technique to precisely register a set of aliased images, based on their low-frequency, aliasing-free part. A high-resolution image is then reconstructed using cubic interpolation. Our algorithm is compared to other algorithms in simulations and practical experiments using real aliased images. Both show very good visual results and prove the attractivity of our approach in the case of aliased input images. A possible application is to digital cameras where a set of rapidly acquired images can be used to recover a higher-resolution final image.

  8. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiao -Lei [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Treu, Tommaso [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Agnello, Adriano [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Auger, Matthew W. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Liao, Kai [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marshall, Philip J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive

  9. Direct imaging of CdTe(001) surface reconstructions by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Smith, David J.

    1991-08-01

    Novel reconstructions of the CdTe(001) surface have been directly observed using high-resolution electron microscopy in the profile-imaging geometry. The CdTe(001) surface, obtained by in situ annealing under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, is found to have a (2 × 1) structure at temperatures of less than about 200° C, but it transforms reversibly into a (3 × 1) structure at temperatures above 200 °C. Structural models for the reconstructions have been proposed and confirmed by extensive computer simulations. The (2 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Cd atoms, consists of a {1}/{2} monolayer of Cd vacancies and a large inward relaxation of the remaining surface Cd atoms, similar to the (2 × 1) reconstruction previously proposed for the GaAs(001) surface. The (3 × 1) reconstruction, stabilized by Te atoms, involves formation of surface dimers and the presence of vacancies. In both reconstructions, atomic displacements are observed that extend a few layers into the bulk and serve to reduce the strain energy.

  10. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, T M; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-01-01

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  11. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  12. Characterization of microfabricated probes for combined atomic force and high-resolution scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Maurizio R; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Akiyama, Terunobu; Engel, Andreas; deRooij, Nico F; Staufer, Urs

    2006-08-01

    A combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscope probe is presented. The probe is electrically insulated except at the very apex of the tip, which has a radius of curvature in the range of 10-15 nm. Steady-state cyclic voltammetry measurements for the reduction of Ru(NH3)6Cl3 and feedback experiments showed a distinct and reproducible response of the electrode. These experimental results agreed with finite element simulations for the corresponding diffusion process. Sequentially topographical and electrochemical studies of Pt lines deposited onto Si3N4 and spaced 100 nm apart (edge to edge) showed a lateral electrochemical resolution of 10 nm. PMID:16878880

  13. Investigating protein conformational energy landscapes and atomic resolution dynamics from NMR dipolar couplings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Loïc; Blackledge, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to protein dynamics. In particular inter-nuclear dipolar couplings, that become measurable in solution when the protein is dissolved in a dilute liquid crystalline solution, report on all conformations sampled up to millisecond timescales. As such they provide the opportunity to describe the Boltzmann distribution present in solution at atomic resolution, and thereby to map the conformational energy landscape in unprecedented detail. The development of analytical methods and approaches based on numerical simulation and their application to numerous biologically important systems is presented. PMID:26517337

  14. Measurement of transient atomic displacements in thin films with picosecond and femtometer resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kozina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of the transient structural response of weakly photo-excited thin films of BiFeO3, Pb(Zr,TiO3, and Bi and time-scales for interfacial thermal transport. Utilizing picosecond x-ray diffraction at a 1.28 MHz repetition rate with time resolution extending down to 15 ps, transient changes in the diffraction angle are recorded. These changes are associated with photo-induced lattice strains within nanolayer thin films, resolved at the part-per-million level, corresponding to a shift in the scattering angle three orders of magnitude smaller than the rocking curve width and changes in the interlayer lattice spacing of fractions of a femtometer. The combination of high brightness, repetition rate, and stability of the synchrotron, in conjunction with high time resolution, represents a novel means to probe atomic-scale, near-equilibrium dynamics.

  15. Measurement of transient atomic displacements in thin films with picosecond and femtometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, M; Hu, T; Wittenberg, J S; Szilagyi, E; Trigo, M; Miller, T A; Uher, C; Damodaran, A; Martin, L; Mehta, A; Corbett, J; Safranek, J; Reis, D A; Lindenberg, A M

    2014-05-01

    We report measurements of the transient structural response of weakly photo-excited thin films of BiFeO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, and Bi and time-scales for interfacial thermal transport. Utilizing picosecond x-ray diffraction at a 1.28 MHz repetition rate with time resolution extending down to 15 ps, transient changes in the diffraction angle are recorded. These changes are associated with photo-induced lattice strains within nanolayer thin films, resolved at the part-per-million level, corresponding to a shift in the scattering angle three orders of magnitude smaller than the rocking curve width and changes in the interlayer lattice spacing of fractions of a femtometer. The combination of high brightness, repetition rate, and stability of the synchrotron, in conjunction with high time resolution, represents a novel means to probe atomic-scale, near-equilibrium dynamics. PMID:26798776

  16. Structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liqing, E-mail: chenlq@uah.edu; Wang, Yujun [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Wells, David; Toh, Diana; Harold, Hunt [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Zhou, Jing [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); DiGiammarino, Enrico [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Meehan, Edward J. [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The crystal structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor has been determined and refined to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors. Osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSF) is an intracellular signaling protein, produced by osteoclasts themselves, that enhances osteoclast formation and bone resorption. It is thought to act via an Src-related signaling pathway and contains SH3 and ankyrin-repeat domains which are involved in protein–protein interactions. As part of a structure-based anti-bone-loss drug-design program, the atomic resolution X-ray structure of the recombinant human OSF SH3 domain (hOSF-SH3) has been determined. The domain, residues 12–72, yielded crystals that diffracted to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The overall structure shows a characteristic SH3 fold consisting of two perpendicular β-sheets that form a β-barrel. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the putative proline-rich peptide-binding site of hOSF-SH3 consists of (i) residues that are highly conserved in the SH3-domain family, including residues Tyr21, Phe23, Trp49, Pro62, Asn64 and Tyr65, and (ii) residues that are less conserved and/or even specific to hOSF, including Thr22, Arg26, Thr27, Glu30, Asp46, Thr47, Asn48 and Leu60, which might be key to designing specific inhibitors for hOSF to fight osteoporosis and related bone-loss diseases. There are a total of 13 well defined water molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the above residues in and around the peptide-binding pocket. Some of those water molecules might be important for drug-design approaches. The hOSF-SH3 structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors.

  17. Feature Recognition of Low-resolution Fiber Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Su-ping; ZENG Pei-feng; WU Xiong-ying; CHEN Jian-ping

    2006-01-01

    The interpolatory edge operator is applied to the recognition of cotton and ramie fibers. Its performance is studied in comparison with the Canny edge operator in the fiber's edge detection for cross-sectional image. The input image is interpolated other than Gaussian function smoothing. The quality of edge output is improved by the interpolatory edge operator. It produces edge output with good continuity for low-resolution input. The fine edge output, such as crossmarkings, can be distinguished clearly, so the interpolatory edge operator is suitable for the study of cotton and ramie fibers. Furthermore, the application of the interpolatory edge operator can cut the hardware cost, reduce the storage and speed up the data transmission.

  18. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering......The purpose of this study is to develop methods in array signal processing which achieve accurate signal reconstruction from limited observations resulting in high-resolution imaging. The focus is on underwater acoustic applications and sonar signal processing both in active (transmit and receive......-of-arrival (DOA) of the associated wavefronts from a limited number of observations. Usually, there are only a few sources generating the acoustic wavefield such that DOA estimation is essentially a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Conventional methods for DOA estimation (i.e., beamforming) suffer from...

  19. Enhancement of Spatial Resolution of the Lroc Wide Angle Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanti, P.; Robinson, M. S.; Sato, H.; Awumah, A.; Henriksen, M.

    2016-06-01

    Image fusion, a popular method for resolution enhancement in Earth-based remote sensing studies involves the integration of geometric (sharpness) detail of a high-resolution panchromatic (Pan) image and the spectral information of a lower resolution multi-spectral (MS) image. Image fusion with planetary images is not as widespread as with terrestrial studies, although successful application of image fusion can lead to the generation of higher resolution MS image data. A comprehensive comparison of six image fusion algorithms in the context of lunar images is presented in this work. Performance of these algorithms is compared by visual inspection of the high-resolution multi-spectral products, derived products such as band-to-band ratio and composite images, and performance metrics with an emphasis on spectral content preservation. Enhanced MS images of the lunar surface can enable new science and maximize the science return for current and future missions.

  20. Algorithm for Soybean Classification Using Medium Resolution Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Gusso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of soybean crop areas while the plants are still in the field is highly necessary for reliable calculation of real crop parameters as to yield, production and other data important to decision-making policies related to government planning. An algorithm for soybean classification over the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, was developed as an objective, automated tool. It is based on reflectance from medium spatial resolution images. The classification method was called the RCDA (Reflectance-based Crop Detection Algorithm, which operates through a mathematical combination of multi-temporal optical reflectance data obtained from Landsat-5 TM images. A set of 39 municipalities was analyzed for eight crop years between 1996/1997 and 2009/2010. RCDA estimates were compared to the official estimates of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE for soybean area at a municipal level. Coefficients R2 were between 0.81 and 0.98, indicating good agreement of the estimates. The RCDA was also compared to a soybean crop map derived from Landsat images for the 2000/2001 crop year, the overall map accuracy was 91.91% and the Kappa Index of Agreement was 0.76. Due to the calculation chain and pre-defined parameters, RCDA is a timesaving procedure and is less subjected to analyst skills for image interpretation. Thus, the RCDA was considered advantageous to provide thematic soybean maps at local and regional scales.

  1. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  2. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  3. Towards continualized task-based resolution modeling in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Karakatsanis, Nicolas; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Rahmim, Arman

    2014-03-01

    We propose a generalized resolution modeling (RM) framework, including extensive task-based optimization, wherein we continualize the conventionally discrete framework of RM vs. no RM, to include varying degrees of RM. The proposed framework has the advantage of providing a trade-off between the enhanced contrast recovery by RM and the reduced inter-voxel correlations in the absence of RM, and to enable improved task performance. The investigated context was that of oncologic lung FDG PET imaging. Given a realistic blurring kernel of FWHM h (`true PSF'), we performed iterative EM including RM using a wide range of `modeled PSF' kernels with varying widths h. In our simulations, h = 6mm, while h varied from 0 (no RM) to 12mm, thus considering both underestimation and overestimation of the true PSF. Detection task performance was performed using prewhitened (PWMF) and nonprewhitened matched filter (NPWMF) observers. It was demonstrated that an underestimated resolution blur (h = 4mm) enhanced task performance, while slight over-estimation (h = 7mm) also achieved enhanced performance. The latter is ironically attributed to the presence of ringing artifacts. Nonetheless, in the case of the NPWMF, the increasing intervoxel correlations with increasing values of h degrade detection task performance, and underestimation of the true PSF provides the optimal task performance. The proposed framework also achieves significant improvement of reproducibility, which is critical in quantitative imaging tasks such as treatment response monitoring.

  4. High resolution mm-VLBI imaging of Cygnus A

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, Bia; Bach, Uwe; Ros, Eduardo; Zensus, J Anton

    2015-01-01

    At a distance of 249 Mpc ($z$=0.056), Cygnus A is the only powerful FR II radio galaxy for which a detailed sub-parsec scale imaging of the base of both jet and counter-jet can be obtained. Observing with VLBI at millimeter wavelengths is fundamental for this object, as it uncovers those regions which appear self-absorbed or free-free absorbed by a circumnuclear torus at longer wavelengths. We performed 7 mm Global VLBI observations, achieving ultra-high resolution imaging on scales down to 90 $\\mu$as. This resolution corresponds to a linear scale of only $\\sim$400 Schwarzschild radii. We studied the transverse structure of the jets through a pixel-based analysis, and kinematic properties of the main emission features by modeling the interferometric visibilities with two-dimensional Gaussian components. Both jets appear limb-brightened, and their opening angles are relatively large ($\\phi_\\mathrm {j}\\sim 10^{\\circ}$). The flow is observed to accelerate within the inner-jet up to scales of $\\sim$1 pc, while lo...

  5. X-ray crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Philip-Kunio; Ogawa, Yu; Sawada, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Tadahisa; Wada, Masahisa

    2016-07-01

    We determined the crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution, using X-ray fiber diffraction data extending to 1.17 Å resolution. The unit cell [a = 8.129(7) Å, b = 8.347(6) Å, c = 10.311(7) Å, space group P21 21 21 ] of anhydrous chitosan contains two chains having one glucosamine residue in the asymmetric unit with the primary hydroxyl group in the gt conformation, that could be directly located in the Fourier omit map. The molecular arrangement of chitosan is very similar to the corner chains of cellulose II implying similar intermolecular hydrogen bonding between O6 and the amine nitrogen atom, and an intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond from O3 to O5 and O6. In addition to the classical hydrogen bonds, all the aliphatic hydrogens were involved in one or two weak hydrogen bonds, mostly helping to stabilize cohesion between antiparallel chains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 361-368, 2016. PMID:26930586

  6. Understanding atomic-resolved STM images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface by DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C; Gonzalez, C; Mendez, J; De Andres, P L; MartIn-Gago, J A; Lopez, M F [Instituto Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Jelinek, P, E-mail: mflopez@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53-Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-08

    We present a combination of experimental STM images and DFT calculations to understand the atomic scale contrast of features found in high-resolution STM images. Simulating different plausible structural models for the tip, we have been able to reproduce various characteristics previously reported in experimental images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) under controlled UHV conditions. Our results allow us to determine the influence of different chemical and morphological tip terminations on the atomic-resolution STM images of the TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface. The commonest images have been properly explained using standard models for a W tip, either clean or with a single O atom located at the apex. Furthermore, a double transfer of oxygen atoms can account for different types of bizarre atomic-resolution features occasionally seen, and not conclusively interpreted before. Importantly, we discuss how typical point-defects are imaged on this surface by different tips, namely bridging O vacancies and adsorbed OH groups.

  7. High-resolution Imaging of Living Retina through Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhui Jiang; Wenji Wang; Ning Ling; Gezhi Xu; Xuejun Rao; Xinyang Li; Yudong Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the possibility as well as the usage of adaptive optics in high-resolution retinal imaging.Methods:From March to November 2001, the fundus of 25 adults were checked by using Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System (OAS). The age of the subjects varied from 18~48 years. All had normal visual acuity from 0.9 to 1.0. No abnormality was found in the ocular examination, and their medical as well as ocular history was unremarkable. Results: High-resolution images of the retinal cells, photoreceptor and bipolar cell, were analysed. In these images, the cells are clearly resolved. The density of the photoreceptor at area 1.5 degree from the foveloa is around 40 000~50 000/mm2. At area 3 degree, it drops to less than 30 000/mm2.Conclusion:Optic Adaptive Retinal Imaging System (AOS) is able to get high-resolution image of retinal cells in living human eyes. It may be widely used in ophthalmology experimentally and clinically.

  8. Single-shot and single-sensor high/super-resolution microwave imaging based on metasurface

    OpenAIRE

    Libo Wang; Lianlin Li; Yunbo Li; Hao Chi Zhang; Tie Jun Cui

    2016-01-01

    Real-time high-resolution (including super-resolution) imaging with low-cost hardware is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications. Here, we propose broadband single-shot and single-sensor high-/super-resolution imaging by using a spatio-temporal dispersive metasurface and an imaging reconstruction algorithm. The metasurface with spatio-temporal dispersive property ensures the feasibility of the single-shot and single-sensor imager for super- and high-resolution imaging, since ...

  9. Mapping hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surface at atom-level resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan V Nicolau

    Full Text Available A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i the surface hydrophobicity; (ii their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced "leopard skin"-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37. These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric

  10. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.;

    2015-01-01

    in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image......An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values for...... sharpness is assessed. Values from all positions plotted together form a curve that peaks at the receive focus, which is set during the beamforming. Selection of three different receive foci for each acquired dataset will result in the generation of three overlapping sharpness curves. A set of three...

  11. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging (JT-SOFI)

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhiping; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition....

  12. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer. PMID:27244400

  13. Overcoming Registration Uncertainty in Image Super-Resolution: Maximize or Marginalize?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Zisserman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In multiple-image super-resolution, a high-resolution image is estimated from a number of lower-resolution images. This usually involves computing the parameters of a generative imaging model (such as geometric and photometric registration, and blur and obtaining a MAP estimate by minimizing a cost function including an appropriate prior. Two alternative approaches are examined. First, both registrations and the super-resolution image are found simultaneously using a joint MAP optimization. Second, we perform Bayesian integration over the unknown image registration parameters, deriving a cost function whose only variables of interest are the pixel values of the super-resolution image. We also introduce a scheme to learn the parameters of the image prior as part of the super-resolution algorithm. We show examples on a number of real sequences including multiple stills, digital video, and DVDs of movies.

  14. Production of High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images for Navigation Information Infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhijun; Djemel Ziou; Costas Armenakis

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the image fusion approach of multi-resolution analysis-based intensity modulation (MRAIM) to produce the high-resolution multi-spectral images from high-resolution panchromatic image and low-resolution multi-spectral images for navigation information infrastructure. The mathematical model of image fusion is derived according to the principle of remote sensing image formation. It shows that the pixel values of a high-resolution multi-spectral images are determined by the pixel values of the approximation of a high-resolution panchromatic image at the resolution level of low-resolution multi-spectral images, and in the pixel valae computation the M-band wavelet theory and the à trous algorithm are then used. In order to evaluate the MRAIM approach, an experiment has been carried out on the basis of the IKONOS 1 m panchromatic image and 4 m multi-spectral images. The result demonstrates that MRAIM image fusion approach gives promising fusion results and it can be used to produce the high-resolution remote sensing images required for navigation information infrastructures.

  15. Effects of frame rate and image resolution on pulse rate measured using multiple camera imaging photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses cameras to facilitate measurements including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, respiration rate, and blood perfusion by measuring characteristic changes in light absorption at the skin's surface resulting from changes in blood volume in the superficial microvasculature. Several factors may affect the accuracy of the physiological measurement including imager frame rate, resolution, compression, lighting conditions, image background, participant skin tone, and participant motion. Before this method can gain wider use outside basic research settings, its constraints and capabilities must be well understood. Recently, we presented a novel approach utilizing a synchronized, nine-camera, semicircular array backed by measurement of an electrocardiogram and fingertip reflectance photoplethysmogram. Twenty-five individuals participated in six, five-minute, controlled head motion artifact trials in front of a black and dynamic color backdrop. Increasing the input channel space for blind source separation using the camera array was effective in mitigating error from head motion artifact. Herein we present the effects of lower frame rates at 60 and 30 (reduced from 120) frames per second and reduced image resolution at 329x246 pixels (one-quarter of the original 658x492 pixel resolution) using bilinear and zero-order downsampling. This is the first time these factors have been examined for a multiple imager array and align well with previous findings utilizing a single imager. Examining windowed pulse rates, there is little observable difference in mean absolute error or error distributions resulting from reduced frame rates or image resolution, thus lowering requirements for systems measuring pulse rate over sufficient length time windows.

  16. High resolution Ceres HAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chris T.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015, and will characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission was mapping Ceres in HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1475 km altitude) between August and October 2015. The framing camera took about 2,600 clear filter images with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected images from one cycle (cycle #1) for the mosaicking process to have similar viewing and illumination conditions. Very minor gaps in the coverage were filled with a few images from cycle #2. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain towards the cartographic products is to ortho-rectify the images to the proper scale and map projec-tion type. This process requires detailed information of the Dawn orbit and attitude data and of the topography of the targets. Both, improved orientation and a high-resolution shape model, are provided by stereo processing (bundle block adjustment) of the HAMO stereo image dataset [3]. Ceres's HAMO shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto the reference sphere of Ceres with a radius of 470 km. The final step is the controlled mosaicking) of all images to a global mosaic of Ceres, the so-called basemap. Ceres map tiles: The Ceres atlas was produced in a scale of 1:750,000 and consists of 15 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4]. A map scale of 1:750,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available Dawn resolution in HAMO. The individual tiles were extracted from the global mosaic and reprojected. Nomenclature: The Dawn team proposed 81 names for geological features. By international

  17. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  18. Improved SOT (Hinode mission) high resolution solar imaging observations

    CERN Document Server

    Goodarzi, Hadis; Adjabshirizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We consider the best today available observations of the Sun free of turbulent Earth atmospheric effects, taken with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft. Both the instrumental smearing and the observed stray light are analyzed in order to improve the resolution. The Point Spread Function (PSF) corresponding to the blue continuum Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) near 450 nm is deduced by analyzing i/ the limb of the Sun and ii/ images taken during the transit of the planet Venus in 2012. A combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian functions is selected to construct a PSF in order to remove both smearing due to the instrumental diffraction effects (PSF core) and the large-angle stray light due to the spiders and central obscuration (wings of the PSF) that are responsible for the parasitic stray light. A Max-likelihood deconvolution procedure based on an optimum number of iterations is discussed. It is applied to several solar field images, including the granulation near the limb. The norma...

  19. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  20. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D2 and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground water

  1. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D{sub 2} and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground

  2. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  3. Investigation of Image Fusion Between High-Resolution Image and Multi-spectral Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pingxiang; WANG Zhijun

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a thorough understanding of the physical characteristics of remote sensing image, this paper employs the theories of wavelet transform and signal sampling to develop a new image fusion algorithm. The algorithm has been successfully applied to the image fusion of SPOT PAN and TM of Guangdong province, China. The experimental results show that a perfect image fusion can be built up by using the image analytical solution and re-construction in the image frequency domain based on the physical characteristics of the image formation. The method has demonstrated that the results of the image fusion do not change spectral characteristics of the original image.

  4. Building identification from very high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Stephane

    Urbanisation still remains one of the main problems worldwide. The extent and rapidity of the urban growth induce a number of socio-economic and environmental conflicts everywhere. In order to reduce these problems, urban planners need to integrate spatial information in planning tools. Actually high expectations are made on Very High Spatial Resolution imagery (VHSR). These high-spatial resolution images are available at a reasonable price and due to short revisit periods, they offer a high degree of actuality. However, interpretation methods seem not to be adapted to this new type of images. The aim of our study is to develop a new method for semi-automatic building extraction with VHSR. The different steps performed to achieve our objective are each presented in a chapter. In the first chapter, the general context of our research is described with the definition of our objective. After a short historical review of urbanisation, we focus on urban growth and associated problems. In the following we discuss the possible contributions of geography to reduce these problems. After discussing concepts, theories and methodologies of geographical analysis in urban areas, we present existing general urban planning tools. Finally, we show the special interest of our study that is due to a growing need to integrate spatial information in these decision support tools. In the second chapter we verify the possibility of reaching our objective by analysing the technical characteristics of the images, the noise and the distortions which affect the images. Quality and interpretability of the studied image is analysed in order to show the capacity of these image to represent urban objects as close to reality as possible. The results confirm the potential of VHSR Imagery for urban objects analysis. The third chapter deal with the preliminary steps necessary for the elaboration of our method of building extraction. First, we evaluate the quality of the Sherbrooke Ikonos image

  5. A Fast Algorithm for Image Super-Resolution from Blurred Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Michael K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of reconstruction of a high-resolution image from several blurred low-resolution image frames. The image frames consist of blurred, decimated, and noisy versions of a high-resolution image. The high-resolution image is modeled as a Markov random field (MRF, and a maximum a posteriori (MAP estimation technique is used for the restoration. We show that with the periodic boundary condition, a high-resolution image can be restored efficiently by using fast Fourier transforms. We also apply the preconditioned conjugate gradient method to restore high-resolution images in the aperiodic boundary condition. Computer simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. A Fast Super-Resolution Reconstruction from Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of imagery, a novel method called the delaminating combining template method, used for the problem of super-resolution reconstruction from image sequence, is described in this paper. The combining template method contains two steps: a delaminating strategy and a combining template algorithm. The delaminating strategy divides the original problem into several sub-problems;each of them is only connected to one degrading factor. The combining template algorithm is suggested to resolve each sub-problem. In addition, to verify the valid of the method, a new index called oriental entropy is presented. The results from the theoretical analysis and experiments illustrate that this method to be promising and efficient.

  7. Monitoring of vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li; Li Li-juan; Liang Li-qiao; Li Jiu-yi

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of vegetation coverage on a small scale is the foundation for the monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage and of the inversion model of monitoring vegetation coverage on a large scale by remote sensing. Using the object-oriented analytical software,Definiens Professional 5,a new method for calculating vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images(aerial photographs or near-surface photography)is proposed. Our research supplies references to remote sensing measurements of vegetation coverage on a small scale and accurate fundamental data for the inversion model of vegetation coverage on a large and intermediatc scale to improve the accuracy of remote sensing monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage.

  8. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  9. Wavelet-Based Mixed-Resolution Coding Approach Incorporating with SPT for the Stereo Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With the advances of display technology, three-dimensional(3-D) imaging systems are becoming increasingly popular. One way of stimulating 3-D perception is to use stereo pairs, a pair of images of the same scene acquired from different perspectives. Since there is an inherent redundancy between the images of a stereo pairs, data compression algorithms should be employed to represent stereo pairs efficiently. The proposed techniques generally use blockbased disparity compensation. In order to get the higher compression ratio, this paper employs the wavelet-based mixed-resolution coding technique to incorporate with SPT-based disparity-compensation to compress the stereo image data. The mixed-resolution coding is a perceptually justified technique that is achieved by presenting one eye with a low-resolution image and the other with a high-resolution image. Psychophysical experiments show that the stereo image pairs with one high-resolution image and one low-resolution image provide almost the same stereo depth to that of a stereo image with two high-resolution images. By combining the mixed-resolution coding and SPT-based disparity-compensation techniques, one reference (left) high-resolution image can be compressed by a hierarchical wavelet transform followed by vector quantization and Huffman encoder. After two level wavelet decompositions, for the lowresolution right image and low-resolution left image, subspace projection technique using the fixed block size disparity compensation estimation is used. At the decoder, the low-resolution right subimage is estimated using the disparity from the low-resolution left subimage. A full-size reconstruction is obtained by upsampling a factor of 4 and reconstructing with the synthesis low pass filter. Finally, experimental results are presented, which show that our scheme achieves a PSNR gain (about 0.92dB) as compared to the current block-based disparity compensation coding techniques.``

  10. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  11. Atomic-Resolution Structure of an N(5) Flavin Adduct in D-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T. (GSU)

    2011-09-06

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 {angstrom} atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct.

  12. Atomic-resolution structure of an N5 flavin adduct in D-arginine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Wang, Siming; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T

    2011-07-26

    D-Arginine dehydrogenase (DADH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-arginine and other D-amino acids to the corresponding imino acids. The 1.07 Å atomic-resolution structure of DADH crystallized with D-leucine unexpectedly revealed a covalent N(5) flavin adduct, instead of the expected iminoleucine product in the active site. This acyl adduct has been successfully reproduced by photoreduction of DADH in the presence of 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (ketoleucine). The iminoleucine may be released readily because of weak interactions in the binding site, in contrast to iminoarginine, converted to ketoleucine, which reacts with activated FAD to form the covalently linked acyl adduct. PMID:21707047

  13. Image Segmentation By Cluster Analysis Of High Resolution Textured SPOT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, M.; Roux, C.; Hillion, A.

    1986-04-01

    Textural analysis is now a commonly used technique in digital image processing. In this paper, we present an application of textural analysis to high resolution SPOT satellite images. The purpose of the methodology is to improve classification results, i.e. image segmentation in remote sensing. Remote sensing techniques, based on high resolution satellite data offer good perspectives for the cartography of littoral environment. Textural information contained in the pan-chromatic channel of ten meters resolution is introduced in order to separate different types of structures. The technique we used is based on statistical pattern recognition models and operates in two steps. A first step, features extraction, is derived by using a stepwise algorithm. Segmentation is then performed by cluster analysis using these extracted. features. The texture features are computed over the immediate neighborhood of the pixel using two methods : the cooccurence matrices method and the grey level difference statistics method. Image segmentation based only on texture features is then performed by pixel classification and finally discussed. In a future paper, we intend to compare the results with aerial data in view of the management of the littoral resources.

  14. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyet, Elise; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Perroy, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferase, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With this, we achieved an unprecedented performance in the field of protein-protein interaction imaging in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, duration of signal stability, signal sensitivity and dynamic range. As proof-of-principle, an Nluc-containing BRET-based sensor of ERK activity enabled the detection of subtle, transient and localized variations in ERK activity in neuronal dendritic spines, induced by the activation of endogenous synaptic NMDA receptors. This development will improve our comprehension of both the spatio-temporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions and the activation patterns of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27302735

  15. Gradient Permittivity Meta-Structure model for Wide-field Super-resolution imaging with a sub-45 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shun; Wang, Taisheng; Xu, Wenbin; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Hu, Bingliang; Yu, Weixing

    2016-03-21

    A gradient permittivity meta-structure (GPMS) model and its application in super-resolution imaging were proposed and discussed in this work. The proposed GPMS consists of alternate metallic and dielectric films with a gradient permittivity which can support surface plasmons (SPs) standing wave interference patterns with a super resolution. By employing the rigorous numerical FDTD simulation method, the GPMS was carefully simulated to find that the period of the SPs interference pattern is only 84 nm for a 532 nm incident light. Furthermore, the potential application of the GPMS for wide-field super-resolution imaging was also discussed and the simulation results show that an imaging resolution of sub-45 nm can be achieved based on the plasmonic structure illumination microscopic method, which means a 5.3-fold improvement on resolution has been achieved in comparison with conventional epifluorescence microscopy. Moreover, besides the super-resolution imaging application, the proposed GPMS model can also be applied for nanolithography and other areas where super resolution patterns are needed.

  16. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  17. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27265903

  18. Reduction of interference fringes in absorption imaging of cold atom cloud using eigenface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolin Li; Min Ke; Bo Yan; Yuzhu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Eigenface method used in face recognition is introduced to reduce the pattern of interference fringes appearing in the absorption image of cold rubidium atom cloud trapped by an atom chip. The standard method for processing the absorption image is proposed, and the origin of the interference fringes is analyzed. Compared with the standard processing method which uses only one reference image, we take advantage of fifty reference images and reconstruct a new reference image which is more similar to the absorption image than all of the fifty original reference images. Then obvious reduction of interference fringes can be obtained.

  19. A novel super resolution reconstruction of low reoslution images progressively using dct and zonal filter based denoising

    CERN Document Server

    Liyakathunisa,

    2011-01-01

    Due to the factors like processing power limitations and channel capabilities images are often down sampled and transmitted at low bit rates resulting in a low resolution compressed image. High resolution images can be reconstructed from several blurred, noisy and down sampled low resolution images using a computational process know as super resolution reconstruction. Super-resolution is the process of combining multiple aliased low-quality images to produce a high resolution, high-quality image. The problem of recovering a high resolution image progressively from a sequence of low resolution compressed images is considered. In this paper we propose a novel DCT based progressive image display algorithm by stressing on the encoding and decoding process. At the encoder we consider a set of low resolution images which are corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise and motion blur. The low resolution images are compressed using 8 by 8 blocks DCT and noise is filtered using our proposed novel zonal filter. Multifr...

  20. High-Resolution Imaging of Asteroids/Satellites with AO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, William

    2012-02-01

    We propose to make high-resolution observations of asteroids using AO, to measure size, shape, and pole position (spin vectors), and/or to search for satellites. We have demonstrated that AO imaging allows determination of the pole/dimensions in 1 or 2 nights on a single target, rather than the years of observations with lightcurve inversion techniques that only yield poles and axial ratios, not true dimensions. Our new technique (KOALA) combines AO imaging with lightcurve and occultation data for optimum size/shape determinations. We request that LGS be available for faint targets, but using NGS AO, we will measure several large and intermediate asteroids that are favorably placed in spring/summer of 2012 for size/shape/pole. Accurately determining the volume from the often-irregular shape allows us to derive densities to much greater precision in cases where the mass is known, e.g., from the presence of a satellite. We will search several d! ozen asteroids for the presence of satellites, particularly in under-studied populations, particularly NEOs (we have recently achieved the first-ever optical image of an NEO binary [Merline et al. 2008b, IAUC 8977]). Satellites provide a real-life lab for testing collisional models. We will search for satellites around special objects at the request of lightcurve observers, and we will make a search for debris in the vicinity of Pluto, in support of the New Horizons mission. Our shape/size work requires observations over most of a full rotation period (typically several hours).

  1. Atomic-scale imaging of surfaces and interfaces. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, volume 295

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegelsen, David K.; Smith, David J.; Tong, S. Y.

    The gap between imagining and imaging is getting ever smaller. The Atomic-Scale Imaging of Surfaces and Interfaces, Symposium W at the 1992 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, brought together researchers using state-of-the-art imaging techniques capable of resolving atomic features. Methods represented were scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), transmission (TEM) and reflection (REM) electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM or POSAP), high and low energy external source electron holographies, and internal source electron holographies. Some highlights from the STM papers included discussions of the limitations and future potential of STM as well as current findings. Several papers presented work with STM at elevated temperatures. Jene Golovchenko reviewed STM work showing cooperative diffusion events (Pb on Ge) involving many tens of substrate atoms. Don Eigler focused on atomic manipulation and some of its uses to enable fundamental studies of small atomic clusters.

  2. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-11

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits.

  3. High-resolution atomic force microscopy of duplex and triplex DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and triple-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA were deposited on the modified surface of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and visualized using atomic force microscopy with high-resolution (radius of ∼1 nm) tips. The high resolution attained by this technique enabled us to detect single-stranded regions in double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and double-stranded and single-stranded regions in poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) triplexes, as well as to resolve the helical pitch of the triplex molecules. We could also follow the reaction of G-strand extension in poly(dG)-poly(dC) by the Klenow exo- fragment of DNA polymerase I. This approach to molecular visualization could serve as a useful tool for the investigation of irregular structures in canonical DNA and other biopolymers, as well as studies of the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and transcription

  4. High-resolution atomic force microscopy of duplex and triplex DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinov, Dmitry [Laboratory of Physics of Nanostructures, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dwir, Benjamin [Laboratory of Physics of Nanostructures, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kapon, Eli [Laboratory of Physics of Nanostructures, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Borovok, Natalia [Department of Biochemistry, George S Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Molotsky, Tatiana [Department of Biochemistry, George S Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kotlyar, Alexander [Department of Biochemistry, George S Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University (Israel)

    2007-06-06

    Double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and triple-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA were deposited on the modified surface of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and visualized using atomic force microscopy with high-resolution (radius of {approx}1 nm) tips. The high resolution attained by this technique enabled us to detect single-stranded regions in double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and double-stranded and single-stranded regions in poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) triplexes, as well as to resolve the helical pitch of the triplex molecules. We could also follow the reaction of G-strand extension in poly(dG)-poly(dC) by the Klenow exo{sup -} fragment of DNA polymerase I. This approach to molecular visualization could serve as a useful tool for the investigation of irregular structures in canonical DNA and other biopolymers, as well as studies of the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and transcription.

  5. High-resolution atomic force microscopy of duplex and triplex DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinov, Dmitry; Dwir, Benjamin; Kapon, Eli; Borovok, Natalia; Molotsky, Tatiana; Kotlyar, Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and triple-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA were deposited on the modified surface of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and visualized using atomic force microscopy with high-resolution (radius of ~1 nm) tips. The high resolution attained by this technique enabled us to detect single-stranded regions in double-stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) and double-stranded and single-stranded regions in poly(dG)-poly(dG)-poly(dC) triplexes, as well as to resolve the helical pitch of the triplex molecules. We could also follow the reaction of G-strand extension in poly(dG)-poly(dC) by the Klenow exo- fragment of DNA polymerase I. This approach to molecular visualization could serve as a useful tool for the investigation of irregular structures in canonical DNA and other biopolymers, as well as studies of the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and transcription.

  6. Photothermal imaging of damage and undercutting to gold-coated Kapton samples exposed to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. W.; Wood, N. J.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design and construction of a laser-based photothermal imaging system, which we have used to evaluate damage to gold-coated Kapton samples that have been exposed to atomic oxygen in a laboratory atomic oxygen source. This exposure simulates the erosive effects of atomic oxygen on spacecraft materials in low Earth orbits. In particular, thermal wave imaging studies have been carried out for materials that are susceptible to atomic oxygen erosion. The photothermal imaging method is sensitive to invisible subsurface features such as the delamination of barrier coatings used to protect vulnerable substrates.

  7. Snow Cover Maps from MODIS Images at 250 m Resolution, Part 2: Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Zebisch; Christian Steurer; Armin Costa; Roberto Monsorno; Thomas Schellenberger; Anke Tetzlaff; Martial Duguay; Nico Moelg; Claudia Notarnicola

    2013-01-01

    The performance of a new algorithm for binary snow cover monitoring based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images at 250 m resolution is validated using snow cover maps (SCA) based on Landsat 7 ETM+ images and in situ snow depth measurements from ground stations in selected test sites in Central Europe. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are the improved ground resolution of 250 m and the near real-time availability with respect to the 500 m standard Na...

  8. Experimental validation of a high-resolution diffuse optical imaging modality: photomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouizi, Farouk; Luk, Alex; Thayer, Dave; Lin, Yuting; Ha, Seunghoon; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental results that validate our imaging technique termed photomagnetic imaging (PMI). PMI illuminates the medium under investigation with a near-infrared light and measures the induced temperature increase using magnetic resonance imaging. A multiphysics solver combining light and heat propagation is used to model spatiotemporal distribution of temperature increase. Furthermore, a dedicated PMI reconstruction algorithm has been developed to reveal high-resolution optical absorption maps from temperature measurements. Being able to perform measurements at any point within the medium, PMI overcomes the limitations of conventional diffuse optical imaging. We present experimental results obtained on agarose phantoms mimicking biological tissue with inclusions having either different sizes or absorption contrasts, located at various depths. The reconstructed images show that PMI can successfully resolve these inclusions with high resolution and recover their absorption coefficient with high-quantitative accuracy. Even a 1-mm inclusion located 6-mm deep is recovered successfully and its absorption coefficient is underestimated by only 32%. The improved PMI system presented here successfully operates under the maximum skin exposure limits defined by the American National Standards Institute, which opens up the exciting possibility of its future clinical use for diagnostic purposes.

  9. Learning Based Single Frame Image Super-resolution Using Fast Discrete Curvelet Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil A. Patil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (HR images play a vital role in all imaging applications as they offer more details. The images captured by the camera system are of degraded quality due to the imaging system and are low-resolution (LR images. Image super-resolution (SR is a process, where HR image is obtained from combining one or multiple LR images of same scene. In this paper, learning based single frame image super-resolution technique is proposed by using Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform (FDCT coefficients. FDCT is an extension to Cartesian wavelets having anisotropic scaling with many directions and positions, which forms tight wedges. Such wedges allow FDCT to capture the smooth curves and fine edges at multiresolution level. The finer scale curvelet coefficients of LR image are learnt locally from a set of high-resolution training images. The super-resolved image is reconstructed by inverse Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform (IFDCT. This technique represents fine edges of reconstructed HR image by extrapolating the FDCT coefficients from the high-resolution training images. Experimentation based results show appropriate improvements in MSE and PSNR.

  10. Influence of angle's ranges for recording an X-ray fluorescence hologram on reconstructed atomic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hong-Lan; CHEN Jian-Wen; GAO Hong-Yi; ZHU Hua-Feng; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a novel method for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of atomic structure. Theoretically, in an XFH experiment, one has to measure the fluorescence energy on a spherical surface to get well-resolved 3D images of atoms. But in practice, the experimental system arrangement does not allow the measurement of the fluorescent intensity oscillations in the full sphere. The holographic information losses because of the limited sampling range (less than 4π) will directly result in defective reconstructed atomic images. In this work, the atomic image of a Fe single crystal (001) was reconstructed by numerically simulating X-ray fluorescence holograms of the crystal at different recording angle's ranges and step lengths. Influences of the ranges of azimuth angles and polar angles and the step length of polar angles on the reconstructed atomic images were discussed.

  11. Single-shot and single-sensor high/super-resolution microwave imaging based on metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Li, Lianlin; Li, Yunbo; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-06-01

    Real-time high-resolution (including super-resolution) imaging with low-cost hardware is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications. Here, we propose broadband single-shot and single-sensor high-/super-resolution imaging by using a spatio-temporal dispersive metasurface and an imaging reconstruction algorithm. The metasurface with spatio-temporal dispersive property ensures the feasibility of the single-shot and single-sensor imager for super- and high-resolution imaging, since it can convert efficiently the detailed spatial information of the probed object into one-dimensional time- or frequency-dependent signal acquired by a single sensor fixed in the far-field region. The imaging quality can be improved by applying a feature-enhanced reconstruction algorithm in post-processing, and the desired imaging resolution is related to the distance between the object and metasurface. When the object is placed in the vicinity of the metasurface, the super-resolution imaging can be realized. The proposed imaging methodology provides a unique means to perform real-time data acquisition, high-/super-resolution images without employing expensive hardware (e.g. mechanical scanner, antenna array, etc.). We expect that this methodology could make potential breakthroughs in the areas of microwave, terahertz, optical, and even ultrasound imaging.

  12. High resolution mosaic image of capillaries in human retina by adaptive optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ling; Yudong Zhang; Xuejun Rao; Cheng Wang; Yiyun Hu; Wenhan Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) has been proved as a powerful means for high resolution imaging of human retina.Because of the pixel number of charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, the field of view is limited to 1°.In order to have image of capillaries around vivo human fovea, we use mosaic method to obtain high resolution image in area of 6°× 6°. Detailed structures of capillaries around fovea with resolution of 2.3μm are clearly shown. Comparison shows that this method has a much higher resolution than current clinic retina imaging methods.

  13. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  14. Detecting Changes Between Optical Images of Different Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: a Fusion-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraris, Vinicius; Wei, Qi; Chabert, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Change detection is one of the most challenging issues when analyzing remotely sensed images. Comparing several multi-date images acquired through the same kind of sensor is the most common scenario. Conversely, designing robust, flexible and scalable algorithms for change detection becomes even more challenging when the images have been acquired by two different kinds of sensors. This situation arises in case of emergency under critical constraints. This paper presents, to the best of authors' knowledge, the first strategy to deal with optical images characterized by dissimilar spatial and spectral resolutions. Typical considered scenarios include change detection between panchromatic or multispectral and hyperspectral images. The proposed strategy consists of a 3-step procedure: i) inferring a high spatial and spectral resolution image by fusion of the two observed images characterized one by a low spatial resolution and the other by a low spectral resolution, ii) predicting two images with respectively the...

  15. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    CERN Document Server

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  16. Quantitative Z-Contrast Imaging of Supported Metal Complexes and Clusters - A Gateway to Understanding Catalysis on the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, Nigel D.; Aydin, C.; Lu, Jing; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Ortalan, V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-09-01

    Z-contrast imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to observe and quantify the sizes, shapes, and compositions of the metal frames in supported mono-, bi-, and multimetallic metal clusters and can even detect the metal atoms in single-metal-atom complexes, as well as providing direct structural information characterizing the metal-support interface. Herein, we assess the major experimental challenges associated with obtaining atomic resolution Z-contrast images of the materials that are highly beam-sensitive, that is, the clusters readily migrate and sinter on support surfaces, and the support itself can drastically change in structure if the experiment is not properly controlled. Calibrated and quantified Z-contrast images are used in conjunction with exsitu analytical measurements and larger-scale characterization methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to generate an atomic-scale understanding of supported catalysts and their function. Examples of the application of these methods include the characterization of a wide range of sizes and compositions of supported clusters, primarily those incorporating Ir, Os, and Au, on highly crystalline supports (zeolites and MgO).

  17. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described

  18. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described.

  19. 256-MSCT image acquisition with sequential axial scans. Evaluation of image quality and resolution in a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klink, T.; Schwartz, B.; Regier, M.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Nagel, H. [Dr. HD Nagel - Wissenschaft und Technik fuer die Radiologie, Buchholz (Germany); Begemann, P.G. [Roentgeninstitut Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Evaluation of image quality and resolution of varying sequential axial scan protocols utilizing two resolution phantoms with a 256-MSCT scanner. Sequential axial scans were performed on a z-axis and an axial-plane resolution phantom with varying acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Two independent observers evaluated the image quality and resolution, and analyzed quantitative image quality parameters and radiation doses. The best image quality and resolution were achieved with an activated z-flying focal spot (zFFS) and overlapping reconstruction. With an activated zFFS, image degradation was significantly minimized in marginal or overlapping zones of the beam, but the maximum effective detector width was reduced to 82 % and 75 %, respectively depending on the field of view. With a deactivated zFFS, the effective detector width was not restricted, but the image quality decreased and the artifacts increased as the collimation increased. For sequential axial CT data acquisition with multi-planar image reformation, the zFFS technique is crucial to achieve the best image quality and resolution. Major advantages are minimized image degradation and increased spatial resolution along the z-axis, but the zFFS reduces the maximum effective detector width. (orig.)

  20. A theoretical analysis of the super-resolution capacity of imagers using speckle illuminations

    CERN Document Server

    Idier, Jérôme; Liu, Penghuan; Allain, Marc; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Sentenac, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Speckle based imaging consists in forming a super-resolved reconstruction of an unknown object from low-resolution images obtained under random inhomogeneous illuminations (speckles). However, the origin of this super-resolution is unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that, under physically realistic conditions, the correlation of the data have a super-resolution power corresponding to the squaring of the imager point spread function. This theoretical result is important for many practical imaging systems such as acoustic and electromagnetic tomographies, fluorescence and photoacoustic microscopies or synthetic aperture radar imaging.

  1. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Lawrence

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Electro-optic (EO image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1 inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2 EO image edge detection; (3 registration; and (4 blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  2. Super-resolution image transfer by a vortex-like metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Hui Yuan; Fung, Kin Hung; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-01-01

    We propose a vortex-like metamaterial device that is capable of transferring image along a spiral route without losing subwavelength information of the image. The super-resolution image can be guided and magnified at the same time with one single design. Our design may provide insights in manipulating super-resolution image in a more flexible manner. Examples are given and illustrated with numerical simulations.

  3. Far-field fluorescence microscopy beyond the diffraction limit: Fluorescence imaging with ultrahigh resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important and extensively utilised tool for imaging biological systems. However, the image resolution that can be obtained has a limit as defined through the laws of diffraction. Demand for improved resolution has stimulated research into developing methods to image beyond the diffraction limit based on far-field fluorescence microscopy techniques. Rapid progress is being made in this area of science with methods emerging that enable fluorescence imaging in the f...

  4. A novel super resolution scheme to acquire and process satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dong-yu; Su, Xiao-feng; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Gan-quan; Kuang, Ding-bo

    2013-09-01

    Geosynchronous satellite has obvious limitations for the weight and the scale of payloads, and large aperture optical system is not permitted. The optical diffraction limit of small aperture optical system has an adverse impact on the resolution of the acquired images. Therefore, how to get high resolution images using super-resolution technique with the acquired low resolution images becomes a popular problem investigated by researchers. Here, we present a novel scheme to acquire low resolution images and process them to achieve a high resolution image. Firstly, to acquire low resolution images, we adopt a special arrangement pattern of four CCD staggered arrays on the focal plane in the remote sensing satellite framework .These four CCD linear arrays are parallelized with a 0.25√2 pixel shift along the CCD direction and a 1.25 pixel shift along the scanning direction. The rotation angle between the two directions is 45 degree. The tilting sampling mode and the special arrangement pattern allow the sensor to acquire images with a smaller sampling interval which can give the resolution a greater enhancement. Secondly, to reconstruct a high resolution image of pretty good quality with a magnification factor 4, we propose a novel algorithm based on the iterative-interpolation super resolution algorithm (IISR) and the new edge-directed interpolation algorithm (NEDI). The new algorithm makes a critical improvement to NEDI and introduces it into the multi-frame interpolation in IISR. The algorithm can preserve the edges well and requires a relatively small number of low-resolution images to achieve better reconstruction accuracy .In the last part of the paper, we carry out a simulation experiment, and use MSE as the quality measure. The results demonstrate that our new scheme substantially improves the image resolution with both better quantitative quality and visual quality compared with some previous normal methods.

  5. High resolution Doppler imager on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, W.R.; Hays, P.B.; Grassl, H.J.; Gell, D.A.; Burrage, M.D.; Marshall, A.R.; Ortland, D.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite has been providing measurements of the wind field in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere since November 1991. Examination of various calibration data indicates the instrument has remained remarkably stable since launch. The instrument has a thermal drift of about 30 m/s/{degree}C (slightly dependent on wavelength) and a long-term temporal drift that has amounted to about 80 m/s since launch. These effects are removed in the data processing leaving an uncertainty in the instrument stability of {minus}2 nVs. The temperature control of the instrument has improved significantly since launch as a new method was implemented. The initial temperature control held the instrument temperature at about {+-}1{degree}C. The improved method, which holds constant the temperature of the optical bench instead of the radiator, keeps the instrument temperature at about 0.2{degree}C. The calibrations indicate very little change in the sensitivity of the instrument. The detector response has shown no degradation and the optics have not changed their transmittance.

  6. Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

  7. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil and rock microstructure X-ray microtomography is extremely useful. However, as any other imaging technique, this one also has a significant drawback - a trade-off between sample size and resolution. The latter is a significant problem for multi-scale complex structures, especially such as soils and carbonates. Other imaging techniques, for example, SEM/FIB-SEM or X-ray macrotomography can be helpful in obtaining higher resolution or wider field of view. The ultimate goal is to create a single dataset containing information from all scales or to characterize such multi-scale structure. In this contribution we demonstrate a general solution for merging multiscale categorical spatial data into a single dataset using stochastic reconstructions with rescaled correlation functions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by merging three images representing macro, micro and nanoscale spatial information on porous media structure. Images obtained by X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy were fused into a single image with predefined resolution. The methodology is sufficiently generic for implementation of other stochastic reconstruction techniques, any number of scales, any number of material phases, and any number of images for a given scale. The methodology can be further used to assess effective properties of fused porous media images or to compress voluminous spatial datasets for efficient data storage. Potential practical applications of this method are abundant in soil science, hydrology and petroleum engineering, as well as other geosciences. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (X-ray microtomography study of shale

  8. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  9. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Communie

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL, of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P. Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae.

  10. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  11. Research on the affect of differential-images technique to the resolution of infrared spatial camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guang; An, Yuan; Qi, Yingchun; Hu, Fusheng

    2007-12-01

    The optical system of infrared spatial camera adopts bigger relative aperture and bigger pixel size on focal plane element. These make the system have bulky volume and low resolution. The potential of the optical systems can not be exerted adequately. So, one method for improving resolution of infrared spatial camera based on multi-frame difference-images is introduced in the dissertation. The method uses more than one detectors to acquire several difference images, and then reconstructs a new high-resolution image from these images through the relationship of pixel grey value. The technique of difference-images that uses more than two detectors is researched, and it can improve the resolution 2.5 times in theory. The relationship of pixel grey value between low-resolution difference-images and high-resolution image is found by analyzing the energy of CCD sampling, a general relationship between the enhanced times of the resolution of the detected figure with differential method and the least count of CCD that will be used to detect figure is given. Based on the research of theory, the implementation process of utilizing difference-images technique to improve the resolution of the figure was simulated used Matlab software by taking a personality image as the object, and the software can output the result as an image. The result gotten from the works we have finished proves that the technique is available in high-resolution image reconstruction. The resolution of infrared spatial camera can be improved evidently when holding the size of optical structure or using big size detector by applying for difference image technique. So the technique has a high value in optical remote fields.

  12. Higher resolution satellite remote sensing and the impact on image mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Allen H.; Thormodsgard, June M.

    Recent advances in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of civil land remote sensing satellite data are presenting new opportunities for image mapping applications. The U.S. Geological Survey's experimental satellite image mapping program is evolving toward larger scale image map products with increased information content as a result of improved image processing techniques and increased resolution. Thematic mapper data are being used to produce experimental image maps at 1:100,000 scale that meet established U.S. and European map accuracy standards. Availability of high quality, cloud-free, 30-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper sensor, along with 10-meter ground resolution panchromatic and 20-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the recently launched French SPOT satellite, present new cartographic and image processing challenges. The need to fully exploit these higher resolution data increases the complexity of processing the images into large-scale image maps. The removal of radiometric artifacts and noise prior to geometric correction can be accomplished by using a variety of image processing filters and transforms. Sensor modeling and image restoration techniques allow maximum retention of spatial and radiometric information. An optimum combination of spectral information and spatial resolution can be obtained by merging different sensor types. These processing techniques are discussed and examples are presented.

  13. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  14. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  15. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  16. Super-resolution deep imaging with hollow Bessel beam STED microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wentao; Dong, Dashan; Yang, Xusan; Xiao, Yunfeng; Gong, Qihuang; Xi, Peng; Shi, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy has become a powerful imaging and localized excitation method beating the diffraction barrier for improved lateral spatial resolution in cellular imaging, lithography, etc. Due to specimen-induced aberrations and scattering distortion, it has been a great challenge for STED to maintain consistent lateral resolution deeply inside the specimens. Here we report on a deep imaging STED microscopy by using Gaussian beam for excitation and hollow Bessel beam for depletion (GB-STED). The proposed scheme shows the improved imaging depth up to ~155{\\mu}m in solid agarose sample, ~115{\\mu}m in PDMS and ~100{\\mu}m in phantom of gray matter in brain tissue with consistent super resolution, while the standard STED microscopy shown a significantly reduced lateral resolution at the same imaging depth. The results indicate the excellent imaging penetration capability of GB-STED, making it a promising tool for deep 3D imaging optical nanoscopy and laser fabrication.

  17. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  18. Whole-animal functional and developmental imaging with isotropic spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C; Keller, Philipp J

    2015-12-01

    Imaging fast cellular dynamics across large specimens requires high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To meet these requirements, we developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy, which rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. Combining these four views by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution yields images with high resolution in all three dimensions. We demonstrate whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and temporal resolution of 2 Hz for several hours. We also present spatially isotropic whole-brain functional imaging in Danio rerio larvae and spatially isotropic multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across gastrulating Drosophila embryos. Compared with conventional light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  19. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  20. Resolution of ghost imaging with entangled photons for different types of momentum correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, MaLin; Xu, Ping; Lu, LiangLiang; Zhu, ShiNing

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical analysis of the spatial resolution of quantum ghost imaging implemented by entangled photons from a general, spontaneously parametric, down-conversion process. We find that the resolution is affected by both the pump beam waist and the nonlinear crystal length. Hence, we determined a method to improve the resolution for a certain imaging setup. It should be noted that the resolution is not uniquely related to the degree of entanglement of the photon pair since the resolution can be optimized for a certain degree of entanglement. For certain types of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states——namely the momentum-correlated or momentum-positively correlated states——the resolution exhibits a simpler relationship with the pump beam waist and crystal length. Further, a vivid numerical simulation of ghost imaging is presented for different types of EPR states, which supports our analysis. This work discusses applicable references to the applications of quantum ghost imaging.

  1. Radial Basis Function Neural Network Based Super-Resolution Restoration for an Underspled Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏秉华; 金伟其; 牛丽红

    2004-01-01

    To achieve restoration of high frequency information for an underspled and degraded low-resolution image, a nonlinear and real-time processing method-the radial basis function (RBF) neural network based super-resolution method of restoration is proposed. The RBF network configuration and processing method is suitable for a high resolution restoration from an underspled low-resolution image. The soft-competition learning scheme based on the k-means algorithm is used, and can achieve higher mapping approximation accuracy without increase in the network size. Experiments showed that the proposed algorithm can achieve a super-resolution restored image from an underspled and degraded low-resolution image, and requires a shorter training time when compared with the multiplayer perception (MLP) network.

  2. Digitized neutron imaging with high spatial resolution at a low power research reactor: I. Analysis of detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawisky, M.; Hameed, F.; Dyrnjaja, E.; Springer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging techniques provide an indispensable tool for investigation of materials. Neutrons, due to their specific properties, offer a unique probe for many aspects of condensed matter. Neutron imaging techniques present a challenging experimental task, especially at a low power research reactor. The Atomic Institute with a 250 kW TRIGA MARK II reactor looks back at a long tradition in neutron imaging. Here we report on the advantages gained in a recent upgrade of the imaging instrument including the acquisition of a thin-plate scintillation detector, a single counting micro-channel plate detector, and an imaging plate detector in combination with a high resolution scanner. We analyze the strengths and limitations of each detector in the field of neutron radiography and tomography, and demonstrate that high resolution digitized imaging down to the 50 μm scale can be accomplished with weak beam intensities of 1.3×10 5 n/cm 2 s, if appropriate measures are taken for the inevitable extension of measurement times. In a separate paper we will present some promising first results from the fields of engineering and geology.

  3. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution

  4. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  5. Progress in BazookaSPECT: High-Resolution, Dynamic Scintigraphy with Large-Area Imagers

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.; Liu, Zhonglin; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2012-01-01

    We present recent progress in BazookaSPECT, a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray detector. It is a new class of scintillation detector that combines columnar scintillators, image intensifiers, and CCD (charge-coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) sensors for high-resolution imaging. A key feature of the BazookaSPECT paradigm is the capability to easily design custom detectors in terms of the desired intrinsic detector resolution and event detection rate. T...

  6. End-to-End Image Super-Resolution via Deep and Shallow Convolutional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yifan; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Hongyu; Li, Peihua

    2016-01-01

    One impressive advantage of convolutional neural networks (CNNs) is their ability to automatically learn feature representation from raw pixels, eliminating the need for hand-designed procedures. However, recent methods for single image super-resolution (SR) fail to maintain this advantage. They utilize CNNs in two decoupled steps, i.e., first upsampling the low resolution (LR) image to the high resolution (HR) size with hand-designed techniques (e.g., bicubic interpolation), and then applyin...

  7. One-dimensional Fibonacci grating for far-field super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2013-06-15

    One-dimensional Fibonacci gratings are used to transform evanescent waves into propagating waves for far-field super-resolution imaging. By detecting far-field intensity distributions of light through objects in front of the Fibonacci grating in free space, we can observe the objects with nearly λ/9 spatial resolution. Analytical results are verified by numerical simulations. We also discuss the effect of sampling error on imaging resolution of the system. PMID:23938967

  8. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also...

  9. Quantitative imaging of the electrostatic field and potential generated by a transmembrane protein pore at subnanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Hensen, Ulf; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms by which proteins translocate small molecules and ions through transmembrane pores and channels is of great interest in biology, medicine, and nanotechnology. However, the characterization of pore forming proteins in their native state lacks suitable methods that are capable of high-resolution imaging (~1 nm) while simultaneously mapping physical and chemical properties. Here we report how force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging can be applied to image the native pore forming outer membrane protein F (OmpF) at subnanometer resolution and to quantify the electrostatic field and potential generated by the transmembrane pore. We further observe the electrostatic field and potential of the OmpF pore switching "on" and "off" in dependence of the electrolyte concentration. Because electrostatic field and potential select for charged molecules and ions and guide them to the transmembrane pore the insights are of fundamental importance to understand the pore function. These experimental results establish FD-based AFM as a unique tool to image biological systems to subnanometer resolution and to quantify their electrostatic properties. PMID:24079830

  10. High-resolution two-dimensional image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We consider a technique for high-resolution image upconversion of thermal light. Experimentally, we demonstrate cw upconversion with a resolution of more than 200 × 1000 pixels of thermally illuminated objects. This is the first demonstration (to our knowledge) of high-resolution cw image...... upconversion. The upconversion method promises an alternative route to high-quantum-efficiency all-optical imaging in the mid-IR wavelength region and beyond using standard CCD cameras. A particular advantage of CCD cameras compared to state-of-the-art thermal cameras is the possibility to tailor and tune...... the spectral response leading to functional spectral imaging....

  11. Turbulence strength estimation and super-resolution from an arbitrary set of atmospherically degraded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamek, Steve; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2006-08-01

    In remote sensing, atmospheric turbulence and aerosols limit the image quality. For many practical cases turbulence is shown to be dominant, especially for horizontal close-to-earth imaging in hot environments. In a horizontal long-range imaging it is usually impractical to measure path-averaged refractive index structure constant C n2 (which characterizes the turbulence strength) with conventional equipment. In this paper we propose a method for estimation of C n2 based just on the available recorded turbulence-degraded image sequence. The method exploits the turbulence-induced image "dancing". C n2 is extracted from the estimated image shifts variance. Experimental comparison with C n2 measurements using a scintillometer shows reliable estimation results. We also estimate image motion with sub-pixel accuracy for the purpose of obtaining a high-resolution image by applying a simple super-resolution procedure. Results of super-resolution for real imagery are presented.

  12. POCS Based Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Using an Adaptive Regularization Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Panda, S S; Jena, G

    2011-01-01

    Crucial information barely visible to the human eye is often embedded in a series of low-resolution images taken of the same scene. Super-resolution enables the extraction of this information by reconstructing a single image, at a high resolution than is present in any of the individual images. This is particularly useful in forensic imaging, where the extraction of minute details in an image can help to solve a crime. Super-resolution image restoration has been one of the most important research areas in recent years which goals to obtain a high resolution (HR) image from several low resolutions (LR) blurred, noisy, under sampled and displaced images. Relation of the HR image and LR images can be modeled by a linear system using a transformation matrix and additive noise. However, a unique solution may not be available because of the singularity of transformation matrix. To overcome this problem, POCS method has been used. However, their performance is not good because the effect of noise energy has been ign...

  13. 3D multicolor super-resolution imaging offers improved accuracy in neuron tracing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Lakadamyali

    Full Text Available The connectivity among neurons holds the key to understanding brain function. Mapping neural connectivity in brain circuits requires imaging techniques with high spatial resolution to facilitate neuron tracing and high molecular specificity to mark different cellular and molecular populations. Here, we tested a three-dimensional (3D, multicolor super-resolution imaging method, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM, for tracing neural connectivity using cultured hippocampal neurons obtained from wild-type neonatal rat embryos as a model system. Using a membrane specific labeling approach that improves labeling density compared to cytoplasmic labeling, we imaged neural processes at 44 nm 2D and 116 nm 3D resolution as determined by considering both the localization precision of the fluorescent probes and the Nyquist criterion based on label density. Comparison with confocal images showed that, with the currently achieved resolution, we could distinguish and trace substantially more neuronal processes in the super-resolution images. The accuracy of tracing was further improved by using multicolor super-resolution imaging. The resolution obtained here was largely limited by the label density and not by the localization precision of the fluorescent probes. Therefore, higher image resolution, and thus higher tracing accuracy, can in principle be achieved by further improving the label density.

  14. High-Sensitivity In situ Fluorescence Imaging of Ytterbium Atoms in a Two-Dimensional Optical Lattice with Dual Optical Molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    We developed a dual molasses technique which enabled us to perform high-sensitivity in situ fluorescence imaging of ytterbium (Yb) atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice prepared in a thin glass cell. This technique successfully combines two different kinds of optical molasses for Yb atoms, that is, the one using the 1S0-1P1 transition which provides high-resolution in the in situ fluorescence imaging and the other using the 1S0-3P1 transition for cooling the atoms in the optical lattice. We performed in situ imaging of 174Yb atoms and could observe a Moiré pattern with a period of about 6 µm produced by the molasses beam with 556 nm and the optical lattice with 532 nm, which implies that the temperature was kept below the lattice depth during the fluorescence imaging. The number of photons per atom is estimated to be enough for single atom detection with our imaging system. This result is quite promising for the realization of an Yb quantum gas microscope.

  15. VIVA, VLA Imaging of Virgo spirals in Atomic gas: I. The Atlas & The HI Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Aeree; Kenney, Jeffrey D P; Crowl, Hugh; Vollmer, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    We present the result of a new VLA HI Imaging survey of Virgo galaxies, VIVA (the VLA Imaging survey of Virgo galaxies in Atomic gas). The survey includes high resolution HI data of 53 carefully selected late type galaxies (48 spirals and 5 irregular systems). The goal is to study environmental effects on HI gas properties of cluster galaxies to understand which physical mechanisms affect galaxy evolution in different density regions, and to establish how far out the impact of the cluster reaches. As a dynamically young cluster, Virgo contains examples of galaxies experiencing a variety of environmental effects. Its nearness allows us to study each galaxy in great detail. We have selected Virgo galaxies with a range of star formation properties in low to high density regions (at the projected distance from M87, d_87=0.3-3.3 Mpc). Contrary to pr evious studies, more than half of the galaxies in the sample (~60%) are fainter than 12 mag in B_T. Overall, the selected galaxies represent the late type Virgo galaxi...

  16. Enhanced Singular Value Decomposition based Fusion for Super Resolution Image Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Joseph Abraham Sundar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The singular value decomposition (SVD plays a very important role in the field of image processing for applications such as feature extraction, image compression, etc. The main objective is to enhance the resolution of the image based on Singular Value Decomposition. The original image and the subsequent sub-pixel shifted image, subjected to image registration is transferred to SVD domain. An enhanced method of choosing the singular values from the SVD domain images to reconstruct a high resolution image using fusion techniques is proposesed. This technique is called as enhanced SVD based fusion. Significant improvement in the performance is observed by applying enhanced SVD method preceding the various interpolation methods which are incorporated. The technique has high advantage and computationally fast which is most needed for satellite imaging, high definition television broadcasting, medical imaging diagnosis, military surveillance, remote sensing etc.

  17. High resolution 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An optimized method for continuous wave 2-dimensional (2-D) upconversion of incoherent or thermal light is demonstrated and quantified. Using standard resolution targets a resolution of 200×1000 pixels is obtained. The suggested method is viewed in scope of modern CCD cameras operating in the nea...

  18. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution ultrasound imaging: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Hanson, Kenneth; Sandoval, Daniel; Pohl, Jennifer; Williamson, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Imaging breast microcalcifications is crucial for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. It is challenging for current clinical ultrasound to image breast microcalcifications. However, new imaging techniques using data acquired with a synthetic-aperture ultrasound system have the potential to significantly improve ultrasound imaging. We recently developed a super-resolution ultrasound imaging method termed the phase-coherent multiple-signal classification (PC-MUSIC). This signal subspace method accounts for the phase response of transducer elements to improve image resolution. In this paper, we investigate the clinical feasibility of our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method for detecting breast microcalcifications. We use our custom-built, real-time synthetic-aperture ultrasound system to acquire breast ultrasound data for 40 patients whose mammograms show the presence of breast microcalcifications. We apply our super-resolution ultrasound imaging method to the patient data, and produce clear images of breast calcifications. Our super-resolution ultrasound PC-MUSIC imaging with synthetic-aperture ultrasound data can provide a new imaging modality for detecting breast microcalcifications in clinic without using ionizing radiation.

  19. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  20. Single-particle cryoEM analysis at near-atomic resolution from several thousand asymmetric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    A single-particle cryoEM reconstruction of the large ribosomal subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained from a dataset of ∼75,000 particles. The gold-standard and frequency-limited approaches to single-particle refinement were each independently used to determine orientation parameters for the final reconstruction. Both approaches showed similar resolution curves and nominal resolution values for the 60S dataset, estimated at 2.9 Å. The amount of over-fitting present during frequency-limited refinement was quantitatively analyzed using the high-resolution phase-randomization test, and the results showed no apparent over-fitting. The number of asymmetric subunits required to reach specific resolutions was subsequently analyzed by refining subsets of the data in an ab initio manner. With our data collection and processing strategies, sub-nanometer resolution was obtained with ∼200 asymmetric subunits (or, equivalently for the ribosomal subunit, particles). Resolutions of 5.6 Å, 4.5 Å, and 3.8 Å were reached with ∼1000, ∼1600, and ∼5000 asymmetric subunits, respectively. At these resolutions, one would expect to detect alpha-helical pitch, separation of beta-strands, and separation of Cα atoms, respectively. Using this map, together with strategies for ab initio model building and model refinement, we built a region of the ribosomal protein eL6, which was missing in previous models of the yeast ribosome. The relevance for more routine high-resolution structure determination is discussed.

  1. A Bayesian Super-Resolution Approach to Demosaicing of Blurred Images

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Rafael; Katsaggelos Aggelos K; Vega Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Most of the available digital color cameras use a single image sensor with a color filter array (CFA) in acquiring an image. In order to produce a visible color image, a demosaicing process must be applied, which produces undesirable artifacts. An additional problem appears when the observed color image is also blurred. This paper addresses the problem of deconvolving color images observed with a single coupled charged device (CCD) from the super-resolution point of view. Utilizing the Bayes...

  2. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution of ultrasound images

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Karls, Joseph; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Vanderby, Ray; Sethares, William

    2014-01-01

    Modern ultrasound systems can output video images containing more spatial and temporal information than still images. Super-resolution techniques can exploit additional information but face two challenges: image registration and complex motion. In addition, information from multiple available frequencies is unexploited. Herein, we utilised these information sources to create better ultrasound images and videos, extending existing technologies for image capture. Spatial and frequency-based sup...

  3. High resolution crustal image of South California Continental Borderland: Reverse time imaging including multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, A.; Gantela, C.

    2014-12-01

    Strong multiples were observed in marine seismic data of Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE).It is crucial to eliminate these multiples in conventional ray-based or one-way wave-equation based depth image methods. As long as multiples contain information of target zone along travelling path, it's possible to use them as signal, to improve the illumination coverage thus enhance the image quality of structural boundaries. Reverse time migration including multiples is a two-way wave-equation based prestack depth image method that uses both primaries and multiples to map structural boundaries. Several factors, including source wavelet, velocity model, back ground noise, data acquisition geometry and preprocessing workflow may influence the quality of image. The source wavelet is estimated from direct arrival of marine seismic data. Migration velocity model is derived from integrated model building workflow, and the sharp velocity interfaces near sea bottom needs to be preserved in order to generate multiples in the forward and backward propagation steps. The strong amplitude, low frequency marine back ground noise needs to be removed before the final imaging process. High resolution reverse time image sections of LARSE Lines 1 and Line 2 show five interfaces: depth of sea-bottom, base of sedimentary basins, top of Catalina Schist, a deep layer and a possible pluton boundary. Catalina Schist shows highs in the San Clemente ridge, Emery Knoll, Catalina Ridge, under Catalina Basin on both the lines, and a minor high under Avalon Knoll. The high of anticlinal fold in Line 1 is under the north edge of Emery Knoll and under the San Clemente fault zone. An area devoid of any reflection features are interpreted as sides of an igneous plume.

  4. High illumination resolution test of low-light-level image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaofeng; Yin, Lei; Zhu, Yufeng; He, Yingping; Miao, Zhuang; Hu, Wen; Hou, Zhipeng; Shi, Hongli

    2013-08-01

    High illumination resolution, which directly determines the applied characteristic of night vision system in flashlight or high light level condition, is an important performance parameter for evaluating the characteristic of low light level image intensifier used in high light level condition. In this article, according to the limited resolution test technique, the test principle, test condition and test method to high illumination resolution are described in detail associated with operation mode and protective way of low light level image intensifier. Test system for measuring the high illumination resolution has been founded based on the limited resolution test system. The value of high illumination for measuring the high illumination resolution has been calculated in theory and measured by illuminometer. High illumination resolution of low light level image intensifiers have been measured in test system, results show that high illumination resolution test system is satisfied the need for measuring high illumination resolution of low light level image intensifier, and test system output light illumination must be greater than 1×103 lux. Light of high illumination, which can be correctly measured by illuminometer, is transferred legitimately. That is worthwhile to evaluate the operational characteristic of low light level image intensifier.

  5. Three-dimensional atomic-scale imaging of impurity segregation to line defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavette; Cadel; Fraczkiewicz; Menand

    1999-12-17

    Clouds of impurity atoms near line defects are believed to affect the plastic deformation of alloys. Three-dimensional atom probe techniques were used to image these so-called Cottrell atmospheres directly. Ordered iron-aluminum alloys (40 atomic percent aluminum) doped with boron (400 atomic parts per million) were investigated on an atomic scale along the direction. A boron enrichment was observed in the vicinity of an edge dislocation. The enriched region appeared as a three-dimensional pipe 5 nanometers in diameter, tangent to the dislocation line. The dislocation was found to be boron-enriched by a factor of 50 (2 atomic percent) relative to the bulk. The local boron enrichment is accompanied by a strong aluminum depletion of 20 atomic percent. PMID:10600736

  6. Atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy of individual electron trap states using force detected dynamic tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first atomic scale imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electron trap states in completely non-conducting surfaces by dynamic tunnelling force microscopy/spectroscopy. Single electrons are dynamically shuttled to/from individual states in thick films of hafnium silicate and silicon dioxide. The new method opens up surfaces that are inaccessible to the scanning tunnelling microscope for imaging and spectroscopy on an atomic scale.

  7. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cloud imaging using ground-based whole sky imagers is essential for a fine-grained understanding of the effects of cloud formations, which can be useful in many applications. Some such imagers are available commercially, but their cost is relatively high, and their flexibility is limited. Therefore, we built a new daytime Whole Sky Imager (WSI) called Wide Angle High-Resolution Sky Imaging System. The strengths of our new design are its simplicity, low manufacturing cost and high resolution. Our imager captures the entire hemisphere in a single high-resolution picture via a digital camera using a fish-eye lens. The camera was modified to capture light across the visible as well as the near-infrared spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of the device as well as the geometric and radiometric calibration of the imaging system.

  8. AN EFFICIENT SUPER RESOLUTION TECHNIQUE FOR LOSS LESS COMPRESSED BAYER COLOUR FILTER ARRAY IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Chiranjeevi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In digital cameras, Bayer color filter array(CFA images are captured and demosaicing is carried out before compression. Recently, it was found that compression-first schemes outperform the conventionaldemosaicing-first schemes in terms of output image quality. An efficient prediction-based lossless compression and super-resolution schemes are proposed in this paper. Compressed image is coded withrice code. The proposed compression and super resolution schemes can achieve a better compression and high image quality than conventional lossless CFA image coding schemes.

  9. Super-Resolution Imaging on Microfluidic Super-Resolution Near-Field Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pei; TANG Lin; ZHANG Dou-Guo; LU Yong-Hua; JIAO Xiao-Jin; XIE Jian-Ping; MING Hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present a new concept of the microfluidic super-resolution near-field structure (MSRENS) based on a microfluidic structure and a super-resolution near-field structure. The near-field distance control, "nano-probe"and scanning can be realized simultaneously using the MSRENS, which is similar to a near-field scanning optical microscope. The design and simulation results are presented. Numerical simulation has demonstrated that the MSRENS with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit could be applicable in chemistry, biologics, and many other fields.

  10. Ultrafast probing of the x-ray-induced lattice and electron dynamics in graphite at atomic-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau-Riege, S

    2010-10-07

    We used LCLS pulses to excite thin-film and bulk graphite with various different microstructures, and probed the ultrafast ion and electron dynamics through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS). We pioneered XRTS at LCLS, making this technique viable for other users. We demonstrated for the first time that the LCLS can be used to characterize warm-dense-matter through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering. The warm-dense-matter conditions were created using the LCLS beam. Representative examples of the results are shown in the Figure above. In our experiment, we utilized simultaneously both Bragg and two Thomson spectrometers. The Bragg measurements as a function of x-ray fluence and pulse length allows us to characterize the onset of atomic motion at 2 keV with the highest resolution to date. The Bragg detector was positioned in back-reflection, providing us access to scattering data with large scattering vectors (nearly 4{pi}/{lambda}). We found a clear difference between the atomic dynamics for 70 and 300 fs pulses, and we are currently in the process of comparing these results to our models. The outcome of this comparison will have important consequences for ultrafast diffractive imaging, for which it is still not clear if atomic resolution can truly be achieved. The backward x-ray Thomson scattering data suggests that the average graphite temperature and ionization was 10 eV and 1.0, respectively, which agrees with our models. In the forward scattering data, we observed an inelastic feature in the Thomson spectrum that our models currently do not reproduce, so there is food for thought. We are in the process of writing these results up. Depending on if we can combine the Bragg and Thomson data or not, we plan to publish them in a single paper (e.g. Nature or Science) or as two separate papers (e.g. two Phys. Rev. Lett.). We will present the first analysis of the results at the APS Plasma Meeting in November 2010. We had a fantastic experience performing our

  11. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  12. Facial identification in very low-resolution images simulating prosthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M. H.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, J. H.; Park, K. S.

    2012-08-01

    Familiar facial identification is important to blind or visually impaired patients and can be achieved using a retinal prosthesis. Nevertheless, there are limitations in delivering the facial images with a resolution sufficient to distinguish facial features, such as eyes and nose, through multichannel electrode arrays used in current visual prostheses. This study verifies the feasibility of familiar facial identification under low-resolution prosthetic vision and proposes an edge-enhancement method to deliver more visual information that is of higher quality. We first generated a contrast-enhanced image and an edge image by applying the Sobel edge detector and blocked each of them by averaging. Then, we subtracted the blocked edge image from the blocked contrast-enhanced image and produced a pixelized image imitating an array of phosphenes. Before subtraction, every gray value of the edge images was weighted as 50% (mode 2), 75% (mode 3) and 100% (mode 4). In mode 1, the facial image was blocked and pixelized with no further processing. The most successful identification was achieved with mode 3 at every resolution in terms of identification index, which covers both accuracy and correct response time. We also found that the subjects recognized a distinctive face especially more accurately and faster than the other given facial images even under low-resolution prosthetic vision. Every subject could identify familiar faces even in very low-resolution images. And the proposed edge-enhancement method seemed to contribute to intermediate-stage visual prostheses.

  13. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu [Radiotracer Imaging Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2015-03-21

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from {sup 137}Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm {sup 137}Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq {sup 137}Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a {sup 137}Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  14. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  15. MAP estimation for hyperspectral image resolution enhancement using an auxiliary sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Russell C; Eismann, Michael T; Wilson, Gregory L

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a novel maximum a posteriori estimator for enhancing the spatial resolution of an image using co-registered high spatial-resolution imagery from an auxiliary sensor. Here, we focus on the use of high-resolution panchomatic data to enhance hyperspectral imagery. However, the estimation framework developed allows for any number of spectral bands in the primary and auxiliary image. The proposed technique is suitable for applications where some correlation, either localized or global, exists between the auxiliary image and the image being enhanced. To exploit localized correlations, a spatially varying statistical model, based on vector quantization, is used. Another important aspect of the proposed algorithm is that it allows for the use of an accurate observation model relating the "true" scene with the low-resolutions observations. Experimental results with hyperspectral data derived from the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed estimator.

  16. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity. PMID:23146658

  17. Sub-pixel processing for super-resolution scanning imaging system with fiber bundle coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bowen An; Bingbin Xue; Shengda Pan; Guilin Chen

    2011-01-01

    A multilayer fiber bundle is used to couple the image in a remote sensing imaging system. The object image passes through all layers of the fiber bundle in micro-scanning mode. The malposition of adjacent layers arranged in a hexagonal pattern is at sub-pixel scale. Therefore, sub-pixel processing can be applied to improve the spatial resolution. The images coupled by the adjacent layer fibers are separated, and subsequently, the intermediate image is obtained by histogram matching based on one of the separated image called base image. Finally, the intermediate and base images are processed in the frequency domain. The malposition of the adjacent layer fiber is converted to the phase difference in Fourier transform. Considering the limited sensitivity of the experimental instruments and human sight, the image is set as a band-limited signal and the interpolation function of image fusion is found. The results indicate that a super-resolution image with ultra-high spatial resolution is obtained.%@@ A multilayer fiber bundle is used to couple the image in a remote sensing imaging system.The object image passes through all layers of the fiber bundle in micro-scanning mode.The malposition of adjacent layers arranged in a hexagonal pattern is at sub-pixel scale.

  18. Image Super-Resolution via Dual-Dictionary Learning And Sparse Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Chen; Xiong, Ruiqin; Ma, Siwei; Zhao, Debin

    2012-01-01

    Learning-based image super-resolution aims to reconstruct high-frequency (HF) details from the prior model trained by a set of high- and low-resolution image patches. In this paper, HF to be estimated is considered as a combination of two components: main high-frequency (MHF) and residual high-frequency (RHF), and we propose a novel image super-resolution method via dual-dictionary learning and sparse representation, which consists of the main dictionary learning and the residual dictionary l...

  19. Super-Resolution Imaging by Arrays of High-Index Spheres Embedded in Transparent Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Kenneth W; Li, Yangcheng; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I; Walker, Dennis E; Urbas, Augustine M; Astratov, Vasily N

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated thin-films made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with embedded high-index (n~1.9-2.2) microspheres for super-resolution imaging applications. To control the position of microspheres, such films can be translated along the surface of the nanoplasmonic structure to be imaged. Microsphere-assisted imaging, through these matrices, provided lateral resolution of ~{\\lambda}/7 in nanoplasmonic dimer arrays with an illuminating wavelength {\\lambda}=405 nm. Such thin films can be used as contact optical components to boost the resolution capability of conventional microscopes.

  20. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  1. Atomic resolution structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic resolution crystal structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 is reported. The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Å resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Å data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modelled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states

  2. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  3. High-resolution light field reconstruction using a hybrid imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Lin; Hou, GuangQi

    2016-04-01

    Recently, light field cameras have drawn much attraction for their innovative performance in photographic and scientific applications. However, narrow baselines and constrained spatial resolution of current light field cameras impose restrictions on their usability. Therefore, we design a hybrid imaging system containing a light field camera and a high-resolution digital single lens reflex camera, and these two kinds of cameras share the same optical path with a beam splitter so as to achieve the reconstruction of high-resolution light fields. The high-resolution 4D light fields are reconstructed with a phase-based perspective variation strategy. First, we apply complex steerable pyramid decomposition on the high-resolution image from the digital single lens reflex camera. Then, we perform phase-based perspective-shift processing with the disparity value, which is extracted from the upsampled light field depth map, to create high-resolution synthetic light field images. High-resolution digital refocused images and high-resolution depth maps can be generated in this way. Furthermore, controlling the magnitude of the perspective shift enables us to change the depth of field rendering in the digital refocused images. We show several experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  4. Real Space Imaging of Nanoparticle Assembly at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with Nanoscale Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Li-Destri, Giovanni; Thomson, Neil H; Konovalov, Oleg; Pontoni, Diego

    2016-09-14

    Bottom up self-assembly of functional materials at liquid-liquid interfaces has recently emerged as method to design and produce novel two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured membranes and devices with tailored properties. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be seen as a "factory floor" for nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly, because NPs are driven there by a reduction of interfacial energy. Such 2D assembly can be characterized by reciprocal space techniques, namely X-ray and neutron scattering or reflectivity. These techniques have drawbacks, however, as the structural information is averaged over the finite size of the radiation beam and nonperiodic isolated assemblies in 3D or defects may not be easily detected. Real-space in situ imaging methods are more appropriate in this context, but they often suffer from limited resolution and underperform or fail when applied to challenging liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we study the surfactant-induced assembly of SiO2 nanoparticle monolayers at a water-oil interface using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) achieving nanoscale resolved imaging capabilities. Hitherto, AFM imaging has been restricted to solid-liquid interfaces because applications to liquid interfaces have been hindered by their softness and intrinsic dynamics, requiring accurate sample preparation methods and nonconventional AFM operational schemes. Comparing both AFM and grazing incidence X-ray small angle scattering data, we unambiguously demonstrate correlation between real and reciprocal space structure determination showing that the average interfacial NP density is found to vary with surfactant concentration. Additionally, the interaction between the tip and the interface can be exploited to locally determine the acting interfacial interactions. This work opens up the way to studying complex nanostructure formation and phase behavior in a range of liquid-liquid and complex liquid interfaces. PMID:27571473

  5. Real Space Imaging of Nanoparticle Assembly at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with Nanoscale Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Li-Destri, Giovanni; Thomson, Neil H; Konovalov, Oleg; Pontoni, Diego

    2016-09-14

    Bottom up self-assembly of functional materials at liquid-liquid interfaces has recently emerged as method to design and produce novel two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured membranes and devices with tailored properties. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be seen as a "factory floor" for nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly, because NPs are driven there by a reduction of interfacial energy. Such 2D assembly can be characterized by reciprocal space techniques, namely X-ray and neutron scattering or reflectivity. These techniques have drawbacks, however, as the structural information is averaged over the finite size of the radiation beam and nonperiodic isolated assemblies in 3D or defects may not be easily detected. Real-space in situ imaging methods are more appropriate in this context, but they often suffer from limited resolution and underperform or fail when applied to challenging liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we study the surfactant-induced assembly of SiO2 nanoparticle monolayers at a water-oil interface using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) achieving nanoscale resolved imaging capabilities. Hitherto, AFM imaging has been restricted to solid-liquid interfaces because applications to liquid interfaces have been hindered by their softness and intrinsic dynamics, requiring accurate sample preparation methods and nonconventional AFM operational schemes. Comparing both AFM and grazing incidence X-ray small angle scattering data, we unambiguously demonstrate correlation between real and reciprocal space structure determination showing that the average interfacial NP density is found to vary with surfactant concentration. Additionally, the interaction between the tip and the interface can be exploited to locally determine the acting interfacial interactions. This work opens up the way to studying complex nanostructure formation and phase behavior in a range of liquid-liquid and complex liquid interfaces.

  6. A Bayesian Super-Resolution Approach to Demosaicing of Blurred Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the available digital color cameras use a single image sensor with a color filter array (CFA in acquiring an image. In order to produce a visible color image, a demosaicing process must be applied, which produces undesirable artifacts. An additional problem appears when the observed color image is also blurred. This paper addresses the problem of deconvolving color images observed with a single coupled charged device (CCD from the super-resolution point of view. Utilizing the Bayesian paradigm, an estimate of the reconstructed image and the model parameters is generated. The proposed method is tested on real images.

  7. Converting Multi-Shell and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Verstynen, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Multi-shell and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) are becoming increasingly popular methods of acquiring diffusion MRI data in a research context. However, single-shell acquisitions, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), still remain the most common acquisition schemes in practice. Here we tested whether multi-shell and DSI data have conversion flexibility to be interpolated into corresponding HARDI data. We acquired multi-shell and DSI data on both a phantom and in vivo human tissue and converted them to HARDI. The correlation and difference between their diffusion signals, anisotropy values, diffusivity measurements, fiber orientations, connectivity matrices, and network measures were examined. Our analysis result showed that the diffusion signals, anisotropy, diffusivity, and connectivity matrix of the HARDI converted from multi-shell and DSI were highly correlated with those of the HARDI acquired on the MR scanner, with correlation coefficients around 0.8~0.9. The average angular error between converted and original HARDI was 20.7° at voxels with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. The network topology measures had less than 2% difference, whereas the average nodal measures had a percentage difference around 4~7%. In general, multi-shell and DSI acquisitions can be converted to their corresponding single-shell HARDI with high fidelity. This supports multi-shell and DSI acquisitions over HARDI acquisition as the scheme of choice for diffusion acquisitions.

  8. Converting Multi-Shell and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Verstynen, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-shell and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) are becoming increasingly popular methods of acquiring diffusion MRI data in a research context. However, single-shell acquisitions, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), still remain the most common acquisition schemes in practice. Here we tested whether multi-shell and DSI data have conversion flexibility to be interpolated into corresponding HARDI data. We acquired multi-shell and DSI data on both a phantom and in vivo human tissue and converted them to HARDI. The correlation and difference between their diffusion signals, anisotropy values, diffusivity measurements, fiber orientations, connectivity matrices, and network measures were examined. Our analysis result showed that the diffusion signals, anisotropy, diffusivity, and connectivity matrix of the HARDI converted from multi-shell and DSI were highly correlated with those of the HARDI acquired on the MR scanner, with correlation coefficients around 0.8~0.9. The average angular error between converted and original HARDI was 20.7° at voxels with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. The network topology measures had less than 2% difference, whereas the average nodal measures had a percentage difference around 4~7%. In general, multi-shell and DSI acquisitions can be converted to their corresponding single-shell HARDI with high fidelity. This supports multi-shell and DSI acquisitions over HARDI acquisition as the scheme of choice for diffusion acquisitions. PMID:27683539

  9. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  10. Single-Image Super Resolution for Multispectral Remote Sensing Data Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, L.; Körner, M.

    2016-06-01

    In optical remote sensing, spatial resolution of images is crucial for numerous applications. Space-borne systems are most likely to be affected by a lack of spatial resolution, due to their natural disadvantage of a large distance between the sensor and the sensed object. Thus, methods for single-image super resolution are desirable to exceed the limits of the sensor. Apart from assisting visual inspection of datasets, post-processing operations—e.g., segmentation or feature extraction—can benefit from detailed and distinguishable structures. In this paper, we show that recently introduced state-of-the-art approaches for single-image super resolution of conventional photographs, making use of deep learning techniques, such as convolutional neural networks (CNN), can successfully be applied to remote sensing data. With a huge amount of training data available, end-to-end learning is reasonably easy to apply and can achieve results unattainable using conventional handcrafted algorithms. We trained our CNN on a specifically designed, domain-specific dataset, in order to take into account the special characteristics of multispectral remote sensing data. This dataset consists of publicly available SENTINEL-2 images featuring 13 spectral bands, a ground resolution of up to 10m, and a high radiometric resolution and thus satisfying our requirements in terms of quality and quantity. In experiments, we obtained results superior compared to competing approaches trained on generic image sets, which failed to reasonably scale satellite images with a high radiometric resolution, as well as conventional interpolation methods.

  11. The statistics of the thermal motion of the atoms during imaging process in transmission electron microscopy and related techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Axel; Gemming, Thomas; Lichte, Hannes

    2009-01-01

    The concern of this work is the influence of the thermal motion of the atoms on electron scattering simulations, used for quantitative interpretation of results in high-resolution electron microscopy. We distinguish between the influence of inelastic phonon excitation and the effect of a moving lattice on images generated by elastically scattered electrons. It is shown that, analog to aberrations, the impact of a moving lattice differs substantially with respect to different imaging conditions and cannot be described by the Debye-Waller damping applicable in XRD. We derive a new formalism, based on the frozen lattice and multislice approach, to incorporate the statistics of the thermal motion into elastic TEM imaging simulations, taking into account different imaging conditions. The averaging over different atom positions is generally performed within a density matrix framework, which can be linearized in the special case of off-axis electron holography. All findings are supported by explicit numerical simulations: molecular dynamics simulations are performed to get a realistic thermal motion and the electron scattering simulations are performed within the new multislice algorithm. PMID:19027234

  12. Miniaturized Imager for Low Energy Neutral Atoms (MILENA) Flown Feb. 7, 2013 on the VISIONS Sounding Rocket Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, J.; Collier, M. R.; Keller, J. W.; Rowland, D. E.; Kujawski, J. T.; Chornay, D. J.; Dobson, N.; Rozmarynowski, P.; Simms, K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Clemmons, J.; Hecht, J. H.; Lemon, C.; Klenzing, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two MILENA imagers flown during the VISIONS (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) Mission imaged energetic neutral atoms (ENA's) during the onset of an auroral substorm, Feb. 7, 2013. MILENA imagers are high energy resolution top-hat analyzers that use a polished tungsten venetian-blind assembly to convert ENA's into ions that are then energy analyzed via an electrostatic toroidal deflection analyzer. An ENA energy spectrum in the range 0.01 to 10 keV can be acquired. The top-hat analyzer enables a 360 degree field-of-view incorporating 6 individual sectors to spatially resolve active regions with an azimuthal span of approximately 10 degrees. The evaluation of the instrument sensitivity as a function of the effective geometric factor will be discussed. By design, the MILENA instruments minimize background from UV photons and rejects ions and electrons. The small size, low weight and power requirements makes MILENA ideal for sounding rocket missions, and an important flight instrument for advancing planetary science.

  13. Tools for Model Building and Optimization into Near-Atomic Resolution Electron Cryo-Microscopy Density Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, F; Chiu, W

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) has advanced dramatically to become a viable tool for high-resolution structural biology research. The ultimate outcome of a cryoEM study is an atomic model of a macromolecule or its complex with interacting partners. This chapter describes a variety of algorithms and software to build a de novo model based on the cryoEM 3D density map, to optimize the model with the best stereochemistry restraints and finally to validate the model with proper protocols. The full process of atomic structure determination from a cryoEM map is described. The tools outlined in this chapter should prove extremely valuable in revealing atomic interactions guided by cryoEM data. PMID:27572730

  14. Image tiling for a high-resolution helmet-mounted display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Aye, Tin M.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Tengara, Indra; Tun, Nay; Win, Tin; Holmstedt, Jason; Schindler, Axel; Hergert, Steffen

    2005-05-01

    Head-mounted or helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) have long proven invaluable for many military applications. Integrated with head position, orientation, and/or eye-tracking sensors, HMDs can be powerful tools for training. For such training applications as flight simulation, HMDs need to be lightweight and compact with good center-of-gravity characteristics, and must display realistic full-color imagery with eye-limited resolution and large field-of-view (FOV) so that the pilot sees a truly realistic out-the-window scene. Under bright illumination, the resolution of the eye is ~300 μr (1 arc-min), setting the minimum HMD resolution. There are several methods of achieving this resolution, including increasing the number of individual pixels on a CRT or LCD display, thereby increasing the size, weight, and complexity of the HMD; dithering the image to provide an apparent resolution increase at the cost of reduced frame rate; and tiling normal resolution subimages into a single, larger high-resolution image. Physical Optics Corporation (POC) is developing a 5120 × 4096 pixel HMD covering 1500 × 1200 mr with resolution of 300 μr by tiling 20 subimages, each of which has a resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels, in a 5 × 4 array. We present theory and results of our preliminary development of this HMD, resulting in a 4k × 1k image tiled from 16 subimages, each with resolution 512 × 512, in an 8 × 2 array.

  15. A fast and automatic mosaic method for high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongshun; He, Hui; Xiao, Hongyu; Huang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fast and fully automatic mosaic method for high-resolution satellite images. First, the overlapped rectangle is computed according to geographical locations of the reference and mosaic images and feature points on both the reference and mosaic images are extracted by a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm only from the overlapped region. Then, the RANSAC method is used to match feature points of both images. Finally, the two images are fused into a seamlessly panoramic image by the simple linear weighted fusion method or other method. The proposed method is implemented in C++ language based on OpenCV and GDAL, and tested by Worldview-2 multispectral images with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. Results show that the proposed method can detect feature points efficiently and mosaic images automatically.

  16. A Statistical Definition of Image Resolution Based on the Correlation of Pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jian-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Resolution, usually defined by the Rayleigh criterion or the Full Width at Half Maximum of a Point Spread Function, is a basic property of an image. Here, we present a new statistical definition of image resolution based on the cross-correlation properties of the pixels in an image. It is shown that the new definition of image resolution depends not only on the PSF of an imaging device, but also on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data and on the structures of an object. In an image, the resolution does not have to be uniform. Our new definition is also suitable for the interpretation of the result of a deconvolution. We illustrate this, in this paper, with a Wiener deconvolution. It is found that weak structures can be extracted from low signal-to-noise ratio data, but with low resolution; a high-resolution image was obtained from high signal-to-noise ratio data after a Wiener deconvolution. The new definition can also be used to compare various deconvolution algorithms on their processing effects, such as r...

  17. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  18. Very high resolution satellite data: New challenges in image analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    with the exception that a ground-based view covers the entire optical range from 400 to 700 nm while satellite images will be wavelength-specific. Although the images will not surpass details observed by a human eye, they will, in principle, be comparable with aerial...

  19. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  20. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.