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Sample records for atomic resolution images

  1. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  2. Imaging enzyme kinetics at atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, John; Lattman, Eaton

    2016-01-01

    Serial crystallography at a synchrotron has been used to obtain time-resolved atomic resolution density maps of enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase. Similar XFEL studies, intended to out-run radiation damage, will also soon appear.

  3. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  4. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  5. High resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Campos, J D; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the optical imaging of a single atom with nanometer resolution using an adaptive optical alignment technique that is applicable to general optical microscopy. By decomposing the image of a single laser-cooled atom, we identify and correct optical aberrations in the system and realize an atomic position sensitivity of $\\approx$ 0.5 nm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom, and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus 3D particle tracking, imaging of atoms in 3D optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10$^{-24}$ N) scale.

  6. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  7. Atomic-Resolution Spectrum Imaging of Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Reza R; Hage, Fredrik S; Lehmann, Sebastian; Ramasse, Quentin M; Dick, Kimberly A

    2017-11-13

    Over the past decade, III-V heterostructure nanowires have attracted a surge of attention for their application in novel semiconductor devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The functionality of such devices critically depends on the specific atomic arrangement at the semiconductor heterointerfaces. However, most of the currently available characterization techniques lack sufficient spatial resolution to provide local information on the atomic structure and composition of these interfaces. Atomic-resolution spectrum imaging by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a powerful technique with the potential to resolve structure and chemical composition with sub-angstrom spatial resolution and to provide localized information about the physical properties of the material at the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic-resolution EELS to understand the interface atomic arrangement in three-dimensional heterostructures in semiconductor nanowires. We observed that the radial interfaces of GaSb-InAs heterostructure nanowires are atomically abrupt, while the axial interface in contrast consists of an interfacial region where intermixing of the two compounds occurs over an extended spatial region. The local atomic configuration affects the band alignment at the interface and, hence, the charge transport properties of devices such as GaSb-InAs nanowire TFETs. STEM-EELS thus represents a very promising technique for understanding nanowire physical properties, such as differing electrical behavior across the radial and axial heterointerfaces of GaSb-InAs nanowires for TFET applications.

  8. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  9. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  10. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  11. High resolution imaging of the dolomite (104) cleavage surface by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pina Martínez, Carlos Manuel; Pimentel, Carlos; García Merino, Marta

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of dolomite (104) cleavage surfaces immersed in pure water. These images show a rectangular lattice with surface unit cell dimensions in general agreement with those derived from the dolomite bulk structure. Furthermore, the twodimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) plots of the high resolution images exhibit a pattern of periodicities consistent with both the alternate orientation of the carbonate ...

  12. Aberration-corrected STEM for atomic-resolution imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, O L; Lovejoy, T C; Dellby, N

    2015-09-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes are able to form electron beams smaller than 100 pm, which is about half the size of an average atom. Probing materials with such beams leads to atomic-resolution images, electron energy loss and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra obtained from single atomic columns and even single atoms, and atomic-resolution elemental maps. We review briefly how such electron beams came about, and show examples of applications. We also summarize recent developments that are propelling aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes in new directions, such as complete control of geometric aberration up to fifth order, and ultra-high-energy resolution EELS that is allowing vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Lattice and strain analysis of atomic resolution Z-contrast images based on template matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianzuo@uiuc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Shah, Amish B. [Center for Microanalysis of Materials, Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kim, Honggyu; Meng, Yifei; Gao, Wenpei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rouviére, Jean-Luc [CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble UMR-E, SP2M, LEMMA, Minatec, Grenoble 38054 (France)

    2014-01-15

    A real space approach is developed based on template matching for quantitative lattice analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images. The method, called TeMA, uses the template of an atomic column, or a group of atomic columns, to transform the image into a lattice of correlation peaks. This is helped by using a local intensity adjusted correlation and by the design of templates. Lattice analysis is performed on the correlation peaks. A reference lattice is used to correct for scan noise and scan distortions in the recorded images. Using these methods, we demonstrate that a precision of few picometers is achievable in lattice measurement using aberration corrected Z-contrast images. For application, we apply the methods to strain analysis of a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice. The results show alternating epitaxial strain inside the superlattice and its variations across interfaces at the spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell. Our methods are general, model free and provide high spatial resolution for lattice analysis. - Highlights: • A real space approach is developed for strain analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images and template matching. • A precision of few picometers is achievable in the measurement of lattice displacements. • The spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell is demonstrated for a LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} superlattice grown by MBE.

  14. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, César; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, Tomoko K; Custance, Oscar

    2015-04-08

    Submolecular imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been established as a stunning technique to reveal the chemical structure of unknown molecules, to characterize intramolecular charge distributions and bond ordering, as well as to study chemical transformations and intermolecular interactions. So far, most of these feats were achieved on planar molecular systems because high-resolution imaging of three-dimensional (3D) surface structures with AFM remains challenging. Here we present a method for high-resolution imaging of nonplanar molecules and 3D surface systems using AFM with silicon cantilevers as force sensors. We demonstrate this method by resolving the step-edges of the (101) anatase surface at the atomic scale by simultaneously visualizing the structure of a pentacene molecule together with the atomic positions of the substrate and by resolving the contour and probe-surface force field on a C60 molecule with intramolecular resolution. The method reported here holds substantial promise for the study of 3D surface systems such as nanotubes, clusters, nanoparticles, polymers, and biomolecules using AFM with high resolution.

  15. Implementing an Accurate and Rapid Sparse Sampling Approach for Low-Dose Atomic Resolution STEM Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovarik, Libor; Stevens, Andrew J.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-10-17

    Aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) has dramatically increased spatial image resolution for beam-stable materials, but it is the sample stability rather than the microscope that often limits the practical resolution of STEM images. To extract physical information from images of beam sensitive materials it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in scan coils, we show that sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by factor of 5x relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dose issues.

  16. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  18. Implementing an accurate and rapid sparse sampling approach for low-dose atomic resolution STEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, L.; Stevens, A.; Liyu, A.; Browning, N. D.

    2016-10-01

    While aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) dramatically increased the spatial resolution obtainable in the images of materials that are stable under the electron beam, the practical resolution of many STEM images is now limited by the sample stability rather than the microscope. To extract physical information from the images of beam sensitive materials, it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here, we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in the scan coils, we show that a sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by at least a factor of 5× relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected the Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dosage issues.

  19. Atomic force microscopy: High resolution dynamic imaging of cellular and molecular structure in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Douglas J; Quinn, Anthony S; Rand, Jacob H; Jena, Bhanu P

    2013-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), invented in 1986, and a member of the scanning probe family of microscopes, offers the unprecedented ability to image biological samples unfixed and in a hydrated environment at high resolution. This opens the possibility to investigate biological mechanisms temporally in a heretofore unattainable resolution. We have used AFM to investigate: (1) fundamental issues in cell biology (secretion) and, (2) the pathological basis of a human thrombotic disease, the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These studies have incorporated the imaging of live cells at nanometer resolution, leading to discovery of the "porosome," the universal secretory portal in cells, and a molecular understanding of membrane fusion from imaging the interaction and assembly of proteins between opposing lipid membranes. Similarly, the development of an in vitro simulacrum for investigating the molecular interactions between proteins and lipids has helped define an etiological explanation for APS. The prime importance of AFM in the success of these investigations will be presented in this manuscript, as well as a discussion of the limitations of this technique for the study of biomedical samples. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  1. Phase measurement of atomic resolution image using transport of intensity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Kazuo; Allman, Brendan

    2005-06-01

    Since the Transport Intensity Equation (TIE) has been applied to electron microscopy only recently, there are controversial discussions in the literature regarding the theoretical concepts underlying the equation and the practical techniques to solve the equation. In this report we explored some of the issues regarding the TIE, especially bearing electron microscopy in mind, and clarified that: (i) the TIE for electrons exactly corresponds to the Schrödinger equation for high-energy electrons in free space, and thus the TIE does not assume weak scattering; (ii) the TIE can give phase information at any distance from the specimen, not limited to a new field; (iii) information transfer in the TIE for each spatial frequency g will be multiplied by g2 and thus low frequency components will be dumped more with respect to high frequency components; (vi) the intensity derivative with respect to the direction of wave propagation is well approximated by using a set of three symmetric images; and (v) a substantially larger defocus distance than expected before can be used for high-resolution electron microscopy. In the second part of this report we applied the TIE down to atomic resolution images to obtain phase information and verified the following points experimentally: (i) although low frequency components are attenuated in the TIE, all frequencies will be recovered satisfactorily except the very low frequencies; and (ii) using a reconstructed phase and the measured image intensity we can correct effectively the defects of imaging, such as spherical aberrations as well as partial coherence.

  2. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  3. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Z., E-mail: zhongbo.lee@uni-ulm.de; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-10-15

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions.

  4. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    OpenAIRE

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of...

  5. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...... Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.......We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent...

  6. Atomic force microscopy with nanoelectrode tips for high resolution electrochemical, nanoadhesion and nanoelectrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Michael R.; Chen, Yikai; Mark, Andreas; Gödrich, Sebastian; Stelling, Christian; Jiang, Jingjing; Poddar, Rakesh; Li, Chunzeng; Kumar, Ravi; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Huang, Zhuangqun; Xiang, Chengxiang; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal nano-imaging in electrochemical environments is important across many areas of science and technology. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) platform with a nanoelectrode probe is reported. In combination with PeakForce tapping AFM mode, the simultaneous characterization of surface topography, quantitative nanomechanics, nanoelectronic properties, and electrochemical activity is demonstrated. The nanoelectrode probe is coated with dielectric materials and has an exposed conical Pt tip apex of ∼200 nm in height and of ∼25 nm in end-tip radius. These characteristic dimensions permit sub-100 nm spatial resolution for electrochemical imaging. With this nanoelectrode probe we have extended AFM-based nanoelectrical measurements to liquid environments. Experimental data and numerical simulations are used to understand the response of the nanoelectrode probe. With PeakForce SECM, we successfully characterized a surface defect on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode showing correlated topographical, electrochemical and nanomechanical information at the highest AFM-SECM resolution. The SECM nanoelectrode also enabled the measurement of heterogeneous electrical conductivity of electrode surfaces in liquid. These studies extend the basic understanding of heterogeneity on graphite/graphene surfaces for electrochemical applications.

  7. Influence of surface relaxation of strained layers on atomic resolution ADF imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Surface relaxation of thin transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens of strained layers results in a severe bending of lattice planes. This bending significantly displaces atoms from their ideal channeling positions which has a strong impact on the measured annular dark field (ADF) intensity. With the example of GaAs quantum wells (QW) embedded in a GaP barrier, we model the resulting displacements by elastic theory using the finite element (FE) formalism. Relaxed and unrelaxed super cells served as input for state of the art frozen phonon simulation of atomic resolution ADF images. We systematically investigate the dependencies on the sample´s geometric parameters, i.e. QW width and TEM sample thickness, by evaluating the simulated intensities at the atomic column´s positions as well as at the background positions in between. Depending on the geometry the ADF intensity can be affected in a range several nm from the actual interface. Moreover, we investigate the influence of the surface relaxation on the angular distribution of the scattered intensity. At high scattering angles we observe an intensity reduction at the interface as well as in the GaP barrier due to de-channeling. The amount of intensity reduction at an atomic column is directly proportional to its mean square displacement. On the contrary we find a clearly increased intensity at low angles caused by additional diffuse scattering. We discuss the implications for quantitative evaluations as well as strategies to compensate for the reduced intensities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detecting and locating light atoms from high-resolution STEM images: The quest for a single optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the optimal detector design is investigated for both detecting and locating light atoms from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. The principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for the detection of light atoms from HR STEM images. To determine the optimal experiment design for locating light atoms, use is made of the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB). It is investigated if a single optimal design can be found for both the detection and location problem of light atoms. Furthermore, the incoming electron dose is optimised for both research goals and it is shown that picometre range precision is feasible for the estimation of the atom positions when using an appropriate incoming electron dose under the optimal detector settings to detect light atoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO{sub 3}: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Lei [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Barthel, Juri [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Jia, Chun-Lin [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, (Germany); School of Electronic and Information Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • First time resolution of 57 pm atom separations by HRTEM with 200 keV electrons. • Quantification of the image spread by absolute matching of experiment and simulation. • An information limit of 52 pm is deduced from the determined image spread. • Substantial deviations from the bulk structure are observed for the ultra-thin sample. - Abstract: The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200 kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  10. Analysis and Calibration of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy Images with atomic Resolution Influenced by Surface Drift Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    The influence of surface drift velocities on in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments with atomic resolution is analysed experimentally and mathematically. Constant drift velocities much smaller than the speed of scanning can in many in situ STM experiments with atomic resolution...... result in an apparent surface reconstruction. It is shown that a surface atomic structure can be distorted and observed as another atomic structure entirely owing to a constant drift velocity in the plane of the surface. The image can be resolved mathematically and the components of the drift velocity...... as well as the vectors of the non-distorted surface lattice can be determined. The calibration of distances can thus be carried out also when the image is influenced by drift. Results with gold surfaces and graphite surfaces are analysed and discussed....

  11. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Lozano, J G; Pennycook, T J; Jones, L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2015-06-04

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures.

  12. StatSTEM: An efficient program for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Van den Broek, W.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2017-09-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced in order to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for the overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, is investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  13. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Polymeric spatial resolution test patterns for mass spectrometry imaging using nano-thermal analysis with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tamin; Kertesz, Vilmos; Lin, Ming-Wei; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Hensley, Dale K; Xiao, Kai; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2017-07-30

    As the spatial resolution of mass spectrometry imaging technologies has begun to reach into the nanometer regime, finding readily available or easily made resolution reference materials has become particularly challenging for molecular imaging purposes. This paper describes the fabrication, characterization and use of vertical line array polymeric spatial resolution test patterns for nano-thermal analysis/atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry chemical imaging. Test patterns of varied line width (0.7 or 1.0 μm) and spacing (0.7 or 1.0 μm) were created in an ~1-μm-thick poly(methyl methacrylate) thin film using electron beam lithography. The patterns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy topography and nano-thermal analysis/mass spectrometry imaging. The efficacy of these polymeric test patterns for the advancement of chemical imaging techniques was illustrated by their use to judge the spatial resolution improvement achieved by heating the ionization interface of the current instrument platform. The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.4 μm, based on the ability to statistically distinguish 0.7-μm-wide lines separated by 0.7-μm-wide spacings in those images when the interface cross was heated to 200°C. This work illustrates that e-beam lithography is a viable method to create spatial resolution test patterns in a thin film of high molecular weight polymer to allow unbiased judgment of intra-laboratory advancement and/or inter-laboratory comparison of instrument advances in nano-thermal analysis/atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry chemical imaging. Published in 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published in 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  16. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Bos, K.H.W. van den [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den Broek, W. [AG Strukturforschung/Elektronenmikroskopie, Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-12-15

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license. - Highlights: • An efficient model-based method for quantitative electron microscopy is introduced. • Images are modelled as a superposition of 2D Gaussian peaks. • Overlap between neighbouring columns is taken into account. • Structure parameters can be obtained with the highest precision and accuracy. • StatSTEM, auser friendly program (GNU public license) is developed.

  17. High-Resolution Imaging of Polyethylene Glycol Coated Dendrimers via Combined Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Riechers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers have shown great promise as drug delivery vehicles in recent years because they can be synthesized with designed size and functionalities for optimal transportation, targeting, and biocompatibility. One of the most well-known termini used for biocompatibility is polyethylene glycol (PEG, whose performance is affected by its actual conformation. However, the conformation of individual PEG bound to soft materials such as dendrimers has not been directly observed. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, this work characterizes the structure adopted by PEGylated dendrimers with the highest resolution reported to date. AFM imaging enables visualization of the individual dendrimers, as well as the differentiation and characterization of the dendrimer core and PEG shell. STM provides direct imaging of the PEG extensions with high-resolution. Collectively, this investigation provides important insight into the structure of coated dendrimers, which is crucial for the design and development of better drug delivery vehicles.

  18. Robust High-Resolution Imaging and Quantitative Force Spectroscopy in Vacuum with Tuned-Oscillator Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Udo; Dagdeviren, Omur; GöTzen, Jan; HöLscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric

    Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact atomic force microscopy has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement. Financial support from National Science Foundation through the Yale Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (Grant No. MRSEC DMR-1119826) is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Tomographic diffractive imaging of monolayer crystals at atomic resolution with onedimensional compact support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierstall, U.; Spence, J.; Hembree, G.

    2003-09-01

    A solution to the phase problem for diffraction by two-dimensional crystalline slabs is described, based on the application of a compact support normal to the slab. Specifically we apply the iterative Gerchberg-Saxton-Fienup algorithm to simulated three-dimensional transmission electron diffraction data from monolayer organic crystals. We find that oversampling normal to the monolayer alone does not solve the phase problem in this geometry in general. However, based on simulations for a crystalline monolayer (tetracyanoethylene), we find that convergence is obtained if phases are supplied from a few high-resolution electron microscope images recorded at small tilts to the beam direction. Since current cryomicroscopy methods required a large number of images to phase tomographic diffraction data, this method should greatly reduce the labor involved in data acquisition and analysis in cryo-electron microscopy of organic thin crystals by avoiding the need to record images at high tilt angles. We discuss also the use of laser tweezers as a method of supporting nanoparticles in TEM for diffractive imaging

  20. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Structural Ordering in a Complex Metal Oxide Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-08-28

    The determination of the atomic structure of a functional material is crucial to understanding its "structure-to-property" relationship (e.g., the active sites in a catalyst), which is however challenging if the structure possesses complex inhomogeneities. Here, we report an atomic structure study of an important MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst that is potentially useful for the industrially relevant propane-based BP/SOHIO process. We combined aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with synchrotron powder X-ray crystallography to explore the structure at both nanoscopic and macroscopic scales. At the nanoscopic scale, this material exhibits structural and compositional order within nanosized "domains", while the domains show disordered distribution at the macroscopic scale. We proposed that the intradomain compositional ordering and the interdomain electric dipolar interaction synergistically induce the displacement of Te atoms in the Mo-V-O channels, which determines the geometry of the multifunctional metal oxo-active sites.

  1. Viscoelasticity of Living Cells Allows High Resolution Imaging by Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to biological objects and processes under physiological conditions has been hampered so far by the deformation and destruction of the soft biological materials invoked. Here we describe a new mode of operation in which the standard V-shaped silicon

  2. Atomic-resolution imaging in liquid by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using small cantilevers with megahertz-order resonance frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, T; Onishi, K; Kobayashi, N; Matsuki, A; Asakawa, H

    2012-04-06

    In this study, we have investigated the performance of liquid-environment FM-AFM with various cantilevers having different dimensions from theoretical and experimental aspects. The results show that reduction of the cantilever dimensions provides improvement in the minimum detectable force as long as the tip height is sufficiently long compared with the width of the cantilever. However, we also found two important issues to be overcome to achieve this theoretically expected performance. The stable photothermal excitation of a small cantilever requires much higher pointing stability of the exciting laser beam than that for a long cantilever. We present a way to satisfy this stringent requirement using a temperature controlled laser diode module and a polarization-maintaining optical fiber. Another issue is associated with the tip. While a small carbon tip formed by electron beam deposition (EBD) is desirable for small cantilevers, we found that an EBD tip is not suitable for atomic-scale applications due to the weak tip-sample interaction. Here we show that the tip-sample interaction can be greatly enhanced by coating the tip with Si. With these improvements, we demonstrate atomic-resolution imaging of mica in liquid using a small cantilever with a megahertz-order resonance frequency. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the improvement in the minimum detectable force obtained by the small cantilever in measurements of oscillatory hydration forces.

  3. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-05-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures.

  4. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  5. Quantitative High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gamm, B.; Popescu, R.; Blank, H.; Schneider, R; Beyer, A.; Gölzhäuser, A.; Gerthsen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Single atoms can be considered as basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling of image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate which induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weick...

  6. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  7. Atomic resolution imaging of precipitate transformation from cubic TaN to tetragonal CrTaN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2012-01-01

    In 9–12% Cr creep-resistant steels Cr(V,Nb,Ta)N Z-phase is known to replace metastable (V,Nb,Ta)N MN precipitates at high temperatures. The precipitation process of Z-phase does not follow the classical nucleation theory, where dissolving MN particles provide constituents for Z-phase nucleation...... in the matrix. Using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy, the current work demonstrates that metastable cubic TaN precipitates in a complex steel gradually transform compositionally and crystallographically into stable tetragonal CrTaN precipitates under the influence of Cr indiffusion from...... the steel matrix....

  8. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and manipulation of nanoscale matter. Unfortunately, standard AFM imaging requires a timescale on the order of seconds to minutes to acquire an image which makes it complicated to observe dynamic processes...

  9. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  10. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  11. A high resolution ion microscope for cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Markus; Schefzyk, Hannah; Fortágh, József; Günther, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We report on an ion-optical system that serves as a microscope for ultracold ground state and Rydberg atoms. The system is designed to achieve a magnification of up to 1000 and a spatial resolution in the 100 nm range, thereby surpassing many standard imaging techniques for cold atoms. The microscope consists of four electrostatic lenses and a microchannel plate in conjunction with a delay line detector in order to achieve single particle sensitivity with high temporal and spatial resolution. We describe the design process of the microscope including ion-optical simulations of the imaging system and characterize aberrations and the resolution limit. Furthermore, we present the experimental realization of the microscope in a cold atom setup and investigate its performance by patterned ionization with a structure size down to 2.7 μm. The microscope meets the requirements for studying various many-body effects, ranging from correlations in cold quantum gases up to Rydberg molecule formation.

  12. Atomic Resolution Structural and Chemical Imaging Revealing the Sequential Migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the Battery Cycling of Layered Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-06-14

    Layered lithium transition metal oxides (LTMO) are promising candidate cathode materials for next-generation high-energy density lithium ion battery. The challenge for using this category of cathode is the capacity and voltage fading, which is believed to be associated with the layered structure disordering, a process that is initiated from the surface or solid-electrolyte interface and facilitated by transition metal (TM) reduction and oxygen vacancy formation. However, the atomic level dynamic mechanism of such a layered structure disordering is still not fully clear. In this work, utilizing atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we map, for the first time at atomic scale, the spatial evolution of Ni, Co and Mn in a cycled LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 layered cathode. In combination with atomic level structural imaging, we discovered the direct correlation of TM ions migration behavior with lattice disordering, featuring the residing of TM ions in the tetrahedral site and a sequential migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the increased lattice disordering of the layered structure. This work highlights that Ni ions, though acting as the dominant redox species in many LTMO, are labile to migrate to cause lattice disordering upon battery cycling, while the Mn ions are more stable as compared with Ni and Co and can act as pillar to stabilize layered structure. Direct visualization of the behavior of TM ions during the battery cycling provides insight for designing of cathode with high structural stability and correspondingly a superior performance.

  13. Atomic Resolution Structural and Chemical Imaging Revealing the Sequential Migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the Battery Cycling of Layered Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-05-11

    Layered lithium transition metal oxides (LTMO) are promising candidate cathode materials for next generation high energy density lithium ion battery. The challenge for using this category of cathode is the capacity and voltage fading, which is believed to be associated with the layered structure disordering, a process that is initiated from the surface or solid-electrolyte interface and facilitated by transition metal (TM) reduction and oxygen vacancy formation. However, the atomic level dynamic mechanism of such a layered structure disordering is still not fully clear. In this work, utilizing atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we map, for the first time at atomic scale, the spatial evolution of Ni, Co and Mn in a cycled LiNi1/3M1/3Co1/3O2 layered cathode. In combination with atomic level structural imaging, we discovered the direct correlation of TM ions migration behavior with lattice disordering, featuring the residing of TM ions in the tetrahedral site and a sequential migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the increased lattice disordering of the layered structure. This work highlights that Ni ions, though acting as the dominant redox species in many LTMO, are labile to migrate to cause lattice disordering upon battery cycling; while the Mn ions are more stable as compared with Ni and Co and can act as pillar to stabilize layered structure. Direct visualization of the behavior of TM ions during the battery cycling provides insight for designing of cathode with structural stability and correspondingly a superior performance.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  15. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  16. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  17. Stitching Grid-wise Atomic Force Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mathias Zacho; Bengtson, Stefan Hein; Pedersen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are able to capture images with a resolution in the nano metre scale. Due to this high resolution, the covered area per image is relatively small, which can be problematic when surveying a sample. A system able to stitch AFM images has been developed to solve this p...

  18. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  19. Electron Cryomicroscopy of Viruses at Near-Atomic Resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelber, Jason T; Hryc, Corey F; Chiu, Wah

    2017-09-29

    Recently, dozens of virus structures have been solved to resolutions between 2.5 and 5.0 Å by means of electron cryomicroscopy. With these structures we are now firmly within the "atomic age" of electron cryomicroscopy, as these studies can reveal atomic details of protein and nucleic acid topology and interactions between specific residues. This improvement in resolution has been the result of direct electron detectors and image processing advances. Although enforcing symmetry facilitates reaching near-atomic resolution with fewer particle images, it unfortunately obscures some biologically interesting components of a virus. New approaches on relaxing symmetry and exploring structure dynamics and heterogeneity of viral assemblies have revealed important insights into genome packaging, virion assembly, cell entry, and other stages of the viral life cycle. In the future, novel methods will be required to reveal yet-unknown structural conformations of viruses, relevant to their biological activities. Ultimately, these results hold the promise of answering many unresolved questions linking structural diversity of viruses to their biological functions.

  20. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0045 Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules Martin Centurion UNIVERSITY OF NEBRSKA Final Report 01/12...Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...a gaseous target of atoms or molecules. An optical setup was designed and constructed to compensate for the blurring of the temporal resolution due

  1. Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    A recently developed high-field technique of atomic chains preparation has made it possible to attain the ultrahigh resolution of field-emission electron microscopy (FEEM), which can be used to direct imaging the intra-atomic electronic structure. By applying cryogenic FEEM, we are able to resolve the spatial configuration of atomic orbitals, which correspond to quantized states of the end atom in free-standing carbon atomic chains. Knowledge of the intra-atomic structure will make it possible to visualize generic aspects of quantum mechanics and also lead to approaches for a wide range of nanotechnological applications.

  2. Atomic resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy of clean metal oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, J V; Reichling, M

    2010-07-07

    In the last two decades the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become the premier tool for topographical analysis of surface structures at the nanometre scale. In its ultimately sensitive implementation, namely dynamic scanning force microscopy (SFM) operated in the so-called non-contact mode (NC-AFM), this technique yields genuine atomic resolution and offers a unique tool for real space atomic-scale studies of surfaces, nanoparticles as well as thin films, single atoms and molecules on surfaces irrespective of the substrate being electrically conducting or non-conducting. Recent advances in NC-AFM have paved the way for groundbreaking atomic level insight into insulator surfaces, specifically in the most important field of metal oxides. NC-AFM imaging now strongly contributes to our understanding of the surface structure, chemical composition, defects, polarity and reactivity of metal oxide surfaces and related physical and chemical surface processes. Here we review the latest advancements in the field of NC-AFM applied to the fundamental atomic resolution studies of clean single crystal metal oxide surfaces with special focus on the representative materials Al(2)O(3)(0001), TiO(2)(110), ZnO(1000) and CeO(2)(111). © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  3. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  4. Spatial Imaging of Strongly Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee

    The strong interactions between Rydberg excitations can result in spatial correlations between the excitations. The ability to control the interaction strength and the correlations between Rydberg atoms is applicable in future technological implementations of quantum computation. In this thesis, I investigates how both the character of the Rydberg-Rydberg interactions and the details of the excitation process affect the nature of the spatial correlations and the evolution of those correlations in time. I first describes the experimental apparatus and methods used to perform high-magnification Rydberg-atom imaging, as well as three experiments in which these methods play an important role. The obtained Rydberg-atom positions reveal the correlations in the many-body Rydberg-atom system and their time dependence with sub-micron spatial resolution. In the first experiment, atoms are excited to a Rydberg state that experiences a repulsive van der Waals interaction. The Rydberg excitations are prepared with a well-defined initial separation, and the effect of van der Waals forces is observed by tracking the interatomic distance between the Rydberg atoms. The atom trajectories and thereby the interaction coefficient C6 are extracted from the pair correlation functions of the Rydberg atom positions. In the second experiment, the Rydberg atoms are prepared in a highly dipolar state by using adiabatic state transformation. The atom-pair kinetics that follow from the strong dipole-dipole interactions are observed. The pair correlation results provide the first direct visualization of the electric-dipole interaction and clearly exhibit its anisotropic nature. In both the first and the second experiment, results of semi-classical simulations of the atom-pair trajectories agree well with the experimental data. In the analysis, I use energy conservation and measurements of the initial positions and the terminal velocities of the atom pairs to extract the C6 and C 3 interaction

  5. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  6. Self-supporting CVD diamond charge state conversion surfaces for high resolution imaging of low-energy neutral atoms in space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuland, M.B., E-mail: neuland@space.unibe.ch; Riedo, A.; Scheer, J.A.; Wurz, P.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate two CVD diamond surfaces for their applicability as charge state conversion surfaces. • We measure angular scattering and ionisation efficiency for hydrogen and oxygen. • Results are compared, amongst others, to the data of the IBEX conversion surface. • The CVD diamond surface has great potential as conversion surface material for future space missions. - Abstract: Two polycrystalline diamond surfaces, manufactured by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique, are investigated regarding their applicability as charge state conversion surfaces (CS) for use in a low energy neutral atom imaging instrument in space research. The capability of the surfaces for converting neutral atoms into negative ions via surface ionisation processes was measured for hydrogen and oxygen with particle energies in the range from 100 eV to 1 keV and for angles of incidence between 6° and 15°. We observed surface charging during the surface ionisation processes for one of the CVD samples due to low electrical conductivity of the material. Measurements on the other CVD diamond sample resulted in ionisation efficiencies of ∼2% for H and up to 12% for O. Analysis of the angular scattering revealed very narrow and almost circular scattering distributions. Comparison of the results with the data of the CS of the IBEX-Lo sensor shows that CVD diamond has great potential as CS material for future space missions.

  7. Knowledge Extraction from Atomically Resolved Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Lukas; Maksov, Artem; Pan, Minghu; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2017-10-24

    Tremendous strides in experimental capabilities of scanning transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) over the past 30 years made atomically resolved imaging routine. However, consistent integration and use of atomically resolved data with generative models is unavailable, so information on local thermodynamics and other microscopic driving forces encoded in the observed atomic configurations remains hidden. Here, we present a framework based on statistical distance minimization to consistently utilize the information available from atomic configurations obtained from an atomically resolved image and extract meaningful physical interaction parameters. We illustrate the applicability of the framework on an STM image of a FeSe x Te 1-x superconductor, with the segregation of the chalcogen atoms investigated using a nonideal interacting solid solution model. This universal method makes full use of the microscopic degrees of freedom sampled in an atomically resolved image and can be extended via Bayesian inference toward unbiased model selection with uncertainty quantification.

  8. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  9. Ambient atomic resolution atomic force microscopy with qPlus sensors: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastl, Daniel S

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an enormous tool to observe nature in highest resolution and understand fundamental processes like friction and tribology on the nanoscale. Atomic resolution in highest quality was possible only in well-controlled environments like ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) or controlled buffer environments (liquid conditions) and more specified for long-term high-resolution analysis at low temperatures (∼4 K) in UHV where drift is nearly completely absent. Atomic resolution in these environments is possible and is widely used. However, in uncontrolled environments like air, with all its pollutants and aerosols, unspecified thin liquid films as thin as a single molecular water-layer of 200 pm or thicker condensation films with thicknesses up to hundred nanometer, have been a problem for highest resolution since the invention of the AFM. The goal of true atomic resolution on hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic samples was reached recently. In this manuscript we want to review the concept of ambient AFM with atomic resolution. The reader will be introduced to the phenomenology in ambient conditions and the problems will be explained and analyzed while a method for scan parameter optimization will be explained. Recently developed concepts and techniques how to reach atomic resolution in air and ultra-thin liquid films will be shown and explained in detail, using several examples. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:50-65, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Imaging and manipulation of single viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Roos, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in virus research and the application of functional viral particles in nanotechnology and medicine rely on sophisticated imaging and manipulation techniques at nanometre resolution in liquid, air and vacuum. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a tool that combines these

  11. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  12. Radiation damage free ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Medvedev, Nikita; Chapman, Henry N.; Shih, Yanhua

    2018-01-01

    The x-ray free electron lasers can enable diffractive structural determination of protein nanocrystals and single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional x-ray diffraction. However the electronic form factor may be modified during the ultrashort x-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense x-ray pulse. For general x-ray imaging techniques, the minimization of the effects of radiation damage is of major concern to ensure reliable reconstruction of molecular structure. Here we show that radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with atomic spatial resolution by using x-ray parametric down-conversion and ghost diffraction with entangled photons of x-ray and optical frequencies. We show that the formation of the diffraction patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that can be as fine as the crystal lattice length scale of several Ångstrom. Since the samples are illuminated by low energy optical photons, they can be free of radiation damage.

  13. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Florian, E-mail: florian.genz@physik.tu-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Niermann, Tore [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30 nm and a fringe spacing of 30 pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability. - Highlights: • Investigation of optimum biprism position implementation into state-of-the-art TEM. • Reduction of artefacts, especially vignetting in double-biprism electron holography. • Biprism vibration and most stable imaging conditions in double-biprism holography. • Demonstration of the optimized double-biprism setup using a thin GaN-foil.

  14. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms.

  16. Near-atomic resolution using electron cryomicroscopy and single-particle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Settembre, Ethan; Xu, Chen; Dormitzer, Philip R; Bellamy, Richard; Harrison, Stephen C; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2008-02-12

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction." During the past two decades, this technique has become an important tool for 3D structure determination, but it generally has not been possible to determine atomic models. In principle, individual molecular images contain high-resolution information contaminated by a much higher level of noise. In practice, it has been unclear whether current averaging methods are adequate to extract this information from the background. We present here a reconstruction, obtained by using recently developed image processing methods, of the rotavirus inner capsid particle ("double-layer particle" or DLP) at a resolution suitable for interpretation by an atomic model. The result establishes single-particle reconstruction as a high-resolution technique. We show by direct comparison that the cryo-EM reconstruction of viral protein 6 (VP6) of the rotavirus DLP is similar in clarity to a 3.8-A resolution map obtained from x-ray crystallography. At this resolution, most of the amino acid side chains produce recognizable density. The icosahedral symmetry of the particle was an important factor in achieving this resolution in the cryo-EM analysis, but as the size of recordable datasets increases, single-particle reconstruction also is likely to yield structures at comparable resolution from samples of much lower symmetry. This potential has broad implications for structural cell biology.

  17. Resolution Of A Shadow Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, Harold E.

    1982-02-01

    The 19th century art of shadow imaging, as started by Wedgwood (1803), and as used by William Henry Fox-Talbot (1851) in England, has been revived by using a small-area electronic flash lamp and fine grain film. One immediate application has been the photographic recording of large samples of living plankton. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the resolution of the shadow system, and to describe some of the strobe light sources that are presently available. Also, a modified method of shadow photography is described where enhanced color images give interesting and, perhaps, important color effects that may be useful in the study of plankton and other semitrans-parent subjects.

  18. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  19. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genz, Florian; Niermann, Tore; Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert; Lehmann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30nm and a fringe spacing of 30pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  1. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@ua.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Erni, R. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 72R0150, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Luysberg, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Helmholtz Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  2. Mapping atomic motions with ultrabright electrons: towards fundamental limits in space-time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Stephanie; Casandruc, Albert; Zhang, Dongfang; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf A; Marx, Alexander; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Liu, Lai Chung; Bayesteh, Shima; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Hoffmann, Matthias; Felber, Matthias; Hachmann, Max; Mayet, Frank; Hirscht, Julian; Keskin, Sercan; Hada, Masaki; Epp, Sascha W; Flöttmann, Klaus; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The long held objective of directly observing atomic motions during the defining moments of chemistry has been achieved based on ultrabright electron sources that have given rise to a new field of atomically resolved structural dynamics. This class of experiments requires not only simultaneous sub-atomic spatial resolution with temporal resolution on the 100 femtosecond time scale but also has brightness requirements approaching single shot atomic resolution conditions. The brightness condition is in recognition that chemistry leads generally to irreversible changes in structure during the experimental conditions and that the nanoscale thin samples needed for electron structural probes pose upper limits to the available sample or "film" for atomic movies. Even in the case of reversible systems, the degree of excitation and thermal effects require the brightest sources possible for a given space-time resolution to observe the structural changes above background. Further progress in the field, particularly to the study of biological systems and solution reaction chemistry, requires increased brightness and spatial coherence, as well as an ability to tune the electron scattering cross-section to meet sample constraints. The electron bunch density or intensity depends directly on the magnitude of the extraction field for photoemitted electron sources and electron energy distribution in the transverse and longitudinal planes of electron propagation. This work examines the fundamental limits to optimizing these parameters based on relativistic electron sources using re-bunching cavity concepts that are now capable of achieving 10 femtosecond time scale resolution to capture the fastest nuclear motions. This analysis is given for both diffraction and real space imaging of structural dynamics in which there are several orders of magnitude higher space-time resolution with diffraction methods. The first experimental results from the Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic

  3. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  4. High Resolution Imaging with AEOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patience, J; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E

    2001-08-27

    The U. S. Air Force Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) which includes a 941 actuator adaptive optics system on a 3.7m telescope has recently been made available for astronomical programs. Operating at a wavelength of 750 nm, the diffraction-limited angular resolution of the system is 0.04 inches; currently, the magnitude limit is V {approx} 7 mag. At the distances of nearby open clusters, diffraction-limited images should resolve companions with separations as small as 4-6 AU--comparable to the Sun-Jupiter distance. The ability to study such close separations is critical, since most companions are expected to have separations in the few AU to tens of AU range. With the exceptional angular resolution of the current AEOS setup, but restricted target magnitude range, we are conducting a companion search of a large, well-defined sample of bright early-type stars in nearby open clusters and in the field. Our data set will both characterize this relatively new adaptive optics system and answer questions in binary star formation and stellar X-ray activity. We will discuss our experience using AEOS, the data analysis involved, and our initial results.

  5. Imaging with neutral atoms: a new matter-wave microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M; Rehbein, S; Schmahl, G; Reisinger, T; Bracco, G; Ernst, W E; Holst, B

    2008-01-01

    Matter-wave microscopy can be dated back to 1932 when Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska published the first image obtained with a beam of focussed electrons. In this paper a new step in the development of matter-wave microscopy is presented. We have created an instrument where a focussed beam of neutral, ground-state atoms (helium) is used to image a sample. We present the first 2D images obtained using this new technique. The imaged sample is a free-standing hexagonal copper grating (with a period of about 36 microm and rod thickness of about 8 microm). The images were obtained in transmission mode by scanning the focussed beam, which had a minimum spot size of about 2.0 microm in diameter (full width at half maximum) across the sample. The smallest focus achieved was 1.9 +/- 0.1 microm. The resolution for this experiment was limited by the speed ratio of the atomic beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate that was used to focus. Ultimately the theoretical resolution limit is set by the wavelength of the probing particle. In praxis, the resolution is limited by the source and the focussing optics.

  6. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  7. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  8. Modeling Protein Structure at Near Atomic Resolutions With Gorgon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew L.; Abeysinghe, Sasakthi S.; Schuh, Stephen; Coleman, Ross A.; Abrams, Austin; Marsh, Michael P.; Hryc, Corey F.; Ruths, Troy; Chiu, Wah; Ju, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) has played an increasingly important role in elucidating the structure and function of macromolecular assemblies in near native solution conditions. Typically, however, only non-atomic resolution reconstructions have been obtained for these large complexes, necessitating computational tools for integrating and extracting structural details. With recent advances in cryo-EM, maps at near-atomic resolutions have been achieved for several macromolecular assemblies from which models have been manually constructed. In this work, we describe a new interactive modeling toolkit called Gorgon targeted at intermediate to near-atomic resolution density maps (10-3.5 Å), particularly from cryo-EM. Gorgon's de novo modeling procedure couples sequence-based secondary structure prediction with feature detection and geometric modeling techniques to generate initial protein backbone models. Beyond model building, Gorgon is an extensible interactive visualization platform with a variety of computational tools for annotating a wide variety of 3D volumes. Examples from cryo-EM maps of Rotavirus and Rice Dwarf Virus are used to demonstrate its applicability to modeling protein structure. PMID:21296162

  9. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , {approximately} 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ``Sun-Earth Connections`` science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science.

  10. Ultrahigh Resolution 3-Dimensional Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop innovative instrumentation for the rapid, 3-dimensional imaging of biological tissues with cellular resolution. Our approach...

  11. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) - Terra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset represents multiple products archived at the multiple archive centers for the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard...

  12. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) - Aqua

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset represents multiple products archived at the multiple archive centers for the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard...

  13. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  14. USGS MODERATE RESOLUTION LAND IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. L.; Willems, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    For the past 37 years, the Landsat series of satellites has provided continuous data of the Earth’s land masses, coastal boundaries, and coral reefs creating an unprecedented comprehensive record of landscape dynamics. Landsat 5 and 7 continue to capture hundreds of images of the Earth’s surface each day. In mid-December 2008, the USGS made the entire Landsat archive available to everyone, anywhere, at anytime via the Internet at no cost to the user. The opening of the Landsat archive, the longest record of the terrestrial environment, is a revolution that will affect the future of moderate resolution Earth observations, enabling scientists to address research questions and develop operational applications that were previously cost prohibitive. In addition, the time-series data richness of the archive allows for the development of essential climate variables used to monitor the causes and consequences of lands cover change as a function of climate variability and anthropogenic influences. Landsat is unique as a single source of systematic, global land observations in terms of the number of spectral bands, global collection capacity, image quality, and the proven fidelity of its calibrated sensors. Through the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992 and the Presidential Decision Direct/NSTC-3 (1994), as amended on October 16, 2000, the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) is charged to ensure the continuity of Landsat data. To accomplish this, the USGS, in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is currently preparing for the launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) in December 2012, the eighth satellite in the Landsat Program. The LDCM will ensure the continuation of the Landsat record and will consist of significant improvements in radiometric response and additional spectral bands, from which high quality data products will be generated and accessible to users at no cost.

  15. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Ryo, E-mail: ishikawa@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lupini, Andrew R. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinuma, Yoyo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, 328 Ferris Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To fully understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation. - Highlights: • We theoretically demonstrate 3D near-atomic depth resolution imaging by large-angle illumination STEM. • This method can be useful to identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies within materials. • This method can be useful to determine reconstructed surface atomic structures.

  16. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarczyk, Marek; Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J.; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Hutton, Simon; Głaszczka, Rafał; Blomfield, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  17. High resolution surface plasmon imaging of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berguiga, Lotfi; Roland, Thibault; Fahys, Audrey; Elezgaray, Juan; Argoul, Françoise

    2010-05-01

    We report a technique of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) which pushes down the resolution limit to sub-micronic scales. To confirm the sensitivity and resolution of this non labeling microscopy we show images of gold and dielectric nanoparticules detected in air. The contrast mechanism is discussed versus the defocusing and versus the nature of the particules.

  18. Resolution limits in imaging ladar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Lorenzo, Joseph; Kierstead, John; Pyburn, Dana; Sengupta, Sandip K.

    2006-02-01

    We introduce a new design concept of laser radar systems that combines both phase comparison and time-of-flight methods. We show from signal-to-noise ratio considerations that there is a fundamental limit to the overall resolution in three-dimensional imaging range laser radar (ladar). We introduce a new metric, volume of resolution, and we show from quantum noise considerations that there is a maximum resolution volume that can be achieved for a given set of system parameters. Consequently, there is a direct trade-off between range resolution and spatial resolution. Thus, in a ladar system, range resolution may be maximized at the expense of spatial image resolution and vice versa. We introduce resolution efficiency etar as a new figure of merit for ladar that describes system resolution under the constraints of a specific design, compared with its optimal resolution performance derived from quantum noise considerations. We analyze how the resolution efficiency could be utilized to improve the resolution performance of a ladar system. Our analysis could be extended to all ladars, regardless of whether they are imaging or scanning laser systems.

  19. Identifying local structural states in atomic imaging by computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Ziatdinov, Maxim; He, Qian; Borisevich, Albina

    2017-01-01

    The availability of atomically resolved imaging modalities enables an unprecedented view into the local structural states of materials, which manifest themselves by deviations from the fundamental assumptions of periodicity and symmetry. Consequently, approaches that aim to extract these local structural states from atomic imaging data with minimal assumptions regarding the average crystallographic configuration of a material are indispensable to advances in structural and chemical investigations of materials. Here, we present an approach to identify and classify local structural states that is rooted in computer vision. This approach introduces a definition of a structural state that is composed of both local and nonlocal information extracted from atomically resolved images, and is wholly untethered from the familiar concepts of symmetry and periodicity. Instead, this approach relies on computer vision techniques such as feature detection, and concepts such as scale invariance. We present the fundamental aspects of local structural state extraction and classification by application to simulated scanning transmission electron microscopy images, and analyze the robustness of this approach in the presence of common instrumental factors such as noise, limited spatial resolution, and weak contrast. Finally, we apply this computer vision-based approach for the unsupervised detection and classification of local structural states in an experimental electron micrograph of a complex oxides interface, and a scanning tunneling micrograph of a defect-engineered multilayer graphene surface.

  20. High-resolution gamma imaging; Imagerie gamma haute resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, M.; Pousse, A.; Tamba, N.; Chavanelle, J.; Bakkali, A.; Kastler, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Lab. Imagerie et Ingenierie pour la Sante, Faculte de Medecine, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2004-01-01

    Gamma imaging involves two-dimensional images of the volume distribution of a radioactive tracer previously injected into the organ under functional exploration. Our Besancon laboratory developed a gamma imager with a spatial resolution three or four times higher than a classic device, which is very useful for functional explorations on small animal, as recently demonstrated by work on myocyte apoptosis and necrosis scintigraphy in the rat. We expect progress in this promising medical imaging technology to be driven by developments in scintillating crystals and position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and by medical demand in applications such as early detection of breast cancer. (authors)

  1. Rapid increase of near atomic resolution virus capsid structures determined by cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phuong T; Reddy, Vijay S

    2017-10-27

    The recent technological advances in electron microscopes, detectors, as well as image processing and reconstruction software have brought single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) into prominence for determining structures of bio-molecules at near atomic resolution. This has been particularly true for virus capsids, ribosomes, and other large assemblies, which have been the ideal specimens for structural studies by cryo-EM approaches. An analysis of time series metadata of virus structures on the methods of structure determination, resolution of the structures, and size of the virus particles revealed a rapid increase in the virus structures determined by cryo-EM at near atomic resolution since 2010. In addition, the data highlight the median resolution (∼3.0 Å) and size (∼310.0 Å in diameter) of the virus particles determined by X-ray crystallography while no such limits exist for cryo-EM structures, which have a median diameter of 508 Å. Notably, cryo-EM virus structures in the last four years have a median resolution of 3.9 Å. Taken together with minimal sample requirements, not needing diffraction quality crystals, and being able to achieve similar resolutions of the crystal structures makes cryo-EM the method of choice for current and future virus capsid structure determinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic-resolution measurements with a new tunable diode laser-based interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, R.M.; Zou, H.; Gonda, S.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of a Michelson interferometer designed to make measurements with an uncertainty of less than 20 pm. This new method uses a tunable diode laser as the light source, with the diode laser wavelength continuously tuned to fix the number of fringes in the measured optical...... path. The diode laser frequency is measured by beating against a reference laser. High-speed, accurate frequency measurements of the beat frequency signal enables the diode laser wavelength to be measured with nominally 20-pm accuracy for the measurements described. The new interferometer design...... is lightweight and is mounted directly on an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope capable of atomic resolution. We report the simultaneous acquisition of an atomic resolution image, while the relative lateral displacement of the tip along the sample distance is measured with the new tunable diode...

  3. Low Resolution Refinement of Atomic Models Against Crystallographic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Robert A; Kovalevskiy, Oleg; Murshudov, Garib N

    2017-01-01

    This review describes some of the problems encountered during low-resolution refinement and map calculation. Refinement is considered as an application of Bayes' theorem, allowing combination of information from various sources including crystallographic experimental data and prior chemical and structural knowledge. The sources of prior knowledge relevant to macromolecules include basic chemical information such as bonds and angles, structural information from reference models of known homologs, knowledge about secondary structures, hydrogen bonding patterns, and similarity of non-crystallographically related copies of a molecule. Additionally, prior information encapsulating local conformational conservation is exploited, keeping local interatomic distances similar to those in the starting atomic model. The importance of designing an accurate likelihood function-the only link between model parameters and observed data-is emphasized. The review also reemphasizes the importance of phases, and describes how the use of raw observed amplitudes could give a better correlation between the calculated and "true" maps. It is shown that very noisy or absent observations can be replaced by calculated structure factors, weighted according to the accuracy of the atomic model. This approach helps to smoothen the map. However, such replacement should be used sparingly, as the bias toward errors in the model could be too much to avoid. It is in general recommended that, whenever a new map is calculated, map quality should be judged by inspection of the parts of the map where there is no atomic model. It is also noted that it is advisable to work with multiple blurred and sharpened maps, as different parts of a crystal may exhibit different degrees of mobility. Doing so can allow accurate building of atomic models, accounting for overall shape as well as finer structural details. Some of the results described in this review have been implemented in the programs REFMAC5, Pro

  4. A design for a subminiature, low energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Greene, S.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a type of scanning electron microscope that works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field, and focused to a spot using a microscale Einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 μm, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size, and an atomic emission site will give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å). Also, because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100 nm in diameter, the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids), it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field emission and can be up to 1×106 times larger than in a typical (high energy) electron microscope. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam electron microscope with atomic resolution are described and include the possibility of it being used to rapidly sequence the human genome from a single strand of DNA as well as being able to identify atomic species directly from the elastic scattering of electrons.

  5. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic modeling of cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions--joint refinement of model and imaging parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael S; Trzynka, Andrew; Chapman, Brynmor K

    2013-04-01

    When refining the fit of component atomic structures into electron microscopic reconstructions, use of a resolution-dependent atomic density function makes it possible to jointly optimize the atomic model and imaging parameters of the microscope. Atomic density is calculated by one-dimensional Fourier transform of atomic form factors convoluted with a microscope envelope correction and a low-pass filter, allowing refinement of imaging parameters such as resolution, by optimizing the agreement of calculated and experimental maps. A similar approach allows refinement of atomic displacement parameters, providing indications of molecular flexibility even at low resolution. A modest improvement in atomic coordinates is possible following optimization of these additional parameters. Methods have been implemented in a Python program that can be used in stand-alone mode for rigid-group refinement, or embedded in other optimizers for flexible refinement with stereochemical restraints. The approach is demonstrated with refinements of virus and chaperonin structures at resolutions of 9 through 4.5 Å, representing regimes where rigid-group and fully flexible parameterizations are appropriate. Through comparisons to known crystal structures, flexible fitting by RSRef is shown to be an improvement relative to other methods and to generate models with all-atom rms accuracies of 1.5-2.5 Å at resolutions of 4.5-6 Å. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  8. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F.

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D imag...

  9. Structural information, resolution, and noise in high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Peter; Boudier, Thomas; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Sturgis, James N; Scheuring, Simon

    2009-05-06

    AFM has developed into a powerful tool in structural biology, providing topographs of proteins under close-to-native conditions and featuring an outstanding signal/noise ratio. However, the imaging mechanism exhibits particularities: fast and slow scan axis represent two independent image acquisition axes. Additionally, unknown tip geometry and tip-sample interaction render the contrast transfer function nondefinable. Hence, the interpretation of AFM topographs remained difficult. How can noise and distortions present in AFM images be quantified? How does the number of molecule topographs merged influence the structural information provided by averages? What is the resolution of topographs? Here, we find that in high-resolution AFM topographs, many molecule images are only slightly disturbed by noise, distortions, and tip-sample interactions. To identify these high-quality particles, we propose a selection criterion based on the internal symmetry of the imaged protein. We introduce a novel feature-based resolution analysis and show that AFM topographs of different proteins contain structural information beginning at different resolution thresholds: 10 A (AqpZ), 12 A (AQP0), 13 A (AQP2), and 20 A (light-harvesting-complex-2). Importantly, we highlight that the best single-molecule images are more accurate molecular representations than ensemble averages, because averaging downsizes the z-dimension and "blurs" structural details.

  10. Imaging transport of ultracold atoms through a quantum wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausler, Samuel; Lebrat, Martin; Husmann, Dominik; Corman, Laura; Krinner, Sebastian; Nakajima, Shuta; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    We report on a scanning gate technique to experimentally image the transport of fermionic lithium atoms through a quantum wire, similar to what is applied to solid state devices. The gate is created with a tightly focused repulsive laser beam whose aberrations are holographically corrected. By scanning its position over the wire and measuring the subsequent variations of conductance, we spatially map the transport at a resolution close to the transverse wave function of atoms inside the channel. The gate extends on the scale of the Fermi wavelength making it sensitive to quantum tunneling. Furthermore, our knowledge of the optical potential allows a direct comparison with an analytical and a numerical model for non-interacting particles. The flexibility offered by programmable holograms make it relatively simple to imprint more complex structures, such as a one-dimensional lattice inside the wire. This opens the path to study metal-insulator physics with strong attractive interactions.

  11. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  12. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. High Resolution Frequency Swept Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-30

    Press, New York, 1969), 114. 15. Farhat, N.H. and C.K. Chan, in Optica Hoy Y Manina, J. Bescos et. al. (eds.), ( Sociedad Espanola De.Optica, Madrid, 1978...transform - a) - y. f r:,., (px,py)e(Px + P9) dpx dp AccogzdLgly parallel slices of the object can be reconstructed from the weighted proj ec- tics 5roj...applied in obtaining the imaging results I& place of the object in Fig. 1 (161. The correc- presented in this paper. The method is novel in tics data for

  14. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, M. A.; Gajdacz, M.; Pedersen, P. L.; Klempt, C.; Sherson, J. F.; Arlt, J. J.; Hilliard, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing N∼ 5× {10}6 atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  15. Super-resolution near field imaging device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging device comprising at least a first and a second elongated coupling element, each having a first transverse dimension at a first end and a second transverse dimension at a second end and being adapted for guiding light between their respective first and second ends, each...... of the matrix and the second ends of the coupling elements are located at or in a vicinity of the second side of the matrix. The second transverse dimension is larger than the first transverse dimension. A microscope objective system and a microscope comprising the super-resolution imaging device are also...

  16. The gating cycle of a K+ channel at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuello, Luis G. [Center for Membrane Protein Research, Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, United States; Cortes, D. Marien [Center for Membrane Protein Research, Department of Cell Physiology and Molecular Biophysics, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, United States; Perozo, Eduardo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, United States

    2017-11-22

    C-type inactivation in potassium channels helps fine-tune long-term channel activity through conformational changes at the selectivity filter. Here, through the use of cross-linked constitutively open constructs, we determined the structures of KcsA’s mutants that stabilize the selectivity filter in its conductive (E71A, at 2.25 Å) and deep C-type inactivated (Y82A at 2.4 Å) conformations. These structural snapshots represent KcsA’s transient open-conductive (O/O) and the stable open deep C-type inactivated states (O/I), respectively. The present structures provide an unprecedented view of the selectivity filter backbone in its collapsed deep C-type inactivated conformation, highlighting the close interactions with structural waters and the local allosteric interactions that couple activation and inactivation gating. Together with the structures associated with the closed-inactivated state (C/I) and in the well-known closed conductive state (C/O), this work recapitulates, at atomic resolution, the key conformational changes of a potassium channel pore domain as it progresses along its gating cycle.

  17. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  18. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  19. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling

  20. Dictionary learning based noisy image super-resolution via distance penalty weight model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yulan; Zhao, Yongping; Wang, Qisong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of noisy image super-resolution. Noisy low resolution (LR) image is always obtained in applications, while most of the existing algorithms assume that the LR image is noise-free. As to this situation, we present an algorithm for noisy image super-resolution which can achieve simultaneously image super-resolution and denoising. And in the training stage of our method, LR example images are noise-free. For different input LR images, even if the noise variance varies, the dictionary pair does not need to be retrained. For the input LR image patch, the corresponding high resolution (HR) image patch is reconstructed through weighted average of similar HR example patches. To reduce computational cost, we use the atoms of learned sparse dictionary as the examples instead of original example patches. We proposed a distance penalty model for calculating the weight, which can complete a second selection on similar atoms at the same time. Moreover, LR example patches removed mean pixel value are also used to learn dictionary rather than just their gradient features. Based on this, we can reconstruct initial estimated HR image and denoised LR image. Combined with iterative back projection, the two reconstructed images are applied to obtain final estimated HR image. We validate our algorithm on natural images and compared with the previously reported algorithms. Experimental results show that our proposed method performs better noise robustness. PMID:28759633

  1. Dictionary learning based noisy image super-resolution via distance penalty weight model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yulan; Zhao, Yongping; Wang, Qisong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of noisy image super-resolution. Noisy low resolution (LR) image is always obtained in applications, while most of the existing algorithms assume that the LR image is noise-free. As to this situation, we present an algorithm for noisy image super-resolution which can achieve simultaneously image super-resolution and denoising. And in the training stage of our method, LR example images are noise-free. For different input LR images, even if the noise variance varies, the dictionary pair does not need to be retrained. For the input LR image patch, the corresponding high resolution (HR) image patch is reconstructed through weighted average of similar HR example patches. To reduce computational cost, we use the atoms of learned sparse dictionary as the examples instead of original example patches. We proposed a distance penalty model for calculating the weight, which can complete a second selection on similar atoms at the same time. Moreover, LR example patches removed mean pixel value are also used to learn dictionary rather than just their gradient features. Based on this, we can reconstruct initial estimated HR image and denoised LR image. Combined with iterative back projection, the two reconstructed images are applied to obtain final estimated HR image. We validate our algorithm on natural images and compared with the previously reported algorithms. Experimental results show that our proposed method performs better noise robustness.

  2. Atomic Resolution of Calcium and Oxygen Sublattices of Calcite in Ambient Conditions by Atomic Force Microscopy Using qPlus Sensors with Sapphire Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastl, Daniel S; Judmann, Michael; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2015-01-01

    Characterization and imaging at the atomic scale with atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomically resolved imaging of the calcite (101̅4) surface plane using stiff quartz cantilevers ("qPlus sensors", stiffness k = 1280 N/m) equipped with sapphire tips in ambient conditions without any surface preparation. With 10 atoms in one surface unit cell, calcite has a highly complex surface structure comprising three different chemical elements (Ca, C, and O). We obtain true atomic resolution of calcite in air at relative humidity ranging from 20% to 40%, imaging atomic steps and single atomic defects. We observe a great durability of sapphire tips with their Mohs hardness of 9, only one step below diamond. Depending on the state of the sapphire tip, we resolve either the calcium or the oxygen sublattice. We determine the tip termination by comparing the experimental images with simulations and discuss the possibility of chemical tip identification in air. The main challenges for imaging arise from the presence of water layers, which form on almost all surfaces and have the potential to dissolve the crystal surface. Frequency shift versus distance spectra show the presence of at least three ordered hydration layers. The measured height of the first hydration layer corresponds well to X-ray diffraction data and molecular dynamic simulations, namely, ∼220 pm. For the following hydration layers we measure ∼380 pm for the second and third layer, ending up in a total hydration layer thickness of at least 1 nm. Understanding the influence of water layers and their structure is important for surface segregation, surface reactions including reconstructions, healing of defects, and corrosion.

  3. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B D; Houben, L; Mayer, J; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Allen, L J

    2014-12-01

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges for a specimen of SrTiO3 oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti-L2,3 and O-K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Super-resolution of facial images in forensics scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satiro, Joao; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Correia, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super-resolution......Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super...

  5. SUPER-RESOLUTION MICROSCOPY LIVE CELL IMAGING AND IMAGE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Lukes, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Novel fundamental research results provided new techniques going beyond the diffraction limit. These recent advances known as super-resolution microscopy have been awarded by the Nobel Prize as they promise new discoveries in biology and live sciences. All these techniques rely on complex signal and image processing. The applicability in biology, and particularly for live cell imaging, remains challenging and needs further investigation. Focusing on image processing and analysis, the thesis i...

  6. Multiparametric Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2017-04-18

    There is a need in biochemical research for new tools that can image and manipulate biomolecular and cellular systems at the nanoscale. During the past decades, there has been tremendous progress in developing atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to analyze biosystems, down to the single-molecule level. Force-distance (FD) curve-based AFM in particular has enabled researchers to map and quantify biophysical properties and biomolecular interactions on a wide variety of specimens. Despite its great potential, this AFM method has long been limited by its low spatial and temporal resolutions. Recently, novel FD-based multiparametric imaging modalities have been developed, allowing us to simultaneously image the structure, elasticity and interactions of biological samples at high spatiotemporal resolution. By oscillating the AFM tip, spatially resolved FD curves are obtained at much higher frequency than before, and as a result, samples are mapped at a speed similar to that of conventional topographic imaging. In this Account, we discuss the general principle of multiparametric AFM imaging and we provide a snapshot of recent studies showing how this new technology has been applied to biological specimens, from soluble proteins to membranes and cells. We emphasize novel methodologies that we recently developed, in which multiparametric imaging is combined with probes functionalized with chemical groups, ligands, or even live cells, in order to image and quantify receptor interaction forces and free-energy landscapes in a way not possible before. Key breakthroughs include observing the mechanical and chemical properties of single proteins in purple membranes, measuring the electrostatic potential of transmembrane pore forming proteins, structurally localizing chemical groups of water-soluble proteins, mapping and nanomechanical analysis of single sensors on yeast cells, imaging the sites of assembly and extrusion of single filamentous bacteriophages in living bacteria

  7. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  8. Atomic Imaging Using Secondary Electrons in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope: Experimental Observations and Possible Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, D.; Inada, H.; Egerton, R.F.; Konno, M.; Wua, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-11-11

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondaryelectrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmissionelectron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. Apossiblemechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  9. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    rage atomic arrangement of the atoms. It may be noted that in X-ray holography methods, the concept of unit cell is not required. We know from the optical reciprocity principle that if we exchange the detector with the source, then we obtain the same experiment. We now have a source in the far field producing a plane wave ...

  10. The Role of Gas in Determining Image Quality and Resolution During In Situ Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Browning, Nigel D. [Physical & Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-08-02

    As gas-solid heterogeneous catalytic reactions are molecular in nature, a full mechanistic understanding of the process requires atomic scale characterization under realistic operating conditions. While atomic resolution imaging has become a routine in modern high-vacuum (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM), both image quality and resolution nominally degrade when reaction gases are introduced. In this work, we systematically assess the effects of different gases at various pressures on the quality and resolution of images obtained at room temperature in the annular dark field STEM imaging mode using a differentially pumped (DP) gas cell. This imaging mode is largely free from inelastic scattering effects induced by the presence of gases and retains good imaging properties over a wide range of gas mass/pressures. We demonstrate the application of the ESTEM with atomic resolution images of a complex oxide alkane oxidation catalyst MoVNbTeOx (M1) immersed in light and heavy gas environments.

  11. High Speed Atomic Force Microscopy of Biomolecules by Image Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, S.J.T.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    An image-tracking procedure for atomic force microscopy is proposed and tested, which allows repeated imaging of the same area without suffering from lateral drift. The drift correction procedure is based on on-line cross-correlation of succeeding images. Using the image-tracking procedure allows

  12. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  13. Sample Preparation and Imaging of Single Adenovirus Particle Using Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Yan; Li Chen, [Unknown; van Rosmalen, Mariska G M; Wuite, Gijs J L; Roos, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as a sophisticated imaging tool with nanoscale resolution, is widely used in virus research and the application of functional viral particles. To investigate single viruses by AFM in a physiologically relevant environment (liquid), an appropriate surface treatment to

  14. Determining the resolution of scanning microwave impedance microscopy using atomic-precision buried donor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrymgeour, D. A.; Baca, A.; Fishgrab, K.; Simonson, R. J.; Marshall, M.; Bussmann, E.; Nakakura, C. Y.; Anderson, M.; Misra, S.

    2017-11-01

    To quantify the resolution limits of scanning microwave impedance microscopy (sMIM), we created scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-patterned donor nanostructures in silicon composed of 10 nm lines of highly conductive silicon buried under a protective top cap of silicon, and imaged them with sMIM. This dopant pattern is an ideal test of the resolution and sensitivity of the sMIM technique, as it is made with nm-resolution and offers minimal complications from topography convolution. It has been determined that typical sMIM tips can resolve lines down to ∼80 nm spacing, while resolution is independent of tip geometry as extreme tip wear does not change the resolving power, contrary to traditional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Going forward, sMIM is an ideal technique for qualifying buried patterned devices, potentially allowing for quantitative post-fabrication characterization of donor structures, which may be an important tool for the study of atomic-scale transistors and state of the art quantum computation schemes.

  15. Fast diffusion imaging with high angular resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chiou, Jr-Yuan George; Maier, Stephan E; Madore, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is a well-established method to help reveal the architecture of nerve bundles, but long scan times and geometric distortions inherent to echo planar imaging (EPI) have limited its integration into clinical protocols. A fast imaging method is proposed here that combines accelerated multishot diffusion imaging (AMDI), multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE), and crossing fiber angular resolution of intravoxel structure (CFARI) to reduce spatial distortions and reduce total scan time. A multishot EPI sequence was used to improve geometrical fidelity as compared to a single-shot EPI acquisition, and acceleration in both k-space and diffusion sampling enabled reductions in scan time. The method is regularized and self-navigated for motion correction. Seven volunteers were scanned in this study, including four with volumetric whole brain acquisitions. The average similarity of microstructural orientations between undersampled datasets and their fully sampled counterparts was above 85%, with scan times below 5 min for whole-brain acquisitions. Up to 2.7-fold scan time acceleration along with four-fold distortion reduction was achieved. The proposed imaging strategy can generate HARDI results with relatively good geometrical fidelity and low scan duration, which may help facilitate the transition of HARDI from a successful research tool to a practical clinical one. Magn Reson Med 77:696-706, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Super-resolution imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable by up to a factor of 10 or more. There are three major approaches to super-resolution, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and localisation microscopy, which have all produced stunning images of cellular structures. A major current challenge is optimising performance of each technique so that the same sort of data can be routinely taken in live cells. There are several major challenges, particularly phototoxicity and the speed with which images of whole cells, or groups of cells, can be acquired. In this review we discuss the various approaches which can be successfully used in live cells, the tradeoffs in resolution, speed, and ease of implementation which one must make for each approach, and the quality of results that one might expect from each technique. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High resolution ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for latent image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hang; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Hongsong; Wu, Wenmin

    2016-03-21

    In this work, we present a close-range ultraviolet imaging spectrometer with high spatial resolution, and reasonably high spectral resolution. As the transmissive optical components cause chromatic aberration in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range, an all-reflective imaging scheme is introduced to promote the image quality. The proposed instrument consists of an oscillating mirror, a Cassegrain objective, a Michelson structure, an Offner relay, and a UV enhanced CCD. The finished spectrometer has a spatial resolution of 29.30μm on the target plane; the spectral scope covers both near and middle UV band; and can obtain approximately 100 wavelength samples over the range of 240~370nm. The control computer coordinates all the components of the instrument and enables capturing a series of images, which can be reconstructed into an interferogram datacube. The datacube can be converted into a spectrum datacube, which contains spectral information of each pixel with many wavelength samples. A spectral calibration is carried out by using a high pressure mercury discharge lamp. A test run demonstrated that this interferometric configuration can obtain high resolution spectrum datacube. The pattern recognition algorithm is introduced to analyze the datacube and distinguish the latent traces from the base materials. This design is particularly good at identifying the latent traces in the application field of forensic imaging.

  18. Resolution limits for wave equation imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-01

    Formulas are derived for the resolution limits of migration-data kernels associated with diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They are applicable to images formed by reverse time migration (RTM), least squares migration (LSM), and full waveform inversion (FWI), and suggest a multiscale approach to iterative FWI based on multiscale physics. That is, at the early stages of the inversion, events that only generate low-wavenumber resolution should be emphasized relative to the high-wavenumber resolution events. As the iterations proceed, the higher-resolution events should be emphasized. The formulas also suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low- and intermediate-wavenumber components of the velocity model not available in the primaries. Finally, diffractions can provide twice or better the resolution than specular reflections for comparable depths of the reflector and diffractor. The width of the diffraction-transmission wavepath is approximately λ at the diffractor location for the diffraction-transmission wavepath. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Simultaneous current-, force- and work function measurement with atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Herz, Markus; Schiller, Christian H.; Giessibl, Franz J.; Mannhart, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    The local work function of a surface determines the spatial decay of the charge density at the Fermi level normal to the surface. Here, we present a method that enables simultaneous measurements of local work function and tip-sample forces. A combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope is used to measure the tunneling current between an oscillating tip and the sample in real time as a function of the cantilever's deflection. Atomically resolved work function mea...

  20. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas (IIT); (Rad. Monitoring)

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  1. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (Web, free access)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  2. Field-ion imaging of nano-objects at far-subangstrom resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Mazilov, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    Low-dimensional materials, such as carbon atomic chains, subnanoribbons, and primary tubular structures, exhibit extraordinary functional properties and hold promise as building blocks for applications in nanoelectronics, but they have only been studied theoretically. Hence there is an increasing need to characterize and image the materials in question at the best possible resolution. Here we demonstrate a possibility to observe the atomic structure of one-dimensional sub-nano-objects with a cryogenic field-ion microscope having a resolution below 0.4 Å. The far-subangstrom imaging described here is a general-purpose technique that can be applied to a wide range of low-dimensional systems.

  3. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Patel, Ankit H; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X

    2010-05-24

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 microm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within approximately 0.5 deg (approximately 100-150 microm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes.

  4. AIRBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado-Molina, J.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost airborne digital imaging system capable to perform aerial surveys with small-format cameras isintroduced. The equipment is intended to obtain high-resolution multispectral digital photographs constituting so aviable alternative to conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery. Monitoring software handles all theprocedures involved in image acquisition, including flight planning, real-time graphics for aircraft position updatingin a mobile map, and supervises the main variables engaged in the imaging process. This software also creates fileswith the geographical position of the central point of every image, and the flight path followed by the aircraftduring the entire survey. The cameras are mounted on a three-axis stabilized platform. A set of inertial sensorsdetermines platform's deviations independently from the aircraft and an automatic control system keeps thecameras at a continuous nadir pointing and heading, with a precision better than ± 1 arc-degree in three-axis. Thecontrol system is also in charge of saving the platform’s orientation angles when the monitoring software triggersthe camera. These external orientation parameters, together with a procedure for camera calibration give theessential elements for image orthocorrection. Orthomosaics are constructed using commercial GIS software.This system demonstrates the feasibility of large area coverage in a practical and economical way using smallformatcameras. Monitoring and automatization reduce the work while increasing the quality and the amount ofuseful images.

  5. Optimising multi-frame ADF-STEM for high-precision atomic-resolution strain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lewys; Wenner, Sigurd; Nord, Magnus; Ninive, Per Harald; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Holmestad, Randi; Nellist, Peter D

    2017-08-01

    Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is a powerful tool to study crystal defects at the atomic scale but historically single slow-scanned frames have been plagued by low-frequency scanning-distortions prohibiting accurate strain mapping at atomic resolution. Recently, multi-frame acquisition approaches combined with post-processing have demonstrated significant improvements in strain precision, but the optimum number of frames to record has not been explored. Here we use a non-rigid image registration procedure before applying established strain mapping methods. We determine how, for a fixed total electron-budget, the available dose should be fractionated for maximum strain mapping precision. We find that reductions in scanning-artefacts of more than 70% are achievable with image series of 20-30 frames in length. For our setup, series longer than 30 frames showed little further improvement. As an application, the strain field around an aluminium alloy precipitate was studied, from which our optimised approach yields data whos strain accuracy is verified using density functional theory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  7. Cryo-electron microscopy and the amazing race to atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binshtein, Elad; Ohi, Melanie D

    2015-05-26

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), the structural analysis of samples embedded in vitreous ice, is a powerful approach for determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological specimens. Over the past two decades, this technique has been used to successfully calculate subnanometer (electron microscopes with automated data collection capabilities and robust direct electron detection cameras, as well as new powerful image processing algorithms, has dramatically expanded the number of biological macromolecules amenable for study using cryo-EM. In addition, these new technological and computational developments have been used to successfully determine cryo-EM. With these exciting new advances, cryo-EM is now on pace to determine atomic resolution 3D structures.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging of trapped cold atoms with a light field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gordon E; Marciniak, Michael A; Burke, John H

    2017-11-01

    This research images trapped atoms in three dimensions, utilizing light field imaging. Such a system is of interest in the development of atom interferometer accelerometers in dynamic systems where strictly defined focal planes may be impractical. In this research, a light field microscope was constructed utilizing a Lytro Development Kit micro lens array and sensor. It was used to image fluorescing rubidium atoms in a magneto optical trap. The three-dimensional (3D) volume of the atoms is reconstructed using a modeled point spread function (PSF), taking into consideration that the low magnification (1.25) of the system changed typical assumptions used in the optics model for the PSF. The 3D reconstruction is analyzed with respect to a standard off-axis fluorescence image. Optical axis separation between two atom clouds is measured to a 100 μm accuracy in a 3 mm deep volume, with a 16 μm in-focus standard resolution with a 3.9 mm by 3.9 mm field of view. Optical axis spreading is observed in the reconstruction and discussed. The 3D information can be used to determine properties of the atom cloud with a single camera and single image, and can be applied anywhere 3D information is needed but optical access may be limited.

  9. Super-Resolution Reconstruction of High-Resolution Satellite ZY-3 TLC Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wang, Wei; Luo, Heng; Ying, Shen

    2017-05-07

    Super-resolution (SR) image reconstruction is a technique used to recover a high-resolution image using the cumulative information provided by several low-resolution images. With the help of SR techniques, satellite remotely sensed images can be combined to achieve a higher-resolution image, which is especially useful for a two- or three-line camera satellite, e.g., the ZY-3 high-resolution Three Line Camera (TLC) satellite. In this paper, we introduce the application of the SR reconstruction method, including motion estimation and the robust super-resolution technique, to ZY-3 TLC images. The results show that SR reconstruction can significantly improve both the resolution and image quality of ZY-3 TLC images.

  10. Stacking it up: Exploring the limits of ultra-high resolution atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369392205

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique wherein an atomically sharp needle raster scans across a surface, detecting forces between it and the sample. In state-of-the-art AFM experiments the measured forces are typically on the order of pico-Newtons, and the lateral resolution is on the order of

  11. 'Big Bang' tomography as a new route to atomic-resolution electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Dirk; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2012-06-13

    Until now it has not been possible to image at atomic resolution using classical electron tomographic methods, except when the target is a perfectly crystalline nano-object imaged along a few zone axes. The main reasons are that mechanical tilting in an electron microscope with sub-ångström precision over a very large angular range is difficult, that many real-life objects such as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices impose geometrical constraints and that many radiation-sensitive objects such as proteins limit the total electron dose. Hence, there is a need for a new tomographic scheme that is able to deduce three-dimensional information from only one or a few projections. Here we present an electron tomographic method that can be used to determine, from only one viewing direction and with sub-ångström precision, both the position of individual atoms in the plane of observation and their vertical position. The concept is based on the fact that an experimentally reconstructed exit wave consists of the superposition of the spherical waves that have been scattered by the individual atoms of the object. Furthermore, the phase of a Fourier component of a spherical wave increases with the distance of propagation at a known 'phase speed'. If we assume that an atom is a point-like object, the relationship between the phase and the phase speed of each Fourier component is linear, and the distance between the atom and the plane of observation can therefore be determined by linear fitting. This picture has similarities with Big Bang cosmology, in which the Universe expands from a point-like origin such that the distance of any galaxy from the origin is linearly proportional to the speed at which it moves away from the origin (Hubble expansion). The proof of concept of the method has been demonstrated experimentally for graphene with a two-layer structure and it will work optimally for similar layered materials, such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide.

  12. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  13. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit...... is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times....... The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static...

  14. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  15. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Chunxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xi Xiang; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi- and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM. PMID:23378926

  16. High Resolution Bathymetry Estimation Improvement with Single Image Super-Resolution Algorithm Super-Resolution Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5514--17-9692 High Resolution Bathymetry Estimation Improvement with Single Image Super...collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources...gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate

  17. Application of Super-Resolution Convolutional Neural Network for Enhancing Image Resolution in Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-10-18

    In this study, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN) scheme, which is the emerging deep-learning-based super-resolution method for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images, was applied and evaluated using the post-processing approach. For evaluation, 89 chest CT cases were sampled from The Cancer Imaging Archive. The 89 CT cases were divided randomly into 45 training cases and 44 external test cases. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, a high-resolution image was reconstructed from a low-resolution image, which was down-sampled from an original test image. For quantitative evaluation, two image quality metrics were measured and compared to those of the conventional linear interpolation methods. The image restoration quality of the SRCNN scheme was significantly higher than that of the linear interpolation methods (p < 0.001 or p < 0.05). The high-resolution image reconstructed by the SRCNN scheme was highly restored and comparable to the original reference image, in particular, for a ×2 magnification. These results indicate that the SRCNN scheme significantly outperforms the linear interpolation methods for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images. The results also suggest that SRCNN may become a potential solution for generating high-resolution CT images from standard CT images.

  18. Averaging scheme for atomic resolution off-axis electron holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, T; Lehmann, M

    2014-08-01

    All micrographs are limited by shot-noise, which is intrinsic to the detection process of electrons. For beam insensitive specimen this limitation can in principle easily be circumvented by prolonged exposure times. However, in the high-resolution regime several instrumental instabilities limit the applicable exposure time. Particularly in the case of off-axis holography the holograms are highly sensitive to the position and voltage of the electron-optical biprism. We present a novel reconstruction algorithm to average series of off-axis holograms while compensating for specimen drift, biprism drift, drift of biprism voltage, and drift of defocus, which all might cause problematic changes from exposure to exposure. We show an application of the algorithm utilizing also the possibilities of double biprism holography, which results in a high quality exit-wave reconstruction with 75 pm resolution at a very high signal-to-noise ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  20. Nanoscale optical imaging by atomic force infrared microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This review outlines progress in atomic force infrared microscopy, reviewing the methodology and its application in nanoscale infrared absorption imaging of both biological and functional materials, including an outline of where this emerging method has been applied to image cellular systems in aqueous environments.

  1. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  2. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  3. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  4. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy in light antiprotonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Borchert, G L; Augsburger, M A; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Elble, M; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    2000-01-01

    At the LEAR facility, CERN, antiprotonic L alpha transitions in light elements have been investigated with a focussing crystal spectrometer. The high resolution of the experiment allowed for the first time to resolve in pH/pH the 2/sup 3/P/sub 0/ state from the close-lying states 2/sup 3/P/sub 2/, 2/sup 1/P/sub 1/, and 2/sup 3/P /sub 1/. In pD the corresponding transitions were found to be more than an order of magnitude broader. To a large extent the results for pH support the meson exchange model. (15 refs).

  5. Inorganic WS{sub 2} nanotubes revealed atom by atom using ultra-high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar Sadan, Maya; Heidelmann, Markus; Houben, Lothar [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Juelich (Germany); Tenne, Reshef [Weizmann Institute of Science, Materials and Interfaces Department, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-08-15

    The characterization of nanostructures to the atomic dimensions becomes more important, as devices based on a single particle are being produced. In particular, inorganic nanotubes were shown to host interesting properties making them excellent candidates for various devices. The WS{sub 2} nanotubes outperform the bulk in their mechanical properties offering numerous applications especially as part of high strength nanocomposites. In contrast, their electrical properties are less remarkable. The structure-function relationship can be investigated by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), which enables the insight into their atomic structure as well as performing spectroscopic measurements down to the atomic scale. In the present work, the deciphering of atomic structure and the chiral angle of the different shells in a multiwall WS{sub 2} nanotube is demonstrated. In certain cases, the helicity of the structure can also be deduced. Finally, first electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of a single tube are presented, acquired by a new acquisition technique that allows for high spatial resolution (denoted StripeSTEM). The measured band gap values correspond with the values found in literature for thin films, obtained by spectroscopic techniques, and are higher than the values resulting from STM measurements. (orig.)

  6. Compositional Analysis With Atomic Column Spatial Resolution by 5th Order Aberration-corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, David [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Herrera, Miriam [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Alonso-Gonzalez, Pablo [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Yolanda [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gonzalez, Luisa [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Guerrero, M. P. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Pizarro, Joaquin [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Galindo, Pedro [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Molina, S. I. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain

    2011-01-01

    We show in this article that it is possible to obtain elemental compositional maps and profiles with atomic-column resolution across an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As multilayer structure from 5th-order aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The compositional profiles obtained from the analysis of HAADF-STEM images describe accurately the distribution of In in the studied multilayer in good agreement with Muraki's segregation model [Muraki, K., Fukatsu, S., Shiraki, Y. & Ito, R. (1992)]. Surface segregation of In atoms during molecular beam epitaxy and its influence on the energy levels in InGaAs/GaAs quantums wells.

  7. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  8. Direct Atom Imaging by Chemical-Sensitive Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Tobias; Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert; Krull, Dominique; Westphal, Carsten

    2016-05-11

    In order to understand the physical and chemical properties of advanced materials, functional molecular adsorbates, and protein structures, a detailed knowledge of the atomic arrangement is essential. Up to now, if subsurface structures are under investigation, only indirect methods revealed reliable results of the atoms' spatial arrangement. An alternative and direct method is three-dimensional imaging by means of holography. Holography was in fact proposed for electron waves, because of the electrons' short wavelength at easily accessible energies. Further, electron waves are ideal structure probes on an atomic length scale, because electrons have a high scattering probability even for light elements. However, holographic reconstructions of electron diffraction patterns have in the past contained severe image artifacts and were limited to at most a few tens of atoms. Here, we present a general reconstruction algorithm that leads to high-quality atomic images showing thousands of atoms. Additionally, we show that different elements can be identified by electron holography for the example of FeS2.

  9. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Li; Dan Dang; Lianqing Liu; Ning Xi; Yuechao Wang

    2017-01-01

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used ...

  10. Chromosome imaging by atomic force microscopy: influencing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    investigated factors influencing chromosome ultrastructures or species-specific ultrastructural characteristics. We studied the effects of several factors on AFM imag- ing of chromosomal ultrastructures. We found that process- ing time had little effect on chromosomal ultrastructures, but that trypsin digestion had a large effect.

  11. O-space with high resolution readouts outperforms radial imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Tam, Leo; Kopanoglu, Emre; Peters, Dana C; Constable, R Todd; Galiana, Gigi

    2017-04-01

    While O-Space imaging is well known to accelerate image acquisition beyond traditional Cartesian sampling, its advantages compared to undersampled radial imaging, the linear trajectory most akin to O-Space imaging, have not been detailed. In addition, previous studies have focused on ultrafast imaging with very high acceleration factors and relatively low resolution. The purpose of this work is to directly compare O-Space and radial imaging in their potential to deliver highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts, as needed for diagnostic applications. We report that the greatest advantages to O-Space imaging are observed with extended data acquisition readouts. A sampling strategy that uses high resolution readouts is presented and applied to compare the potential of radial and O-Space sequences to generate high resolution images at high undersampling factors. Simulations and phantom studies were performed to investigate whether use of extended readout windows in O-Space imaging would increase k-space sampling and improve image quality, compared to radial imaging. Experimental O-Space images acquired with high resolution readouts show fewer artifacts and greater sharpness than radial imaging with equivalent scan parameters. Radial images taken with longer readouts show stronger undersampling artifacts, which can cause small or subtle image features to disappear. These features are preserved in a comparable O-Space image. High resolution O-Space imaging yields highly undersampled images of high resolution and minimal artifacts. The additional nonlinear gradient field improves image quality beyond conventional radial imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. YUP.SCX: coaxing atomic models into medium resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert K-Z; Devkota, Batsal; Harvey, Stephen C

    2008-08-01

    The structures of large macromolecular complexes in different functional states can be determined by cryo-electron microscopy, which yields electron density maps of low to intermediate resolutions. The maps can be combined with high-resolution atomic structures of components of the complex, to produce a model for the complex that is more accurate than the formal resolution of the map. To this end, methods have been developed to dock atomic models into density maps rigidly or flexibly, and to refine a docked model so as to optimize the fit of the atomic model into the map. We have developed a new refinement method called YUP.SCX. The electron density map is converted into a component of the potential energy function to which terms for stereochemical restraints and volume exclusion are added. The potential energy function is then minimized (using simulated annealing) to yield a stereochemically-restrained atomic structure that fits into the electron density map optimally. We used this procedure to construct an atomic model of the 70S ribosome in the pre-accommodation state. Although some atoms are displaced by as much as 33A, they divide themselves into nearly rigid fragments along natural boundaries with smooth transitions between the fragments.

  13. Conformational conversion during amyloid formation at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Timo; Kalverda, Arnout P; Thompson, Gary S; Homans, Steve W; Radford, Sheena E

    2011-01-21

    Numerous studies of amyloid assembly have indicated that partially folded protein species are responsible for initiating aggregation. Despite their importance, the structural and dynamic features of amyloidogenic intermediates and the molecular details of how they cause aggregation remain elusive. Here, we use ΔN6, a truncation variant of the naturally amyloidogenic protein β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)m), to determine the solution structure of a nonnative amyloidogenic intermediate at high resolution. The structure of ΔN6 reveals a major repacking of the hydrophobic core to accommodate the nonnative peptidyl-prolyl trans-isomer at Pro32. These structural changes, together with a concomitant pH-dependent enhancement in backbone dynamics on a microsecond-millisecond timescale, give rise to a rare conformer with increased amyloidogenic potential. We further reveal that catalytic amounts of ΔN6 are competent to convert nonamyloidogenic human wild-type β(2)m (Hβ(2)m) into a rare amyloidogenic conformation and provide structural evidence for the mechanism by which this conformational conversion occurs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  15. Imaging many-body Coulomb interactions and ultrafast photoionization and diffraction with cold atom electron and ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Robert; Speirs, Rory; Murphy, Dene; Torrance, Joshua; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The CAEIS cold-atom electron/ion source, based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms, provides a powerful tool for investigating fundamental physical processes. The very low temperature of the ions has allowed us to image intra-beam Coulomb effects with unprecedented detail. With ultrafast laser excitation and streak detection we can probe competing ionization processes, particularly via Rydberg states, including sequential excitation, multiphoton excitation, resonance-enhanced multiphoton excitation and two-color multiphoton excitation. Knowledge from these studies has enabled ultrafast single-shot diffractive electron imaging with atomic resolution using a CAEIS.

  16. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  17. Super-resolution imaging in live cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cox, Susan

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable...

  18. Spatial-resolution analysis and optimal design of integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, ChunHong; Wang, QianQian; Wang, HongXia; Lan, JinHui

    2013-11-01

    Integral imaging is a promising technology for 3D imaging and display. This paper reports the 3D spatial-resolution research based on reconstructed 3D space. Through geometric analysis of the reconstructed optical distribution from all the element images that attend recording, the relationship among microlens parameters, planar-recording resolution, and 3D spatial resolution was obtained. The effect of microlens parameter accuracy on the reconstructed position error also was discussed. The research was carried on the depth priority integral imaging system (DPII). The results can be used in the optimal design of integral imaging.

  19. Building the atomic model for the bacterial flagellar filament by electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Koji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Namba, Keiichi

    2005-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a helical propeller for bacterial locomotion. It is a well-ordered helical assembly of a single protein, flagellin, and its tubular structure is formed by 11 protofilaments, each in either of the two distinct conformations, L- and R-type, for supercoiling. We have been studying the three-dimensional structures of the flagellar filaments by electron cryomicroscopy and recently obtained a density map of the R-type filament up to 4 angstroms resolution from an image data set containing only about 41,000 molecular images. The density map showed the features of the alpha-helical backbone and some large side chains, which allowed us to build the complete atomic model as one of the first atomic models of macromolecules obtained solely by electron microscopy image analysis (Yonekura et al., 2003a). We briefly review the structure and the structure analysis, and point out essential techniques that have made this analysis possible.

  20. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrate a quantum gas microscopy using the Faraday effect which has an inherently non-destructive nature. The observed Faraday rotation angle reaches 3.0(2) degrees for a single atom. We reveal the non-destructive feature of this Faraday imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal strength with that of the photon scattering rate. We determine the atom distribution with deconvolution analysis. We also demonstrate the absorption and the dark field Faraday imaging, and reveal the different shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by theoretical analysis. Our result is an important first step towards an ultimate quantum non-demolition site-resolved imaging and furthermore opens up the possibilities for quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with a single-site resolution.

  1. Detecting correlations in deterministically prepared quantum states with single-atom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergschneider, Andrea; Klinkhamer, Vincent M.; Becher, Jan Hendrik; Bommer, Philine L.; Niedermayer, Justin F.; Zuern, Gerhard; Preiss, Philipp M.; Jochim, Selim

    2017-04-01

    We deterministically prepare quantum states consisting of few fermions in single and double-well potentials. Here we report on a new imaging scheme for 6Lithium with which we detect the correlations of the quantum state on a single-atom level and with spin resolution. The detection method uses fluorescence imaging at high magnetic field where the optical transitions for the used hyperfine states are almost closed. With a high-resolution objective we image about 15 scattered photons per atom on an EMCCD camera. This is sufficient to identify and locate single atoms in our imaging plane. We can perform this scheme in situ or after an expansion in time-of-flight and additionally resolve the spin by subsequently adressing the different hyperfine states. By combining this scheme with our deterministic preparation, we measure the two-point momentum correlations to probe the spatial symmetry of the two-particle wavefunction. The high contrast and the scalability of the detection technique allows us to go beyond measuring two-point correlations and characterize many-body quantum states.

  2. Forming intermediate spatial resolution of microscopy images for continuous zooming on multi-resolution processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranto, Evan H. E.; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Usuki, Shin; Miura, Kenjiro T.

    2017-09-01

    Digital zooming especially on microscopy image has attempted to improve their quality of measurement into a better assessment. However, since the field of view of high-resolution image are not wide despite of the fact that high-resolution image has more information detail and low-resolution image has their merits which is bring a big picture of the whole structure, we need to observe the sample in any scale. This problem was been solved by developing dual-view of high and low images resolution1 but in a single interpolated images. The goal of this research is utilize multi-resolution images to develop smooth zooming magnification of microscopy image. In order to achieve smooth zooming magnification on different condition of the images, scheme process will be needed. First, we took a several spatial images of the same sample based on the different objective lens, author was used 4 objective lens which are 10×, 20×, 50× and 150× magnification. In this synthesize phase, we interpolate lower resolution image for synthesize purpose with the next higher resolution image of the sample. Second, continue to looking for the feature point of both images with SIFT feature point method until we synthesize both images. Third, author treat this synthesized image with discrete fourier transform (DFT) with low-pass filter as the same size with numerical aperture (NA) that was input on the first phase. Then the fourth phase is looping this processes until intermediate images are generated enough to be blend with pyramid blend method. In this article we also try to make a system that can arbitrarily generate intermediate image with hierarchical system.

  3. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  4. Pyramidal nanowire tip for atomic force microscopy and thermal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel 3D nanowire pyramid as scanning microscopy probe for thermal imaging and atomic force microscopy. This probe is fabricated by standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four

  5. Prospects for electron imaging with ultrafast time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Reed, Bryan W.; Torralva, Ben R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2007-03-01

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here the authors demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10km/s) without smearing. The authors outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, the authors present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10nm/10ps spatiotemporal resolution.

  6. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M R; Reed, B W; Torralva, B R; Browning, N D

    2007-01-26

    Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

  7. A fast subgradient algorithm in image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, D.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Ruggiero, V.; Zama, F.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we propose an ε–subgradient method for solving a constrained minimization problem arising in super-resolution imaging applications. The method, compared to the state-of-the-art methods for single image super-resolution on some test problems, proves to be very efficient, both for the reconstruction quality and the computational time.

  8. On the Design of High Resolution Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, A.; Reulke, R.

    2017-05-01

    The design of high-resolution systems is always a consideration of many parameters. Technological parameter of the imaging system, e.g. diameter of the imaging system, mass and power, as well as storage and data transfer, have an direct impact on spacecraft size and design. The paper describes the essential design parameters for the description of high-resolution systems.

  9. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Plant Geminivirus Determined by Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Grimm, Clemens; Jeske, Holger; Böttcher, Bettina

    2017-08-01

    African cassava mosaic virus is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus which forms unique twin particles of incomplete icosahedra that are joined at five-fold vertices, building an unusual waist. How its 22 capsomers interact within a half-capsid or across the waist is unknown thus far. Using electron cryo-microscopy and image processing, we determined the virion structure with a resolution of 4.2 Å and built an atomic model for its capsid protein. The inter-capsomer contacts mediated by the flexible N termini and loop regions differed within the half-capsids and at the waist, explaining partly the unusual twin structure. The tip of the pentameric capsomer is sealed by a plug formed by a turn region harboring the evolutionary conserved residue Y193. Basic amino acid residues inside the capsid form a positively charged pocket next to the five-fold axis of the capsomer suitable for binding DNA. Within this pocket, density most likely corresponding to DNA was resolved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoy, A.; Bissbort, U.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cappellaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  11. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-04

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  12. Nanoscale imaging and characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans epicuticle using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullina, Gölnur; Akhatova, Farida; Kibardina, Maria; Fokin, Denis; Fakhrullin, Rawil

    2017-02-01

    Here we introduce PeakForce Tapping non-resonance atomic force microscopy for imaging and nanomechanical mapping of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The animals were imaged both in air and water at nanoscale resolution. Layer-by-layer glass surface modification was employed to secure the worms for imaging in water. Microtopography of head region, annuli, furrows, lateral alae and tail region was visualized. Analysis of nanoscale surface features obtained during AFM imaging of three larval and adult hermaphrodite nematodes in natural environment allowed for numerical evaluation of annuli periodicity, furrows depth and annuli roughness. Nanomechanical mapping of surface deformation, Young modulus and adhesion confirms that the mechanical properties of the nematode cuticle are non-uniform. Overall, PeakForce Tapping AFM is a robust and simple approach applicable for nanoscale three-dimensional imaging and characterization of C. elegans nematodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction and labeling high-resolution images from PDF documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Suchet K.; Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2013-12-01

    Accuracy of content-based image retrieval is affected by image resolution among other factors. Higher resolution images enable extraction of image features that more accurately represent the image content. In order to improve the relevance of search results for our biomedical image search engine, Open-I, we have developed techniques to extract and label high-resolution versions of figures from biomedical articles supplied in the PDF format. Open-I uses the open-access subset of biomedical articles from the PubMed Central repository hosted by the National Library of Medicine. Articles are available in XML and in publisher supplied PDF formats. As these PDF documents contain little or no meta-data to identify the embedded images, the task includes labeling images according to their figure number in the article after they have been successfully extracted. For this purpose we use the labeled small size images provided with the XML web version of the article. This paper describes the image extraction process and two alternative approaches to perform image labeling that measure the similarity between two images based upon the image intensity projection on the coordinate axes and similarity based upon the normalized cross-correlation between the intensities of two images. Using image identification based on image intensity projection, we were able to achieve a precision of 92.84% and a recall of 82.18% in labeling of the extracted images.

  14. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  15. Ocular Imaging Combining Ultrahigh Resolution and High Speed OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoll, Tilman; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    The impact of ultrahigh-resolution and ultrahigh-speed OCT technique on corneal and retinal imaging is shown. The capabilities of advanced OCT system for imaging of the cornea and the thickness determination of the tear film, corneal epithelium, and Bowman's layer over a wide field of view are demonstrated. The high transverse and axial resolution of OCT system allowing one to image individual nerve fiber bundles, the parafoveal capillary network, and individual cone photoreceptors is described.

  16. High-resolution electron microscope and computed images of human tooth enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brés, E F; Barry, J C; Hutchison, J L

    1985-03-01

    The structure of human enamel crystallites has been studied at a near atomic level by high-resolution electron microscopy. Electron micrographs have been obtained from crystallites present in human enamel with a structure resolution of 0.2 nm in the [0001], [1210], [1213], [1100] and [4510] zone axes directions. In most cases it was possible to match the experimental images with images calculated using the atomic positions of mineral hydroxyapatite. However, in some cases a discrepancy between calculated and experimental image detail was observed in the c direction of the [1210] and the [1100] images. This shows: (i) a structural heterogeneity of the crystals, and (ii) a loss of hexagonal symmetry of the structure. The resolution required to distinguish individual atomic sites in the different zones has been determined, and this will provide a useful basis for future work. As the determination of the "real structure" of biological crystals is of prime importance for the study of calcification mechanisms (crystal growth), biological properties and destructive phenomena of calcified tissues (i.e., dental caries and bone resorption).

  17. Super-resolution thermographic imaging using blind structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas; Gruber, Jürgen; Mayr, Günther

    2017-07-01

    Using an infrared camera for thermographic imaging allows the contactless temperature measurement of many surface pixels simultaneously. From the measured surface data, the structure below the surface, embedded inside a sample or tissue, can be reconstructed and imaged, if heated by an excitation light pulse. The main drawback in active thermographic imaging is the degradation of the spatial resolution with the imaging depth, which results in blurred images for deeper lying structures. We circumvent this degradation by using blind structured illumination combined with a non-linear joint sparsity reconstruction algorithm. We demonstrate imaging of a line pattern and a star-shaped structure through a 3 mm thick steel sheet with a resolution four times better than the width of the thermal point-spread-function. The structured illumination is realized by parallel slits cut in an aluminum foil, where the excitation coming from a flashlight can penetrate. This realization of super-resolution thermographic imaging demonstrates that blind structured illumination allows thermographic imaging without high degradation of the spatial resolution for deeper lying structures. The groundbreaking concept of super-resolution can be transferred from optics to diffusive imaging by defining a thermal point-spread-function, which gives the principle resolution limit for a certain signal-to-noise ratio, similar to the Abbe limit for a certain optical wavelength. In future work, the unknown illumination pattern could be the speckle pattern generated by a short laser pulse inside a light scattering sample or tissue.

  18. Wave atom transform generated strong image hashing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Cheng, Lee-Ming; Leung, Hon-Yin; Fu, Qi-Kai

    2012-11-01

    The rapid development of multimedia technology has resulted in a rising rate on digital unauthorized utilization and forgery, which makes the situation of image authentication increasingly severe. A novel strong image hashing scheme is proposed based on wave atom transform, which can better authenticate images by precisely distinguishing the malicious tampered images from the non-maliciously processed ones. Wave atom transform is employed since it has significantly sparser expansion and better characteristics of texture feature extraction than other traditional transforms. For better detection sensitivity, gray code is applied instead of natural binary code to optimize the hamming distance. Randomizations are also performed using Rényi chaotic map for the purposes of secure image hashing and key sensitivity. The experimental results show that the proposed strong scheme is robust to non-malicious content-preserving operations and also fragile to malicious content-altering operations. The scheme also outperforms DCT and DWT based schemes in terms of receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Moreover, to provide an application-defined tradeoff, a security enhancement approach based on Rényi map is presented, which can further protect the integrity and secrecy of images.

  19. Infrared image super-resolution via transformed self-similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2017-03-01

    Single image super-resolution is of great importance in computer vision. Various methods (e.g. learning methods) have been successfully developed in recent years. Despite the demonstrated success in the natural images, less research focuses on the infrared images. In this paper, we present a transformed self-similarity based super-resolution method without any learning priors, restore high-resolution infrared images from low-resolution ones. We exploit appearance similarity, dense error, and region covariances, and use the detected cues to guide the patch search process. We also add scale cue to consider local scale variations. We then present a compositional framework to simultaneously accommodate the four different cues. Experimental results demonstrate that our method performs better than previous methods, restores pleasant results, and high evaluate scores further show the effectiveness and robustness of our method for the infrared images.

  20. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  1. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  2. Raman cooling imaging: Detecting single atoms near their ground state of motion

    OpenAIRE

    Lester, Brian J.; Kaufman, Adam M.; Regal, Cindy A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate imaging of neutral atoms via the light scattered during continuous Raman sideband cooling. We detect single atoms trapped in optical tweezers while maintaining a significant motional ground-state fraction. The techniques presented provide a framework for single-atom resolved imaging of a broad class of atomic species.

  3. High Resolution Pulse Compression Imaging Using Super Resolution FM-Chirp Correlation Method (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Okubo, K.; Tagawa, N.

    This study addresses the issue of the super-resolution pulse compression technique (PCT) for ultrasound imaging. Time resolution of multiple ultrasonic echoes using the FM-Chirp PCT is limited by the bandwidth of the sweep-frequency. That is, the resolution depends on the sharpness of auto-correlation function. We propose the Super resolution FM-Chirp correlation Method (SCM) and evaluate its performance. This method is based on the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. Our simulations were made for the model assuming multiple signals reflected from some scatterers. We confirmed that SCM detects time delay of complicated reflected signals successfully with high resolution.

  4. Super-resolution imaging applied to moving object tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swalaganata, Galandaru; Ratna Sulistyaningrum, Dwi; Setiyono, Budi

    2017-10-01

    Moving object tracking in a video is a method used to detect and analyze changes that occur in an object that being observed. Visual quality and the precision of the tracked target are highly wished in modern tracking system. The fact that the tracked object does not always seem clear causes the tracking result less precise. The reasons are low quality video, system noise, small object, and other factors. In order to improve the precision of the tracked object especially for small object, we propose a two step solution that integrates a super-resolution technique into tracking approach. First step is super-resolution imaging applied into frame sequences. This step was done by cropping the frame in several frame or all of frame. Second step is tracking the result of super-resolution images. Super-resolution image is a technique to obtain high-resolution images from low-resolution images. In this research single frame super-resolution technique is proposed for tracking approach. Single frame super-resolution was a kind of super-resolution that it has the advantage of fast computation time. The method used for tracking is Camshift. The advantages of Camshift was simple calculation based on HSV color that use its histogram for some condition and color of the object varies. The computational complexity and large memory requirements required for the implementation of super-resolution and tracking were reduced and the precision of the tracked target was good. Experiment showed that integrate a super-resolution imaging into tracking technique can track the object precisely with various background, shape changes of the object, and in a good light conditions.

  5. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  6. Adaptive Outlier Rejection in Image Super-resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrjänäinen Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One critical aspect to achieve efficient implementations of image super-resolution is the need for accurate subpixel registration of the input images. The overall performance of super-resolution algorithms is particularly degraded in the presence of persistent outliers, for which registration has failed. To enhance the robustness of processing against this problem, we propose in this paper an integrated adaptive filtering method to reject the outlier image regions. In the process of combining the gradient images due to each low-resolution image, we use adaptive FIR filtering. The coefficients of the FIR filter are updated using the LMS algorithm, which automatically isolates the outlier image regions by decreasing the corresponding coefficients. The adaptation criterion of the LMS estimator is the error between the median of the samples from the LR images and the output of the FIR filter. Through simulated experiments on synthetic images and on real camera images, we show that the proposed technique performs well in the presence of motion outliers. This relatively simple and fast mechanism enables to add robustness in practical implementations of image super-resolution, while still being effective against Gaussian noise in the image formation model.

  7. Heisenberg scaling of imaging resolution by coherent enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Yoder, Theodore J; Bruzewicz, Colin D; Chuang, Isaac L; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Classical imaging works by scattering photons from an object to be imaged, and achieves resolution scaling as $1/\\sqrt{t}$, with $t$ the imaging time. By contrast, the laws of quantum mechanics allow one to utilize quantum coherence to obtain imaging resolution that can scale as quickly as $1/t$ -- the so-called "Heisenberg limit." However, ambiguities in the obtained signal often preclude taking full advantage of this quantum enhancement, while imaging techniques designed to be unambiguous often lose this optimal Heisenberg scaling. Here, we demonstrate an imaging technique which combines unambiguous detection of the target with Heisenberg scaling of the resolution. We also demonstrate a binary search algorithm which can efficiently locate a coherent target using the technique, resolving a target trapped ion to within 3% of the $1/e^2$ diameter of the excitation beam.

  8. Improved-resolution millimeter-wave imaging through structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayei, Ali; Kavehvash, Zahra; Shabany, Mahdi

    2017-05-20

    A resolution-improved active millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging structure, based on the theory of structured illumination, is proposed in this paper. The structured illumination is a well-defined concept for surpassing the diffraction limit in optical microscopy, where imposing grating patterns on the targeted object could help in moving the object frequency spectrum along the desired direction in the spatial frequency domain. This frequency shift helps in passing different parts of the object's frequency spectrum through the diffraction filter. The combination of resultant images provides a framework to pass a wider frequency band of the object, thereby achieving super-resolution. This idea has not yet been employed for MMW image resolution improvement due to practical limitations in producing the desired grating patterns. Therefore, a desired fringe pattern is produced here and tailored for a MMW imaging system through antenna array synthesis. In the proposed scheme, the structured illumination has been implemented for improving the MMW image resolution. Furthermore, an adaptive approach has been proposed in order to generalize the structure for resolution improvement in all required directions in a very fast manner. Electromagnetic simulation results show at most twofold improvement in the image resolution through the proposed MMW imaging structure.

  9. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  10. Integrative, dynamic structural biology at atomic resolution--it's about time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bedem, Henry; Fraser, James S

    2015-04-01

    Biomolecules adopt a dynamic ensemble of conformations, each with the potential to interact with binding partners or perform the chemical reactions required for a multitude of cellular functions. Recent advances in X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and other techniques are helping us realize the dream of seeing--in atomic detail--how different parts of biomolecules shift between functional substates using concerted motions. Integrative structural biology has advanced our understanding of the formation of large macromolecular complexes and how their components interact in assemblies by leveraging data from many low-resolution methods. Here, we review the growing opportunities for integrative, dynamic structural biology at the atomic scale, contending there is increasing synergistic potential between X-ray crystallography, NMR and computer simulations to reveal a structural basis for protein conformational dynamics at high resolution.

  11. Resolution enhancement of tri-stereo remote sensing images by super resolution methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Caglayan; Akoguz, Alper; Unal, Gozde; Sertel, Elif

    2016-10-01

    Super resolution (SR) refers to generation of a High Resolution (HR) image from a decimated, blurred, low-resolution (LR) image set, which can be either a single frame or multi-frame that contains a collection of several images acquired from slightly different views of the same observation area. In this study, we propose a novel application of tri-stereo Remote Sensing (RS) satellite images to the super resolution problem. Since the tri-stereo RS images of the same observation area are acquired from three different viewing angles along the flight path of the satellite, these RS images are properly suited to a SR application. We first estimate registration between the chosen reference LR image and other LR images to calculate the sub pixel shifts among the LR images. Then, the warping, blurring and down sampling matrix operators are created as sparse matrices to avoid high memory and computational requirements, which would otherwise make the RS-SR solution impractical. Finally, the overall system matrix, which is constructed based on the obtained operator matrices is used to obtain the estimate HR image in one step in each iteration of the SR algorithm. Both the Laplacian and total variation regularizers are incorporated separately into our algorithm and the results are presented to demonstrate an improved quantitative performance against the standard interpolation method as well as improved qualitative results due expert evaluations.

  12. Medium resolution image fusion, does it enhance forest structure assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, JW

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This research explored the potential benefits of fusing optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) medium resolution satellite-borne sensor data for forest structural assessment. Image fusion was applied as a means of retaining disparate data...

  13. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  14. Influences of image resolution on herbaceous root morphological parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zeyou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Root images of four herbaceous species (including Plantago virginica,Solidago canadensis,Conyza canadensis and Erigeron philadelphicus were obtained by using EPSON V7000 scanner with different resolutions.Root morphological parameters including root length,diameter,volume and area were determined by using a WinRhizo root analyzing software.The results show a distinct influence of image resolution on root morphological parameter.For different herbaceous species,the optimal resolutions of root images,which would produce an acceptable precision with relative short time,vary with different species.For example,a resolution of 200 dpi was recommended for the root images of Plantago virginica and S.Canadensis, while 400 dpi for Conyza canadensis and Erigeron philadelphicus.

  15. Automatic Matching of High Resolution Satellite Images Based on RFM

    OpenAIRE

    JI Shunping; YUAN Xiuxiao

    2016-01-01

    A matching method for high resolution satellite images based on RFM is presented.Firstly,the RFM parameters are used to predict the initial parallax of corresponding points and the prediction accuracy is analyzed.Secondly,the approximate epipolar equation is constructed based on projection tracking and its accuracy is analyzed.Thirdly,approximate 1D image matching is executed on pyramid images and least square matching on base images.At last RANSAC is imbedded to eliminate mis-matching points...

  16. Robust microbubble tracking for super resolution imaging in ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer B.; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Currently ultrasound resolution is limited by diffraction to approximately half the wavelength of the sound wave employed. In recent years, super resolution imaging techniques have overcome the diffraction limit through the localization and tracking of a sparse set of microbubbles through the vas...

  17. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is...

  18. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  19. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  20. High-Resolution Fluorescence Microscope Imaging of Erythroblast Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alyson S; Nowak, Roberta B; Fowler, Velia M

    2018-01-01

    During erythropoiesis, erythroblasts undergo dramatic morphological changes to produce mature erythrocytes. Many unanswered questions regarding the molecular mechanisms behind these changes can be addressed with high-resolution fluorescence imaging. Immunofluoresence staining enables localization of specific molecules, organelles, and membrane components in intact cells at different phases of erythropoiesis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy can provide high-resolution, three-dimensional images of stained structures, which can be used to dissect the molecular mechanisms driving erythropoiesis. The sample preparation, staining procedure, imaging parameters, and image analysis methods used directly affect the quality of the confocal images and the amount and accuracy of information that they can provide. Here, we describe methods to dissect erythropoietic tissues from mice, to perform immunofluorescence staining and confocal imaging of various molecules, organelles and structures of interest in erythroblasts, and to present and quantitatively analyze the data obtained in these fluorescence images.

  1. Plasmonics and metamaterials based super-resolution imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, surface imaging of various biological dynamics and biomechanical phenomena has seen a surge of interest. Imaging of processes such as exocytosis and kinesin motion are most effective when depth is limited to a very thin region of interest at the edge of the cell or specimen. However, many objects and processes of interest are of size scales below the diffraction limit for safe, visible wavelength illumination. Super-resolution imaging methods such as structured illumination microscopy and others have offered various compromises between resolution, imaging speed, and bio-compatibility. In this talk, I will present our most recent progress in plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) and localized plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (LPSIM), and their applications in bio-imaging. We have achieved wide-field surface imaging with resolution down to 75 nm while maintaining reasonable speed and compatibility with biological specimens. These plasmonic enhanced super resolution techniques offer unique solutions to obtain 50nm spatial resolution and 50 frames per second wide imaging speed at the same time.

  2. SINGLE FRAME SUPER RESOLUTION OF NONCOOPERATIVE IRIS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in biometrics, satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. The long range captured iris identification systems often suffer from low resolution and meager focus of the captured iris images. These degrade the iris recognition performance. This paper proposes enhanced iterated back projection (EIBP method to super resolute the long range captured iris polar images. The performance of proposed method is tested and analyzed on CASIA long range iris database by comparing peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity index (SSIM with state-of-the-art super resolution (SR algorithms. It is further analyzed by increasing the up-sampling factor. Performance analysis shows that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art algorithms, the peak signal-to-noise ratio improved about 0.1-1.5 dB. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is well suited to super resolve the iris polar images captured at a long distance

  3. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Zhou, Weibin; Peng, Leilei

    2017-02-01

    Fourier multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) scanning laser optical tomography (FmFLIM-SLOT) combines FmFLIM and Scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) to perform multiplexed 3D FLIM imaging of live embryos. The system had demonstrate multiplexed functional imaging of zebrafish embryos genetically express Foster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors. However, previous system has a 20 micron resolution because the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, makes it difficult to achieve high resolution imaging over a long projection depth. Here, we present a high-resolution FmFLIM-SLOT system with achromatic Bessel beam, which achieves 3 micron resolution in 3D deep tissue imaging. In Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT, multiple laser excitation lines are firstly intensity modulated by a Michelson interferometer with a spinning polygon mirror optical delay line, which enables Fourier multiplexed multi-channel lifetime measurements. Then, a spatial light modulator and a prism are used to transform the modulated Gaussian laser beam to an achromatic Bessel beam. The achromatic Bessel beam scans across the whole specimen with equal angular intervals as sample rotated. After tomography reconstruction and the frequency domain lifetime analysis method, both the 3D intensity and lifetime image of multiple excitation-emission can be obtained. Using Bessel-FmFLIM-SLOT system, we performed cellular-resolution FLIM tomography imaging of live zebrafish embryo. Genetically expressed FRET sensors in these embryo will allow non-invasive observation of multiple biochemical processes in vivo.

  4. Refinement of atomic models in high resolution EM reconstructions using Flex-EM and local assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Malhotra, Sony; Burnley, Tom; Wood, Chris; Clare, Daniel K; Winn, Martyn; Topf, Maya

    2016-05-01

    As the resolutions of Three Dimensional Electron Microscopic reconstructions of biological macromolecules are being improved, there is a need for better fitting and refinement methods at high resolutions and robust approaches for model assessment. Flex-EM/MODELLER has been used for flexible fitting of atomic models in intermediate-to-low resolution density maps of different biological systems. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of the method to successfully refine structures at higher resolutions (2.5-4.5Å) using both simulated and experimental data, including a newly processed map of Apo-GroEL. A hierarchical refinement protocol was adopted where the rigid body definitions are relaxed and atom displacement steps are reduced progressively at successive stages of refinement. For the assessment of local fit, we used the SMOC (segment-based Manders' overlap coefficient) score, while the model quality was checked using the Qmean score. Comparison of SMOC profiles at different stages of refinement helped in detecting regions that are poorly fitted. We also show how initial model errors can have significant impact on the goodness-of-fit. Finally, we discuss the implementation of Flex-EM in the CCP-EM software suite. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microwave atomic force microscopy imaging for nanometer-scale electrical property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Ju, Yang; Hosoi, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Akifumi

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a new type of microscopy which is capable of investigating surface topography and electrical property of conductive and dielectric materials simultaneously on a nanometer scale. The microwave atomic force microscopy is a combination of the principles of the scanning probe microscope and the microwave-measurement technique. As a result, under the noncontact AFM working conditions, we successfully generated a microwave image of a 200-nm Au film coating on a glass wafer substrate with a spatial resolution of 120 nm and a measured voltage difference of 19.2 mV between the two materials.

  6. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure Determination in Over-Focus with Volta Phase Plate by Cs-Corrected Cryo-EM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao; Zhao, Lingyun; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Jin-Can; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun; Peng, Hai-Lin; Lei, Jianlin; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2017-10-03

    Volta phase plate (VPP) is a recently developed transmission electron microscope (TEM) apparatus that can significantly enhance the image contrast of biological samples in cryoelectron microscopy, and therefore provide the possibility to solve structures of relatively small macromolecules at high-resolution. In this work, we performed theoretical analysis and found that using phase plate on objective lens spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected TEM may gain some interesting optical properties, including the over-focus imaging of macromolecules. We subsequently evaluated the imaging strategy of frozen-hydrated apo-ferritin with VPP on a Cs-corrected TEM and obtained the structure of apo-ferritin at near-atomic resolution from both under- and over-focused dataset, illustrating the feasibility and new potential of combining VPP with Cs-corrected TEM for high-resolution cryo-EM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of atomic four-body processes

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, M; Fischer, D; Kollmus, H; Madison, D H; Jones, S; Ullrich, J

    2003-01-01

    To understand the physical processes that occur in nature we need to obtain a solid concept about the 'fundamental' forces acting between pairs of elementary particles. it is also necessary to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of many mutually interacting particles under the influence of these forces. This latter step, known as the few-body problem, remains an important unsolved problem in physics. Experiments involving atomic collisions represent a useful testing ground for studying the few-body problem. For the single ionization of a helium atom by charged particle impact, kinematically complete experiments have been performed since 1969. The theoretical analysis of such experiments was thought to yield a complete picture of the basic features of the collision process, at least for large collision energies. These conclusions are, however, almost exclusively based on studies of restricted electron-emission geometries. We report three- dimensional images of the complete electron emission pattern for...

  8. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  9. Atomic force microscopic imaging of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ateeq, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Kulsoom, Huma; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy have been successfully used in the study of microbes, as well as free-living protists. Unlike light microscopy, which enables us to observe living organisms or the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional image, atomic force microscopy provides a three-dimensional surface profile. Here, we observed two free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris under the phase contrast inverted microscope, transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Although light microscopy was of lower magnification, it revealed functional biology of live amoebae such as motility and osmoregulation using contractile vacuoles of the trophozoite stage, but it is of limited value in defining the cyst stage. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed significantly greater magnification and resolution to reveal the ultra-structural features of trophozoites and cysts including intracellular organelles and cyst wall characteristics but it only produced a snapshot in time of a dead amoeba cell. Atomic force microscopy produced three-dimensional images providing detailed topographic description of shape and surface, phase imaging measuring boundary stiffness, and amplitude measurements including width, height and length of A. castellanii and B. mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts. These results demonstrate the importance of the application of various microscopic methods in the biological and structural characterization of the whole cell, ultra-structural features, as well as surface components and cytoskeleton of protist pathogens. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  10. High-resolution neutron imaging of laser imploded DT targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disdier, L. E-mail: laurent.disdier@cea.fr; Rouyer, A.; Wilson, D.C.; Fedotoff, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Garconnet, J.-P.; Seka, W

    2002-08-21

    Using a penumbral technique with a biconical aperture we have obtained neutron images with the highest spatial resolution ever achieved. Implosions at the Omega laser of deuterium-tritium-filled glass microballoons with 2.5 and 4.2 {mu}m thick walls produced images with full-width at half-maximums of 78 and 62 {mu}m recorded with a resolution of 60 and 45 {mu}m, respectively. Image sizes are in good agreement with calculations when the effects of noise are included. Higher geometrical spatial resolution and a new deconvolution technique improve the previous measurements of Ress et al. (Science 241 (1988) 956) obtained with a 80 {mu}m resolution.

  11. High-resolution neutron imaging of laser imploded DT targets

    CERN Document Server

    Disdier, L; Wilson, D C; Fedotoff, A; Stoeckl, C; Bourgade, J L; Glebov, V Yu; Garconnet, J P; Seka, W

    2002-01-01

    Using a penumbral technique with a biconical aperture we have obtained neutron images with the highest spatial resolution ever achieved. Implosions at the Omega laser of deuterium-tritium-filled glass microballoons with 2.5 and 4.2 mu m thick walls produced images with full-width at half-maximums of 78 and 62 mu m recorded with a resolution of 60 and 45 mu m, respectively. Image sizes are in good agreement with calculations when the effects of noise are included. Higher geometrical spatial resolution and a new deconvolution technique improve the previous measurements of Ress et al. (Science 241 (1988) 956) obtained with a 80 mu m resolution.

  12. High Resolution Digital Imaging of Paintings: The Vasari Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk

    1991-01-01

    Describes VASARI (the Visual Art System for Archiving and Retrieval of Images), a project funded by the European Community to show the feasibility of high resolution colormetric imaging directly from paintings. The hardware and software used in the system are explained, storage on optical disks is described, and initial results are reported. (five…

  13. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... two simultaneous equations of values of image noise index (INI) and degradation level Index (LDI), a robust technique for predicting optimal image resolution for the mapping of savannah ecosystems was developed. ..... of aerial photography, Landsat TM and SPOT satellite imagery. Int. J. Remote Sens.

  14. Atomic-scale chemical imaging of composition and bonding by aberration-corrected microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, D A; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Murfitt, M; Song, J H; Hwang, H Y; Silcox, J; Dellby, N; Krivanek, O L

    2008-02-22

    Using a fifth-order aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which provides a factor of 100 increase in signal over an uncorrected instrument, we demonstrated two-dimensional elemental and valence-sensitive imaging at atomic resolution by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy, with acquisition times of well under a minute (for a 4096-pixel image). Applying this method to the study of a La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayer, we found an asymmetry between the chemical intermixing on the manganese-titanium and lanthanum-strontium sublattices. The measured changes in the titanium bonding as the local environment changed allowed us to distinguish chemical interdiffusion from imaging artifacts.

  15. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kobayashi, Jun; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantum gas microscope based on the Faraday effect that does not require a stochastic spontaneous emission process. We reveal the dispersive feature of this Faraday-imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal with that of the photon scattering rate. In addition, we determine the atom distribution through a deconvolution analysis, demonstrate absorption and dark-field Faraday imaging, and reveal the various shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by a theoretical analysis. The results constitute an important first step toward ultimate quantum nondemolition site-resolved imaging and open the way to quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with single-site resolution.

  16. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  17. High resolution OCT image generation using super resolution via sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad Usman; Hassan, Taimur; Shaukat, Arslan; Waqar, Razi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for obtaining a high resolution (HR) image from a single low resolution (LR) image -using joint learning dictionary - on the basis of image statistic research. It suggests that with an appropriate choice of an over-complete dictionary, image patches can be well represented as a sparse linear combination. Medical imaging for clinical analysis and medical intervention is being used for creating visual representations of the interior of a body, as well as visual representation of the function of some organs or tissues (physiology). A number of medical imaging techniques are in use like MRI, CT scan, X-rays and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT is one of the new technologies in medical imaging and one of its uses is in ophthalmology where it is being used for analysis of the choroidal thickness in the eyes in healthy and disease states such as age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, diabetic retinopathy and inherited retinal dystrophies. We have proposed a technique for enhancing the OCT images which can be used for clearly identifying and analyzing the particular diseases. Our method uses dictionary learning technique for generating a high resolution image from a single input LR image. We train two joint dictionaries, one with OCT images and the second with multiple different natural images, and compare the results with previous SR technique. Proposed method for both dictionaries produces HR images which are comparatively superior in quality with the other proposed method of SR. Proposed technique is very effective for noisy OCT images and produces up-sampled and enhanced OCT images.

  18. Automatic Matching of High Resolution Satellite Images Based on RFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JI Shunping

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A matching method for high resolution satellite images based on RFM is presented.Firstly,the RFM parameters are used to predict the initial parallax of corresponding points and the prediction accuracy is analyzed.Secondly,the approximate epipolar equation is constructed based on projection tracking and its accuracy is analyzed.Thirdly,approximate 1D image matching is executed on pyramid images and least square matching on base images.At last RANSAC is imbedded to eliminate mis-matching points and matching results are obtained.Test results verified the method more robust and with higher matching rate,compared to 2D gray correlation method and the popular SIFT matching method,and the method preferably solved the question of high resolution satellite image matching with different stereo model,different time and large rotation images.

  19. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  20. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  1. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: Applications in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Z.; Caruso, J A; B. Lai; Matusch, A.; Becker, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical researc...

  2. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  3. Dual camera system for acquisition of high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papon, Jeremie A.; Broussard, Randy P.; Ives, Robert W.

    2007-02-01

    Video surveillance is ubiquitous in modern society, but surveillance cameras are severely limited in utility by their low resolution. With this in mind, we have developed a system that can autonomously take high resolution still frame images of moving objects. In order to do this, we combine a low resolution video camera and a high resolution still frame camera mounted on a pan/tilt mount. In order to determine what should be photographed (objects of interest), we employ a hierarchical method which first separates foreground from background using a temporal-based median filtering technique. We then use a feed-forward neural network classifier on the foreground regions to determine whether the regions contain the objects of interest. This is done over several frames, and a motion vector is deduced for the object. The pan/tilt mount then focuses the high resolution camera on the next predicted location of the object, and an image is acquired. All components are controlled through a single MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI). The final system we present will be able to detect multiple moving objects simultaneously, track them, and acquire high resolution images of them. Results will demonstrate performance tracking and imaging varying numbers of objects moving at different speeds.

  4. EM-Fold: De novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium resolution density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps the general arrangement of secondary structure elements is revealed while their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the secondary structure elements de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with RMSD values smaller than 3 Å. PMID:22405005

  5. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  6. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  7. DMD based digital speckle illumination for high resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Anant; Mishra, Ayush; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    Spatially non-uniform illumination patterns have shown significant potential to improve the imaging. Recent developments in the patterned illumination microscopy have demonstrated that the use of an optical speckle as an illumination pattern significantly improves the imaging resolution at the same time reducing the computational overheads. We present a DMD based method for generation of digital speckle pattern. The generated digital speckle and uniform white light illumination are used as two illuminations to acquire images. The image reconstruction algorithm for blind structured illumination microscopy is used to get the high resolution image. Our approach does not require any calibration step or stringent control of the illumination, and dramatically simplifies the experimental set-up.

  8. Design of UAV high resolution image transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Ji, Ming; Pang, Lan; Jiang, Wen-tao; Fan, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xingcheng

    2017-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of the bandwidth limitation of the image transmission system on UAV, a scheme with image compression technology for mini UAV is proposed, based on the requirements of High-definition image transmission system of UAV. The video codec standard H.264 coding module and key technology was analyzed and studied for UAV area video communication. Based on the research of high-resolution image encoding and decoding technique and wireless transmit method, The high-resolution image transmission system was designed on architecture of Android and video codec chip; the constructed system was confirmed by experimentation in laboratory, the bit-rate could be controlled easily, QoS is stable, the low latency could meets most applied requirement not only for military use but also for industrial applications.

  9. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  10. Bacterial immobilization for imaging by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Mortensen, Ninell Pollas; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel

    2011-08-10

    AFM is a high-resolution (nm scale) imaging tool that mechanically probes a surface. It has the ability to image cells and biomolecules, in a liquid environment, without the need to chemically treat the sample. In order to accomplish this goal, the sample must sufficiently adhere to the mounting surface to prevent removal by forces exerted by the scanning AFM cantilever tip. In many instances, successful imaging depends on immobilization of the sample to the mounting surface. Optimally, immobilization should be minimally invasive to the sample such that metabolic processes and functional attributes are not compromised. By coating freshly cleaved mica surfaces with porcine (pig) gelatin, negatively charged bacteria can be immobilized on the surface and imaged in liquid by AFM. Immobilization of bacterial cells on gelatin-coated mica is most likely due to electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged bacteria and the positively charged gelatin. Several factors can interfere with bacterial immobilization, including chemical constituents of the liquid in which the bacteria are suspended, the incubation time of the bacteria on the gelatin coated mica, surface characteristics of the bacterial strain and the medium in which the bacteria are imaged. Overall, the use of gelatin-coated mica is found to be generally applicable for imaging microbial cells.

  11. Sensing Noncollinear Magnetism at the Atomic Scale Combining Magnetic Exchange and Spin-Polarized Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Gerritsen, Jan W; Wegner, Daniel; Khajetoorians, Alexander A

    2017-09-13

    Storing and accessing information in atomic-scale magnets requires magnetic imaging techniques with single-atom resolution. Here, we show simultaneous detection of the spin-polarization and exchange force with or without the flow of current with a new method, which combines scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy. To demonstrate the application of this new method, we characterize the prototypical nanoskyrmion lattice formed on a monolayer of Fe/Ir(111). We resolve the square magnetic lattice by employing magnetic exchange force microscopy, demonstrating its applicability to noncollinear magnetic structures for the first time. Utilizing distance-dependent force and current spectroscopy, we quantify the exchange forces in comparison to the spin-polarization. For strongly spin-polarized tips, we distinguish different signs of the exchange force that we suggest arises from a change in exchange mechanisms between the probe and a skyrmion. This new approach may enable both nonperturbative readout combined with writing by current-driven reversal of atomic-scale magnets.

  12. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  13. High-resolution digital imaging with storage phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, C R; Gur, D; Schaetzing, R

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the current status and potential applications of high-resolution storage phosphor for imaging of the chest. Digital imaging that uses storage phosphor technology is easily adaptable to existing x-ray--generating equipment and can also be used with mobile equipment. The wide latitude of the storage phosphor technique permits satisfactory imaging in situations in which exposure factors cannot be accurately estimated or easily controlled. Early experience with an experimental Kodak high-resolution (4K x 4K) storage phosphor system suggests that standard and portal chest images of excellent quality can be obtained. Many issues must be resolved, however, before digital radiology with a storage phosphor can be advocated as being preferable to conventional film-screen systems. These issues, which include display modalities (film or television monitor), resolution requirements, and the effects of image processing, can only be resolved by further large-scale accuracy studies. The change to a digital imaging system will involve major expenditures for equipment and computers. Cost will be related largely to the level of spatial resolution required for primary radiographic diagnosis.

  14. Atomic-Scale Time and Space Resolution of Terahertz Frequency Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kim, Ki-Yong; Glownia, James H.

    2008-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and analytics, we find that strain waves of terahertz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. By considering AlN/GaN heterostructures, we show that the radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time dependence of the strain wave with potentially subpicosecond, nearly atomic time and space resolution. We demonstrate this phenomenon within the context of high amplitude terahertz frequency strain waves that spontaneously form at the front of shock waves in GaN crystals.

  15. A history of gap junction structure: hexagonal arrays to atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosely, Rosslyn; Sorgen, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Gap junctions are specialized membrane structures that provide an intercellular pathway for the propagation and/or amplification of signaling cascades responsible for impulse propagation, cell growth, and development. Prior to the identification of the proteins that comprise gap junctions, elucidation of channel structure began with initial observations of a hexagonal nexus connecting apposed cellular membranes. Concomitant with technological advancements spanning over 50 years, atomic resolution structures are now available detailing channel architecture and the cytoplasmic domains that have helped to define mechanisms governing the regulation of gap junctions. Highlighted in this review are the seminal structural studies that have led to our current understanding of gap junction biology.

  16. High resolution 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An optimized method for continuous wave 2-dimensional (2-D) upconversion of incoherent or thermal light is demonstrated and quantified. Using standard resolution targets a resolution of 200×1000 pixels is obtained. The suggested method is viewed in scope of modern CCD cameras operating in the near...... CCD detectors. Furthermore, we discuss the exceptionally good depth of field possible for imaging systems based on the proposed method....

  17. Generating High-Temporal and Spatial Resolution TIR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Huerta, M.; Lagüela, S.; Alfieri, S. M.; Menenti, M.

    2017-09-01

    Remote sensing imagery to monitor global biophysical dynamics requires the availability of thermal infrared data at high temporal and spatial resolution because of the rapid development of crops during the growing season and the fragmentation of most agricultural landscapes. Conversely, no single sensor meets these combined requirements. Data fusion approaches offer an alternative to exploit observations from multiple sensors, providing data sets with better properties. A novel spatio-temporal data fusion model based on constrained algorithms denoted as multisensor multiresolution technique (MMT) was developed and applied to generate TIR synthetic image data at both temporal and spatial high resolution. Firstly, an adaptive radiance model is applied based on spectral unmixing analysis of . TIR radiance data at TOA (top of atmosphere) collected by MODIS daily 1-km and Landsat - TIRS 16-day sampled at 30-m resolution are used to generate synthetic daily radiance images at TOA at 30-m spatial resolution. The next step consists of unmixing the 30 m (now lower resolution) images using the information about their pixel land-cover composition from co-registered images at higher spatial resolution. In our case study, TIR synthesized data were unmixed to the Sentinel 2 MSI with 10 m resolution. The constrained unmixing preserves all the available radiometric information of the 30 m images and involves the optimization of the number of land-cover classes and the size of the moving window for spatial unmixing. Results are still being evaluated, with particular attention for the quality of the data streams required to apply our approach.

  18. GENERATING HIGH-TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION TIR IMAGE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herrero-Huerta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing imagery to monitor global biophysical dynamics requires the availability of thermal infrared data at high temporal and spatial resolution because of the rapid development of crops during the growing season and the fragmentation of most agricultural landscapes. Conversely, no single sensor meets these combined requirements. Data fusion approaches offer an alternative to exploit observations from multiple sensors, providing data sets with better properties. A novel spatio-temporal data fusion model based on constrained algorithms denoted as multisensor multiresolution technique (MMT was developed and applied to generate TIR synthetic image data at both temporal and spatial high resolution. Firstly, an adaptive radiance model is applied based on spectral unmixing analysis of . TIR radiance data at TOA (top of atmosphere collected by MODIS daily 1-km and Landsat – TIRS 16-day sampled at 30-m resolution are used to generate synthetic daily radiance images at TOA at 30-m spatial resolution. The next step consists of unmixing the 30 m (now lower resolution images using the information about their pixel land-cover composition from co-registered images at higher spatial resolution. In our case study, TIR synthesized data were unmixed to the Sentinel 2 MSI with 10 m resolution. The constrained unmixing preserves all the available radiometric information of the 30 m images and involves the optimization of the number of land-cover classes and the size of the moving window for spatial unmixing. Results are still being evaluated, with particular attention for the quality of the data streams required to apply our approach.

  19. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katskov, Dmitri

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D2 and Xe lamps within 200-400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3-5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground water

  20. Novel fractal characteristic of atomic force microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtseva, Maria N; Starodubtsev, Ivan E; Starodubtsev, Evgenii G

    2017-05-01

    Fractal dimension (DF) is one of the important parameters in the description of object's properties in different fields including biology and medicine. The present paper is focused on the application of the fractal dimension (the box counting dimension) in the analysis of the properties of cell surface on the base of its images obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fractal dimension of digital 3D AFM images depends on interpoint distances determined by the scanning step in the XY-plane and Z-scale factor t. We have studied the dependence of DF of AFM images on the Z-scale factor (DF=φ(t)) with purpose to reveal the features of the dependence and its usefulness in the analysis of the maps of surface properties. Using the model digital surfaces such as the plane, sinusoidal surfaces and "hilly" surface, we revealed that the sizes and spatial frequency of surface structural elements determined the basic features of the dependence (the parameters of peaks on the curve DF=φ(t)) and the element of chance in the localization of the structural elements on the surface had no significant influence on the dependence. Our findings demonstrate that the dependence of the fractal dimension on the Z-scale factor characterizes the structure of the AFM images more comprehensively than the roughness Ra and fractal dimension DF evaluated at a certain t. The dependence DF=φ(t) can be considered as a novel characteristic of AFM images. On analyzing the AFM images (lateral force maps) of glutaraldehyde-fixed adhered human fibroblasts and A549 human lung epithelial cells we found the significant difference in the dependences DF=φ(t) for different cell types that could be related to the difference of structural and mechanical surface properties of the studied cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards an automatic tool for resolution evaluation of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, J. E. E. [FUMEC, Av. Alfonso Pena 3880, CEP 30130-009 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: juliae@fumec.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Quality of Mammographies from the Public and Private Services of the State. With an essentially educational character, an evaluation of the image quality is monthly held from a breast phantom in each mammographic equipment. In face of this, this work proposes to develop a protocol for automatic evaluation of image quality of mammograms so that the radiological protection and image quality requirements are met in the early detection of breast cancer. Specifically, image resolution will be addressed and evaluated, as a part of the program of image quality evaluation. Results show that for the fourth resolution and using 28 phantom images with the ground truth settled, the computer analysis of the resolution is promising and may be used as a tool for the assessment of the image quality. (Author)

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsay, Joseph D.; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  3. Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Forchheimer, Robert; Haviland, David B.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigenmodes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution.

  4. Human eye visual hyperacuity: Controlled diffraction for image resolution improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, A.; Domínguez, O.; Martinez-Conde, S.; Macknik, S. L.; Del-Río, C.

    2017-09-01

    The Human Visual System appears to be using a low number of sensors for image capturing, and furthermore, regarding the physical dimensions of cones—photoreceptors responsible for the sharp central vision—we may realize that these sensors are of a relatively small size and area. Nonetheless, the human eye is capable of resolving fine details thanks to visual hyperacuity and presents an impressive sensitivity and dynamic range when set against conventional digital cameras of similar characteristics. This article is based on the hypothesis that the human eye may be benefiting from diffraction to improve both image resolution and acquisition process. The developed method involves the introduction of a controlled diffraction pattern at an initial stage that enables the use of a limited number of sensors for capturing the image and makes possible a subsequent post-processing to improve the final image resolution.

  5. 3D super-resolution imaging with blinking quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Cai, En; Ng, Tony; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots are promising candidates for single molecule imaging due to their exceptional photophysical properties, including their intense brightness and resistance to photobleaching. They are also notorious for their blinking. Here we report a novel way to take advantage of quantum dot blinking to develop an imaging technique in three-dimensions with nanometric resolution. We first applied this method to simulated images of quantum dots, and then to quantum dots immobilized on microspheres. We achieved imaging resolutions (FWHM) of 8–17 nm in the x-y plane and 58 nm (on coverslip) or 81 nm (deep in solution) in the z-direction, approximately 3–7 times better than what has been achieved previously with quantum dots. This approach was applied to resolve the 3D distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) molecules at, and inside of, the plasma membrane of resting basal breast cancer cells. PMID:24093439

  6. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  7. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  8. Quantifying B Site Disorder in Polycrystalline and Single Crystal Yb2Ti2O7 Pyrochlore by Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy at Atomic Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Xin, Yan; Zhou, Haidong

    The cubic pyrochlore oxides, A2B2O7, have attracted much attention over the past 20 years. A and B ions reside on two distinct interpenetrating lattices of corner-sharing tetrahedral. It has been noticed that the magnetic ground states of Yb2Ti2O7 are sample dependent. It could have long-range ordered collinear ferromagnetic state, or non-collinear ferromagnetic fluctuations, or short ranged fluctuations. In particular, the specific heat shows sharp peaks at 265 mK for polycrystalline samples, but a broad peak at 214 mK to 250 mK for optical floating zone (OFZ) single crystals. Neutron scattering study shows that OFZ single crystals are lightly stuffed pyrochlore with 2.3% Yb on to Ti sites. We have studied this disorder by quantitative scanning electron microscopy at atomic resolution for both polycrystals and single crystals. We have carried out atomic resolution imaging of Yb2Ti2O7 along [110] and by comparing image simulations, we have quantified the Yb atoms on the Ti atomic columns, and compared the disorders for both crystals. We also related the degree of the disorder to their magnetic ground states.

  9. Sub-nanometer drift correction for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Wang, X; Zhang, X; Li, J; Dai, L

    2014-10-01

    Spatial resolution of conventional far-field fluorescence microscopy is limited by diffraction of light. Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), such as (direct) stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM/STORM), and (fluorescence) photoactivation localization microscopy (fPALM/PALM), can break this barrier by localizing single emitters and reconstructing super-resolution image with much higher precision. Nevertheless, a SMLM measurement needs to record a large number of image frames and takes considerable recording time. In this process, sample drift becomes a critical problem and cannot be neglected. In this Letter, we present a sub-nanometer precision, low-cost sample drift correction method based on minimizing normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) between bright field images. Two optical configurations are suggested for recording bright field and fluorescence images simultaneously or alternately. The method was demonstrated on simulated data, and better than 0.3 nm drift correction precision was achieved. It was also applied on dSTORM imaging of F-actins of 3T3 cell, and the quality of reconstructed super-resolution image was improved observably. This method does not require special hardware, extra labelling or markers, and no precision decline due to photobleaching. It can be applied as an add-on for SMLM setups and achieves sub-nanometer precision drift correction for post-measurement or real time drift compensation.

  10. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  11. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  12. High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Duchin, Yuval; Ullberg, Christer; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with applying iterative image reconstruction, based on constrained total-variation minimization, to low-intensity X-ray CT systems that have a high sampling rate. Such systems pose a challenge for iterative image reconstruction, because a very fine image grid is needed to realize the resolution inherent in such scanners. These image arrays lead to under-determined imaging models whose inversion is unstable and can result in undesirable artifacts and noise patterns. There are many possibilities to stabilize the imaging model, and this work proposes a method which may have an advantage in terms of algorithm efficiency. The proposed method introduces additional constraints in the optimization problem; these constraints set to zero high spatial frequency components which are beyond the sensing capability of the detector. The method is demonstrated with an actual CT data set and compared with another method based on projection up-sampling.

  13. Effects of pose and image resolution on automatic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ali, Tauseef; Khan, Samee U.

    The popularity of face recognition systems have increased due to their use in widespread applications. Driven by the enormous number of potential application domains, several algorithms have been proposed for face recognition. Face pose and image resolutions are among the two important factors that

  14. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past studies to predict optimal image resolution required for generating spatial information for savannah ecosystems have yielded different outcomes, hence providing a knowledge gap that was investigated in the present study. The postulation, for the present study, was that by graphically solving two simultaneous ...

  15. Very high resolution satellite data: New challenges in image analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    Early years of coming century will see a large number of satellites with very high spatial resolution reaching beyond 1 m in the visible range of electromagnetic spectrum. Such images will come very close to giving a ground-based view of a terrain...

  16. Super-resolution Microscopy in Plant Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy methods dates back to 1994, relevant applications in plant cell imaging only started to emerge in 2010. Since then, the principal super-resolution methods, including structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), have been implemented in plant cell research. However, progress has been limited due to the challenging properties of plant material. Here we summarize the basic principles of existing super-resolution methods and provide examples of applications in plant science. The limitations imposed by the nature of plant material are reviewed and the potential for future applications in plant cell imaging is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Seismic exploration utilizes controlled sources, which emit seismic waves that propagate through the earth subsurface and get reflected off subsurface interfaces and scatterers. The reflected and scattered waves are recorded by recording stations installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single-scattering assumption, where only energy that bounces once off a subsurface scatterer and recorded by a receiver is projected back to its subsurface position. The internally multiply scattered seismic energy is considered as unwanted noise and is usually suppressed or removed from the recorded data. Conventional seismic imaging techniques yield subsurface images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and acquisition fingerprint due to the limited acquisition aperture, number of sources and receivers, and bandwidth of the source wavelet. Hydrocarbon traps are becoming more challenging and considerable reserves are trapped in stratigraphic and pinch-out traps, which require highly resolved seismic images to delineate them. This thesis focuses on developing and implementing new advanced cost-effective seismic imaging techniques aiming at enhancing the resolution of the migrated images by exploiting the sparseness of the subsurface reflectivity distribution and utilizing the multiples that are usually neglected when imaging seismic data. I first formulate the seismic imaging problem as a Basis pursuit denoise problem, which I solve using an L1-minimization algorithm to obtain the sparsest migrated image corresponding to the recorded data. Imaging multiples may illuminate subsurface zones, which are not easily illuminated by conventional seismic imaging using primary reflections only. I then develop an L2-norm (i.e. least-squares) inversion technique to image

  18. Understanding atomic-resolved STM images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface by DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C; Gonzalez, C; Mendez, J; De Andres, P L; MartIn-Gago, J A; Lopez, M F [Instituto Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Jelinek, P, E-mail: mflopez@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53-Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-08

    We present a combination of experimental STM images and DFT calculations to understand the atomic scale contrast of features found in high-resolution STM images. Simulating different plausible structural models for the tip, we have been able to reproduce various characteristics previously reported in experimental images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) under controlled UHV conditions. Our results allow us to determine the influence of different chemical and morphological tip terminations on the atomic-resolution STM images of the TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface. The commonest images have been properly explained using standard models for a W tip, either clean or with a single O atom located at the apex. Furthermore, a double transfer of oxygen atoms can account for different types of bizarre atomic-resolution features occasionally seen, and not conclusively interpreted before. Importantly, we discuss how typical point-defects are imaged on this surface by different tips, namely bridging O vacancies and adsorbed OH groups.

  19. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) diffusion MRI can be advantageous over pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) for diffusion times that are long compared with T2 . It therefore has potential for biomedical diffusion imaging applications at 7T and above where T2 is short. However, gradient pulses...... angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM...

  20. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  1. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  2. Natural-pose hand detection in low-resolution images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyan Bo Bo1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Robust real-time hand detection and tracking in video sequences would enable many applications in areas as diverse ashuman-computer interaction, robotics, security and surveillance, and sign language-based systems. In this paper, we introducea new approach for detecting human hands that works on single, cluttered, low-resolution images. Our prototype system, whichis primarily intended for security applications in which the images are noisy and low-resolution, is able to detect hands as smallas 2424 pixels in cluttered scenes. The system uses grayscale appearance information to classify image sub-windows as eithercontaining or not containing a human hand very rapidly at the cost of a high false positive rate. To improve on the false positiverate of the main classifier without affecting its detection rate, we introduce a post-processor system that utilizes the geometricproperties of skin color blobs. When we test our detector on a test image set containing 106 hands, 92 of those hands aredetected (86.8% detection rate, with an average false positive rate of 1.19 false positive detections per image. The rapiddetection speed, the high detection rate of 86.8%, and the low false positive rate together ensure that our system is useable asthe main detector in a diverse variety of applications requiring robust hand detection and tracking in low-resolution, clutteredscenes.

  3. Optimized multiple linear mappings for single image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibing; Li, Jie; Xiong, Zenggang; Liu, Xiuping; Gao, Xinbo

    2017-12-01

    Learning piecewise linear regression has been recognized as an effective way for example learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) in literature. In this paper, we employ an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to further improve the SR performance of our previous multiple linear mappings (MLM) based SR method. In the training stage, the proposed method starts with a set of linear regressors obtained by the MLM-based method, and then jointly optimizes the clustering results and the low- and high-resolution subdictionary pairs for regression functions by using the metric of the reconstruction errors. In the test stage, we select the optimal regressor for SR reconstruction by accumulating the reconstruction errors of m-nearest neighbors in the training set. Thorough experimental results carried on six publicly available datasets demonstrate that the proposed SR method can yield high-quality images with finer details and sharper edges in terms of both quantitative and perceptual image quality assessments.

  4. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  5. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  6. Development of a combined atomic force microscopy and side-view imaging system for mechanotransduction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beicker, Kellie N.

    Key metrics for understanding cell response to mechanical stimuli include rearrangement of the cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal structure, induced strains and biochemical distributions; however, structural information during applied stress is limited by our ability to image cells under load. In order to study the mechanics of single cells and subcellular components under load, I have developed a unique imaging system that combines an atomic force microscope (AFM) with both vertical light-sheet (VLS) illumination and a new imaging technique called PRISM - Pathway Rotated Imaging for Sideways Microscopy. The combined AFM and PRISM system facilitates the imaging of cell deformation in the direction of applied force with accompanying pico-Newton resolution force measurements. The additional inclusion of light-sheet microscopy improves the signal-to-noise ratio achieved by illumination of only a thin layer of the cell. This system is capable of pico-newton resolution force measurements with simultaneous side-view high frame rate imaging for single-molecule and single-cell force studies. Longer-term goals for this instrument are to investigate how external mechanical stimuli, specifically single-molecule interactions, alter gene expression, motility, and differentiation. The overall goal of my dissertation work is to design a tool useful for mechanobiology studies of single cells. This requires the design and implementation of PRISM and VLS systems that can be coupled to the standard Asylum AFM on inverted optical microscope. I also examine the strategy and implementation of experimental procedures and data analysis pipelines for single-cell and single-molecule force spectroscopy. These goals can be broken down as follows: • Performed single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. • Performed single-cell force spectroscopy experiments. • Constructed and characterized the side-view microscopy system. • Applied combined AFM and side-vew microscopy system.

  7. Atom Resolved Electron Microscpe Images of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Nanofibers for Water Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suqi; Reneker, Darrell

    Ultra-thin nanofibers of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), observed with an aberration corrected transmission electron microscope, in a through focus series of 50 images, revealed three-dimensional positions and motions of some molecular segments. The x,y positions of fluorine atoms in the PVDF segments were observed at high resolution as described in (DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01619c). The methods described in (DOI:10.1038/nature11074) were used to measure the positions of fluorine atoms along the observation direction of the microscope. PVDF is widely used to separate salt ions from water in reverse osmosis systems. The observed separation depends on the atomic scale positions and motions of segments of the PVDF molecules. Conformational changes and the associated changes in the directions of the dipole moments of PVDF segments distinguish the diffusion of dipolar water molecules from diffusion of salt ions to accomplish desalination. Authors thank Coalescence Filtration Nanofibers Consortium at The University of Akron for support.

  8. Virtual interface substructure synthesis method for normal mode analysis of super-large molecular complexes at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuehui; Sun, Yunxiang; An, Xiongbo; Ming, Dengming

    2011-10-14

    Normal mode analysis of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution remains challenging in computational structure biology due to the requirement of large amount of memory space and central processing unit time. In this paper, we present a method called virtual interface substructure synthesis method or VISSM to calculate approximate normal modes of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution. VISSM introduces the subunit interfaces as independent substructures that join contacting molecules so as to keep the integrity of the system. Compared with other approximate methods, VISSM delivers atomic modes with no need of a coarse-graining-then-projection procedure. The method was examined for 54 protein-complexes with the conventional all-atom normal mode analysis using CHARMM simulation program and the overlap of the first 100 low-frequency modes is greater than 0.7 for 49 complexes, indicating its accuracy and reliability. We then applied VISSM to the satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV, 78,300 atoms) and to F-actin filament structures of up to 39-mer, 228,813 atoms and found that VISSM calculations capture functionally important conformational changes accessible to these structures at atomic resolution. Our results support the idea that the dynamics of a large biomolecular complex might be understood based on the motions of its component subunits and the way in which subunits bind one another. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  9. Single image super-resolution via an iterative reproducing kernel Hilbert space method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liang-Jian; Guo, Weihong; Huang, Ting-Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. Many existing approaches use multiple low-resolution images to recover one high-resolution image. In this paper, we present an iterative scheme to solve single image super-resolution problems. It recovers a high quality high-resolution image from solely one low-resolution image without using a training data set. We solve the problem from image intensity function estimation perspective and assume the image contains smooth and edge components. We model the smooth components of an image using a thin-plate reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) and the edges using approximated Heaviside functions. The proposed method is applied to image patches, aiming to reduce computation and storage. Visual and quantitative comparisons with some competitive approaches show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Atomically resolved imaging of highly ordered alternating fluorinated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtiban, Reza J.; Dyson, M. Adam; Nair, Rahul R.; Zan, Recep; Wong, Swee L.; Ramasse, Quentin; Geim, Andre K.; Bangert, Ursel; Sloan, Jeremy

    2014-09-01

    One of the most desirable goals of graphene research is to produce ordered two-dimensional (2D) chemical derivatives of suitable quality for monolayer device fabrication. Here we reveal, by focal series exit wave reconstruction (EWR), that C2F chair is a stable graphene derivative and demonstrates pristine long-range order limited only by the size of a functionalized domain. Focal series of images of graphene and C2F chair formed by reaction with XeF2 were obtained at 80 kV in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. EWR images reveal that single carbon atoms and carbon-fluorine pairs in C2F chair alternate strictly over domain sizes of at least 150 nm2 with electron diffraction indicating ordered domains ≥0.16 μm2. Our results also indicate that, within an ordered domain, functionalization occurs on one side only as theory predicts. In addition, we show that electron diffraction provides a quick and easy method for distinguishing between graphene, C2F chair and fully fluorinated stoichiometric CF 2D phases.

  11. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  12. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  13. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  14. Low energy neutral atom imaging on the Moon with the SARA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports on the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) experiment that will be flown on the first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1. The SARA is a low energy neutral atom. (LENA) imaging mass spectrometer, which will perform remote sensing of the lunar surface via detection of neutral atoms in the energy ...

  15. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2002-07-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI. The basic parameters used all through the projects will be presented. In Chapter 3, a reproducibility study on DTI with the single shot EPI sequence will be conducted. The single shot DT-EPI was carried out on a stroke patient. In Chapter 4, current techniques on high spatial resolution DTI will be explored. Sequences of Interleaved EPI of two segments and EPI with Half Fourier acquisition will be developed. The sources of artefacts which contaminate most DT images will be discussed with solution proposed. Chapter 5 proposed a new selective averaging algorithm for the data acquired by the sequences of interleaved EPI. It does not require cardiac gating during data acquisition period and thus increase the speed of data collection. A new ghost free segmented EPI sequence will be presented in Chapter 6: Half-FOV EPI. The technique will be tested on a phantom in vitro as well as in two normal male volunteers in vivo. A comparison study on diffusion tensor imaging

  16. Atomic resolution snapshot of Leishmania ribosome inhibition by the aminoglycoside paromomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev-Benami, Moran; Zhang, Yan; Rozenberg, Haim; Nobe, Yuko; Taoka, Masato; Matzov, Donna; Zimmerman, Ella; Bashan, Anat; Isobe, Toshiaki; Jaffe, Charles L; Yonath, Ada; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2017-11-17

    Leishmania is a single-celled eukaryotic parasite afflicting millions of humans worldwide, with current therapies limited to a poor selection of drugs that mostly target elements in the parasite's cell envelope. Here we determined the atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the Leishmania ribosome in complex with paromomycin (PAR), a highly potent compound recently approved for treatment of the fatal visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The structure reveals the mechanism by which the drug induces its deleterious effects on the parasite. We further show that PAR interferes with several aspects of cytosolic translation, thus highlighting the cytosolic rather than the mitochondrial ribosome as the primary drug target. The results also highlight unique as well as conserved elements in the PAR-binding pocket that can serve as hotspots for the development of novel therapeutics.

  17. Segmentation of Striatal Brain Structures from High Resolution PET Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J. P. C. Farinha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and evaluate an automatic segmentation method for extracting striatal brain structures (caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum from parametric C11-raclopride positron emission tomography (PET brain images. We focus on the images acquired using a novel brain dedicated high-resolution (HRRT PET scanner. The segmentation method first extracts the striatum using a deformable surface model and then divides the striatum into its substructures based on a graph partitioning algorithm. The weighted kernel k-means algorithm is used to partition the graph describing the voxel affinities within the striatum into the desired number of clusters. The method was experimentally validated with synthetic and real image data. The experiments showed that our method was able to automatically extract caudate, ventral striatum, and putamen from the images. Moreover, the putamen could be subdivided into anterior and posterior parts. An automatic method for the extraction of striatal structures from high-resolution PET images allows for inexpensive and reproducible extraction of the quantitative information from these images necessary in brain research and drug development.

  18. A parallel solution for high resolution histological image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, G; González, R; Déniz, O; García-Rojo, M; González-García, J; Fernández-Carrobles, M M; Vállez, N; Salido, J

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a general methodology for developing parallel image processing algorithms based on message passing for high resolution images (on the order of several Gigabytes). These algorithms have been applied to histological images and must be executed on massively parallel processing architectures. Advances in new technologies for complete slide digitalization in pathology have been combined with developments in biomedical informatics. However, the efficient use of these digital slide systems is still a challenge. The image processing that these slides are subject to is still limited both in terms of data processed and processing methods. The work presented here focuses on the need to design and develop parallel image processing tools capable of obtaining and analyzing the entire gamut of information included in digital slides. Tools have been developed to assist pathologists in image analysis and diagnosis, and they cover low and high-level image processing methods applied to histological images. Code portability, reusability and scalability have been tested by using the following parallel computing architectures: distributed memory with massive parallel processors and two networks, INFINIBAND and Myrinet, composed of 17 and 1024 nodes respectively. The parallel framework proposed is flexible, high performance solution and it shows that the efficient processing of digital microscopic images is possible and may offer important benefits to pathology laboratories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation length imaging with high-resolution telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B.; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C.; Lütticke, F.

    2017-02-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length X/X0 profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the X/X0 imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of X/X0 imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of 100 million tracks at 4 GeV has been collected, which is sufficient to resolve complex material profiles on the 30 μm scale.

  20. Atomic resolution observation of conversion-type anode RuO₂ during the first electrochemical lithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Minmin; Nie, Anmin; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xi-Xiang

    2015-03-27

    Transition metal oxides have attracted great interest as alternative anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Among them, ruthenium dioxide is considered to be a prototype material that reacts with the Li ions in the conversion type. In situ transmission electron microscopy reveals a two-step process during the initial lithiation of the RuO2 nanowire anode at atomic resolution. The first step is characterized by the formation of the intermediate phase LixRuO2 due to the Li-ion intercalation. The following step is manifested by the solid-state amorphization reaction driven by advancing the reaction front. The crystalline/amorphous interface is consisted of {011} atomic terraces, revealing the orientation-dependent mobility. In the crystalline matrix, lattice disturbance and dislocation are identified to be two major stress-induced distortions. The latter can be effective diffusion channels, facilitating transportation of the Li ions inside the bulk RuO2 crystal and further resulting in non-uniform Li-ion distribution. It is expected that the local enrichment of the Li ions may account for the homogeneous nucleation of dislocations in the bulk RuO2 crystal and the special island-like structures. These results elucidate the structural evolution and the phase transformation during electrochemical cycling, which sheds light on engineering RuO2 anode materials.

  1. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant.

  2. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Composition and Bonding at Perovskite Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting Kourkoutis, L.

    2010-03-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study buried perovskite oxide heterointerfaces. With the recent addition of 3^rd order and now 5^th order aberration correction, which provides a factor of 100x increase in signal over an uncorrected system, we are now able to record 2D maps of composition and bonding of oxide interfaces at atomic resolution [1]. Here, we present studies of the microscopic structure of oxide/oxide multilayers and heterostructures by STEM in combination with EELS and its effect on the properties of the film. Using atomic-resolution spectroscopic imaging we show that the degradation of the magnetic and transport properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3 multilayers correlates with atomic intermixing at the interfaces and the presence of extended defects in the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layers. When these defects are eliminated, metallic ferromagnetism at room temperature can be stabilized in 5 unit cell thick manganite layers, almost 40% thinner than the previously reported critical thickness of 3-5 nm for sustaining metallic ferromagnetism below Tc in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3.[4pt] [1] D.A. Muller, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, M. Murfitt, J.H. Song, H.Y. Hwang, J. Silcox, N. Dellby, O.L. Krivanek, Science 319, 1073-1076 (2008).

  3. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Elemental imaging of thin films with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Christoph M.; Riepl, Kevin M.; Huber, Norbert; Pedarnig, Johannes D.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS) for the spectrochemical imaging of thin films with high spatial resolution. Chemical images are obtained by recording LIBS spectra at each site of 2D raster-scans across the samples employing one fs-laser pulse per site. The diffraction images of the Echelle spectrometer are binned to reduce the read-out time of the intensified CCD detector and to increase the stability of the emission signals against peak drifts in the echellograms. For copper thin films on glass the intensities of Cu I emission lines and the size of ablation craters vary non-monotonously with the film thickness hCu = 5-500 nm. The emission efficiency, defined as the Cu I line intensity per ablated volume, strongly decreases for films thicker than the optical penetration depth. The Na I line intensity from glass increases exponentially with decreasing Cu film thickness. For yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films on MgO various atomic and molecular emission lines of the laser-induced plasma are measured (film thickness hYBCO = 200-1000 nm). The obtained element (Y, Ba, Cu, Mg) and molecular (Y-O) fs-LIBS images match the structure of the micro-patterned YBCO films very well. The achieved lateral resolution δr = 6 μm is among the best values reported for spectrochemical LIBS imaging.

  4. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. GF-4 Images Super Resolution Reconstruction Based on POCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Lina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The super resolution reconstruction of GF-4 is made by projection on convex sets (POCS. Papoulis-Gerchberg is used to construct reference frame which can reduce iteration and improve algorithm efficiency.Vandewalle is used to estimate motion parameter which is benefit to block process. Tested and analyzed by real GF-4 series images, it shows that sharpness of super resolution result is positive correlatie to frame amount, and signal to noise ratio (SNR is negative correlate to frame amount. After processing by 5 frames, information entropy (IE changes little; sharpness (average gradient increases from 7.803 to 14.386; SNR reduces a little, from 3.411 to 3.336. The experiment shows that after super resolution reconstruction, sharpness and detail information of results can be greatly improved.

  7. Single Image Super-resolution using Deformable Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Yanning; Yuille, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a deformable patches based method for single image super-resolution. By the concept of deformation, a patch is not regarded as a fixed vector but a flexible deformation flow. Via deformable patches, the dictionary can cover more patterns that do not appear, thus becoming more expressive. We present the energy function with slow, smooth and flexible prior for deformation model. During example-based super-resolution, we develop the deformation similarity based on the minimized energy function for basic patch matching. For robustness, we utilize multiple deformed patches combination for the final reconstruction. Experiments evaluate the deformation effectiveness and super-resolution performance, showing that the deformable patches help improve the representation accuracy and perform better than the state-of-art methods. PMID:25473254

  8. Segmentation Based Fuzzy Classification of High Resolution Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mukund; Rao, Suryaprakash; Masser, Ian; Kasturirangan, K.

    images, we build a much needed bridge between the methodology domains of GIS and Image Analysis. The idea of having an integrated 'geographical information processing' environment is becoming much more realistic now that 'GIS' objects can be used for analysing an image and vice versa, new 'GIS' objects can be directly generated without ignoring the rich information environment of geographical concepts, relations and scales. In the above scenario, the main aim of this project is to assess whether object-oriented classification techniques would be more suitable for remote sensing images - specifically in the context of high resolution images. The paper basically examines potentials of classification techniques - especially segmentation based methods that is based on an object-semantics and that uses not only the spectral information but also the spatial characteristics; studies the integration of segmentation and fuzzy-classification to derive user-oriented information from the high resolution images and evaluates how such segmentation based classification compares with the more common pixel- based statistical technique. Segmentation based fuzzy classification is applied to high resolution images from IRS and for 1m images from satellites - especially to extract urban information.

  9. Wavelet-based image registration technique for high-resolution remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gang; Zhang, Yun

    2008-12-01

    Image registration is the process of geometrically aligning one image to another image of the same scene taken from different viewpoints at different times or by different sensors. It is an important image processing procedure in remote sensing and has been studied by remote sensing image processing professionals for several decades. Nevertheless, it is still difficult to find an accurate, robust, and automatic image registration method, and most existing image registration methods are designed for a particular application. High-resolution remote sensing images have made it more convenient for professionals to study the Earth; however, they also create new challenges when traditional processing methods are used. In terms of image registration, a number of problems exist in the registration of high-resolution images: (1) the increased relief displacements, introduced by increasing the spatial resolution and lowering the altitude of the sensors, cause obvious geometric distortion in local areas where elevation variation exists; (2) precisely locating control points in high-resolution images is not as simple as in moderate-resolution images; (3) a large number of control points are required for a precise registration, which is a tedious and time-consuming process; and (4) high data volume often affects the processing speed in the image registration. Thus, the demand for an image registration approach that can reduce the above problems is growing. This study proposes a new image registration technique, which is based on the combination of feature-based matching (FBM) and area-based matching (ABM). A wavelet-based feature extraction technique and a normalized cross-correlation matching and relaxation-based image matching techniques are employed in this new method. Two pairs of data sets, one pair of IKONOS panchromatic images from different times and the other pair of images consisting of an IKONOS panchromatic image and a QuickBird multispectral image, are used to

  10. Enhanced beetle luciferase for high-resolution bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Nakajima

    Full Text Available We developed an enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc to be used as a bioluminescence imaging (BLI probe. ELuc exhibits a light signal in mammalian cells that is over 10-fold stronger than that of the firefly luciferase (FLuc, which is the most widely used luciferase reporter gene. We showed that ELuc produces a strong light signal in primary cells and tissues and that it enables the visualization of gene expression with high temporal resolution at the single-cell level. Moreover, we successfully imaged the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of importin alpha by fusing ELuc at the intracellular level. These results demonstrate that the use of ELuc allows a BLI spatiotemporal resolution far greater than that provided by FLuc.

  11. Algorithms for Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images Supplementary Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods.......Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods....

  12. Three-dimensional molecular imaging using mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Zheng Leiliang; Willingham, David; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We combine imaging ToF-SIMS depth profiling and wide area atomic force microscopy to analyze a test structure consisting of a 300 nm trehalose film deposited on a Si substrate and pre-structured by means of a focused 15-keV Ga{sup +} ion beam. Depth profiling is performed using a 40-keV C{sub 60}{sup +} cluster ion beam for erosion and mass spectral data acquisition. A generic protocol for depth axis calibration is described which takes into account both lateral and in-depth variations of the erosion rate. By extrapolation towards zero analyzed lateral area, an 'intrinsic' depth resolution of about 8 nm is found which appears to be characteristic of the cluster-surface interaction process.

  13. Preliminary testing of microstructured Imaging Plates with improved spatial resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratyev, V I; Mezentsev, N A; Mezentseva, L A; Nazmov, V P; Pavlyukhin, Y T; Pindyurin, V F; Sidelnikov, A A; Tolochko, B P

    2000-01-01

    Read-out device and method for the Contrast-Frequency Characteristics (CFC) measurements of the Imaging Plates X-ray area detectors are described. The results of the CFC measurements for the different types of these detectors are shown. Also shown is the preliminary result of CFC measurement for the new detector type - microstructured memorized Imaging Plates with improved spatial resolution, produced with LIGA-technology on the synchrotron radiation beam on the VEPP-3 storage ring. These results demonstrate that the specific information capacity of the new microstructured detectors more than 2 times exceed the specific information capacity of the FUJI serial production detectors.

  14. High-speed atomic force microscopy imaging of live mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Direct imaging of morphological dynamics of live mammalian cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly expected, but yet challenging. High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is a unique technique for capturing biomolecules at work under near physiological conditions. However, application of HS-AFM for imaging of live mammalian cells was hard to be accomplished because of collision between a huge mammalian cell and a cantilever during AFM scanning. Here, we review our recent improvements of HS-AFM for imaging of activities of live mammalian cells without significant damage to the cell. The improvement of an extremely long (~3 μm) AFM tip attached to a cantilever enables us to reduce severe damage to soft mammalian cells. In addition, a combination of HS-AFM with simple fluorescence microscopy allows us to quickly locate the cell in the AFM scanning area. After these improvements, we demonstrate that developed HS-AFM for live mammalian cells is possible to image morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pits open-close formations, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells as well as hippocampal neurons.

  15. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Michael; Stock, Lorenz G; Traxler, Lukas; Leclercq, Laurent; Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot; Cottet, Hervé; Stutz, Hanno; Ebner, Andreas

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High resolution microphotonic needle for endoscopic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin; Mohanty, Aseema; Roberts, Samantha P.; Barbosa, Felippe; Lipson, Michal

    2017-02-01

    GRIN (Graded index) lens have revolutionized micro endoscopy enabling deep tissue imaging with high resolution. The challenges of traditional GRIN lenses are their large size (when compared with the field of view) and their limited resolution. This is because of the relatively weak NA in standard graded index lenses. Here we introduce a novel micro-needle platform for endoscopy with much higher resolution than traditional GRIN lenses and a FOV that corresponds to the whole cross section of the needle. The platform is based on polymeric (SU-8) waveguide integrated with a microlens micro fabricated on a silicon substrate using a unique molding process. Due to the high index of refraction of the material the NA of the needle is much higher than traditional GRIN lenses. We tested the probe in a fluorescent dye solution (19.6 µM Alexa Flour 647 solution) and measured a numerical aperture of 0.25, focal length of about 175 µm and minimal spot size of about 1.6 µm. We show that the platform can image a sample with the field of view corresponding to the cross sectional area of the waveguide (80x100 µm2). The waveguide size can in principle be modified to vary size of the imaging field of view. This demonstration, combined with our previous work demonstrating our ability to implant the high NA needle in a live animal, shows that the proposed system can be used for deep tissue imaging with very high resolution and high field of view.

  17. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values...... for in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image...

  18. Learning Based Single Frame Image Super-resolution Using Fast Discrete Curvelet Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Anil A. Patil; Jyoti Singhai

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) images play a vital role in all imaging applications as they offer more details. The images captured by the camera system are of degraded quality due to the imaging system and are low-resolution (LR) images. Image super-resolution (SR) is a process, where HR image is obtained from combining one or multiple LR images of same scene. In this paper, learning based single frame image super-resolution technique is proposed by using Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform (FDCT) coeffi...

  19. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  20. Image super-resolution reconstruction based on regularization technique and guided filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, De-tian; Huang, Wei-qin; Gu, Pei-ting; Liu, Pei-zhong; Luo, Yan-min

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of sparse representation coefficients and the quality of reconstructed images, an improved image super-resolution algorithm based on sparse representation is presented. In the sparse coding stage, the autoregressive (AR) regularization and the non-local (NL) similarity regularization are introduced to improve the sparse coding objective function. A group of AR models which describe the image local structures are pre-learned from the training samples, and one or several suitable AR models can be adaptively selected for each image patch to regularize the solution space. Then, the image non-local redundancy is obtained by the NL similarity regularization to preserve edges. In the process of computing the sparse representation coefficients, the feature-sign search algorithm is utilized instead of the conventional orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to improve the accuracy of the sparse coefficients. To restore image details further, a global error compensation model based on weighted guided filter is proposed to realize error compensation for the reconstructed images. Experimental results demonstrate that compared with Bicubic, L1SR, SISR, GR, ANR, NE + LS, NE + NNLS, NE + LLE and A + (16 atoms) methods, the proposed approach has remarkable improvement in peak signal-to-noise ratio, structural similarity and subjective visual perception.

  1. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  2. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  3. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  4. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: applications in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenyu; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Matusch, Andreas; Becker, J Sabine

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical research are introduced, including synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). These are exemplified by a demonstration of the dopamine-Fe complexes, by assessment of boron distribution in a boron neutron capture therapy cell model, by mapping Cu and Zn in human brain cancer and a rat brain tumor model, and by the analysis of metal topography within neuromelanin. These studies have provided solid evidence that demonstrates that the sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity, and quantification ability of metal imaging techniques is suitable and highly desirable for biomedical research. Moreover, these novel studies on the nanometre scale (e.g., of individual single cells or cell organelles) will lead to a better understanding of metal processes in cells and tissues.

  5. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS): Science and Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Davis, Curtiss O.

    1991-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is a facility instrument slated for flight on the second of the EOS-A series of platforms. HIRIS is designed to acquire 24-km wide, 30-m pixel images in 192 spectral bands simultaneously in the 0.4-2.45-micrometer wavelength region. With pointing mirrors it can sample any place on Earth, except the poles, every two days. HIRIS operates at the intermediate scale between the human and the global and therefore links studies of Earth surface processes to global monitoring carried out by lower-resolution instruments. So far, over 50 science data products from HIRIS images have been identified in the fields of atmospheric gases, clouds, snow and ice, water, vegetation, and rocks and soils. The key attribute of imaging spectrometry that makes it possible to derive quantitative information from the data is the large number of contiguous spectral bands. Therefore spectrum matching techniques can be applied. Such techniques are not possible with present-day, multispectral scanner data.

  6. Positioning systems for high-resolution tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylock, Thomas M.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Chifman, Lev M.; Christensen, Peter B.; Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Hajian, Arsen R.; Hendrikse, Jan; Meade, Jeff T.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue handling systems position ex-vivo samples to a required accuracy that depends on the features to be imaged. For example, to resolve cellular structure, micron pixel spacing is needed. 3D tissue scanning at cellular resolution allows for more complete histology to be obtained and more accurate diagnosis to be made. However, accurate positioning of a light beam on the sample is a significant challenge, especially when fine spacing between scan steps is desired or large, inconsistently shaped samples need to be imaged. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an application where accurate positioning systems are required to reap the full benefit of the technology. By simultaneously manipulating the light beam position and sample location, a 3D image is reconstructed from a series of depth profiles produced. To automate image acquisition, a fully integrated and synchronised system is necessary. A tissue handling and light delivery system for free-space optical devices is described. Performance characteristics such as resolution, uncertainty, and repeatability are evaluated for novel hardware configurations of OCT. Typical scanning patterns with associated synchronisation requirements are discussed.

  7. Progress Toward A Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, Clarence M.; Vourlidas, A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Klimchuck, J.

    2007-07-01

    Recent imaging at arcsecond (TRACE) and sub-arcsecond (VAULT) spatial resolution clearly show that structures with fine spatial scales play a key role in the physics of the upper solar atmosphere. Both theoretical and observational considerations point to the importance of small spatial scales, impulsive energy release, strong dynamics, and extreme plasma nonuniformity. Fundamental questions regarding the nature, structure, properties and dynamics of loops and filamentary structures in the upper atmosphere have been raised. To address these questions, we are developing a next generation, VEry high angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) as a sounding rocket instrument. VERIS will obtain the necessary high spatial resolution, high fidelity measurements of plasma temperatures, densities and velocities. With broad simultaneous temperature coverage, the VERIS observations will directly address unresolved issues relating to interconnections of various temperature solar plasmas. VERIS will provide the first ever subarcsecond spectra of transition region and coronal structures. It will do so with a sufficient spectral resolution of to allow centroided Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Finally, in addition to the spectra, VERIS will simultaneously obtain spectrally pure slot images (10x150 arcsec) in the +/-1 grating orders, which can be combined to make instantaneous line-of-sight velocity maps with 8km/s accuracy over an unprecedented field of view. The VERIS program is beginning the second year of its three year development cycle. All design activities and reviews are complete. Fabrication of all major components has begun. Brassboard electronics cards have been fabricated, assembled and tested. The paper presents the essential scientific

  8. Note: High-speed Z tip scanner with screw cantilever holding mechanism for atomic-resolution atomic force microscopy in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Akrami, Seyed; Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy has attracted much attention due to its unique capability of visualizing nanoscale dynamic processes at a solid/liquid interface. However, its usability and resolution have yet to be improved. As one of the solutions for this issue, here we present a design of a high-speed Z-tip scanner with screw holding mechanism. We perform detailed comparison between designs with different actuator size and screw arrangement by finite element analysis. Based on the desig...

  9. Image reconstructions from super-sampled data sets with resolution modeling in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    Spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) is still a limiting factor in many imaging applications. To improve the spatial resolution for an existing scanner with fixed crystal sizes, mechanical movements such as scanner wobbling and object shifting have been considered for PET systems. Multiple acquisitions from different positions can provide complementary information and increased spatial sampling. The objective of this paper is to explore an efficient and useful reconstruction framework to reconstruct super-resolution images from super-sampled low-resolution data sets. The authors introduce a super-sampling data acquisition model based on the physical processes with tomographic, downsampling, and shifting matrices as its building blocks. Based on the model, we extend the MLEM and Landweber algorithms to reconstruct images from super-sampled data sets. The authors also derive a backprojection-filtration-like (BPF-like) method for the super-sampling reconstruction. Furthermore, they explore variant methods for super-sampling reconstructions: the separate super-sampling resolution-modeling reconstruction and the reconstruction without downsampling to further improve image quality at the cost of more computation. The authors use simulated reconstruction of a resolution phantom to evaluate the three types of algorithms with different super-samplings at different count levels. Contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) versus background variability, as an image-quality metric, is calculated at each iteration for all reconstructions. The authors observe that all three algorithms can significantly and consistently achieve increased CRCs at fixed background variability and reduce background artifacts with super-sampled data sets at the same count levels. For the same super-sampled data sets, the MLEM method achieves better image quality than the Landweber method, which in turn achieves better image quality than the BPF-like method. The authors also demonstrate

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of Eu dopant atoms in Ca-α-SiAlON via through-focus HAADF-STEM imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Genki, E-mail: genki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Yamaki, Fuuta; Kunisada, Yuji; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Through-focus HAADF-STEM imaging was studied. • Spatial distribution of Eu atoms in Ca-α-SiAlON was analyzed. • A large convergence semi-angle increased the depth resolution. • The radial distribution function of Eu dopants was analyzed. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) distributional analysis of individual dopant atoms in materials is important to development of optical, electronic, and magnetic materials. In this study, we adopted through-focus high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging for 3D distributional analysis of Eu dopant atoms in Ca-α-SiAlON phosphors. In this context, the effects of convergence semi-angle and Eu z-position on the HAADF image contrast were investigated. Multi-slice image simulation revealed that the contrast of the dopant site was sensitive to change of the defocus level. When the defocus level matched the depth position of a Eu atom, the contrast intensity was significantly increased. The large convergence semi-angle greatly increased the depth resolution because the electron beam tends spread instead of channeling along the atomic columns. Through-focus HAADF-STEM imaging was used to analyze the Eu atom distribution surrounding 10 nm cubes with defocus steps of 0.68 nm each. The contrast depth profile recorded with a narrow step width clearly analyzed the possible depth positions of Eu atoms. The radial distribution function obtained for the Eu dopants was analyzed using an atomic distribution model that was based on the assumption of random distribution. The result suggested that the Ca concentration did not affect the Eu distribution. The decreased fraction of neighboring Eu atoms along z-direction might be caused by the enhanced short-range Coulomb-like repulsive forces along the z-direction.

  11. High-resolution ZTE imaging of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiger, Markus; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Bracher, Anna-Katinka; Köhler, Sascha; Lehmann, Volker; Wolfram, Uwe; Hennel, Franciszek; Rasche, Volker

    2012-10-01

    MRI with zero echo time (ZTE) is achieved by 3D radial centre-out encoding and hard-pulse RF excitation while the projection gradient is already on. Targeting short-T(2) samples, the efficient, robust and silent ZTE approach was implemented for high-bandwidth high-resolution imaging requiring particularly rapid transmit-receive switching and algebraic image reconstruction. The ZTE technique was applied to image extracted human teeth at 11.7T field strength, yielding detailed depictions with very good delineation of the mineralised dentine and enamel layers. ZTE results are compared with UTE (ultra-short echo time) MRI and micro-computed tomography (μCT), revealing significant differences in SNR and CNR yields. Compared to μCT, ZTE MRI appears to be less susceptible to artefacts caused by dental fillings and to offer superior sensitivity for the detection of early demineralisation and caries lesions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Communie

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL, of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P. Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae.

  13. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communie, Guillaume; Habchi, Johnny; Yabukarski, Filip; Blocquel, David; Schneider, Robert; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Longhi, Sonia; Blackledge, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL), of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P). Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL) domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL) and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL) upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL) without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae.

  14. Accelerated High Spatial Resolution Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Taquet, Maxime; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Gholipour, Ali; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a series of anisotropically oversampled acquisitions (so-called anisotropic "snapshots") and reconstruction in the image space has recently been proposed to increase the spatial resolution in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), providing a theoretical 8x acceleration at equal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to conventional dense k-space sampling. However, in most works, each DW image is reconstructed separately and the fact that the DW images constitute different views of the same anatomy is ignored. In addition, current approaches are limited by their inability to reconstruct a high resolution (HR) acquisition from snapshots with different subsets of diffusion gradients: an isotropic HR gradient image cannot be reconstructed if one .of its anisotropic snapshots is missing, for example due to intra-scan motion, even if other snapshots for this gradient were successfully acquired. In this work, we propose a novel multi-snapshot DWI reconstruction technique that simultaneously achieves HR reconstruction and local tissue model estimation while enabling reconstruction from snapshots containing different subsets of diffusion gradients, providing increased robustness to patient motion and potential for acceleration. Our approach is formalized as a joint probabilistic model with missing observations, from which interactions between missing snapshots, HR reconstruction and a generic tissue model naturally emerge. We evaluate our approach with synthetic simulations, simulated multi-snapshot scenario and in vivo multi-snapshot imaging. We show that (1) our combined approach ultimately provides both better HR reconstruction and better tissue model estimation and (2) the error in the case of missing snapshots can be quantified. Our novel multi-snapshot technique will enable improved high spatial characterization of the brain connectivity and microstructure in vivo.

  15. Efficient elastic imaging of single atoms on ultrathin supports in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 148532 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Mono-atomic-layer membranes such as graphene offer new opportunities for imaging and detecting individual light atoms in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). For such applications where multiple scattering and diffraction effects are weak, we evaluate the detection efficiency and interpretability of single atom images for the most common detector geometries using quantitative quantum mechanical simulations. For well-resolved and atomically-thin specimens, the low angle annular dark field (LAADF) detector can provide a significant increase in signal-to-noise over other common detector geometries including annular bright field and incoherent bright field. This dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Simulations of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) imaged under ideal conditions indicate the minimal dose requirements for elastic imaging by STEM or conventional TEM still exceed previously reported dose limits. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene offers new opportunities for imaging individual light atoms in electron microscopes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For ultrathin materials, a low angle annular dark field detector can provide a SNR comparable to TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LAADF dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations for atomic imaging of ATP nucleotides exceed the molecules' dose limits.

  16. Hyperresolution: an hyperspectral and high resolution imager for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vidi, R.; Chiarantini, L.; Bini, A.

    2017-11-01

    Hyperspectral space imagery is an emerging technology that supports many scientific, civil, security and defence operational applications. The main advantage of this remote sensing technique is that it allows the so-called Feature Extraction: in fact the spectral signature allows the recognition of the materials composing the scene. Hyperspectral Products and their applications have been investigated in the past years by Galileo Avionica to direct the instrument characteristics design. Sample products have been identified in the civil / environment monitoring fields (such as coastal monitoring, vegetation, hot spot and urban classification) and in defense / security applications: their performances have been verified by means of airborne flight campaigns. The Hyperspectral and High Resolution Imager is a space-borne instrument that implement a pushbroom technique to get strip spectral images over the Hyperspectral VNIR and SWIR bands, with a ground sample distance at nadir of 20m in a 20 km wide ground swath, with 200 spectral channels, realizing an average spectral resolution of 10nm. The High Resolution Panchromatic Channel insists in the same swath to allow for multiresolution data fusion of hyperspectral imagery.

  17. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H.; Baker, Matthew L.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of non-icosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course has been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic and biochemical states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures “in situ”. Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future. PMID:22297510

  18. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H; Baker, Matthew L; Chiu, Wah

    2012-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single-particle electron -cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of nonicosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single-particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course have been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures "in situ". Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future.

  19. Imaging and measuring the molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a new technology to visualize the cellular topography and quantify the molecular interactions at nanometer spatial resolution. In this work, AFM was used to image the cellular topography and measure the molecular force of pathological cells from B-cell lymphoma patients. After the fluorescence staining, cancer cells were recognized by their special morphological features and then the detailed topography was visualized by AFM imaging. The AFM images showed that cancer cells were much rougher than healthy cells. CD20 is a surface marker of B cells and rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. To measure the CD20-rituximab interaction forces, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker was used to link rituximab onto the AFM tip and the verification experiments of the functionalized probe indicated that rituximab molecules were successfully linked onto the AFM tip. The CD20-rituximab interaction forces were measured on about 20 pathological cells and the force measurement results indicated the CD20-rituximab binding forces were mainly in the range of 110-120 pN and 130-140 pN. These results can improve our understanding of the topography and molecular force of lymphoma pathological cells. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  1. Coupled kernel embedding for low resolution face image recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chuan-Xian; Dai, Dao-Qing; Yan, Hong

    2012-08-01

    Practical video scene and face recognition systems are sometimes confronted with low-resolution (LR) images. The faces may be very small even if the video is clear, thus it is difficult to directly measure the similarity between the faces and the high-resolution (HR) training samples. Traditional super-resolution (SR) methods based face recognition usually have limited performance because the target of SR may not be consistent with that of classification, and time-consuming SR algorithms are not suitable for real-time applications. In this paper, a new feature extraction method called Coupled Kernel Embedding (CKE) is proposed for LR face recognition without any SR preprocessing. In this method, the final kernel matrix is constructed by concatenating two individual kernel matrices in the diagonal direction, and the (semi-)positively definite properties are preserved for optimization. CKE addresses the problem of comparing multi-modal data that are difficult for conventional methods in practice due to the lack of an efficient similarity measure. Particularly, different kernel types (e.g., linear, Gaussian, polynomial) can be integrated into an uniformed optimization objective, which cannot be achieved by simple linear methods. CKE solves this problem by minimizing the dissimilarities captured by their kernel Gram matrices in the low- and high-resolution spaces. In the implementation, the nonlinear objective function is minimized by a generalized eigenvalue decomposition. Experiments on benchmark and real databases show that our CKE method indeed improves the recognition performance.

  2. High-resolution panoramic images with megapixel MWIR FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboucher, Vincent; Aubry, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    In the continuity of its current strategy, HGH maintains a deep effort in developing its most recent product family: the infrared (IR) panoramic 360-degree surveillance sensors. During the last two years, HGH optimized its prototype Middle Wave IR (MWIR) panoramic sensor IR Revolution 360 HD that gave birth to Spynel-S product. Various test campaigns proved its excellent image quality. Cyclope, the software associated with Spynel, benefitted from recent image processing improvements and new functionalities such as target geolocalization, long range sensor slue to cue and facilitated forensics analysis. In the frame of the PANORAMIR project sustained by the DGA (Délégation Générale de l'Armement), HGH designed a new extra large resolution sensor including a MWIR megapixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector (1280×1024 pixels). This new sensor is called Spynel-X. It provides outstanding resolution 360-degree images (with more than 100 Mpixels). The mechanical frame of Spynel (-S and -X) was designed with the collaboration of an industrial design agency. Spynel got the "Observeur du Design 2013" label.

  3. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Le Roux, P. [GEHC, Buc (France); Dehaine-Lambertz, G. [Unite INSERM 562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  4. Super-resolution imaging of bacteria in a microfluidics device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego I Cattoni

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved complex, highly-coordinated, multi-component cellular engines to achieve high degrees of efficiency, accuracy, adaptability, and redundancy. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy methods are ideally suited to investigate the internal composition, architecture, and dynamics of molecular machines and large cellular complexes. These techniques require the long-term stability of samples, high signal-to-noise-ratios, low chromatic aberrations and surface flatness, conditions difficult to meet with traditional immobilization methods. We present a method in which cells are functionalized to a microfluidics device and fluorophores are injected and imaged sequentially. This method has several advantages, as it permits the long-term immobilization of cells and proper correction of drift, avoids chromatic aberrations caused by the use of different filter sets, and allows for the flat immobilization of cells on the surface. In addition, we show that different surface chemistries can be used to image bacteria at different time-scales, and we introduce an automated cell detection and image analysis procedure that can be used to obtain cell-to-cell, single-molecule localization and dynamic heterogeneity as well as average properties at the super-resolution level.

  5. Schlieren imaging of nano-scale atom-surface inelastic transition using a Fresnel biprism atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Perales, F.; Dutier, G.; Bocvarski, V.; Karam, J.-C.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.

    2008-05-01

    Surface-induced exo-energetic inelastic transitions among atomic Zeeman states in a magnetic field (“van der Waals Zeeman” transitions) are useable as tuneable beam splitters. A transversally coherent atom beam impinging a pair of opposite surfaces (e.g. 2 edges of a slit or of an ensemble of periodic slits) gives rise to two coherently diffracted wave packets. Within the wave packet overlap, non-localised interference fringes of the Young-slit type are predicted. From the diffraction pattern observed in the Fraunhofer regime (Schlieren image), detailed information about the transition amplitude on a scale of a few nanometers should be derived.

  6. The Singapore high resolution single cell imaging facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Vera, Armin Baysic De; Udalagama, Chammika N. B.; Ren, M.; Kan, Jeroen A. van; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    2011-10-01

    The Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore has recently expanded from three state-of-the-art beam lines to five. Two new beam lines have been constructed: A second generation proton beam writing line, and a high resolution single cell imaging facility. Both systems feature high demagnification lens systems based on compact Oxford Microbeams OM52 lenses, coupled with reduced lens/image distances. The single cell imaging facility is designed around OM52 compact lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations including the spaced Oxford triplet and the double crossover Russian quadruplet. The new facility has design specifications aimed at spatial resolutions below 50 nm, with a variety of techniques including STIM, secondary electron and fluorescence imaging, and an in-built optical and fluorescence microscope for sample imaging, identification and positioning. Preliminary tests using the single space Oxford triplet configuration have indicated a beam spot size of 31 × 39 nm in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively, at beam currents of ∼10,000 protons per second. However, a weakness in the specifications of the electrostatic scanning system has been identified, and a more stable scanning system needs to be implemented before we can fully realize the optimum performance. A single whole fibroblast cell has been scanned using 1.5 MeV protons, and a median fit to the proton transmission energy loss data has shown that proton STIM gives excellent details of the cell structure despite the relatively poor contrast of proton STIM compared with alpha STIM.

  7. The Singapore high resolution single cell imaging facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Frank, E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Dept. of Physics, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chen, Xiao; Vera, Armin Baysic De; Udalagama, Chammika N.B.; Ren, M.; Kan, Jeroen A van; Bettiol, Andrew A [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Dept. of Physics, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore has recently expanded from three state-of-the-art beam lines to five. Two new beam lines have been constructed: A second generation proton beam writing line, and a high resolution single cell imaging facility. Both systems feature high demagnification lens systems based on compact Oxford Microbeams OM52 lenses, coupled with reduced lens/image distances. The single cell imaging facility is designed around OM52 compact lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations including the spaced Oxford triplet and the double crossover Russian quadruplet. The new facility has design specifications aimed at spatial resolutions below 50 nm, with a variety of techniques including STIM, secondary electron and fluorescence imaging, and an in-built optical and fluorescence microscope for sample imaging, identification and positioning. Preliminary tests using the single space Oxford triplet configuration have indicated a beam spot size of 31 x 39 nm in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively, at beam currents of {approx}10,000 protons per second. However, a weakness in the specifications of the electrostatic scanning system has been identified, and a more stable scanning system needs to be implemented before we can fully realize the optimum performance. A single whole fibroblast cell has been scanned using 1.5 MeV protons, and a median fit to the proton transmission energy loss data has shown that proton STIM gives excellent details of the cell structure despite the relatively poor contrast of proton STIM compared with alpha STIM.

  8. Primed for Discovery: Atomic-Resolution Cryo-EM Structure of a Reovirus Entry Intermediate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D. Trask

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A recently solved structure of the aquareovirus virion (Zhang, X; Jin, L.; Fang, Q; Hui, W.H.; Zhou Z.H. 3.3 Å Cryo-EM Structure of a Nonenveloped Virus Reveals a Priming Mechanism for Cell Entry. Cell 2010, 141, 472-482 [1] provides new insights into the order of entry events, as well as confirming and refining several aspects of the entry mechanism, for aquareovirus and the related orthoreovirus. In particular, the structure provides evidence of a defined order for the progressive proteolytic cleavages of myristoylated penetration protein VP5 that prime the virion for membrane penetration. These observations reinforce the concept that, much like enveloped viruses, nonenveloped virions often undergo priming events that lead to a meta-stable state, preparing the virus for membrane penetration under the appropriate circumstances. In addition, this and other recent studies highlight the increasing power of electron cryomicroscopy to analyze large, geometrically regular structures, such as icosahedral viruses, at atomic resolution.

  9. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  10. Separate-type scanner and wideband high-voltage amplifier for atomic-resolution and high-speed atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miyata, Kazuki; Usho, Satoshi; Yamada, Satoshi; Furuya, Shoji; Yoshida, Kiyonori; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a liquid-environment atomic force microscope with a wideband and low-noise scanning system for atomic-scale imaging of dynamic processes at solid/liquid interfaces. The developed scanning system consists of a separate-type scanner and a wideband high-voltage amplifier (HVA). By separating an XY-sample scanner from a Z-tip scanner, we have enabled to use a relatively large sample without compromising the high resonance frequency. We compared various cantilever- and sample-hol...

  11. Microbubble Axial Localization Errors in Ultrasound Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Harput, Sevan; Brown, Jemma; Wells, Peter N T; Aljabar, Paul; Dunsby, Chris; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J

    2017-08-17

    Acoustic super-resolution imaging has allowed visualization of microvascular structure and flow beyond the diffraction limit using standard clinical ultrasound systems through the localization of many spatially isolated microbubble signals. The determination of each microbubble position is typically performed by calculating the centroid, finding a local maximum, or finding the peak of a 2-D Gaussian function fit to the signal. However, the backscattered signal from a microbubble depends not only on diffraction characteristics of the waveform, but also on the microbubble behavior in the acoustic field. Here, we propose a new axial localization method by identifying the onset of the backscattered signal. We compare the accuracy of localization methods using in vitro experiments performed at 7 cm depth and 2.3 MHz center frequency. We corroborate these findings with simulated results based on the Marmottant model. We show experimentally and in simulations that detecting the onset of the returning signal provides considerably increased accuracy for super-resolution. Resulting experimental cross-sectional profiles in super-resolution images demonstrate at least 5.8 times improvement in contrast ratio and more than 1.8 reduction in spatial spread (provided by 90% of the localizations) for the onset method over centroiding, peak detection and 2D Gaussian fitting methods. Simulations estimate that these latter methods could create errors in relative bubble positions as high as 900 μ m at these experimental settings, while the onset method reduced the interquartile range of these errors by a factor of over 2.2. Detecting the signal onset is therefore expected to considerably improve the accuracy of super-resolution.

  12. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiao -Lei [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Treu, Tommaso [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Agnello, Adriano [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Auger, Matthew W. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Liao, Kai [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marshall, Philip J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive

  13. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, N.; Rupen, M.P.; Shapiro, I.I. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA)); Preston, R.A. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Rius, A. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Astronomia y Geodesia)

    1991-03-21

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of {similar to}12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author).

  14. Correcting for photodestruction in super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Yves; Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Bouwens, Arno; Lukeš, Tomáš; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2017-09-05

    Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging overcomes the diffraction limit by analyzing fluctuations in the fluorophore emission. A key assumption of the imaging is that the fluorophores are independent, though this is invalidated in the presence of photodestruction. In this work, we evaluate the effect of photodestruction on SOFI imaging using theoretical considerations and computer simulations. We find that photodestruction gives rise to an additional signal that does not present an easily interpretable view of the sample structure. This additional signal is strong and the resulting images typically exhibit less noise. Accordingly, these images may be mis-interpreted as being more visually pleasing or more informative. To address this uncertainty, we develop a procedure that can robustly estimate to what extent any particular experiment is affected by photodestruction. We also develop a detailed assessment methodology and use it to evaluate the performance of several correction algorithms. We identify two approaches that can correct for the presence of even strong photodestruction, one of which can be implemented directly in the SOFI calculation software.

  15. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  16. Global Magellan-image map of Venus at full resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R. L.; Edwards, K. B.; Morgan, H. F.; Soderblom, L. A.; Stoewe, T. L.

    1993-03-01

    During its first 243-day mapping cycle, the Magellan spacecraft succeeded in imaging 84 percent of the surface of Venus at resolutions on the order of 100 meters; subsequent cycles have increased the total coverage to over 97 percent and provided redundant coverage of much of the planet with differing viewing geometries. Unfortunately, this full-resolution global dataset is in the form of thousands of individual orbit tracks (F-BIDR's) whose length-to-width ratio of nearly 1000:1 makes them minimally useful unless mosaicked. The Magellan project produced full-resolution mosaics (F-MIDR's) only for selected regions on the planet, whereas a global set of mosaics was made only at threefold degraded resolution (C1-MIDR's). Furthermore, although the F-MIDR's, which are approximately equidimensional, are much better suited for scientific interpretation than the F-BIDR's, they are still an unwieldy dataset: over 1500 quadrangles, each showing a region only about 600 km on a side, would be required to cover the entire planet. The USGS has therefore undertaken to produce and distribute a global, full resolution set of mosaics of the Magellan image data in a format that will be efficient for both hardcopy and digital use. The initial motivation was that it would provide an efficient means of verifying the integrity of the F-BIDR's to be archived on computer-compatible tape at the USGS Flagstaff facility. However, the resulting product, known as the FMAP, should also serve as an important resource for future scientific interpretation. It will offer several advantages beyond global coverage at full resolution. The first, alluded to above, is its division of the planet's surface to minimize the number of quadrangles and maximize their area, subject to the limits on the number of pixels imposed by state-of-the-art digital recording media and hardcopy output devices. The second, the use of improved 'cosmetic' processing techniques, will greatly reduce tonal discontinuities

  17. Compact Single Site Resolution Cold Atom Experiment for Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Specifically, we will design and construct a set of compact single atom traps with integrated optics, suitable for heralded entanglement and loophole...technical development is to achieve fast loading and qubit manipulation in the single- atom traps, which will enable our scientific investigation. The...goal of our scientific investigation is to demonstrate high fidelity and fast atom - atom entanglement between physically 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4

  18. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  19. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    The purpose of this study is to develop methods in array signal processing which achieve accurate signal reconstruction from limited observations resulting in high-resolution imaging. The focus is on underwater acoustic applications and sonar signal processing both in active (transmit and receive...... in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering......-of-arrival (DOA) of the associated wavefronts from a limited number of observations. Usually, there are only a few sources generating the acoustic wavefield such that DOA estimation is essentially a sparse signal reconstruction problem. Conventional methods for DOA estimation (i.e., beamforming) suffer from...

  20. Optical diffraction tomography for high resolution live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Wonshik; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We report the experimental implementation of optical diffraction tomography for quantitative 3D mapping of refractive index in live biological cells. Using a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer, we record complex field images of light transmitted through a sample with varying directions of illumination. To quantitatively reconstruct the 3D map of complex refractive index in live cells, we apply optical diffraction tomography based on the Rytov approximation. In this way, the effect of diffraction is taken into account in the reconstruction process and diffraction-free high resolution 3D images are obtained throughout the entire sample volume. The quantitative refractive index map can potentially serve as an intrinsic assay to provide the molecular concentrations without the addition of exogenous agents and also to provide a method for studying the light scattering properties of single cells. PMID:19129896

  1. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also...

  2. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging of Young Outflow-Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibisch, Thomas; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd

    For a better understanding of the mechanisms by which jets and outflows from young stellar objects are generated accelerated and collimated it is essential to look as close as possible to their launching point at the disk/star boundary. High-spatial resolution is therefore of crucial importance for further progress in this field. In this contribution we present recent results from our near-infrared bispectrum speckle interferometry studies of several outflow sources. With a spatial resolution of up to 0.055'' our images have the highest spatial resolution achieved so far for these objects and exhibit previously unseen complex structures. Our results include the identification of two distinct bipolar outflow systems originating simultaneously from the protostar S140 IRS1 the detection of an episodic precessing jet from S140 IRS3 and the discovery of a micro-jet from one of the embedded sources in Mon R2 IRS3. We will also discuss the relation of the observed circumstellar structures to the jets and outflows from the young stellar objects

  3. Multisensor Fusion of Landsat Images for High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Images Using Sparse Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important parameter in the analysis of climate and human-environment interactions. Landsat Earth observation satellite data including a thermal band have been used for environmental research and applications; however, the spatial resolution of this thermal band is relatively low. This study investigates an efficient method of fusing Landsat panchromatic and thermal infrared images using a sparse representation (SR technique. The application of SR is used for the estimation of missing details of the available thermal infrared (TIR image to enhance its spatial features. First, we propose a method of building a proper dictionary considering the spatial resolution of the original thermal image. Second, a sparse representation relation between low- and high-resolution images is constructed in terms of the Landsat spectral response. We then compare the fused images created with different sampling factors and patch sizes. The results of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation show that the proposed method improves spatial resolution and preserves the thermal properties of basic LST data for use with environmental problems.

  4. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    . Next, a plausible neighborhood structure is estimated. Finally, atom positions are adjusted by simulation of a Markov random field model, integrating image evidence and the strong geometric prior. A pristine sample with high regularity and a sample with an induced hole are analyzed. False discovery...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...... with a preferred orientation, suggesting either strain in the structure or a buckling of the graphene sheet. The precision of the method is demonstrated on simulated model structures and by its application to multiple exposures of the two graphene samples....

  5. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De wael, Annelies, E-mail: annelies.dewael@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Backer, Annick [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Van Aert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. - Highlights: • A hybrid method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images is introduced. • Image simulations are incorporated into a statistical framework in a reliable manner. • Limits of the existing methods for atom-counting are far exceeded. • Reliable counting results from an experimental low dose image are obtained. • Progress towards reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials is made.

  6. High-Resolution Mars Camera Test Image of Moon (Infrared)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This crescent view of Earth's Moon in infrared wavelengths comes from a camera test by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on its way to Mars. The mission's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera took the image on Sept. 8, 2005, while at a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles) from the Moon. The dark feature on the right is Mare Crisium. From that distance, the Moon would appear as a star-like point of light to the unaided eye. The test verified the camera's focusing capability and provided an opportunity for calibration. The spacecraft's Context Camera and Optical Navigation Camera also performed as expected during the test. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched on Aug. 12, 2005, is on course to reach Mars on March 10, 2006. After gradually adjusting the shape of its orbit for half a year, it will begin its primary science phase in November 2006. From the mission's planned science orbit about 300 kilometers (186 miles) above the surface of Mars, the high resolution camera will be able to discern features as small as one meter or yard across.

  7. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  8. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  9. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Dang, Dan; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2017-01-01

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface) was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed. PMID:28117741

  10. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Dang, Dan; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2017-01-22

    The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface) was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed.

  11. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  12. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging (JT-SOFI)

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhiping; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition....

  13. Overcoming Registration Uncertainty in Image Super-Resolution: Maximize or Marginalize?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Zisserman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In multiple-image super-resolution, a high-resolution image is estimated from a number of lower-resolution images. This usually involves computing the parameters of a generative imaging model (such as geometric and photometric registration, and blur and obtaining a MAP estimate by minimizing a cost function including an appropriate prior. Two alternative approaches are examined. First, both registrations and the super-resolution image are found simultaneously using a joint MAP optimization. Second, we perform Bayesian integration over the unknown image registration parameters, deriving a cost function whose only variables of interest are the pixel values of the super-resolution image. We also introduce a scheme to learn the parameters of the image prior as part of the super-resolution algorithm. We show examples on a number of real sequences including multiple stills, digital video, and DVDs of movies.

  14. Focal plane resolution and overlapped array time delay and integrate imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we model sub-pixel image registration for a generic earth-observing satellite system with a focal plane using two offset time delay and integrate (TDI) arrays in the focal plane to improve the achievable ground resolution over the resolution achievable with a single array. The modeling process starts with a high-resolution image as ground truth. The Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation Software (PICASSO) modeling tool is used to degrade the images to match the optical transfer function, sampling, and noise characteristics of the target system. The model outputs a pair of images with a separation close to the nominal half-pixel separation between the overlapped arrays. A registration estimation algorithm is used to measure the offset for image reconstruction. The two images are aligned and summed on a grid with twice the capture resolution. We compare the resolution in images between the inputs before overlap, the reconstructed image, and a simulation for the image which would have been captured on a focal plane with twice the resolution. We find the performance to always be better than the lower resolution baseline, and to approach the performance of the high-resolution array in the ideal case. We show that the overlapped array imager significantly outperforms both the conventional high- and low-resolution imagers in conditions with high image smear.

  15. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  16. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  18. High resolution Ceres HAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chris T.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015, and will characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission was mapping Ceres in HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1475 km altitude) between August and October 2015. The framing camera took about 2,600 clear filter images with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected images from one cycle (cycle #1) for the mosaicking process to have similar viewing and illumination conditions. Very minor gaps in the coverage were filled with a few images from cycle #2. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain towards the cartographic products is to ortho-rectify the images to the proper scale and map projec-tion type. This process requires detailed information of the Dawn orbit and attitude data and of the topography of the targets. Both, improved orientation and a high-resolution shape model, are provided by stereo processing (bundle block adjustment) of the HAMO stereo image dataset [3]. Ceres's HAMO shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto the reference sphere of Ceres with a radius of 470 km. The final step is the controlled mosaicking) of all images to a global mosaic of Ceres, the so-called basemap. Ceres map tiles: The Ceres atlas was produced in a scale of 1:750,000 and consists of 15 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4]. A map scale of 1:750,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available Dawn resolution in HAMO. The individual tiles were extracted from the global mosaic and reprojected. Nomenclature: The Dawn team proposed 81 names for geological features. By international

  19. Retrieving high-resolution images over the Internet from an anatomical image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupp-Adams, Annette; Henderson, Earl

    1999-12-01

    The Visible Human Data set is an important contribution to the national collection of anatomical images. To enhance the availability of these images, the National Library of Medicine has supported the design and development of a prototype object-oriented image database which imports, stores, and distributes high resolution anatomical images in both pixel and voxel formats. One of the key database modules is its client-server Internet interface. This Web interface provides a query engine with retrieval access to high-resolution anatomical images that range in size from 100KB for browser viewable rendered images, to 1GB for anatomical structures in voxel file formats. The Web query and retrieval client-server system is composed of applet GUIs, servlets, and RMI application modules which communicate with each other to allow users to query for specific anatomical structures, and retrieve image data as well as associated anatomical images from the database. Selected images can be downloaded individually as single files via HTTP or downloaded in batch-mode over the Internet to the user's machine through an applet that uses Netscape's Object Signing mechanism. The image database uses ObjectDesign's object-oriented DBMS, ObjectStore that has a Java interface. The query and retrieval systems has been tested with a Java-CDE window system, and on the x86 architecture using Windows NT 4.0. This paper describes the Java applet client search engine that queries the database; the Java client module that enables users to view anatomical images online; the Java application server interface to the database which organizes data returned to the user, and its distribution engine that allow users to download image files individually and/or in batch-mode.

  20. A SPATIO-SPECTRAL CAMERA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Livens

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600–900 nm in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots, horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field. Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475–925 nm, and we discuss future work.

  1. High resolution fluorescence bio-imaging upconversion nanoparticles in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Masfer; Chen, Yunyun; Pedraza, Julie J; González, Jorge M; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Hemmer, Philip R; Liang, Hong

    2017-01-23

    Imaging fluorescent markers with brightness, photostability, and continuous emission with auto fluorescence background suppression in biological samples has always been challenging due to limitations of available and economical techniques. Here we report a new approach, to achieve high contrast imaging inside small and difficult biological systems with special geometry such as fire ants, an important agricultural pest, using a homemade cost-effective optical system. Unlike the commonly used rare-earth doped fluoride nanoparticles, we utilized nanoparticles with a high upconversion efficiency in water. Specifically Y2O3:Er+3,Yb+3 nanoparticles (40-50 nm diameter) were fed to fire ants as food and then a simple illuminating experiment was conducted at 980 nm wavelength at relatively low pump intensity8 kW.cm-2. The locations were further confirmed by X-ray tomography, where most particles aggregated inside the ant's mouth. High resolution, fast, and economical optical imaging system opens the door for studying more complex biological systems.

  2. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  3. a Spatio-Spectral Camera for High Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livens, S.; Pauly, K.; Baeck, P.; Blommaert, J.; Nuyts, D.; Zender, J.; Delauré, B.

    2017-08-01

    Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600-900 nm) in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots), horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields) and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field). Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475-925 nm), and we discuss future work.

  4. Hypoxia imaging and radiotherapy: bridging the resolution gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R; Warren, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen distribution is a major determinant of treatment success in radiotherapy, with well-oxygenated tumour regions responding by up to a factor of three relative to anoxic volumes. Conversely, tumour hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance and negative prognosis. Tumour oxygenation is highly heterogeneous and difficult to measure directly. The recent advent of functional hypoxia imaging modalities such as fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography have shown promise in non-invasively determining regions of low oxygen tension. This raises the prospect of selectively increasing dose to hypoxic subvolumes, a concept known as dose painting. Yet while this is a promising approach, oxygen-mediated radioresistance is inherently a multiscale problem, and there are still a number of substantial challenges that must be overcome if hypoxia dose painting is to be successfully implemented. Current imaging modalities are limited by the physics of such systems to have resolutions in the millimetre regime, whereas oxygen distribution varies over a micron scale, and treatment delivery is typically modulated on a centimetre scale. In this review, we examine the mechanistic basis and implications of the radiobiological oxygen effect, the factors influencing microscopic heterogeneity in tumour oxygenation and the consequent challenges in the interpretation of clinical hypoxia imaging (in particular fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography). We also discuss dose-painting approaches and outline challenges that must be addressed to improve this treatment paradigm. PMID:28540739

  5. Fast high resolution whole brain T2* weighted imaging using echo planar imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Versluis, Maarten J; Luijten, Peter R; Petridou, Natalia

    2011-06-15

    Magnetic susceptibility based (T(2)* weighted) contrast in MRI at high magnetic field strength is of great value in research on brain structure and cortical architecture, but its use is hampered by the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency of the conventional spoiled gradient echo sequence (GRE) leading to long scan times even for a limited number of slices. In this work, we show that high resolution (0.5mm isotropic) T(2)* weighted images of the whole brain can be obtained in 6min by utilizing the high SNR efficiency of echo-planar imaging (EPI). A volumetric (3D) EPI protocol is presented and compared to conventional 3D GRE images acquired with the same resolution, amount of T(2)* weighting, and imaging duration. Spatial coverage in 3D EPI was increased by a factor of 4.5 compared to 3D GRE, while also the SNR was increased by a factor of 2. Image contrast for both magnitude and phase between gray and white matter was similar for both sequences, with enhanced conspicuity of anatomic details in the 3D EPI images due to the increased SNR. Even at 7T, image blurring and distortion is limited if the EPI train length remains short (not longer than the T(2)* of the imaged tissue). 3D EPI provides steps (speed, whole brain coverage, and high isotropic resolution) that are necessary to utilize the benefits of high field MRI in research that employs T(2)* weighted imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Atomic resolution structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, K., E-mail: sekar@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: sekar@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Yogavel, M.; Gayathri, D.; Velmurugan, D. [Department of Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Krishna, R. [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Poi, M.-J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, National Cancer Institute, Brookhaven National Laboratory Building, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsai, M.-D. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Academia Sinica,Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2006-01-01

    The atomic resolution crystal structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} is reported. The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Å resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Å data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modelled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states.

  8. Ordered arrays of native chromatin molecules for high-resolution imaging and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Tian, Harvey C; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-09-25

    Individual chromatin molecules contain valuable genetic and epigenetic information. To date, there have not been reliable techniques available for the controlled stretching and manipulation of individual chromatin fragments for high-resolution imaging and analysis of these molecules. We report the controlled stretching of single chromatin fragments extracted from two different cancerous cell types (M091 and HeLa) characterized through fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our method combines soft lithography with molecular stretching to form ordered arrays of more than 250,000 individual chromatin fragments immobilized into a beads-on-a-string structure on a solid transparent support. Using fluorescence microscopy and AFM, we verified the presence of histone proteins after the stretching and transfer process.

  9. High temperature surface imaging using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmaat, Joska Johannes; Brinkman, Alexander; Blank, David H.A.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most important tools in nanotechnology and surface science. Because of recent developments, nowadays, it is also used to study dynamic processes, such as thin film growth and surface reaction mechanisms. These processes often take place at high temperature

  10. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Togami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Norio

    2017-11-06

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture-in cooperation with image processing technologies-for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  11. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Yamamoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture—in cooperation with image processing technologies—for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  12. Tools for Model Building and Optimization into Near-Atomic Resolution Electron Cryo-Microscopy Density Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, F; Chiu, W

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) has advanced dramatically to become a viable tool for high-resolution structural biology research. The ultimate outcome of a cryoEM study is an atomic model of a macromolecule or its complex with interacting partners. This chapter describes a variety of algorithms and software to build a de novo model based on the cryoEM 3D density map, to optimize the model with the best stereochemistry restraints and finally to validate the model with proper protocols. The full process of atomic structure determination from a cryoEM map is described. The tools outlined in this chapter should prove extremely valuable in revealing atomic interactions guided by cryoEM data. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fast and gentle side approach for atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, W.A.; Broekmaat, Joska Johannes; Beerends, R.J.L.; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is one of the most popular imaging tools with atomic resolution in different research fields. Here, a fast and gentle side approach for atomic force microscopy is proposed to image the same surface location and to reduce the time delay between modification and imaging without

  14. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) NASA Mission-of- Opportunity - Up and Operational

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas*, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    *Presented on behalf of the entire TWINS Team Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) is a NASA Explorer Mission-of-Opportunity to stereoscopically image the Earth's magnetosphere for the first time [McComas et al., 2008]. TWINS extends our understanding of magnetospheric structure and processes by providing simultaneous Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imaging from two widely separated locations. TWINS observes ENAs from 1-100 keV with high angular (~4° x 4°) and time (~1-minute) resolution. The TWINS Ly-α monitor measures the geocoronal hydrogen density to aid in ENA analysis while environmental sensors provide contemporaneous measurements of the local charged particle environments. By imaging ENAs with identical instruments from two widely spaced, high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS enables three-dimensional visualization of the large-scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. As of the summer of 2008, both TWINS instruments are finally on orbit and operational and stereo imaging of the magnetosphere has begun. This talk briefly summarizes the TWINS mission and instruments and shows some of the 'first-light' observations. More information about TWINS and access to these data are available at http://twins.swri.edu. Reference: McComas, D.J., F. Allegrini, J. Baldonado, B. Blake, P. C. Brandt, J. Burch, J. Clemmons, W. Crain, D. Delapp, R. DeMajistre, D. Everett, H. Fahr, L. Friesen, H. Funsten, J. Goldstein, M. Gruntman, R. Harbaugh, R. Harper, H. Henkel, C. Holmlund, G. Lay, D. Mabry, D. Mitchell, U. Nass, C. Pollock, S. Pope, M. Reno, S. Ritzau, E. Roelof, E. Scime, M. Sivjee, R. Skoug, T. S. Sotirelis, M. Thomsen, C. Urdiales, P. Valek, K. Viherkanto, S. Weidner, T. Ylikorpi, M. Young, J. Zoennchen, The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) NASA Mission-of-Opportunity, Submitted to Space Science Reviews, 2008.

  15. Low-Z target optimization for spatial resolution improvement in megavoltage imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, Tanner; Robar, James L. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, 1650 Avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, several authors have shown contrast improvements in megavoltage portal imaging and cone-beam computed tomography using low atomic number (Z) targets. This work compliments previous studies by investigating the effects of varying different beam production parameters including target atomic number, target thickness, and incident electron energy on spatial resolution. Methods: Target materials of beryllium, aluminum, and tungsten were investigated over a range of thicknesses between 10% and 100% of the continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. Incident electron kinetic energies of 4.5 and 7.0 MeV were used, in conjunction with custom targets installed above the carousel of a modern radiotherapy linear accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of the accelerator were constructed and compared to the experimental results. Results: The results showed that thinner targets, as well higher incident electron energies, generally produce more favorable modulation transfer function (MTF) curves. Due to an MTF dependence of the detector system on the photon energy, the experimental results showed that low-Z targets produced superior MTF curves. Simulations showed 14.5% and 21.5% increases in f{sub 50} for the 7.0 and 4.5 MeV targets (Al; 60%R{sub %CSDA}), respectively, when moved from the carousel to the location of the clinical target. f{sub 50} values for the custom targets were compared to the clinical 6 MV beam and were found to be between 10.4% lower (4.5 MeV/W) and 15.5% higher (7.0 MeV/Be). Conclusions: Integration of low-Z external targets into the treatment head of a medical linear was achieved with only minor modifications. It was shown that reasonably high resolution images on par or better than those acquired with the clinical 6 MV beam can be achieved using external low-Z targets.

  16. Low-Z target optimization for spatial resolution improvement in megavoltage imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tanner; Robar, James L

    2010-01-01

    Recently, several authors have shown contrast improvements in megavoltage portal imaging and cone-beam computed tomography using low atomic number (Z) targets. This work compliments previous studies by investigating the effects of varying different beam production parameters including target atomic number, target thickness, and incident electron energy on spatial resolution. Target materials of beryllium, aluminum, and tungsten were investigated over a range of thicknesses between 10% and 100% of the continuous slowing down approximation range of electrons. Incident electron kinetic energies of 4.5 and 7.0 MeV were used, in conjunction with custom targets installed above the carousel of a modern radiotherapy linear accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of the accelerator were constructed and compared to the experimental results. The results showed that thinner targets, as well higher incident electron energies, generally produce more favorable modulation transfer function (MTF) curves. Due to an MTF dependence of the detector system on the photon energy, the experimental results showed that low-Z targets produced superior MTF curves. Simulations showed 14.5% and 21.5% increases in f50 for the 7.0 and 4.5 MeV targets (A1; 60% R% CSDA), respectively, when moved from the carousel to the location of the clinical target. f50 values for the custom targets were compared to the clinical 6 MV beam and were found to be between 10.4% lower (4.5 MeV/W) and 15.5% higher (7.0 MeV/Be). Integration of low-Z external targets into the treatment head of a medical linear was achieved with only minor modifications. It was shown that reasonably high resolution images on par or better than those acquired with the clinical 6 MV beam can be achieved using external low-Z targets.

  17. Building identification from very high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Stephane

    Urbanisation still remains one of the main problems worldwide. The extent and rapidity of the urban growth induce a number of socio-economic and environmental conflicts everywhere. In order to reduce these problems, urban planners need to integrate spatial information in planning tools. Actually high expectations are made on Very High Spatial Resolution imagery (VHSR). These high-spatial resolution images are available at a reasonable price and due to short revisit periods, they offer a high degree of actuality. However, interpretation methods seem not to be adapted to this new type of images. The aim of our study is to develop a new method for semi-automatic building extraction with VHSR. The different steps performed to achieve our objective are each presented in a chapter. In the first chapter, the general context of our research is described with the definition of our objective. After a short historical review of urbanisation, we focus on urban growth and associated problems. In the following we discuss the possible contributions of geography to reduce these problems. After discussing concepts, theories and methodologies of geographical analysis in urban areas, we present existing general urban planning tools. Finally, we show the special interest of our study that is due to a growing need to integrate spatial information in these decision support tools. In the second chapter we verify the possibility of reaching our objective by analysing the technical characteristics of the images, the noise and the distortions which affect the images. Quality and interpretability of the studied image is analysed in order to show the capacity of these image to represent urban objects as close to reality as possible. The results confirm the potential of VHSR Imagery for urban objects analysis. The third chapter deal with the preliminary steps necessary for the elaboration of our method of building extraction. First, we evaluate the quality of the Sherbrooke Ikonos image

  18. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  19. Lensless high-resolution photoacoustic imaging scanner for in vivo skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Taiichiro; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Omuro, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi

    2017-10-01

    We previously launched a high-resolution photoacoustic (PA) imaging scanner based on a unique lensless design for in vivo skin imaging. The design, imaging algorithm and characteristics of the system are described in this paper. Neither an optical lens nor an acoustic lens is used in the system. In the imaging head, four sensor elements are arranged quadrilaterally, and by checking the phase differences for PA waves detected with these four sensors, a set of PA signals only originating from a chromophore located on the sensor center axis is extracted for constructing an image. A phantom study using a carbon fiber showed a depth-independent horizontal resolution of 84.0 ± 3.5 µm, and the scan direction-dependent variation of PA signals was about ± 20%. We then performed imaging of vasculature phantoms: patterns of red ink lines with widths of 100 or 200 μm formed in an acrylic block co-polymer. The patterns were visualized with high contrast, showing the capability for imaging arterioles and venues in the skin. Vasculatures in rat burn models and healthy human skin were also clearly visualized in vivo.

  20. AUTOMATIC INTERPRETATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES: FIRST RESULTS OF SAR IMAGE SIMULATION FOR SINGLE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the all-weather data acquisition capabilities, high resolution space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR plays an important role in remote sensing applications like change detection. However, because of the complex geometric mapping of buildings in urban areas, SAR images are often hard to interpret. SAR simulation techniques ease the visual interpretation of SAR images, while fully automatic interpretation is still a challenge. This paper presents a method for supporting the interpretation of high resolution SAR images with simulated radar images using a LiDAR digital surface model (DSM. Line features are extracted from the simulated and real SAR images and used for matching. A single building model is generated from the DSM and used for building recognition in the SAR image. An application for the concept is presented for the city centre of Munich where the comparison of the simulation to the TerraSAR-X data shows a good similarity. Based on the result of simulation and matching, special features (e.g. like double bounce lines, shadow areas etc. can be automatically indicated in SAR image.

  1. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry - An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welz, Bernhard [Instituto de Quimica, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, 40170-290 Salvador - BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis - SC (Brazil)], E-mail: w.bernardo@terra.com.br; Borges, Daniel L.G.; Lepri, Fabio G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis - SC (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre - RS (Brazil); Heitmann, Uwe [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department of Interface Spectroscopy, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed.

  2. A Fast Algorithm for Image Super-Resolution from Blurred Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Michael K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of reconstruction of a high-resolution image from several blurred low-resolution image frames. The image frames consist of blurred, decimated, and noisy versions of a high-resolution image. The high-resolution image is modeled as a Markov random field (MRF, and a maximum a posteriori (MAP estimation technique is used for the restoration. We show that with the periodic boundary condition, a high-resolution image can be restored efficiently by using fast Fourier transforms. We also apply the preconditioned conjugate gradient method to restore high-resolution images in the aperiodic boundary condition. Computer simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... is shown to be negligible. The concept of such a 3D detector enables ray tracing and super resolution algorithms to be applied. Realized pore geometries have a lower aspect ratio than used in simulations and the roughness of the pore walls gives a 13% decrease in waveguide efficiency. Compared to currently...

  4. Coded aperture subreflector array for high resolution radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan J.; Herrault, Florian; Kona, Keerti; Virbila, Gabriel; McGuire, Chuck; Wetzel, Mike; Fung, Helen; Prophet, Eric

    2017-05-01

    HRL Laboratories has been developing a new approach for high resolution radar imaging on stationary platforms. High angular resolution is achieved by operating at 235 GHz and using a scalable tile phased array architecture that has the potential to realize thousands of elements at an affordable cost. HRL utilizes aperture coding techniques to minimize the size and complexity of the RF electronics needed for beamforming, and wafer level fabrication and integration allow tiles containing 1024 elements to be manufactured with reasonable costs. This paper describes the results of an initial feasibility study for HRL's Coded Aperture Subreflector Array (CASA) approach for a 1024 element micromachined antenna array with integrated single-bit phase shifters. Two candidate electronic device technologies were evaluated over the 170 - 260 GHz range, GaN HEMT transistors and GaAs Schottky diodes. Array structures utilizing silicon micromachining and die bonding were evaluated for etch and alignment accuracy. Finally, the overall array efficiency was estimated to be about 37% (not including spillover losses) using full wave array simulations and measured device performance, which is a reasonable value at 235 GHz. Based on the measured data we selected GaN HEMT devices operated passively with 0V drain bias due to their extremely low DC power dissipation.

  5. Super-Resolution Far-Field Infrared Imaging by Photothermal Heterodyne Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongming; Aleshire, Kyle; Kuno, Masaru; Hartland, Gregory V

    2017-09-21

    Infrared (IR) imaging provides chemical-specific information without the need for exogenous labels. Conventional far-field IR imaging techniques are diffraction limited, which means an effective spatial resolution of >5 μm with currently available optics. In this article, we present a novel far-field IR imaging technique based on photothermal heterodyne imaging (IR-PHI). In our version of IR-PHI, an IR pump laser excites the sample, causing a small temperature rise that is detected by a counterpropagating visible probe beam. Images and spectra of several different types of soft matter systems (polystyrene beads, thin polymer films, and single Escherichia coli bacterial cells) are presented to demonstrate the sensitivity and versatility of the technique. Importantly, the spatial resolution in the IR-PHI measurements is determined by the visible probe beam: a spatial resolution of 0.3 μm was achieved with a 0.53 μm probe wavelength and a high numerical aperture focusing objective. This is the highest spatial resolution reported to date for far-field IR imaging. Analysis of the experiments shows that for polymer beads in a dry environment, the magnitude of the IR-PHI signal is determined by the scattering cross section of the nano-object at the probe wavelength. This is in contrast to conventional PHI experiments in a heat-transfer medium, where the signal scales as the absorption cross section. This different scaling can be understood through the optical theorem. Our analysis also shows that both thermal expansion and changes in the refractive index of the material are important and that these two effects, in general, counteract each other.

  6. Imaging Multi-Particle Atomic and Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Final Report for Grant Number: DE- FG02-10ER16146 This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms and molecules with photons and electrons. The duration of the grant was the 5 year period from 4/1/2010 – 10/31/2015. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 20 peer reviewed publications over these 5 years with 2 of the publications in Physical Review Letters and 1 in Nature; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B ...).

  7. Air–water interface of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Moosmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Underwater air retention of superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces is of increasing interest for technical applications. Persistent air layers (the Salvinia effect are known from biological species, for example, the floating fern Salvinia or the backswimmer Notonecta. The use of this concept opens up new possibilities for biomimetic technical applications in the fields of drag reduction, antifouling, anticorrosion and under water sensing. Current knowledge regarding the shape of the air–water interface is insufficient, although it plays a crucial role with regards to stability in terms of diffusion and dynamic conditions. Optical methods for imaging the interface have been limited to the micrometer regime. In this work, we utilized a nondynamic and nondestructive atomic force microscopy (AFM method to image the interface of submerged superhydrophobic structures with nanometer resolution. Up to now, only the interfaces of nanobubbles (acting almost like solids have been characterized by AFM at these dimensions. In this study, we show for the first time that it is possible to image the air–water interface of submerged hierarchically structured (micro-pillars surfaces by AFM in contact mode. By scanning with zero resulting force applied, we were able to determine the shape of the interface and thereby the depth of the water penetrating into the underlying structures. This approach is complemented by a second method: the interface was scanned with different applied force loads and the height for zero force was determined by linear regression. These methods open new possibilities for the investigation of air-retaining surfaces, specifically in terms of measuring contact area and in comparing different coatings, and thus will lead to the development of new applications.

  8. Air-water interface of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmann, Markus; Schimmel, Thomas; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Mail, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Underwater air retention of superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces is of increasing interest for technical applications. Persistent air layers (the Salvinia effect) are known from biological species, for example, the floating fern Salvinia or the backswimmer Notonecta. The use of this concept opens up new possibilities for biomimetic technical applications in the fields of drag reduction, antifouling, anticorrosion and under water sensing. Current knowledge regarding the shape of the air-water interface is insufficient, although it plays a crucial role with regards to stability in terms of diffusion and dynamic conditions. Optical methods for imaging the interface have been limited to the micrometer regime. In this work, we utilized a nondynamic and nondestructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to image the interface of submerged superhydrophobic structures with nanometer resolution. Up to now, only the interfaces of nanobubbles (acting almost like solids) have been characterized by AFM at these dimensions. In this study, we show for the first time that it is possible to image the air-water interface of submerged hierarchically structured (micro-pillars) surfaces by AFM in contact mode. By scanning with zero resulting force applied, we were able to determine the shape of the interface and thereby the depth of the water penetrating into the underlying structures. This approach is complemented by a second method: the interface was scanned with different applied force loads and the height for zero force was determined by linear regression. These methods open new possibilities for the investigation of air-retaining surfaces, specifically in terms of measuring contact area and in comparing different coatings, and thus will lead to the development of new applications.

  9. Air–water interface of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces imaged by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Thomas; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Mail, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Underwater air retention of superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces is of increasing interest for technical applications. Persistent air layers (the Salvinia effect) are known from biological species, for example, the floating fern Salvinia or the backswimmer Notonecta. The use of this concept opens up new possibilities for biomimetic technical applications in the fields of drag reduction, antifouling, anticorrosion and under water sensing. Current knowledge regarding the shape of the air–water interface is insufficient, although it plays a crucial role with regards to stability in terms of diffusion and dynamic conditions. Optical methods for imaging the interface have been limited to the micrometer regime. In this work, we utilized a nondynamic and nondestructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to image the interface of submerged superhydrophobic structures with nanometer resolution. Up to now, only the interfaces of nanobubbles (acting almost like solids) have been characterized by AFM at these dimensions. In this study, we show for the first time that it is possible to image the air–water interface of submerged hierarchically structured (micro-pillars) surfaces by AFM in contact mode. By scanning with zero resulting force applied, we were able to determine the shape of the interface and thereby the depth of the water penetrating into the underlying structures. This approach is complemented by a second method: the interface was scanned with different applied force loads and the height for zero force was determined by linear regression. These methods open new possibilities for the investigation of air-retaining surfaces, specifically in terms of measuring contact area and in comparing different coatings, and thus will lead to the development of new applications. PMID:28875104

  10. Super-resolution convolutional neural network for the improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishimaru, Naoki; Ohno, Shunsuke; Okamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takanori; Shirai, Naoki; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    Single image super-resolution (SR) method can generate a high-resolution (HR) image from a low-resolution (LR) image by enhancing image resolution. In medical imaging, HR images are expected to have a potential to provide a more accurate diagnosis with the practical application of HR displays. In recent years, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN), which is one of the state-of-the-art deep learning based SR methods, has proposed in computer vision. In this study, we applied and evaluated the SRCNN scheme to improve the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs. For evaluation, a total of 247 chest X-rays were sampled from the JSRT database. The 247 chest X-rays were divided into 93 training cases with non-nodules and 152 test cases with lung nodules. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, the HR image was reconstructed from the LR one. We compared the image quality of the SRCNN and conventional image interpolation methods, nearest neighbor, bilinear and bicubic interpolations. For quantitative evaluation, we measured two image quality metrics, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In the SRCNN scheme, PSNR and SSIM were significantly higher than those of three interpolation methods (pimage resolution and that the use of the SRCNN can yield substantial improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs.

  11. Gradient Permittivity Meta-Structure model for Wide-field Super-resolution imaging with a sub-45 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shun; Wang, Taisheng; Xu, Wenbin; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Hu, Bingliang; Yu, Weixing

    2016-03-21

    A gradient permittivity meta-structure (GPMS) model and its application in super-resolution imaging were proposed and discussed in this work. The proposed GPMS consists of alternate metallic and dielectric films with a gradient permittivity which can support surface plasmons (SPs) standing wave interference patterns with a super resolution. By employing the rigorous numerical FDTD simulation method, the GPMS was carefully simulated to find that the period of the SPs interference pattern is only 84 nm for a 532 nm incident light. Furthermore, the potential application of the GPMS for wide-field super-resolution imaging was also discussed and the simulation results show that an imaging resolution of sub-45 nm can be achieved based on the plasmonic structure illumination microscopic method, which means a 5.3-fold improvement on resolution has been achieved in comparison with conventional epifluorescence microscopy. Moreover, besides the super-resolution imaging application, the proposed GPMS model can also be applied for nanolithography and other areas where super resolution patterns are needed.

  12. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  13. Reply to ``Comment on `Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2010-03-01

    In our recent paper [I. M. Mikhailovskij, E. V. Sadanov, T. I. Mazilova, V. A. Ksenofontov, and O. A. Velicodnaja, Phys. Rev. B 80, 165404 (2009)], we have presented evidence for field emission from individual orbitals of self-standing carbon chains, which can be used for real-space imaging of the end-atom orbitals with a field-emission electron microscope (FEEM). In this reply to the preceding Comment, we refer to the issues brought up there, which concern the viewpoint that the observed spontaneous mutual transformations of FEEM patterns have been attributed to the ligand-induced symmetry breaking by calling attention to the role of hydrogen atoms unavoidable in most nanostructured carbon materials.

  14. Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Imaging by Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bo Huang; Wenqin Wang; Mark Bates; Xiaowei Zhuang

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in far-field fluorescence microscopy have led to substantial improvements in image resolution, achieving a near-molecular resolution of 20 to 30 nanometers in the two lateral dimensions. Three-dimensional (3D...

  15. Elimination of conjugate image for holograms using a resolution redistribution optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Yuki

    2008-08-20

    A technique to alter the ratio of the horizontal and vertical resolution of a spatial light modulator has been proposed. This technique increases the horizontal resolution by a factor of K and decreases the vertical resolution by a factor of 1/K. The proposed technique increases the horizontal viewing angle by a factor of approximately K, although a conjugate image appeared. In the present study, the resolution redistribution technique is modified to eliminate the conjugate image. The height of a horizontal slit placed on the Fourier plane of a 4 f imaging system used for the resolution redistribution system is reduced by half. The horizontal resolution becomes K times larger, and the vertical resolution becomes 1/2K times smaller. The improved technique generates only the object wave. We demonstrated fourfold enlargement of the horizontal resolution to increase the horizontal viewing angle by approximately four times without generating the conjugate image.

  16. Spatiotonal adaptivity in super-resolution of under-sampled image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis concerns the use of spatial and tonal adaptivity in improving the resolution of aliased image sequences under scene or camera motion. Each of the five content chapters focuses on a different subtopic of super-resolution: image registration (chapter 2), image fusion (chapter 3 and 4),

  17. Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement with Dictionary-optimized Sparse Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Bao; Liu, Jing; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Yao, Hongxun

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement (MRIM) is an effective way of measuring materials. MRIM has wide applications in physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medical and material science, especially in medical diagnosis. It is feasible to improve the resolution of MR imaging through increasing radiation intensity, but the high radiation intensity and the longtime of magnetic field harm the human body. Thus, in the practical applications the resolution of hardware imaging reaches the limitation of resolution. Software-based super-resolution technology is effective to improve the resolution of image. This work proposes a framework of dictionary-optimized sparse learning based MR super-resolution method. The framework is to solve the problem of sample selection for dictionary learning of sparse reconstruction. The textural complexity-based image quality representation is proposed to choose the optimal samples for dictionary learning. Comprehensive experiments show that the dictionary-optimized sparse learning improves the performance of sparse representation.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement with Dictionary-optimized Sparse Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun-Bao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement (MRIM is an effective way of measuring materials. MRIM has wide applications in physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medical and material science, especially in medical diagnosis. It is feasible to improve the resolution of MR imaging through increasing radiation intensity, but the high radiation intensity and the longtime of magnetic field harm the human body. Thus, in the practical applications the resolution of hardware imaging reaches the limitation of resolution. Software-based super-resolution technology is effective to improve the resolution of image. This work proposes a framework of dictionary-optimized sparse learning based MR super-resolution method. The framework is to solve the problem of sample selection for dictionary learning of sparse reconstruction. The textural complexity-based image quality representation is proposed to choose the optimal samples for dictionary learning. Comprehensive experiments show that the dictionary-optimized sparse learning improves the performance of sparse representation.

  19. New High-Resolution Images of Summer Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Ronald; Untersteiner, Norbert

    2011-02-01

    In 1995 a group of government and academic scientists were appointed by the vice president of the United States to review and advise on acquisitions of imagery obtained by classified intelligence satellites (National Technical Means) and to recommend the declassification of certain data sets for the benefit of science. The group is called MEDEA and was first described by Richelson [1998]. MEDEA disbanded in 2000 but reassembled in 2008. On 15 June 2009, under the auspices of MEDEA, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released to the public as Literal Image Derived Products (LIDPs) numerous images with 1-meter resolution acquired since 1999 at six locations in the Arctic Basin (Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic, Fram Strait, East Siberian Sea, Chukchi Sea, and Point Barrow). These locations are named “fiducial sites” to suggest that the collected imagery establishes a baseline data set for understanding recent and future changes. Data in the Global Fiducials Library (GFL) can be accessed via http://gfl.usgs.gov/. This data repository is updated by USGS as additional data become available.

  20. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  1. A High Spatial Resolution CT Scanner for Small Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicalini, E.; Baldazzi, G.; Belcari, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Gombia, M.; Motta, A.; Panetta, D.

    2006-01-01

    We have built a micro-CT system that will be integrated with a small animal PET scanner. The components are: an X-ray source with a peak voltage of up to 60 kV, a power of 10 W and a focal spot size of 30 μm; a CCD coupled to CsI(Tl) scintillator, subdivided into 128×3072 square pixels, each with a size of 48 μm; stepping motors for the sample roto-translation; a PCI acquisition board; electronic boards to control and read-out the CCD. A program in Lab VIEW controls the data acquisition. Reconstruction algorithms have been implemented for fan-beam and cone-beam configurations. Images of a bar pattern have been acquired to evaluate the detector performance: the CTF curve has been extracted from the data, obtaining a value of 10 % at 5 lp/mm and about 3 % at 10 lp/mm. Tomographic acquisitions have been performed with a test phantom consisting of a Plexiglas cylinder, 3 cm in diameter, with holes ranging from 3 mm down to 0.6 mm in diameter, filled with different materials. The contrast resolution has been extracted from the reconstructed images: a value of 6 % (in water) for a cubic voxel size of 80 μm has been obtained.

  2. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Moyamoya Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le-Bao; Zhang, Qian; Shi, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Ming-Qiu; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the imaging characteristics of moyamoya disease (MMD) using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) and to discuss the role of HR-MRI in differentiating MMD from other intracranial artery diseases, especially intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD). Data Sources: This review was based on the data in articles published between 2005 and 2015, which were obtained from PubMed. The keywords included HR-MRI, MMD, ICAD, and intracranial artery diseases. Study Selection: Articles related to HR-MRI for MMD or other intracranial artery diseases were selected for review. Results: There are differences between the characteristic patterns of HR-MRI in MMD and ICAD. MMD is associated with inward remodeling, smaller outer diameters, concentric occlusive lesions and homogeneous signal intensity, while ICAD is more likely to be associated with outward remodeling, normal outer diameters, eccentric occlusive lesions, and heterogeneous signal intensity. Other intracranial artery diseases, such as dissection and vasculitis, also have distinctive characteristics in HR-MRI. HR-MRI may become a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of MMD in the future. Conclusions: HR-MRI of MMD provides a more in-depth understanding of MMD, and it is helpful in evaluating pathological changes in the vessel wall and in differentiating MMD from other intracranial artery steno-occlusive diseases, particularly ICAD. PMID:26612300

  3. Interface Structure and Atomic Bonding Characteristics in Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Ziegler; J. C. Idrobo; M. K. Cinibulk; C. Kisielowski; N. D. Browning; R. O. Ritchie

    2004-01-01

    Direct atomic resolution images have been obtained that illustrate how a range of rare-earth atoms bond to the interface between the intergranular phase and the matrix grains in an advanced silicon nitride ceramic...

  4. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  5. Video-rate computational super-resolution and integral imaging at longwave-infrared wavelengths

    OpenAIRE

    Preciado, Miguel A.; Carles, Guillem; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first computational super-resolved, multi-camera integral imaging at long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths. A synchronized array of FLIR Lepton cameras was assembled, and computational super-resolution and integral-imaging reconstruction employed to generate video with light-field imaging capabilities, such as 3D imaging and recognition of partially obscured objects, while also providing a four-fold increase in effective pixel count. This approach to high-resolution imaging enab...

  6. Angle-resolved x-ray imaging using a resolution-tunable double-crystal analyser

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, K

    2003-01-01

    A resolution-tunable double-crystal analyser was successfully applied, for the first time, to angle-resolved x-ray imaging. Tuning the resolution between 0.5'' and 2.3'' was done with small loss of peak intensity using a Si(220) double-crystal analyser. The angle-resolved images of a housefly were recorded on nuclear emulsion plates at various angular resolutions. Several methods to improve the angular resolution of the analyser are also proposed.

  7. High-Resolution Imaging of Asteroids/Satellites with AO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, William

    2012-02-01

    We propose to make high-resolution observations of asteroids using AO, to measure size, shape, and pole position (spin vectors), and/or to search for satellites. We have demonstrated that AO imaging allows determination of the pole/dimensions in 1 or 2 nights on a single target, rather than the years of observations with lightcurve inversion techniques that only yield poles and axial ratios, not true dimensions. Our new technique (KOALA) combines AO imaging with lightcurve and occultation data for optimum size/shape determinations. We request that LGS be available for faint targets, but using NGS AO, we will measure several large and intermediate asteroids that are favorably placed in spring/summer of 2012 for size/shape/pole. Accurately determining the volume from the often-irregular shape allows us to derive densities to much greater precision in cases where the mass is known, e.g., from the presence of a satellite. We will search several d! ozen asteroids for the presence of satellites, particularly in under-studied populations, particularly NEOs (we have recently achieved the first-ever optical image of an NEO binary [Merline et al. 2008b, IAUC 8977]). Satellites provide a real-life lab for testing collisional models. We will search for satellites around special objects at the request of lightcurve observers, and we will make a search for debris in the vicinity of Pluto, in support of the New Horizons mission. Our shape/size work requires observations over most of a full rotation period (typically several hours).

  8. Research on super-resolution image reconstruction based on an improved POCS algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiming; Miao, Hong; Yang, Chong; Xiong, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution image reconstruction (SRIR) can improve the fuzzy image's resolution; solve the shortage of the spatial resolution, excessive noise, and low-quality problem of the image. Firstly, we introduce the image degradation model to reveal the essence of super-resolution reconstruction process is an ill-posed inverse problem in mathematics. Secondly, analysis the blurring reason of optical imaging process - light diffraction and small angle scattering is the main reason for the fuzzy; propose an image point spread function estimation method and an improved projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm which indicate effectiveness by analyzing the changes between the time domain and frequency domain algorithm in the reconstruction process, pointed out that the improved POCS algorithms based on prior knowledge have the effect to restore and approach the high frequency of original image scene. Finally, we apply the algorithm to reconstruct synchrotron radiation computer tomography (SRCT) image, and then use these images to reconstruct the three-dimensional slice images. Comparing the differences between the original method and super-resolution algorithm, it is obvious that the improved POCS algorithm can restrain the noise and enhance the image resolution, so it is indicated that the algorithm is effective. This study and exploration to super-resolution image reconstruction by improved POCS algorithm is proved to be an effective method. It has important significance and broad application prospects - for example, CT medical image processing and SRCT ceramic sintering analyze of microstructure evolution mechanism.

  9. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  10. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  11. Mapping permeability in low‐resolution micro‐CT images: A multiscale statistical approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botha, Pieter W. S. K; Sheppard, Adrian P

    2016-01-01

    ...; however, the lower resolution causes connecting pore throats to be represented by intermediate gray scale values and limits information on pore system geometry, rendering such images inadequate...

  12. Nano-scale imaging of chromosomes and DNA by scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Hagiwara, Shoji; Fukushi, Daisuke; Shichiri, Motoharu; Nakao, Hidenobu; Kim, J.-M.; Hirose, Tamaki; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Toshio

    2003-10-15

    Nano-scale structures of the YOYO-1-stained barley chromosomes and lambda-phage DNA were investigated by scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM). This technique enabled precise analysis of fluorescence structural images in relation to the morphology of the biomaterials. The results suggested that the fluorescence intensity does not always correspond to topographic height of the chromosomes, but roughly reflects the local amount and/or density of DNA. Various sizes of the bright fluorescence spots were clearly observed in fluorescence banding-treated chromosomes. Furthermore, fluorescence-stained lambda-phage DNA analysis by SNOM/AFM demonstrated the possibility of nanometer-scale imaging for a novel technique termed nano-fluorescence in situ hybridization (nano-FISH). Thus, SNOM/AFM is a powerful tool for analyzing the structure and the function of biomaterials with higher resolution than conventional optical microscopes.

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of Eu dopant atoms in Ca-α-SiAlON via through-focus HAADF-STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Genki; Yamaki, Fuuta; Kunisada, Yuji; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) distributional analysis of individual dopant atoms in materials is important to development of optical, electronic, and magnetic materials. In this study, we adopted through-focus high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging for 3D distributional analysis of Eu dopant atoms in Ca-α-SiAlON phosphors. In this context, the effects of convergence semi-angle and Eu z-position on the HAADF image contrast were investigated. Multi-slice image simulation revealed that the contrast of the dopant site was sensitive to change of the defocus level. When the defocus level matched the depth position of a Eu atom, the contrast intensity was significantly increased. The large convergence semi-angle greatly increased the depth resolution because the electron beam tends spread instead of channeling along the atomic columns. Through-focus HAADF-STEM imaging was used to analyze the Eu atom distribution surrounding 10nm cubes with defocus steps of 0.68nm each. The contrast depth profile recorded with a narrow step width clearly analyzed the possible depth positions of Eu atoms. The radial distribution function obtained for the Eu dopants was analyzed using an atomic distribution model that was based on the assumption of random distribution. The result suggested that the Ca concentration did not affect the Eu distribution. The decreased fraction of neighboring Eu atoms along z-direction might be caused by the enhanced short-range Coulomb-like repulsive forces along the z-direction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Photoelectron Holographic Atomic Arrangement Imaging of Cleaved Bimetal-intercalated Graphite Superconductor Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Nishiyama, Saki; Izumi, Masanari; Uesugi, Eri; Goto, Hidenori; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Sugita, Kenji; Daimon, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Yuji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-04

    From the C 1s and K 2p photoelectron holograms, we directly reconstructed atomic images of the cleaved surface of a bimetal-intercalated graphite superconductor, (Ca, K)C 8 , which differed substantially from the expected bulk crystal structure based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Graphene atomic images were collected in the in-plane cross sections of the layers 3.3 Å and 5.7 Å above the photoelectron emitter C atom and the stacking structures were determined as AB- and AA-type, respectively. The intercalant metal atom layer was found between two AA-stacked graphenes. The K atomic image revealing 2 × 2 periodicity, occupying every second centre site of C hexagonal columns, was reconstructed, and the Ca 2p peak intensity in the photoelectron spectra of (Ca, K)C 8 from the cleaved surface was less than a few hundredths of the K 2p peak intensity. These observations indicated that cleavage preferentially occurs at the KC 8 layers containing no Ca atoms.

  15. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described.

  16. Roads Data Conflation Using Update High Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, A.; Riyahi Bakhtiari, H. R.

    2017-11-01

    Urbanization, industrialization and modernization are rapidly growing in developing countries. New industrial cities, with all the problems brought on by rapid population growth, need infrastructure to support the growth. This has led to the expansion and development of the road network. A great deal of road network data has made by using traditional methods in the past years. Over time, a large amount of descriptive information has assigned to these map data, but their geometric accuracy and precision is not appropriate to today's need. In this regard, the improvement of the geometric accuracy of road network data by preserving the descriptive data attributed to them and updating of the existing geo databases is necessary. Due to the size and extent of the country, updating the road network maps using traditional methods is time consuming and costly. Conversely, using remote sensing technology and geographic information systems can reduce costs, save time and increase accuracy and speed. With increasing the availability of high resolution satellite imagery and geospatial datasets there is an urgent need to combine geographic information from overlapping sources to retain accurate data, minimize redundancy, and reconcile data conflicts. In this research, an innovative method for a vector-to-imagery conflation by integrating several image-based and vector-based algorithms presented. The SVM method for image classification and Level Set method used to extract the road the different types of road intersections extracted from imagery using morphological operators. For matching the extracted points and to find the corresponding points, matching function which uses the nearest neighborhood method was applied. Finally, after identifying the matching points rubber-sheeting method used to align two datasets. Two residual and RMSE criteria used to evaluate accuracy. The results demonstrated excellent performance. The average root-mean-square error decreased from 11.8 to 4.1 m.

  17. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  18. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  19. Multi-Frame Super-Resolution of Gaofen-4 Remote Sensing Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jieping; Liang, Yonghui; Liu, Jin; Huang, Zongfu

    2017-09-18

    Gaofen-4 is China's first geosynchronous orbit high-definition optical imaging satellite with extremely high temporal resolution. The features of staring imaging and high temporal resolution enable the super-resolution of multiple images of the same scene. In this paper, we propose a super-resolution (SR) technique to reconstruct a higher-resolution image from multiple low-resolution (LR) satellite images. The method first performs image registration in both the spatial and range domains. Then the point spread function (PSF) of LR images is parameterized by a Gaussian function and estimated by a blind deconvolution algorithm based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP). Finally, the high-resolution (HR) image is reconstructed by a MAP-based SR algorithm. The MAP cost function includes a data fidelity term and a regularized term. The data fidelity term is in the L₂ norm, and the regularized term employs the Huber-Markov prior which can reduce the noise and artifacts while preserving the image edges. Experiments with real Gaofen-4 images show that the reconstructed images are sharper and contain more details than Google Earth ones.

  20. Color atomic force microscopy: A method to acquire three independent potential parameters to generate a color image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, P. E.; Damiron, D.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kaminishi, K.; Pop, F. V.; Kobayashi, D.; Sasaki, N.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2017-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy has enabled imaging at the sub-molecular level, and 3D mapping of the tip-surface potential field. However, fast identification of the surface still remains a challenging topic for the microscope to enjoy widespread use as a tool with chemical contrast. In this paper, as a step towards implementation of such function, we introduce a control scheme and mathematical treatment of the acquired data that enable retrieval of essential information characterizing this potential field, leading to fast acquisition of images with chemical contrast. The control scheme is based on the tip sample distance modulation at an angular frequency ω , and null-control of the ω component of the measured self-excitation frequency of the oscillator. It is demonstrated that this control is robust, and that effective Morse Parameters that give satisfactory curve fit to the measured frequency shift can be calculated at rates comparable to the scan. Atomic features with similar topography were distinguished by differences in these parameters. The decay length parameter was resolved with a resolution of 10 pm. The method was demonstrated on quenched silicon at a scan rate comparable to conventional imaging.

  1. An investigation of polarized atomic photofragments using the ion imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracker, A.S.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis describes measurement and analysis of the recoil angle dependence of atomic photofragment polarization (atomic v-J correlation). This property provides information on the electronic rearrangement which occurs during molecular photodissociation. Chapter 1 introduces concepts of photofragment vector correlations and reviews experimental and theoretical progress in this area. Chapter 2 described the photofragment ion imaging technique, which the author has used to study the atomic v-J correlation in chlorine and ozone dissociation. Chapter 3 outlines a method for isolating and describing the contribution to the image signal which is due exclusively to angular momentum alignment. Ion imaging results are presented and discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 discusses a different set of experiments on the three-fragment dissociation of azomethane. 122 refs.

  2. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    In situ AFM images of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) hydrolysis of mica-supported one- and two-component lipid bilayers are presented. For one-component DPPC bilayers an enhanced enzymatic activity is observed towards preexisting defects in the bilayer. Phase separation is observed in two-co...

  3. Atomic-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Movies for Study of Organic Molecules, Assemblies, and Reactions: The First 10 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2017-06-20

    A molecule is a quantum mechanical entity. "Watching motions and reactions of a molecule with our eyes" has therefore been a dream of chemists for a century. This dream has come true with the aid of the movies of atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopic (AR-TEM) molecular images through real-time observation of dynamic motions of single organic molecules (denoted hereafter as single-molecule atomic-resolution real-time (SMART) TEM imaging). Since 2007, we have reported movies of a variety of single organic molecules, organometallic molecules, and their assemblies, which are rotating, stretching, and reacting. Like movies in the theater, the atomic-resolution molecular movies provide us information on the 3-D structures of the molecules and also their time evolution. The success of the SMART-TEM imaging crucially depends on the development of "chemical fishhooks" with which fish (organic molecules) in solution can be captured on a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT, serving as a "fishing rod"). The captured molecules are connected to a slowly vibrating CNT, and their motions are displayed on a monitor in real time. A "fishing line" connecting the fish and the rod may be a σ-bond, a van der Waals force, or other weak connections. Here, the molecule/CNT system behaves as a coupled oscillator, where the low-frequency anisotropic vibration of the CNT is transmitted to the molecules via the weak chemical connections that act as an energy filter. Interpretation of the observed motions of the molecules at atomic resolution needs us to consider the quantum mechanical nature of electrons as well as bond rotation, letting us deviate from the conventional statistical world of chemistry. What new horizons can we explore? We have so far carried out conformational studies of individual molecules, assigning anti or gauche conformations to each C-C bond in conformers that we saw. We can also determine the structures of van der Waals assemblies of organic molecules

  4. Improving Resolution and Depth of Astronomical Observations via Modern Mathematical Methods for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, M.; Ottaviani, D.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Pilo, S.; Falcone, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

  5. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  6. Near-Atomic Resolution Using Electron Cryomicroscopy and Single-Particle Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing Zhang; Ethan Settembre; Chen Xu; Philip R. Dormitzer; Richard Bellamy; Stephen C. Harrison; Nikolaus Grigorieff

    2008-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) yields images of macromolecular assemblies and their components, from which 3D structures can be determined, by using an image processing method commonly known as "single-particle reconstruction...

  7. Broadband X-ray Imaging in the Near-Field Region of an Airblast Atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danyu; Bothell, Julie; Morgan, Timothy; Heindel, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The atomization process has a close connection to the efficiency of many spray applications. Examples include improved fuel atomization increasing the combustion efficiency of aircraft engines, or controlled droplet size and spray angle enhancing the quality and speed of the painting process. Therefore, it is vital to understand the physics of the atomization process, but the near-field region is typically optically dense and difficult to probe with laser-based or intrusive measurement techniques. In this project, broadband X-ray radiography and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging were performed in the near-field region of a canonical coaxial airblast atomizer. The X-ray absorption rate was enhanced by adding 20% by weight of Potassium Iodide to the liquid phase to increase image contrast. The radiographs provided an estimate of the liquid effective mean path length and spray angle at the nozzle exit for different flow conditions. The reconstructed CT images provided a 3D map of the time-average liquid spray distribution. X-ray imaging was used to quantify the changes in the near-field spray characteristics for various coaxial airblast atomizer flow conditions. Office of Naval Research.

  8. Undetectable changes in image resolution of luminance-contrast gradients affect depth perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eTsushima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/ foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.. It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder. In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  9. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Lawrence

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Electro-optic (EO image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1 inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2 EO image edge detection; (3 registration; and (4 blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  10. On the creation of high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data from multi-temporal low spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; van Aardt, Jan; Messinger, David

    2017-05-01

    The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission aims to provide global imaging spectroscopy data to the benefit of especially ecosystem studies. The onboard spectrometer will collect radiance spectra from the visible to short wave infrared (VSWIR) regions (400-2500 nm). The mission calls for fine spectral resolution (10 nm band width) and as such will enable scientists to perform material characterization, species classification, and even sub-pixel mapping. However, the global coverage requirement results in a relatively low spatial resolution (GSD 30m), which restricts applications to objects of similar scales. We therefore have focused on the assessment of sub-pixel vegetation structure from spectroscopy data in past studies. In this study, we investigate the development or reconstruction of higher spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data via fusion of multi-temporal data sets to address the drawbacks implicit in low spatial resolution imagery. The projected temporal resolution of the HyspIRI VSWIR instrument is 15 days, which implies that we have access to as many as six data sets for an area over the course of a growth season. Previous studies have shown that select vegetation structural parameters, e.g., leaf area index (LAI) and gross ecosystem production (GEP), are relatively constant in summer and winter for temperate forests; we therefore consider the data sets collected in summer to be from a similar, stable forest structure. The first step, prior to fusion, involves registration of the multi-temporal data. A data fusion algorithm then can be applied to the pre-processed data sets. The approach hinges on an algorithm that has been widely applied to fuse RGB images. Ideally, if we have four images of a scene which all meet the following requirements - i) they are captured with the same camera configurations; ii) the pixel size of each image is x; and iii) at least r2 images are aligned on a grid of x/r - then a high-resolution image, with a pixel

  11. Super-resolution T1 estimation: Quantitative high resolution T1 mapping from a set of low resolution T1 -weighted images with different slice orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenkiste, Gwendolyn; Poot, Dirk H J; Jeurissen, Ben; den Dekker, Arnold J; Vanhevel, Floris; Parizel, Paul M; Sijbers, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative T1 mapping is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that estimates the spin-lattice relaxation time of tissues. Even though T1 mapping has a broad range of potential applications, it is not routinely used in clinical practice as accurate and precise high resolution T1 mapping requires infeasibly long acquisition times. To improve the trade-off between the acquisition time, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution, we acquire a set of low resolution T1 -weighted images and directly estimate a high resolution T1 map by means of super-resolution reconstruction. Simulation and in vivo experiments show an increased spatial resolution of the T1 map, while preserving a high signal-to-noise ratio and short scan time. Moreover, the proposed method outperforms conventional estimation in terms of root-mean-square error. Super resolution T1 estimation enables resolution enhancement in T1 mapping with the use of standard (inversion recovery) T1 acquisition sequences. Magn Reson Med 77:1818-1830, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil and rock microstructure X-ray microtomography is extremely useful. However, as any other imaging technique, this one also has a significant drawback - a trade-off between sample size and resolution. The latter is a significant problem for multi-scale complex structures, especially such as soils and carbonates. Other imaging techniques, for example, SEM/FIB-SEM or X-ray macrotomography can be helpful in obtaining higher resolution or wider field of view. The ultimate goal is to create a single dataset containing information from all scales or to characterize such multi-scale structure. In this contribution we demonstrate a general solution for merging multiscale categorical spatial data into a single dataset using stochastic reconstructions with rescaled correlation functions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by merging three images representing macro, micro and nanoscale spatial information on porous media structure. Images obtained by X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy were fused into a single image with predefined resolution. The methodology is sufficiently generic for implementation of other stochastic reconstruction techniques, any number of scales, any number of material phases, and any number of images for a given scale. The methodology can be further used to assess effective properties of fused porous media images or to compress voluminous spatial datasets for efficient data storage. Potential practical applications of this method are abundant in soil science, hydrology and petroleum engineering, as well as other geosciences. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (X-ray microtomography study of shale

  13. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  14. Image resolution enhancement for healthy weight-bearing bones based on topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Jin; Jang, In Gwun

    2016-09-06

    Although high-resolution skeletal images are essential for accurate bone strength assessment, the current high-resolution imaging modalities have critical problems that remain to be solved such as high radiation doses, low signal-to-noise ratios, and long scan times. Resolution enhancement techniques, which have recently received much attention, have also been difficult to obtain acceptable image resolutions. Inspired by the self-optimizing capabilities of bone (i.e. reorienting the trabecula for maximum mechanical efficiency with minimum bone mass), this paper proposes a novel resolution enhancement method that can reconstruct a high-resolution skeletal image from a low-resolution image. In order to achieve this, the proposed method conducts mesh refinement for resolution upscaling and then performs topology optimization with a constraint for the bone mineral density deviation in order to preserve the subject-specific bone distribution data. The numerical results show that the proposed method successfully reconstructs the enhanced images of trabecular architecture in terms of structure similarity and apparent elastic modulus, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed method for skeletal image resolution enhancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The limit of time resolution in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy by a pump-probe approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Spielhofer, Andreas; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely achieves structural information in the sub-nm length scale. Measuring time resolved properties on this length scale to understand kinetics at the nm scale remains an elusive goal. We present a general analysis of the lower limit for time resolution in AFM. Our finding suggests that the time resolution in AFM is ultimately limited by the well-known thermal limit of AFM and not as often proposed by the mechanical response time of the force sensing cantilever. We demonstrate a general pump-probe approach using the cantilever as a detector responding to the averaged signal. This method can be applied to any excitation signal such as electrical, thermal, magnetic or optical. Experimental implementation of this method allows us to measure a photocarrier decay time of ˜1 ps in low temperature grown GaAs using a cantilever with a resonant frequency of 280 kHz.

  16. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  17. Fluorescent Nanodiamond: A Versatile Tool for Long-Term Cell Tracking, Super-Resolution Imaging, and Nanoscale Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Hui, Yuen Yung; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) has recently played a central role in fueling new discoveries in interdisciplinary fields spanning biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences. The nanoparticle is unique in that it contains a high density ensemble of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers as built-in fluorophores. The center possesses a number of outstanding optical and magnetic properties. First, NV(-) has an absorption maximum at ∼550 nm, and when exposed to green-orange light, it emits bright fluorescence at ∼700 nm with a lifetime of longer than 10 ns. These spectroscopic properties are little affected by surface modification but are distinctly different from those of cell autofluorescence and thus enable background-free imaging of FNDs in tissue sections. Such characteristics together with its excellent biocompatibility render FND ideal for long-term cell tracking applications, particularly in stem cell research. Next, as an artificial atom in the solid state, the NV(-) center is perfectly photostable, without photobleaching and blinking. Therefore, the NV-containing FND is suitable as a contrast agent for super-resolution imaging by stimulated emission depletion (STED). An improvement of the spatial resolution by 20-fold is readily achievable by using a high-power STED laser to deplete the NV(-) fluorescence. Such improvement is crucial in revealing the detailed structures of biological complexes and assemblies, including cellular organelles and subcellular compartments. Further enhancement of the resolution for live cell imaging is possible by manipulating the charge states of the NV centers. As the "brightest" member of the nanocarbon family, FND holds great promise and potential for bioimaging with unprecedented resolution and precision. Lastly, the NV(-) center in diamond is an atom-like quantum system with a total electron spin of 1. The ground states of the spins show a crystal field splitting of 2.87 GHz, separating the ms = 0 and

  18. High-resolution wavefront shaping with a photonic crystal fiber for multimode fiber imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amitonova, Lyubov; Descloux, Adrien; Petschulat, Joerg; Frosz, Michael H.; Ahmed, Goran; Babic, Fehim; Mosk, Allard; Russell, Philip St.J.; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a high-numerical-aperture photonic crystal fiber allows lensless focusing at an unparalleled resolution by complex wavefront shaping. This paves the way toward high-resolution imaging exceeding the capabilities of imaging with multi-core single-mode optical fibers. We analyze the

  19. Quantitative imaging of electrospun fibers by PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy using etched scanning probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlanda, Adrian; Rebis, Janusz; Kijeńska, Ewa; Wozniak, Michal J; Rozniatowski, Krzysztof; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-05-01

    Electrospun polymeric submicron and nanofibers can be used as tissue engineering scaffolds in regenerative medicine. In physiological conditions fibers are subjected to stresses and strains from the surrounding biological environment. Such stresses can cause permanent deformation or even failure to their structure. Therefore, there is a growing necessity to characterize their mechanical properties, especially at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool for the visualization and probing of selected mechanical properties of materials in biomedical sciences. Image resolution of atomic force microscopy techniques depends on the equipment quality and shape of the scanning probe. The probe radius and aspect ratio has huge impact on the quality of measurement. In the presented work the nanomechanical properties of four different polymer based electrospun fibers were tested using PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy, with standard and modified scanning probes. Standard, commercially available probes have been modified by etching using focused ion beam (FIB). Results have shown that modified probes can be used for mechanical properties mapping of biomaterial in the nanoscale, and generate nanomechanical information where conventional tips fail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracting a Good Quality Frontal Face Image from a Low-Resolution Video Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images and on the......Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images...... and on the other hand facial analysis systems. The proposed system in this paper deals with exactly this problem. Our approach is to apply a reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithm. Such an algorithm, however, has two main problems: first, it requires relatively similar images with not too much noise...

  1. Imaging Individual Molecules and Atoms by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    Spherical aberration correctors recently developed for transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) have enabled direct imaging of single molecules and atoms at low electron acceleration voltages. Here, we review some recent studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and fullerene nanopeapods using aberration-corrected TEM/STEM operated at 120 kV or lower voltages. Local structures of individual CNTs are visualized in details including various defects such as atomic vacancies and so-called Stone-Wales defects. Atomic-level structures of fullerene molecules inside CNTs are unambiguously visualized. Single atoms of lanthanides and calcium in nanopeapods are identified by using STEM-EELS operated at 60 kV.

  2. Accurate model annotation of a near-atomic resolution cryo-EM map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryc, Corey F; Chen, Dong-Hua; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Wang, Zhao; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Jiang, Wen; Adams, Paul D; King, Jonathan A; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah

    2017-03-21

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has been used to determine the atomic coordinates (models) from density maps of biological assemblies. These models can be assessed by their overall fit to the experimental data and stereochemical information. However, these models do not annotate the actual density values of the atoms nor their positional uncertainty. Here, we introduce a computational procedure to derive an atomic model from a cryo-EM map with annotated metadata. The accuracy of such a model is validated by a faithful replication of the experimental cryo-EM map computed using the coordinates and associated metadata. The functional interpretation of any structural features in the model and its utilization for future studies can be made in the context of its measure of uncertainty. We applied this protocol to the 3.3-Å map of the mature P22 bacteriophage capsid, a large and complex macromolecular assembly. With this protocol, we identify and annotate previously undescribed molecular interactions between capsid subunits that are crucial to maintain stability in the absence of cementing proteins or cross-linking, as occur in other bacteriophages.

  3. High-resolution two-dimensional image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We consider a technique for high-resolution image upconversion of thermal light. Experimentally, we demonstrate cw upconversion with a resolution of more than 200 × 1000 pixels of thermally illuminated objects. This is the first demonstration (to our knowledge) of high-resolution cw image...... upconversion. The upconversion method promises an alternative route to high-quantum-efficiency all-optical imaging in the mid-IR wavelength region and beyond using standard CCD cameras. A particular advantage of CCD cameras compared to state-of-the-art thermal cameras is the possibility to tailor and tune...... the spectral response leading to functional spectral imaging....

  4. Multiplexed 3D Cellular Super-Resolution Imaging with DNA-PAINT and Exchange-PAINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, R.; Avendano, M.S.; Woehrstein, J.B.; Dai, M.; Shih, W.M.; Yin, P.

    2014-01-01

    While super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for biological research, obtaining multiplexed images for a large number of distinct target species remains challenging. Here we use the transient binding of short fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides (DNA-PAINT, point accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography) for simple and easy-to-implement multiplexed 3D super-resolution imaging inside fixed cells and achieve sub-10 nm spatial resolution in vitro using synthetic DNA structures. We also report a novel approach for multiplexing (Exchange-PAINT) that allows sequential imaging of multiple targets using only a single dye and a single laser source. We experimentally demonstrate ten-“color” super-resolution imaging in vitro on synthetic DNA structures and four-“color” imaging of proteins in a fixed cell. PMID:24487583

  5. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of spring stiffness and anisotropy on stick-slip atomic force microscopy imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssemakers, J.W J; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of high-load friction atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of layered structures in terms of a discrete stick-slip model. It turned out that based on a geometric approach, the characteristics of slip behavior can be linked to the cantilever/sample spring

  7. Integrative Modeling of Macromolecular Assemblies from Low to Near-Atomic Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While conventional high-resolution techniques in structural biology are challenged by the size and flexibility of many biological assemblies, recent advances in low-resolution techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS have opened up new avenues to define the structures of such assemblies. By systematically combining various sources of structural, biochemical and biophysical information, integrative modeling approaches aim to provide a unified structural description of such assemblies, starting from high-resolution structures of the individual components and integrating all available information from low-resolution experimental methods. In this review, we describe integrative modeling approaches, which use complementary data from either cryo-EM or SAXS. Specifically, we focus on the popular molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF method, which has been widely used for flexible fitting into cryo-EM maps. Second, we describe hybrid molecular dynamics, Rosetta Monte-Carlo and minimum ensemble search (MES methods that can be used to incorporate SAXS into pseudoatomic structural models. We present concise descriptions of the two methods and their most popular alternatives, along with select illustrative applications to protein/nucleic acid assemblies involved in DNA replication and repair.

  8. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible 3He/10 T cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Allwörden, H.; Ruschmeier, K.; Köhler, A.; Eelbo, T.; Schwarz, A.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped 3He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  9. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible (3)He/10 T cryostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Allwörden, H; Ruschmeier, K; Köhler, A; Eelbo, T; Schwarz, A; Wiesendanger, R

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped (3)He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  10. Using Adobe Acrobat to create high-resolution line art images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyoun Sik; Lee, Jeong Min

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a method for using Adobe Acrobat to make high-resolution and high-quality line art images. High-resolution and high-quality line art images for radiology journal submission can be generated using Adobe Acrobat as a steppingstone, and the customized PDF conversion settings can be used for converting hybrid images, including both bitmap and vector components.

  11. Ab Initio Structure Determination of the Triple Mutant (K53,56,121M) of Bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A(2) at Atomic and High Resolution Using ACORN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velmurugan,D.; Rajakannan, V.; Gayathri, D.; Banumathi, S.; Yamane, T.; Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M.; Sekar, K.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic resolution (0.97 Angstroms) data were collected for the triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} at 100 K and data extending to 1.0 Angstroms resolution were used for the present study. Accuracy of the data at high resolution allowed the structure to be solved using the program ACORN, with a random single-atom start in an ab initio manner. The phases obtained from ACORN are of good quality and revealed most of the amino acid residues. Single wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (SAD) data were also used to locate the position of the sulphurs and ACORN was run with these atomic positions as a source of phasing information. The effect of truncating the data to 1.4 and 1.45 Angstroms for input to ACORN is also examined. Larger fragments are required to trigger successful phase refinement at these lower resolutions.

  12. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single NMR image super-resolution based on extreme learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiong; Xin, Junchang; Wang, Zhongyang; Tian, Shuo; Qiu, Xuejun

    2016-10-01

    The performance limitation of MRI equipment and higher resolution demand of NMR images from radiologists have formed a strong contrast. Therefore, it is important to study the super resolution algorithm suitable for NMR images, using low costs software to replace the expensive equipment-updating. Firstly, a series of NMR images are obtained from original NMR images with original noise to the lowest resolution images with the highest noise. Then, based on extreme learning machine, the mapping relation model is constructed from lower resolution NMR images with higher noise to higher resolution NMR images with lower noise in each pair of adjacent images in the obtained image sequence. Finally, the optimal mapping model is established by the ensemble way to reconstruct the higher resolution NMR images with lower noise on the basis of original resolution NMR images with original noise. Experiments are carried out by 990111 NMR brain images in datasets NITRC, REMBRANDT, RIDER NEURO MRI, TCGA-GBM and TCGA-LGG. The performance of proposed method is compared with three approaches through 7 indexes, and the experimental results show that our proposed method has a significant improvement. Since our method considers the influence of the noise, it has 20% higher in Peak-Signal-to-Noise-Ratio comparison. As our method is sensitive to details, and has a better characteristic retention, it has higher image quality upgrade of 15% in the additional evaluation. Finally, since extreme learning machine has a celerity learning speed, our method is 46.1% faster. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Image Fusion Through Multi-Resolution Contrast Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-07

    perceptie het incest relevant zijn. Ter illustratie worden de resul- taten getoond die werden vcrkregen door de combinatie van wamte- en visuele...registered CCD and FIR images on video tape. The images were thereafter digitized and brought in register. Finally we digitally merged corresponding images...in the scene. The signals from both cameras were recorded on synchronized U-matlc video taperecorders. Image merging Fig. 9 shows the CCD (Fig. 9a

  15. ATOM - an OMERO add-on for automated import of image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipp Peter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern microscope platforms are able to generate multiple gigabytes of image data in a single experimental session. In a routine research laboratory workflow, these data are initially stored on the local acquisition computer from which files need to be transferred to the experimenter's (remote image repository (e.g., DVDs, portable hard discs or server-based storage because of limited local data storage. Although manual solutions for this migration, such as OMERO - a client-server software for visualising and managing large amounts of image data - exist, this import process may be a time-consuming and tedious task. Findings We have developed ATOM, a Java-based and thus platform-independent add-on for OMERO enabling automated transfer of image data from a wide variety of acquisition software packages into OMERO. ATOM provides a graphical user interface and allows pre-organisation of experimental data for the transfer. Conclusions ATOM is a convenient extension of the OMERO software system. An automated interface to OMERO will be a useful tool for scientists working with file formats supported by the Bio-Formats file format library, a platform-independent library for reading the most common file formats of microscope images.

  16. Image Super-Resolution Based on Sparse Representation via Direction and Edge Dictionaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sparse representation has recently attracted enormous interests in the field of image super-resolution. The sparsity-based methods usually train a pair of global dictionaries. However, only a pair of global dictionaries cannot best sparsely represent different kinds of image patches, as it neglects two most important image features: edge and direction. In this paper, we propose to train two novel pairs of Direction and Edge dictionaries for super-resolution. For single-image super-resolution, the training image patches are, respectively, divided into two clusters by two new templates representing direction and edge features. For each cluster, a pair of Direction and Edge dictionaries is learned. Sparse coding is combined with the Direction and Edge dictionaries to realize super-resolution. The above single-image super-resolution can restore the faithful high-frequency details, and the POCS is convenient for incorporating any kind of constraints or priors. Therefore, we combine the two methods to realize multiframe super-resolution. Extensive experiments on image super-resolution are carried out to validate the generality, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed method. Experimental results demonstrate that our method can recover better edge structure and details.

  17. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  18. A comparison of reconstruction methods for undersampled atomic force microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yufan; Andersson, Sean B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-raster scanning and undersampling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images is a technique for improving imaging rate and reducing the amount of tip-sample interaction needed to produce an image. Generation of the final image can be done using a variety of image processing techniques based on interpolation or optimization. The choice of reconstruction method has a large impact on the quality of the recovered image and the proper choice depends on the sample under study. In this work we compare interpolation through the use of inpainting algorithms with reconstruction based on optimization through the use of the basis pursuit algorithm commonly used for signal recovery in compressive sensing. Using four different sampling patterns found in non-raster AFM, namely row subsampling, spiral scanning, Lissajous scanning, and random scanning, we subsample data from existing images and compare reconstruction performance against the original image. The results illustrate that inpainting generally produces superior results when the image contains primarily low frequency content while basis pursuit is better when the images have mixed, but sparse, frequency content. Using support vector machines, we then classify images based on their frequency content and sparsity and, from this classification, develop a fast decision strategy to select a reconstruction algorithm to be used on subsampled data. The performance of the classification and decision test are demonstrated on test AFM images.

  19. High resolution retinal image restoration with wavefront sensing and self-extracted filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuyu; Erry, Gavin; Nemeth, Sheila; Mitra, Sunanda; Soliz, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy commonly rely on a clear view of the retina. The challenge in obtaining high quality retinal image lies in the design of the imaging system that can reduce the strong aberrations of the human eye. Since the amplitudes of human eye aberrations decrease rapidly as the aberration order goes up, it is more cost-effective to correct low order aberrations with adaptive optical devices while process high order aberrations through image processing. A cost effective fundus imaging device that can capture high quality retinal images with 2-5 times higher resolution than conventional retinal images has been designed [1]. This imager improves image quality by attaching complementary adaptive optical components to a conventional fundus camera. However, images obtained with the high resolution camera are still blurred due to some uncorrected aberrations as well as defocusing resulting from non-isoplanatic effect. Therefore, advanced image restoration algorithms have been employed for further improvement in image quality. In this paper, we use wavefront-based and self-extracted blind deconvolution techniques to restore images captured by the high resolution fundus camera. We demonstrate that through such techniques, pathologies that are critical to retinal disease diagnosis but not clear or not observable in the original image can be observed clearly in the restored images. Image quality evaluation is also used to finalize the development of a cost-effective, fast, and automated diagnostic system that can be used clinically.

  20. Femtosecond photoelectron imaging of transient electronic states and Rydberg atom emission from electronically excited he droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Bünermann, Oliver; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2011-07-14

    Ultrafast relaxation of electronically excited pure He droplets is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Droplets are excited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses with photon energies below 24 eV. Excited states and relaxation products are probed by ionization with an infrared (IR) pulse with 1.6 eV photon energy. An initially excited droplet state decays on a time scale of 220 fs, leading predominantly to the emission of unaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms. In a second relaxation channel, electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are emitted from the droplet within less than 120 fs. The experimental results are described within a model that approximates electronically excited droplet states by localized, atomic Rydberg states perturbed by the local droplet environment in which the atom is embedded. The model suggests that, below 24 eV, EUV excitation preferentially leads to states that are localized in the surface region of the droplet. Electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are expected to originate from excitations in the outermost surface regions, while nonaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms emerge from a deeper surface region with higher local densities. The model is used to simulate the He droplet EUV absorption spectrum in good agreement with previously reported fluorescence excitation measurements.

  1. Single-Molecule High-Resolution Imaging with Photobleaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew P. Gordon; Taekjip Ha; Paul R. Selvin; Gordon A. Baym

    2004-01-01

    ... of 1.5 nm with subsecond time resolution. Here we locate the position of two dyes and determine their separation with 5-nm precision, using the quantal photobleaching behavior of single fluorescent dye molecules...

  2. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  3. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, M; Sokolov, I

    2015-07-28

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7 s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  4. Finsler geometry on higher order tensor fields and applications to high angular resolution diffusion imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astola, L.; Florack, L.

    2011-01-01

    We study 3D-multidirectional images, using Finsler geometry. The application considered here is in medical image analysis, specifically in High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) (Tuch et al. in Magn. Reson. Med. 48(6):1358–1372, 2004) of the brain. The goal is to reveal the architecture

  5. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  6. High-resolution image reconstruction for GRIN rod lens probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Park, Kwan Jun; Yang, Taeseok D.; Choi, Wonshik; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Youngwoon

    2017-02-01

    Graded-index (GRIN) lenses have been widely used for developing compact imaging devices due to the small dimensions and simple optics designs. GRIN lenses, however, have intrinsic aberration which causes a distortion of the image and thus are subject to limited resolution and blurred imaging quality. Here, we employ the high-precision wavefront measurement technique for compensation of the distortion of a GRIN lens to obtain a high-resolution and high-contrast image. In doing so, we demonstrate a high-resolution and ultra-thin endo-microscope using a GRIN. A reflection-type interferometric microscope through a GRIN lens was constructed using multiple lasers (473 nm, 532 nm, and 633 nm) as light sources. The characteristics of the aberration of the GRIN lens were measured using the digital holographic method. The distortion of the GRIN lens was removed by numerical image processing with the prior information from the pre-calibration. We apply this technique to a reflection image of biological tissues acquired by our custom-built GRIN lens probe. Consequently, a diffraction limited lateral resolution as well as improved axial resolution can be achieved. Our approach will facilitate the use of GRIN lenses for compact imaging devices without compromising optical resolution and image quality.

  7. Single Image Super-Resolution by Non-Linear Sparse Representation and Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungang Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sparse representations are widely used tools in image super-resolution (SR tasks. In the sparsity-based SR methods, linear sparse representations are often used for image description. However, the non-linear data distributions in images might not be well represented by linear sparse models. Moreover, many sparsity-based SR methods require the image patch self-similarity assumption; however, the assumption may not always hold. In this paper, we propose a novel method for single image super-resolution (SISR. Unlike most prior sparsity-based SR methods, the proposed method uses non-linear sparse representation to enhance the description of the non-linear information in images, and the proposed framework does not need to assume the self-similarity of image patches. Based on the minimum reconstruction errors, support vector regression (SVR is applied for predicting the SR image. The proposed method was evaluated on various benchmark images, and promising results were obtained.

  8. Atomic resolution of structural changes in elastic crystals of copper(II) acetylacetonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Anna; Grosjean, Arnaud; Pfrunder, Michael C.; Xu, Yanan; Yan, Cheng; Edwards, Grant; Clegg, Jack K.; McMurtrie, John C.

    2018-01-01

    Single crystals are typically brittle, inelastic materials. Such mechanical responses limit their use in practical applications, particularly in flexible electronics and optical devices. Here we describe single crystals of a well-known coordination compound—copper(II) acetylacetonate—that are flexible enough to be reversibly tied into a knot. Mechanical measurements indicate that the crystals exhibit an elasticity similar to that of soft materials such as nylon, and thus display properties normally associated with both hard and soft matter. Using microfocused synchrotron radiation, we mapped the changes in crystal structure that occur on bending, and determined the mechanism that allows this flexibility with atomic precision. We show that, under strain, the molecules in the crystal reversibly rotate, and thus reorganize to allow the mechanical compression and expansion required for elasticity and still maintain the integrity of the crystal structure.

  9. Integral imaging based light field display with enhanced viewing resolution using holographic diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xingpeng; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Wen, Jun

    2017-11-01

    An integral imaging based light field display method is proposed by use of holographic diffuser, and enhanced viewing resolution is gained over conventional integral imaging systems. The holographic diffuser is fabricated with controlled diffusion characteristics, which interpolates the discrete light field of the reconstructed points to approximate the original light field. The viewing resolution can thus be improved and independent of the limitation imposed by Nyquist sampling frequency. An integral imaging system with low Nyquist sampling frequency is constructed, and reconstructed scenes of high viewing resolution using holographic diffuser are demonstrated, verifying the feasibility of the method.

  10. High time resolution measurements of the thermosphere from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the performance of CCD detectors have enabled a high time resolution study of the high latitude upper thermosphere with Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs to be performed. 10-s integration times were used during a campaign in April 2004 on an FPI located in northern Sweden in the auroral oval. The FPI is used to study the thermosphere by measuring the oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm, which emits at an altitude of approximately 240 km. Previous time resolutions have been 4 min at best, due to the cycle of look directions normally observed. By using 10 s rather than 40 s integration times, and by limiting the number of full cycles in a night, high resolution measurements down to 15 s were achievable. This has allowed the maximum variability of the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and 630.0 nm emission intensities, at approximately 240 km, to be determined as a few minutes. This is a significantly greater variability than the often assumed value of 1 h or more. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with waves with short periods. Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. At high latitudes gravity waves may be generated in-situ by localised auroral activity. Short period waves were detected in all four clear nights when this experiment was performed, in 630.0 nm intensities and thermospheric winds and temperatures. Waves with many periodicities were observed, from periods of several hours, down to 14 min. These waves were seen in all parameters over several nights, implying that this variability is a typical property of the thermosphere.

  11. Super-resolution image reconstruction applied to an active millimeter wave imaging system based on compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkuş, Ümit; Şengün Ermeydan, Esra; Şahin, Asaf Behzat; ćankaya, Ä.°lyas; Altan, Hakan

    2017-10-01

    The development of passive and active millimeter wave imaging systems is progressing rapidly fueled by the need for many applications in the area of security and defense. Imaging schemes that may either utilize array detectors or single detectors in scan architectures offer suffer from poor resolution due to the longer wavelengths used and the limits of the optical system in terms of lens and mirror dimensions. In order to overcome this limit, super-resolution techniques can be employed to enhance the resolution of the imaging system. Here, a form of this technique based on oversampling is applied to reconstruct the image of a target which is acquired using compressive sensing based on scanning the image plane using randomly patterned masks with fixed pixel sizes. The mm-wave stand-off imaging system uses a 93 GHz center frequency source and heterodyne sub-harmonic receiver place in a bi-static configuration to image a target in reflection mode. The image of the target is projected onto a mechanically scanned spatial light modulator (SLM), which is a patterned two-dimensional mask that is translated along one axis. In order to improve the resolution of the image, the masks are shifted by half the pixel size (2.5mm). To enhance the resolution of the image, the patterns are shifted by smaller steps, thereby each pixel is oversampled and the resulting new pattern and detected intensity is fed into the CS algorithm to reconstruct the image of the target. After the image reconstruction process, sharper edges are observed for a circular object of 12mm diameter compared to the image acquired by whole pixel step scanning.

  12. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-02-01

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force-distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High Resolution Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Atomic Scale: CO on Au(110) and Cu(100), and C2H2 on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Jiang, Chilun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, Wilson

    2012-11-01

    STM-IETS has been regarded as the ultimate tool to identify and characterize single molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with atomic spatial resolution. With the improvement of the energy resolution obtained at ˜600 mK, STM-IETS is able to reveal subtle interactions between the molecule and its environment which was previously not possible at higher temperatures. Here we demonstrate the capability of sub-Kelvin STM on detecting the influence of the tip as well as the anisotropy of the reconstructed Au(110) surface on the low energy hindered vibrational motions of single adsorbed CO molecule. In the case of acetylene, more vibrational modes are resolved due to the enhanced spectral resolution. Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with atomic scale spatial resolution opens new possibilities to probe molecular interactions with high spectral resolution.

  14. Michelson Interferometer for Global High-Resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Instrument Design and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Harlander, John M.; Brown, Charles M.; Marr, Kenneth D.; Miller, Ian J.; Stump, J. Eloise; Hancock, Jed; Peterson, James Q.; Kumler, Jay; Morrow, William H.; Mooney, Thomas A.; Ellis, Scott; Mende, Stephen B.; Harris, Stewart E.; Stevens, Michael H.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Harding, Brian J.; Immel, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument was built for launch and operation on the NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission. The instrument was designed to measure thermospheric horizontal wind velocity profiles and thermospheric temperature in altitude regions between 90 km and 300 km, during day and night. For the wind measurements it uses two perpendicular fields of view pointed at the Earth's limb, observing the Doppler shift of the atomic oxygen red and green lines at 630.0 nm and 557.7 nm wavelength. The wavelength shift is measured using field-widened, temperature compensated Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Het