WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic resolution images

  1. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  2. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Dandan; Kisielowski, Christian; Dou, Letian; Kornienko, Nikolay; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Wong, Andrew B; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2016-12-14

    The radiation-sensitive nature of halide perovskites has hindered structural studies at the atomic scale. We overcome this obstacle by applying low dose-rate in-line holography, which combines aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with exit-wave reconstruction. This technique successfully yields the genuine atomic structure of ultrathin two-dimensional CsPbBr3 halide perovskites, and a quantitative structure determination was achieved atom column by atom column using the phase information of the reconstructed exit-wave function without causing electron beam-induced sample alterations. An extraordinarily high image quality enables an unambiguous structural analysis of coexisting high-temperature and low-temperature phases of CsPbBr3 in single particles. On a broader level, our approach offers unprecedented opportunities to better understand halide perovskites at the atomic level as well as other radiation-sensitive materials.

  3. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  4. Atomic resolution images of solid-liquid interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Giambattista, Brian; McNairy, W. W.; Slough, C. G.; Johnson, A.; Bell, L. D.; Coleman, R. V.; Schneir, J.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Drake, B; Hansma, P K

    1987-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can provide atomic-resolution images of solids covered with a variety of liquids, including cryogenic fluids, both polar and nonpolar solvents, conductive aqueous solutions, oils, and even greases. This short overview includes images of solids covered with liquid nitrogen, liquid helium, paraffin oil, silicone oil, microscope immersion oil, silicone vacuum grease, fluorocarbon grease, glycerol, and salt water. These images show atoms, charge-density waves...

  5. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  6. High resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Campos, J D; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the optical imaging of a single atom with nanometer resolution using an adaptive optical alignment technique that is applicable to general optical microscopy. By decomposing the image of a single laser-cooled atom, we identify and correct optical aberrations in the system and realize an atomic position sensitivity of $\\approx$ 0.5 nm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom, and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus 3D particle tracking, imaging of atoms in 3D optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10$^{-24}$ N) scale.

  7. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  8. Atomic Resolution Images of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambattista, Brian; McNairy, W. W.; Slough, C. G.; Johnson, A.; Bell, L. D.; Coleman, R. V.; Schneir, J.; Sonnenfeld, R.; Drake, B.; Hansma, P. K.

    1987-07-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) can provide atomic-resolution images of solids covered with a variety of liquids, including cryogenic fluids, both polar and nonpolar solvents, conductive aqueous solutions, oils, and even greases. This short overview includes images of solids covered with liquid nitrogen, liquid helium, paraffin oil, silicone oil, microscope immersion oil, silicone vacuum grease, fluorocarbon grease, glycerol, and salt water. These images show atoms, charge-density waves, grains in an evaporated metal film, and even corrosion processes as they occur in real time. The future includes not only basic research in surface science but also applied research in lithography, lubrication, catalysis, corrosion, electrochemistry, and perhaps even biology.

  9. Atom column indexing: atomic resolution image analysis through a matrix representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Xiahan; Oni, Adedapo A; LeBeau, James M

    2014-12-01

    Here, we report the development of an approach to map atomic resolution images into a convenient matrix representation. Through the combination of two-dimensional Gaussian fitting and the projective standard deviation, atom column locations are projected onto two noncollinear reference lattice vectors that are used to assign each a unique (i, j) matrix index. By doing so, straightforward atomic resolution image analysis becomes possible. Using practical examples, we demonstrate that the matrix representation greatly simplifies categorizing atom columns to different sublattices. This enables a myriad of direct analyses, such as mapping atom column properties and correlating long-range atom column pairs. MATLAB source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/subangstrom/aci.

  10. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  11. High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Campos, J. D.; Johnson, K. G.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are used extensively in the life and physical sciences because of their ability to non-invasively capture details on the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. Such systems are often limited by source or detector noise, image distortions and human operator misjudgement. Here, we report a general, quantitative method to analyse and correct these errors. We use this method to identify and correct optical aberrations in an imaging system for single atoms and realize an atomic position sensitivity of ˜0.5 nm Hz-1/2 with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus three-dimensional particle tracking, imaging of atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10-24 N) scale.

  12. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  13. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  14. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy:The influence of the Electrostatic Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lit, J.; Cicco, F.; Hapala, P.; Jelinek, P.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules

  15. Fluorine in shark teeth: its direct atomic-resolution imaging and strengthening function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Tohei, Tetsuya; Takano, Yoshiro; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-02-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging of beam-sensitive biominerals is extremely challenging, owing to their fairly complex structures and the damage caused by electron irradiation. Herein, we overcome these difficulties by performing aberration-corrected electron microscopy with low-dose imaging techniques, and report the successful direct atomic-resolution imaging of every individual atomic column in the complex fluorapatite structure of shark tooth enameloid, which can be of paramount importance for teeth in general. We demonstrate that every individual atomic column in shark tooth enameloid can be spatially resolved, and has a complex fluorapatite structure. Furthermore, ab initio calculations show that fluorine atoms can be covalently bound to the surrounding calcium atoms, which improves understanding of their caries-reducing effects in shark teeth.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of dislocations in a nanoparticle at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Zhu, Chun; White, Edward R; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Scott, M C; Regan, B C; Marks, Laurence D; Huang, Yu; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-04-04

    Dislocations and their interactions strongly influence many material properties, ranging from the strength of metals and alloys to the efficiency of light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. Several experimental methods can be used to visualize dislocations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has long been used to image dislocations in materials, and high-resolution electron microscopy can reveal dislocation core structures in high detail, particularly in annular dark-field mode. A TEM image, however, represents a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional (3D) object (although stereo TEM provides limited information about 3D dislocations). X-ray topography can image dislocations in three dimensions, but with reduced resolution. Using weak-beam dark-field TEM and scanning TEM, electron tomography has been used to image 3D dislocations at a resolution of about five nanometres (refs 15, 16). Atom probe tomography can offer higher-resolution 3D characterization of dislocations, but requires needle-shaped samples and can detect only about 60 per cent of the atoms in a sample. Here we report 3D imaging of dislocations in materials at atomic resolution by electron tomography. By applying 3D Fourier filtering together with equal-slope tomographic reconstruction, we observe nearly all the atoms in a multiply twinned platinum nanoparticle. We observed atomic steps at 3D twin boundaries and imaged the 3D core structure of edge and screw dislocations at atomic resolution. These dislocations and the atomic steps at the twin boundaries, which appear to be stress-relief mechanisms, are not visible in conventional two-dimensional projections. The ability to image 3D disordered structures such as dislocations at atomic resolution is expected to find applications in materials science, nanoscience, solid-state physics and chemistry.

  17. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of Molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy: The Influence of the Electrostatic Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lit, Joost; Di Cicco, Francesca; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-03-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules. Specifically, we image strongly polarized molecules with negatively and positively charged tips. A contrast inversion is observed above the polar groups. By taking into account the electrostatic forces between tip and molecule, the observed contrast differences can be reproduced using a molecular mechanics model. In addition, we analyze the height dependence of the various force components contributing to the high-resolution AFM contrast.

  18. Optimal experimental design for nano-particle atom-counting from high-resolution STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; De wael, A.; Gonnissen, J.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be

    2015-04-15

    In the present paper, the principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. Binary and multiple hypothesis testing have been investigated in order to determine the limits to the precision with which the number of atoms in a projected atomic column can be estimated. The probability of error has been calculated when using STEM images, scattering cross-sections or peak intensities as a criterion to count atoms. Based on this analysis, we conclude that scattering cross-sections perform almost equally well as images and perform better than peak intensities. Furthermore, the optimal STEM detector design can be derived for atom-counting using the expression for the probability of error. We show that for very thin objects LAADF is optimal and that for thicker objects the optimal inner detector angle increases.

  19. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  20. Atomic Resolution Imaging at an Ultralow Accelerating Voltage by a Monochromatic Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shigeyuki; Mukai, Masaki; Suenaga, Kazu; Sawada, Hidetaka

    2016-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy using low-energy electrons would be very useful for atomic resolution imaging of specimens that would be damaged at higher energies. However, the resolution at low voltages is degraded because of geometrical and chromatic aberrations. In the present study, we diminish the effect of these aberrations by using a delta-type corrector and a monochromator. The dominant residual aberration in a delta-type corrector, which is the sixth-order three-lobe aberration, is counterbalanced by other threefold aberrations. Defocus spread caused by chromatic aberration is reduced by using a monochromated beam with an energy spread of 0.05 eV. We obtain images of graphene and demonstrate atomic resolution at an ultralow accelerating voltage of 15 kV.

  1. Implementing an Accurate and Rapid Sparse Sampling Approach for Low-Dose Atomic Resolution STEM Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovarik, Libor; Stevens, Andrew J.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-10-17

    Aberration correction for scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) has dramatically increased spatial image resolution for beam-stable materials, but it is the sample stability rather than the microscope that often limits the practical resolution of STEM images. To extract physical information from images of beam sensitive materials it is becoming clear that there is a critical dose/dose-rate below which the images can be interpreted as representative of the pristine material, while above it the observation is dominated by beam effects. Here we describe an experimental approach for sparse sampling in the STEM and in-painting image reconstruction in order to reduce the electron dose/dose-rate to the sample during imaging. By characterizing the induction limited rise-time and hysteresis in scan coils, we show that sparse line-hopping approach to scan randomization can be implemented that optimizes both the speed of the scan and the amount of the sample that needs to be illuminated by the beam. The dose and acquisition time for the sparse sampling is shown to be effectively decreased by factor of 5x relative to conventional acquisition, permitting imaging of beam sensitive materials to be obtained without changing the microscope operating parameters. The use of sparse line-hopping scan to acquire STEM images is demonstrated with atomic resolution aberration corrected Z-contrast images of CaCO3, a material that is traditionally difficult to image by TEM/STEM because of dose issues.

  2. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max.; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-01

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed Cc/Cs corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  3. Chromatic Aberration Correction for Atomic Resolution TEM Imaging from 20 to 80 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linck, Martin; Hartel, Peter; Uhlemann, Stephan; Kahl, Frank; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max; Niestadt, Marcel; Bischoff, Maarten; Biskupek, Johannes; Lee, Zhongbo; Lehnert, Tibor; Börrnert, Felix; Rose, Harald; Kaiser, Ute

    2016-08-12

    Atomic resolution in transmission electron microscopy of thin and light-atom materials requires a rigorous reduction of the beam energy to reduce knockon damage. However, at the same time, the chromatic aberration deteriorates the resolution of the TEM image dramatically. Within the framework of the SALVE project, we introduce a newly developed C_{c}/C_{s} corrector that is capable of correcting both the chromatic and the spherical aberration in the range of accelerating voltages from 20 to 80 kV. The corrector allows correcting axial aberrations up to fifth order as well as the dominating off-axial aberrations. Over the entire voltage range, optimum phase-contrast imaging conditions for weak signals from light atoms can be adjusted for an optical aperture of at least 55 mrad. The information transfer within this aperture is no longer limited by chromatic aberrations. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using the examples of 30 kV phase-contrast TEM images of graphene and molybdenum disulfide, showing unprecedented contrast and resolution that matches image calculations.

  4. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging.

  5. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  6. Atomic resolution imaging of beryl: an investigation of the nano-channel occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivazhagan, V; Schmitz, F D; Vullum, P E; VAN Helvoort, A T J; Holst, B

    2017-02-01

    Beryl in different varieties (emerald, aquamarine, heliodor etc.) displays a wide range of colours that have fascinated humans throughout history. Beryl is a hexagonal cyclo-silicate (ring-silicate) with channels going through the crystal along the c-axis. The channels are about 0.5 nm in diameter and can be occupied by water and alkali ions. Pure beryl (Be3 Al2 Si6 O18 ) is colourless (variety goshenite). The characteristic colours are believed to be mainly generated through substitutions with metal atoms in the lattice. Which atoms that are substituted is still debated it has been proposed that metal ions may also be enclosed in the channels and that this can also contribute to the crystal colouring. So far spectroscopy studies have not been able to fully answer this. Here we present the first experiments using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope imaging (STEM) to investigate the channel occupation in beryl. We present images of a natural beryl crystal (variety heliodor) from the Bin Thuan Province in Vietnam. The channel occupation can be visualized. Based on the image contrast in combination with ex situ element analysis we suggest that some or all of the atoms that are visible in the channels are Fe ions.

  7. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  8. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-03-01

    We present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  9. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  10. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kohno, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Cardamone, L.A. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO{sub 3}. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH{sub 2} and lithium columns in Al{sub 3}Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles. - Author-Highlights: • We present a method for enhancing the visibility and reliability of imaging light elements in STEM. • The method involves taking the difference between signals on separate bright field detectors. • Experimental data for LaAlO{sub 3} are presented, and are shown to compare favourably with simulation. • Optimum imaging parameters are explored through simulation.

  11. Atomic resolution imaging of YAlO3: Ce in the chromatic and spherical aberration corrected PICO electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Barthel, Juri; Jia, Chun-Lin; Urban, Knut W

    2017-01-31

    The application of combined chromatic and spherical aberration correction in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy enables a significant improvement of the spatial resolution down to 50 pm. We demonstrate that such a resolution can be achieved in practice at 200kV. Diffractograms of images of gold nanoparticles on amorphous carbon demonstrate corresponding information transfer. The Y atom pairs in [010] oriented yttrium orthoaluminate are successfully imaged together with the Al and the O atoms. Although the 57 pm pair separation is well demonstrated separations between 55 pm and 80 pm are measured. This observation is tentatively attributed to structural relaxations and surface reconstruction in the very thin samples used. Quantification of the resolution limiting effective image spread is achieved based on an absolute match between experimental and simulated image intensity distributions.

  12. Quantitative annular dark-field imaging of single-layer graphene-II: atomic-resolution image contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shunsuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Kikkawa, Jun; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated how accurately atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) images match between experiments and simulations to conduct more reliable crystal structure analyses. Quantitative ADF imaging, in which the ADF intensity at each pixel represents the fraction of the incident probe current, allows us to perform direct comparisons with simulations without the use of fitting parameters. Although the conventional comparison suffers from experimental uncertainties such as an amorphous surface layer and specimen thickness, in this study we eliminated such uncertainties by using a single-layer graphene as a specimen. Furthermore, to reduce image distortion and shot noises in experimental images, multiple acquisitions with drift correction were performed, and the atomic ADF contrast was quantitatively acquired. To reproduce the experimental ADF contrast, we used three distribution functions as the effective source distribution in simulations. The optimum distribution function and its full-width at half-maximum were evaluated by measuring the residuals between the experimental and simulated images. It was found that the experimental images could be explained well by a linear combination of a Gaussian function and a Lorentzian function with a longer tail than the Gaussian function.

  13. Atomic force microscopy with nanoelectrode tips for high resolution electrochemical, nanoadhesion and nanoelectrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Michael R.; Chen, Yikai; Mark, Andreas; Gödrich, Sebastian; Stelling, Christian; Jiang, Jingjing; Poddar, Rakesh; Li, Chunzeng; Kumar, Ravi; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Huang, Zhuangqun; Xiang, Chengxiang; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal nano-imaging in electrochemical environments is important across many areas of science and technology. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) platform with a nanoelectrode probe is reported. In combination with PeakForce tapping AFM mode, the simultaneous characterization of surface topography, quantitative nanomechanics, nanoelectronic properties, and electrochemical activity is demonstrated. The nanoelectrode probe is coated with dielectric materials and has an exposed conical Pt tip apex of ∼200 nm in height and of ∼25 nm in end-tip radius. These characteristic dimensions permit sub-100 nm spatial resolution for electrochemical imaging. With this nanoelectrode probe we have extended AFM-based nanoelectrical measurements to liquid environments. Experimental data and numerical simulations are used to understand the response of the nanoelectrode probe. With PeakForce SECM, we successfully characterized a surface defect on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode showing correlated topographical, electrochemical and nanomechanical information at the highest AFM-SECM resolution. The SECM nanoelectrode also enabled the measurement of heterogeneous electrical conductivity of electrode surfaces in liquid. These studies extend the basic understanding of heterogeneity on graphite/graphene surfaces for electrochemical applications.

  14. 'Sub-atomic' resolution of non-contact atomic force microscope images induced by a heterogeneous tip structure: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbellová, Anna; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, Pablo; Pérez, Rubén; Klapetek, Petr; Jelínek, Pavel

    2011-07-22

    A Si adatom on a Si(111)-(7 × 7) reconstructed surface is a typical atomic feature that can rather easily be imaged by a non-contact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM) and can be thus used to test the atomic resolution of the microscope. Based on our first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that the structure of the termination of the AFM tip plays a decisive role in determining the appearance of the adatom image. We show how the AFM image changes depending on the tip-surface distance and the composition of the atomic apex at the end of the tip. We also demonstrate that contaminated tips may give rise to image patterns displaying so-called 'sub-atomic' features even in the attractive force regime.

  15. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  16. AFM's path to atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We review progress in improving the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) under vacuum. After an introduction to the basic imaging principle and a conceptual comparison to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we outline the main challenges of AFM as well as the solutions that have evolved in the first 20 years of its existence. Some crucial steps along AFM's path toward higher resolution are discussed, followed by an outlook on current and future applications.

  17. Achieving atomic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Spence

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the nanotube in 19915 by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM, following closely on the discovery of fullerenes, has initiated a new field of science known as nanoscience. (In fact the fullerene buckyball itself was first observed in 1980, by HREM1. While nanoscience now spans many disciplines, from molecular biology to quantum computing, for all of them, the HREM technique has become the indispensable tool for analyzing the atomic structure of individual bulk nanostructural elements. However this method has long been the technique of choice whenever questions of microstructural characterization arise in materials science.

  18. Understanding 2D atomic resolution imaging of the calcite surface in water by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Spijker, Peter; Miyata, Kazuki; Reischl, Bernhard; Federici Canova, Filippo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Fukuma, Takeshi; Foster, Adam S.

    2016-10-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) experiments were performed on the calcite (10\\bar{1}4) surface in pure water, and a detailed analysis was made of the 2D images at a variety of frequency setpoints. We observed eight different contrast patterns that reproducibly appeared in different experiments and with different measurement parameters. We then performed systematic free energy calculations of the same system using atomistic molecular dynamics to obtain an effective force field for the tip-surface interaction. By using this force field in a virtual AFM simulation we found that each experimental contrast could be reproduced in our simulations by changing the setpoint, regardless of the experimental parameters. This approach offers a generic method for understanding the wide variety of contrast patterns seen on the calcite surface in water, and is generally applicable to AFM imaging in liquids.

  19. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; van den Bos, K H W; Van den Broek, W; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-12-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  20. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  1. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  2. A low noise all-fiber interferometer for high resolution frequency modulated atomic force microscopy imaging in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Haider I; Wilkinson, Paul R; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a low noise all-fiber interferometer for use as the deflection sensor in liquid environment frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). A detailed description and rationale for the choice of the critical components are provided along with the design of a simple alignment assembly. The optimization of the deflection sensor toward achieving the highest possible sensitivity and lowest deflection noise density is discussed in the context of an ideal interference cavity. Based on the provided analysis we have achieved deflection noise densities of 2 fm/square root(Hz) on commercially available cantilevers in both ambient and liquid environments. The low noise interferometer works without the need for differential detection, special focusing lenses, or polarization sensitive optics, dramatically simplifying measurements. True atomic resolution imaging of muscovite mica by FM-AFM in water is demonstrated using the developed deflection sensor.

  3. Can Atomic Force Microscopy Achieve Atomic Resolution in Contact Mode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, M. R.; Pérez, Rubén; Payne, M. C.

    2001-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy operating in the contact mode is studied using total-energy pseudopotential calculations. It is shown that, in the case of a diamond tip and a diamond surface, it is possible for a tip terminated by a single atom to sustain forces in excess of 30 nN. It is also shown that imaging at atomic resolution may be limited by blunting of the tip during lateral scanning.

  4. Ghost Imaging with Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khakimov, R I; Shin, D K; Hodgman, S S; Dall, R G; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a technique -- first realized in quantum optics -- in which the image emerges from cross-correlation between particles in two separate beams. One beam passes through the object to a bucket (single-pixel) detector, while the second beam's spatial profile is measured by a high resolution (multi-pixel) detector but never interacts with the object. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. However, until now ghost imaging has only been demonstrated with photons. Here we report the first realisation of ghost imaging of an object using massive particles. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms, originating from two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) via $s$-wave scattering. We use the higher-order Kapitza-Dirac effect to generate the large number of correlated atom pairs required, enabling the creation of a ghost image with good visibility and sub-millimetre resolution. Future extensions could include ghost interfe...

  5. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Structural Ordering in a Complex Metal Oxide Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-08-28

    The determination of the atomic structure of a functional material is crucial to understanding its "structure-to-property" relationship (e.g., the active sites in a catalyst), which is however challenging if the structure possesses complex inhomogeneities. Here, we report an atomic structure study of an important MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst that is potentially useful for the industrially relevant propane-based BP/SOHIO process. We combined aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with synchrotron powder X-ray crystallography to explore the structure at both nanoscopic and macroscopic scales. At the nanoscopic scale, this material exhibits structural and compositional order within nanosized "domains", while the domains show disordered distribution at the macroscopic scale. We proposed that the intradomain compositional ordering and the interdomain electric dipolar interaction synergistically induce the displacement of Te atoms in the Mo-V-O channels, which determines the geometry of the multifunctional metal oxo-active sites.

  6. Molecular Resolution of Zeolite Surfaces as Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-15

    absorption of molecules may for our AFM study. The techniques required to use phenmenaAFM for synthetic crystals that are currently available... clinoptilolite ) single crystal by imaging with an AFM under water, salt solutions, and alcohols. 7 Previously, - AFMs have been used to nondestructively

  7. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    Progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology requires tools that enable the imaging and manipulation of matter at the atomic and molecular scale. During the last two decades or so, scanning probe-based techniques have proven to be particularly versatile in this regard. Among the various probe-based approaches, atomic force microscopy (AFM) stands out in many ways, including the total number of citations and the breadth of possible applications, ranging from materials characterization to nanofabrication and biological studies. However, while nanometer scale operation in different environments became routine, atomic resolution imaging remained elusive for a long time. The reason for this initial deficiency was that contact with the sample blunts atomically sharp tips, which are mandatory for successful atomic resolution imaging. This problem was overcome in the mid-1990s with the introduction of noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), which represents a version of AFM where the cantilever is oscillated close to the sample surface without actually 'touching' it. This allows the preservation of the atomic sharpness of the tip while interaction-induced changes in the cantilever's resonance frequency are used to quantify the tip-sample distance. Since then, progress has been steady and includes the development of commercial instruments as well as the addition of many new capabilities beyond imaging, such as the identification and manipulation of individual atoms. A series of annual international conferences, starting in Osaka in 1998, have contributed significantly to this outstanding performance. The program of the most recent conference from this series, held in Madrid on 15-19 September 2008, reflects the maturity of this field, with an increasing number of groups developing strong activities that involve novel approaches and applications covering areas well beyond the original vacuum-based imaging. In this special issue of Nanotechnology we present a selection of

  8. Optimized absorption imaging of mesoscopic atomic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessel, Wolfgang; Strobel, Helmut; Joos, Maxime; Nicklas, Eike; Stroescu, Ion; Tomkovič, Jiří; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the optimization of high-intensity absorption imaging for small Bose-Einstein condensates. The imaging calibration exploits the linear scaling of the quantum projection noise with the mean number of atoms for a coherent spin state. After optimization for atomic clouds containing up to 300 atoms, we find an atom number resolution of atoms, mainly limited by photon shot noise and radiation pressure.

  9. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuaki Tsuruyama

    Full Text Available It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  10. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  11. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  12. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  13. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik W.; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G.; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  14. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, Timothy J., E-mail: tpennycook@gmail.com [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lupini, Andrew R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Yang, Hao [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Murfitt, Matthew F. [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Jones, Lewys [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D. [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested.

  15. Imaging of microwave fields using ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Boehi, Pascal; Haensch, Theodor W; Treutlein, Philipp; 10.1063/1.3470591

    2010-01-01

    We report a technique that uses clouds of ultracold atoms as sensitive, tunable, and non-invasive probes for microwave field imaging with micrometer spatial resolution. The microwave magnetic field components drive Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions whose frequency can be tuned with a static magnetic field. Readout is accomplished using state-selective absorption imaging. Quantitative data extraction is simple and it is possible to reconstruct the distribution of microwave magnetic field amplitudes and phases. While we demonstrate 2d imaging, an extension to 3d imaging is straightforward. We use the method to determine the microwave near-field distribution around a coplanar waveguide integrated on an atom chip.

  16. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This is especially relevant for closely packed ensembles of atoms where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a m...

  17. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  18. ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPY AND REAL ATOMIC-RESOLUTION - SIMPLE COMPUTER-SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOUTSOS, [No Value; MANIAS, E; TENBRINKE, G; HADZIIOANNOU, G

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its regis

  19. Spatial resolution in atom probe tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Baptiste; de Geuser, Frederic; La Fontaine, Alex; Stephenson, Leigh T; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses gaps in definitions and a lack of standard measurement techniques to assess the spatial resolution in atom probe tomography. This resolution is known to be anisotropic, being better in the depth than laterally. Generally the presence of atomic planes in the tomographic reconstruction is considered as being a sufficient proof of the quality of the spatial resolution of the instrument. Based on advanced spatial distribution maps, an analysis methodology that interrogates the local neighborhood of the atoms within the tomographic reconstruction, it is shown how both the in-depth and the lateral resolution can be quantified. The influences of the crystallography and the temperature are investigated, and models are proposed to explain the observed results. We demonstrate that the absolute value of resolution is specimenspecific.

  20. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C

    2015-04-01

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed.

  1. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  2. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjung [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Chelikowsky, James R. [Center for Computational Materials, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, and Departments of Physics and Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule.

  3. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  4. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Streed, E W; Norton, B G; Kielpinski, D

    2012-01-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebula. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in vacuum. The simplicity of this system lets us compare our results directly to quantum theory, unlike recent work on absorption imaging of single molecules. The observed image contrast of 3.1(3)% achieved the maximum allowed by quantum theory for our setup, while the imaging resolution was on the order of the 370 nm illumination wavelength. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing (QIP). Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and x-ray regimes. In particular, the dynamics of chromatin in living cells could be imaged without delivering a lethal UV dose.

  5. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  6. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  7. Stitching Grid-wise Atomic Force Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mathias Zacho; Bengtson, Stefan Hein; Pedersen, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are able to capture images with a resolution in the nano metre scale. Due to this high resolution, the covered area per image is relatively small, which can be problematic when surveying a sample. A system able to stitch AFM images has been developed to solve...

  8. Imaging techniques: Nanoparticle atoms pinpointed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farle, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The locations of atoms in a metallic alloy nanoparticle have been determined using a combination of electron microscopy and image simulation, revealing links between the particle's structure and magnetic properties. See Letter p.75

  9. What atomic resolution annular dark field imaging can tell us about gold nanoparticles on TiO{sub 2} (1 1 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging was recently applied to a catalyst consisting of gold nanoparticles on TiO{sub 2} (1 1 0), showing directly that the gold atoms in small nanoparticles preferentially attach to specific sites on the TiO{sub 2} (1 1 0) surface. Here, through simulation, a parameter exploration of the imaging conditions which maximise the visibility of such nanoparticles is presented. Aberration correction, finite source size and profile imaging are all considered while trying to extracting the maximum amount of information from a given sample. Comment is made on the role of the thermal vibration of the atoms in the nanoparticle, the magnitude of which is generally not known a priori but which affects the visibility of the nanoparticles in this imaging mode.

  10. Atomic resolution in noncontact AFM by probing cantilever frequency shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yong Xie

    2007-01-01

    Rutile TiO2(001) quantum dots (or nano-marks) in different shapes were used to imitate uncleaved material surfaces or materials with rough surfaces. By numerical integration of the equation of motion of cantilever for silicon tip scanning along the [110] direction over the rutile TiO2 (001) quantum dots in ultra high vacuum (UHV), scanning routes were explored to achieve atomic resolution from frequency shift image. The tip-surface interaction forces were calculated from Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential by the Hamaker summation method. The calculated results showed that atomic resolution could be achieved by frequency shift image for TiO2 (001) surfaces of rhombohedral quantum dot scanning in a vertical route, and spherical cap quantum dot scanning in a superposition route.

  11. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  12. Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0045 Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules Martin Centurion UNIVERSITY OF NEBRSKA Final Report 01/12...Ultrafast Imaging of Electronic Motion in Atoms and Molecules 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...a gaseous target of atoms or molecules . An optical setup was designed and constructed to compensate for the blurring of the temporal resolution due

  13. Atomic resolution 3D electron diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; O' Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Electron lens aberration is the major barrier limiting the resolution of electron microscopy. Here we describe a novel form of electron microscopy to overcome electron lens aberration. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a 2 x 2 x 2 unit cell nano-crystal (framework of LTA [Al12Si12O48]8) can be ab initio determined at the resolution of 1 Angstrom from a series of simulated noisy diffraction pattern projections with rotation angles ranging from -70 degrees to +70 degrees in 5 degrees increments along a single rotation axis. This form of microscopy (which we call 3D electron diffraction microscopy) does not require any reference waves, and can image the 3D structure of nanocrystals, as well as non-crystalline biological and materials science samples, with the resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction.

  14. X-ray holography with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegze, Miklós; Faigel, Gyula

    1996-03-01

    DIFFRACTION methods for crystallographic structure determination suffer from the so-called 'phase problem'; a diffraction pattern provides intensity but not phase information for the scattered beams, and therefore cannot be uniquely inverted to obtain the crystal structure of a sample. Holographic methods1, on the other hand, offer a means of extracting both intensity and phase information. To be useful for crystallographic applications, holography must be implemented with radiation of sufficiently small wavelength to resolve atomic-scale features2. One method, electron-emission holography3-9, uses electron waves and is a powerful tool for studying surface structure; but it cannot image the internal structure of solids because of complications arising from the highly anisotropic nature of electron scattering processes. A proposed alternative method uses X-rays2,10-13, which scatter more isotropically than electrons. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of atomic-scale X-ray holography by obtaining direct images of the three-dimensional arrangement of strontium atoms in the cubic perovskite SrTiO3. With more intense synchrotron sources for illumination, and with the development of improved X-ray detectors, X-ray holography should become a powerful general technique for unambiguous structure determination in condensed matter systems.

  15. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  16. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  17. Modeling noncontact atomic force microscopy resolution on corrugated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Burson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Key developments in NC-AFM have generally involved atomically flat crystalline surfaces. However, many surfaces of technological interest are not atomically flat. We discuss the experimental difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images of rough surfaces, with amorphous SiO2 as a specific case. We develop a quasi-1-D minimal model for noncontact atomic force microscopy, based on van der Waals interactions between a spherical tip and the surface, explicitly accounting for the corrugated substrate (modeled as a sinusoid. The model results show an attenuation of the topographic contours by ~30% for tip distances within 5 Å of the surface. Results also indicate a deviation from the Hamaker force law for a sphere interacting with a flat surface.

  18. Super Resolution Imaging Applied to Scientific Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    investigator, (3) development of Papoulis -Gerchberg method to implement the analytic continuation of spectral details, (4) exploration of contourlet and...off with noise present in the observation. In [30] we make use of Papoulis -Gerchberg algorithm of signal extrapolation to perform Image super...we have used a training database consisting of high resolution images. For Papoulis -Gerchberg method number of iterations and the filter used both

  19. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  20. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  1. Programmable resolution imager for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Elisenda; Soriano, German; Espejo, Servando; Dominguez-Castro, Rafael; Linan, Gustavo; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel

    2000-05-01

    In this paper a programmable imager with averaging capabilities will be described which is intended for averaging of different groups or sets of pixels formed by n X n kernels, n X m kernels or any group of randomly- selected pixels across the array. This imager is a 64 X 64 array which uses passive pixels with electronic shutter and anti-blooming structure that can be randomly accessed. The read-out stage includes a sole charge amplifier with programmable gain, a sample-and-hold structure and an analog buffer. This read-out structure is different from other existing imagers with variable resolution since it uses a sole charge amplifier, whereas the conventional structure employs an opamp per column plus another global opamp. this architecture allows a reduction of the fixed-pattern noise observed in standard imagers. The prototype also includes an analog to digital converter which provides the digital output of the images.

  2. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  3. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel;

    2010-01-01

    on the lattice and identify individual excitations with high fidelity. A comparison of the radial density and variance distributions with theory provides a precise in situ temperature and entropy measurement from single images. We observe Mott-insulating plateaus with near-zero entropy and clearly resolve...... in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution...

  4. High-resolution ophthalmic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Carrano, Carmen J.

    2007-12-04

    A system for providing an improved resolution retina image comprising an imaging camera for capturing a retina image and a computer system operatively connected to the imaging camera, the computer producing short exposures of the retina image and providing speckle processing of the short exposures to provide the improved resolution retina image. The system comprises the steps of capturing a retina image, producing short exposures of the retina image, and speckle processing the short exposures of the retina image to provide the improved resolution retina image.

  5. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  6. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms. Limita

  7. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genz, Florian; Niermann, Tore; Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert; Lehmann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30nm and a fringe spacing of 30pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability.

  8. Super resolution of images and video

    CERN Document Server

    Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on the super resolution of images and video. The authors' use of the term super resolution (SR) is used to describe the process of obtaining a high resolution (HR) image, or a sequence of HR images, from a set of low resolution (LR) observations. This process has also been referred to in the literature as resolution enhancement (RE). SR has been applied primarily to spatial and temporal RE, but also to hyperspectral image enhancement. This book concentrates on motion based spatial RE, although the authors also describe motion free and hyperspectral image SR problems. Also exa

  9. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  10. Statistiscal Experimental Design for Quantitative Atomic Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, S.

    2003-01-01

    Statistical experimental design is applied to set up quantitative atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments. In such experiments, observations of the atomic structure of the object under study are always subject to spontaneous fluctuations. As a result of these fluctuations, the

  11. Imaging and manipulation of single viruses by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Roos, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in virus research and the application of functional viral particles in nanotechnology and medicine rely on sophisticated imaging and manipulation techniques at nanometre resolution in liquid, air and vacuum. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a tool that combines these requirem

  12. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Florian, E-mail: florian.genz@physik.tu-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Niermann, Tore [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30 nm and a fringe spacing of 30 pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability. - Highlights: • Investigation of optimum biprism position implementation into state-of-the-art TEM. • Reduction of artefacts, especially vignetting in double-biprism electron holography. • Biprism vibration and most stable imaging conditions in double-biprism holography. • Demonstration of the optimized double-biprism setup using a thin GaN-foil.

  13. Ultrahigh Resolution 3-Dimensional Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop innovative instrumentation for the rapid, 3-dimensional imaging of biological tissues with cellular resolution. Our approach...

  14. High-resolution dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquids with different feedback architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Melcher

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent achievement of atomic resolution with dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM [Fukuma et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 87, 034101], where quality factors of the oscillating probe are inherently low, challenges some accepted beliefs concerning sensitivity and resolution in dAFM imaging modes. Through analysis and experiment we study the performance metrics for high-resolution imaging with dAFM in liquid media with amplitude modulation (AM, frequency modulation (FM and drive-amplitude modulation (DAM imaging modes. We find that while the quality factors of dAFM probes may deviate by several orders of magnitude between vacuum and liquid media, their sensitivity to tip–sample forces can be remarkable similar. Furthermore, the reduction in noncontact forces and quality factors in liquids diminishes the role of feedback control in achieving high-resolution images. The theoretical findings are supported by atomic-resolution images of mica in water acquired with AM, FM and DAM under similar operating conditions.

  15. High Resolution Image Reconstruction from Projection of Low Resolution Images DIffering in Subpixel Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple algorithm that projects low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithm is very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. used in projection yield comparable results. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum a posterior (MAP) algorithms. The algorithm is robust and is not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  16. High resolution image reconstruction from projection of low resolution images differing in subpixel shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate simple algorithms that project low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithms are very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. are used in projection. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithms. The algorithms are robust and are not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  17. Finite atomic lattices and resolutions of monomial ideals

    CERN Document Server

    Mapes, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we primarily study monomial ideals and their minimal free resolutions by studying their associated LCM lattices. In particular, we formally define the notion of coordinatizing a finite atomic lattice P to produce a monomial ideal whose LCM lattice is P, and we give a complete characterization of all such coordinatizations. We prove that all relations in the lattice L(n) of all finite atomic lattices with n ordered atoms can be realized as deformations of exponents of monomial ideals. We also give structural results for L(n). Moreover, we prove that the cellular structure of a minimal free resolution of a monomial ideal M can be extended to minimal resolutions of certain monomial ideals whose LCM lattices are greater than that of M in L(n).

  18. Communication: Neutral atom imaging using a pulsed electromagnetic lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jamie R.; Anciaux, Erik M.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on progress towards a neutral atom imaging device that will be used for chemically sensitive surface microscopy and nanofabrication. Our novel technique for improving refractive power and correcting chromatic aberration in atom lenses is based on a fundamental paradigm shift from continuous-beam focusing to a pulsed, three-dimensional approach. Simulations of this system suggest that it will pave the way toward the long-sought goal of true atom imaging on the nanoscale. Using a prototype lens with a supersonic beam of metastable neon, we have imaged complex patterns with lower distortion and higher resolution than has been shown in any previous experiment. Comparison with simulations corroborates the underlying theory and encourages further refinement of the process.

  19. Low-resolution density maps from atomic models: how stepping "back" can be a step "forward".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, D M; Kumar, A; Folk, J T; Smith, T J; Baker, T S

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-resolution structures have had a tremendous impact on modern biological science. Much useful information also has been gleaned by merging and correlating atomic-resolution structural details with lower-resolution (15-40 A), three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions computed from images recorded with cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) procedures. One way to merge these structures involves reducing the resolution of an atomic model to a level comparable to a cryoTEM reconstruction. A low-resolution density map can be derived from an atomic-resolution structure by retrieving a set of atomic coordinates editing the coordinate file, computing structure factors from the model coordinates, and computing the inverse Fourier transform of the structure factors. This method is a useful tool for structural studies primarily in combination with 3D cryoTEM reconstructions. It has been used to assess the quality of 3D reconstructions, to determine corrections for the phase-contrast transfer function of the transmission electron microscope, to calibrate the dimensions and handedness of 3D reconstructions, to produce difference maps, to model features in macromolecules or macromolecular complexes, and to generate models to initiate model-based determination of particle orientation and origin parameters for 3D reconstruction.

  20. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  1. Super-resolution reconstruction of hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakary, Mohamed; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2007-04-01

    Hyperspectral imagery is used for a wide variety of applications, including target detection, tacking, agricultural monitoring and natural resources exploration. The main reason for using hyperspectral imagery is that these images reveal spectral information about the scene that are not available in a single band. Unfortunately, many factors such as sensor noise and atmospheric scattering degrade the spatial quality of these images. Recently, many algorithms are introduced in the literature to improve the resolution of hyperspectral images [7]. In this paper, we propose a new method to produce high resolution bands from low resolution bands that are strongly correlated to the corresponding high resolution panchromatic image. The proposed method is based on using the local correlation instead of using the global correlation to improve the estimated interpolation in order to construct the high resolution image. The utilization of local correlation significantly improved the resolution of high resolution images when compared to the corresponding results obtained using the traditional algorithms. The local correlation is implemented by using predefined small windows across the low resolution image. In addition, numerous experiments are conducted to investigate the effect of the chosen window size in the image quality. Experiments results obtained using real life hyperspectral imagery is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy of the intergranular structure of a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-silicon nitride ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, A.; Kisielowski, C.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) employing focus-variation phase-reconstruction methods is used to image the atomic structure of grain boundaries in a silicon nitride ceramic at a resolution of 0.8 Angstrom

  3. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  4. Polarization imaging with enhanced spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, A.; Lizana, A.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and the experimental implementation of a new imaging set-up, based on Liquid Crystal technology, able to obtain super-resolved polarimetric images of polarimetric samples when the resolution is detector limited. The proposed set-up is a combination of two modules. One of them is an imaging Stokes polarimeter, based on Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal cells, which is used to analyze the polarization spatial distribution of an incident beam. The other module is used to obtain high resolved intensity images of the sample in an optical system whose resolution is mainly limited by the CCD pixel geometry. It contains a calibrated Parallel Aligned Liquid Crystal on Silicon display employed to introduce controlled linear phases. As a result, a set of different low resolved intensity images with sub-pixel displacements are captured by the CCD. By properly combining these images and after applying a deconvolution process, a super-resolved intensity image of the object is obtained. Finally, the combination of the two different optical modules permits to employ super-resolved images during the polarimetric data reduction calculation, leading to a final polarization image with enhanced spatial resolution. The proposed optical set-up performance is implemented and experimentally validated by providing super-resolved images of an amplitude resolution test and a birefringent resolution test. A significant improvement in the spatial resolution (by a factor of 1.4) of the obtained polarimetric images, in comparison with the images obtained with the regular imaging system, is clearly observed when applying our proposed technique.

  5. Structural High-resolution Satellite Image Indexing

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Gui-Song; YANG, WEN; Delon, Julie; Gousseau, Yann; Sun, Hong; Maître, Henri

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Satellite images with high spatial resolution raise many challenging issues in image understanding and pattern recognition. First, they allow measurement of small objects maybe up to 0.5 m, and both texture and geometrical structures emerge simultaneously. Second, objects in the same type of scenes might appear at different scales and orientations. Consequently, image indexing methods should combine the structure and texture information of images and comply with some i...

  6. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles. The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep. This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing. Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  7. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  8. Effect of hydration film on scanning images of atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A standard calibration grating was used for image scanning to investigate the effect of hydration films on imaging resolution by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The results showed that the hydration films greatly affect the imaging resolution for the tapping mode, but no evident effect on the contact mode. The possible reasons for the effect of hydration films on scanning images of AFM are also brought forward here.

  9. Near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM for molecular virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryc, Corey F; Chen, Dong-Hua; Chiu, Wah

    2011-08-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is a technique in structural biology that is widely used to solve the three-dimensional structures of macromolecular assemblies, close to their biological and solution conditions. Recent improvements in cryo-EM and single-particle reconstruction methodologies have led to the determination of several virus structures at near-atomic resolution (3.3 - 4.6 Å). These cryo-EM structures not only resolve the Cα backbones and side-chain densities of viral capsid proteins, but also suggest functional roles that the protein domains and some key amino acid residues play. This paper reviews the recent advances in near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM for probing the mechanisms of virus assembly and morphogenesis.

  10. Electron microscopy of gold nanoparticles at atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azubel, Maia; Koivisto, Jaakko; Malola, Sami; Bushnell, David; Hura, Greg L.; Koh, Ai Leen; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Tsukuda, Tatsuya; Pettersson, Mika; Häkkinen, Hannu; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is necessary for understanding their physical and chemical properties, and only one AuNP larger than 1 nm in diameter, an Au102NP, has been solved to atomic resolution. Whereas the Au102NP structure was determined by X-ray crystallography, other large AuNPs have proved refractory to this approach. Here we report the structure determination of an Au68NP at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), performed with the use of a minimal electron dose, an approach that should prove applicable to metal NPs in general. The structure of the Au68NP was supported by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and by comparison of observed infrared (IR) absorption spectra with calculations by density functional theory (DFT). PMID:25146285

  11. Towards quantitative, atomic-resolution reconstruction of the electrostatic potential via differential phase contrast using electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, R.; Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Differential phase contrast images in scanning transmission electron microscopy can be directly and quantitatively related to the gradient of the projected specimen potential provided that (a) the specimen can be treated as a phase object and (b) full 2D diffraction patterns as a function of probe position can be obtained. Both are challenging to achieve in atomic resolution imaging. The former is fundamentally limited by probe spreading and dynamical electron scattering, and we explore its validity domain in the context of atomic resolution differential phase contrast imaging. The latter, for which proof-of-principle experimental data sets exist, is not yet routine. We explore the extent to which more established segmented detector geometries can instead be used to reconstruct a quantitatively good approximation to the projected specimen potential. - Highlights: • Atomic-resolution differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging explored via simulation. • Phase-object approximation limits quantification to specimens a few nanometers thick. • Segmented detectors give good estimates of the diffraction pattern's first moment.

  12. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  13. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. THz Detection and Imaging using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher; Sibalic, Nikola; Kondo, Jorge; de Melo, Natalia; Adams, Charles; Weatherill, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Atoms make excellent electromagnetic field sensors because each atom of the same isotope is identical and has well-studied, permanent properties allowing calibration to SI units. Thus far, atoms have not generally been exploited for terahertz detection because transitions from the atomic ground state are constrained to a limited selection of microwave and optical frequencies. In contrast, highly excited `Rydberg' states allow us access to many strong, electric dipole transitions from the RF to THz regimes. Recent advances in the coherent optical detection of Rydberg atoms have been exploited by a number of groups for precision microwave electrometry Here we report the demonstration of a room-temperature, cesium Rydberg gas as a THz to optical interface. We present two configurations: First, THz-induced fluorescence offers non-destructive and direct imaging of the THz field, providing real-time, single shot images. Second, we convert narrowband terahertz photons to infrared photons with 6% quantum efficiency allowing us to use nano-Watts of THz power to control micro-Watts of laser power on microsecond timescales. Exploiting hysteresis and a room-temperature phase transition in the response of the medium, we demonstrate a latching optical memory for sub pico-Joule THz pulses.

  15. Does resolution really increase image quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisse, Christel-Loïc; Guichard, Frédéric; Cao, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A general trend in the CMOS image sensor market is for increasing resolution (by having a larger number of pixels) while keeping a small form factor by shrinking photosite size. This article discusses the impact of this trend on some of the main attributes of image quality. The first example is image sharpness. A smaller pitch theoretically allows a larger limiting resolution which is derived from the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). But recent sensor technologies (1.75μm, and soon 1.45μm) with typical aperture f/2.8 are clearly reaching the size of the diffraction blur spot. A second example is the impact on pixel light sensitivity and image sensor noise. For photonic noise, the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) is typically a decreasing function of the resolution. To evaluate whether shrinking pixel size could be beneficial to the image quality, the tradeoff between spatial resolution and light sensitivity is examined by comparing the image information capacity of sensors with varying pixel size. A theoretical analysis that takes into consideration measured and predictive models of pixel performance degradation and improvement associated with CMOS imager technology scaling, is presented. This analysis is completed by a benchmarking of recent commercial sensors with different pixel technologies.

  16. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Ryo, E-mail: ishikawa@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lupini, Andrew R. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinuma, Yoyo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, 328 Ferris Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To fully understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation. - Highlights: • We theoretically demonstrate 3D near-atomic depth resolution imaging by large-angle illumination STEM. • This method can be useful to identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies within materials. • This method can be useful to determine reconstructed surface atomic structures.

  17. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  18. Atomic-focuser imaging in electron nanodiffraction from carbon nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley

    2000-03-01

    When nanodiffraction patterns are obtained by transmission through the top and bottom walls of near-spherical, hollow carbon nano-shells, using the focused probe of a STEM instrument, a graphitic crystal in one wall may act as an atomic focuser to produce high-resolution images of small regions of the other wall within the central beam and the diffraction disks of the nanodiffraction pattern. A theoretical analysis of the imaging process is given. Images showing one- and two-dimensional periodicities, with fringe spacings as small as 0.124 nm, and also images showing non-periodic features have been obtained from carbon nanoshells having diameters of the order of 100 nm.

  19. Is there a Stobbs factor in atomic-resolution STEM-EELS mapping?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Huolin L., E-mail: hxin@bnl.gov [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Dwyer, Christian, E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Clayton, 3800 Vic (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, 3800 Vic (Australia); Muller, David A., E-mail: dm24@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Recent work has convincingly argued that the Stobbs factor—disagreement in contrast between simulated and experimental atomic-resolution images—in ADF-STEM imaging can be accounted for by including the incoherent source size in simulation. However, less progress has been made for atomic-resolution STEM-EELS mapping. Here we have performed carefully calibrated EELS mapping experiments of a [101] DyScO{sub 3} single-crystal specimen, allowing atomic-resolution EELS signals to be extracted on an absolute scale for a large range of thicknesses. By simultaneously recording the elastic signal, also on an absolute scale, and using it to characterize the source size, sample thickness and inelastic mean free path, we eliminate all free parameters in the simulation of the core-loss signals. Coupled with double channeling simulations that incorporate both core-loss inelastic scattering and dynamical elastic and thermal diffuse scattering, the present work enables a close scrutiny of the scattering physics in the inelastic channel. We found that by taking into account the effective source distribution determined from the ADF images, both the absolute signal and the contrast in atomic-resolution Dy-M{sub 5} maps can be closely reproduced by the double-channeling simulations. At lower energy losses, discrepancies are present in the Sc-L{sub 2,3} and Dy-N{sub 4,5} maps due to the energy-dependent spatial distribution of the background spectrum, core-hole effects, and omitted complexities in the final states. This work has demonstrated the possibility of using quantitative STEM-EELS for element-specific column-by-column atom counting at higher energy losses and for atomic-like final states, and has elucidated several possible improvements for future theoretical work. - Highlights: • This paper present a carefully calibrated experiment, which allows, for the first time, atomic-resolution chemical signals to be extracted on an absolute scale. • By simultaneously recording

  20. Resolution of electro-holographic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Young; Chernyshov, Oleksii; Lee, Hyoung; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Park, Min-Chul

    2016-06-01

    The resolution of the reconstructed image from a hologram displayed on a DMD is measured with the light field images along the propagation direction of the reconstructed image. The light field images reveal that a point and line image suffers a strong astigmatism but the line focusing distance differences for lines with different directions. This will be astigmatism too. The focusing distance of the reconstructed image is shorter than that of the object. The two lines in transverse direction are resolved when the gap between them is around 16 pixels of the DMD's in use. However, the depth direction is difficult to estimate due to the depth of focus of each line. Due to the astigmatism, the reconstructed image of a square appears as a rectangle or a rhombus.

  1. Imaging population transfer in atoms with ultrafast electron pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have made significant progress recently in investigating atomic-scale structural dynamics in gas-phase and condensed materials. With these advances, direct imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction is anticipated. We propose imaging a laser-driven coherent population transfer in lithium atoms by femtosecond ultrafast electron pulses. Valuable information and insight can be obtained from studying such a system in order to refine ultrafast electron techniques and to interpret experimental results. Adiabatic passage by level crossing is used to transfer the electron population from the 2 s to the 2 p state. Our simulations demonstrate the ability of ultrafast electron diffraction to image this population transfer, as the time-dependent diffraction images reflect the electronic motion in the scattering intensity and angular distribution. Furthermore, asymmetric diffraction patterns indicate that even the relative phases of the electronic wave function can be resolved, provided there is sufficient temporal resolution. This work has been supported in part by DOE Award No. DE-SC0012193 [H.-C.S.] and by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492 [A.F.S.].

  2. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  3. Resolution-limited statistical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Marek; Syrkin, Mark

    1993-09-01

    We have examined the performance of a one-layer Perceptron for the detection and classification of small (resolution-limited) targets from their images, which are stochastic realizations of random processes. The processes are governed by non-Gaussian, non-white distributions. Our results show the potential of the Perceptron classifier as an Ideal Observer and suggest image detection and classification problems for which neural networks may be more reliable than human observers.

  4. MULTI-RESOLUTION SEAMLESS IMAGE DATABASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the basic concepts and principles,data structure and high efficient spatial index for multi-resolution image database.The database is characterized by arrangement of multi-resource image data and seamless mosaic,distribution-based storage and management,integration with other spatial database software such as GeoStar and GeoGrid developed by Wuhan Technical University of Surveying and Mapping.

  5. Atomic-Resolution Observations of Semi-Crystalline IntegranularThin Films in Silicon Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, Alexander; Idrobo, Juan C.; Cinibulk, Michael K.; Kisielowski, Christian; Browning, Nigel D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-08-01

    The thin intergranular phase in a silicon nitride (Si3N4)ceramic, which has been regarded for decades as having an entirely amorphous morphology, is shown to have a semi-crystalline structure. Using two different but complementary high-resolution electron microscopy methods, the intergranular atomic structure was directly imaged at the atomic level. These high-resolution images show that the atomic arrangement of the dopand element cerium takes very periodic positions not only along the interface between the intergranular phase and the Si3N4 matrix grains, but it arranges in a semi-crystalline structure that spans the entire width of the intergranular phase between two adjacent matrix grains, in principle connecting the two separate matrix grains. The result will have implications on the approach of understanding the materials properties of ceramics, most significantly on the mechanical properties and the associated computational modeling of the atomic structure of the thin intergranular phase in Si3N4 ceramics.

  6. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Regtmeier, Jan, E-mail: jan.regtmeier@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Anselmetti, Dario [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  7. Imaging using lateral bending modes of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A.; Rabe, U.; Reinstädtler, M.; Turner, J. A.; Arnold, W.

    2004-12-01

    Using scanning probe techniques, surface properties such as shear stiffness and friction can be measured with a resolution in the nanometer range. The torsional deflection or buckling of atomic force microscope cantilevers has previously been used in order to measure the lateral forces acting on the tip. This letter shows that the flexural vibration modes of cantilevers oscillating in their width direction parallel to the sample surface can also be used for imaging. These lateral cantilever modes exhibit vertical deflection amplitudes if the cantilever is asymmetric in thickness direction, e.g., by a trapezoidal cross section.

  8. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  9. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  10. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  11. Resolution enhancement in nonlinear photoacoustic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goy, Alexandre S.; Fleischer, Jason W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden St., Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Nonlinear processes can be exploited to gain access to more information than is possible in the linear regime. Nonlinearity modifies the spectra of the excitation signals through harmonic generation, frequency mixing, and spectral shifting, so that features originally outside the detector range can be detected. Here, we present an experimental study of resolution enhancement for photoacoustic imaging of thin metal layers immersed in water. In this case, there is a threshold in the excitation below which no acoustic signal is detected. Above threshold, the nonlinearity reduces the width of the active area of the excitation beam, resulting in a narrower absorption region and thus improved spatial resolution. This gain is limited only by noise, as the active area of the excitation can be arbitrarily reduced when the fluence becomes closer to the threshold. Here, we demonstrate a two-fold improvement in resolution and quantify the image quality as the excitation fluence goes through threshold.

  12. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  13. Atomic modeling of cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions--joint refinement of model and imaging parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael S; Trzynka, Andrew; Chapman, Brynmor K

    2013-04-01

    When refining the fit of component atomic structures into electron microscopic reconstructions, use of a resolution-dependent atomic density function makes it possible to jointly optimize the atomic model and imaging parameters of the microscope. Atomic density is calculated by one-dimensional Fourier transform of atomic form factors convoluted with a microscope envelope correction and a low-pass filter, allowing refinement of imaging parameters such as resolution, by optimizing the agreement of calculated and experimental maps. A similar approach allows refinement of atomic displacement parameters, providing indications of molecular flexibility even at low resolution. A modest improvement in atomic coordinates is possible following optimization of these additional parameters. Methods have been implemented in a Python program that can be used in stand-alone mode for rigid-group refinement, or embedded in other optimizers for flexible refinement with stereochemical restraints. The approach is demonstrated with refinements of virus and chaperonin structures at resolutions of 9 through 4.5 Å, representing regimes where rigid-group and fully flexible parameterizations are appropriate. Through comparisons to known crystal structures, flexible fitting by RSRef is shown to be an improvement relative to other methods and to generate models with all-atom rms accuracies of 1.5-2.5 Å at resolutions of 4.5-6 Å.

  14. Super-resolution of facial images in forensics scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satiro, Joao; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Correia, Paulo;

    2015-01-01

    Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super-resolution......Forensics facial images are usually provided by surveillance cameras and are therefore of poor quality and resolution. Simple upsampling algorithms can not produce artifact-free higher resolution images from such low-resolution (LR) images. To deal with that, reconstruction-based super...

  15. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Stolzenberg, U; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the $X$/$X_0$ imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of $X$/$X_0$ imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of ...

  16. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm;

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present...... rate-controlled large-scale simultaneous hypothesis testing is used as a statistical framework for interpretation of results. The first sample yields, as expected, a homogeneous distribution of carbon–carbon (C–C) bond lengths. The second sample exhibits regions of shorter C–C bond lengths...

  17. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  18. The crystal structure of samarosporin I at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Axford, Danny; Evans, Gwyndaf; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2012-11-01

    The atomic resolution structures of samarosporin I have been determined at 100 and 293 K. This is the first crystal structure of a natural 15-residue peptaibol. The amino acid sequence in samarosporin I is identical to emerimicin IV and stilbellin I. Samarosporin is a peptide antibiotic produced by the ascomycetous fungus Samarospora rostrup and belongs to peptaibol subfamily 2. The structures at both temperatures are very similar to each other adopting mainly a 3₁₀-helical and a minor fraction of α-helical conformation. The helices are significantly bent and packed in an antiparallel fashion in the centered monoclinic lattice leaving among them an approximately 10-Å channel extending along the crystallographic twofold axis. Only two ordered water molecules per peptide molecule were located in the channel. Comparisons have been carried out with crystal structures of subfamily 2 16-residue peptaibols antiamoebin and cephaibols. The repercussion of the structural analysis of samarosporin on membrane function is discussed.

  19. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization.

  20. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  1. Atomically resolved images of lithium purple bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinke, Melanie; Bienert, Robert; Waelsch, Michael; Podlich, Tatjana; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Jin, Rongying [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lousiana State University (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The lithium molybdenum purple bronze Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} is a quasi 1D metal at room temperature showing Luttinger liquid physics. The highly anisotropic conductivity runs along the crystallographic b axis where Mo-O chains, formed by the shared edges of the MoO{sub 6} octahedra, provide the electrical transport. Li{sub 0.9}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 17} samples were investigated with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. By cleaving the samples at low temperatures (60 K) we obtained atomically resolved images of the surface. In these images the Mo-O chains are visible, which are covered by layers of MoO{sub 6} octahedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  2. Super-resolution near field imaging device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging device comprising at least a first and a second elongated coupling element, each having a first transverse dimension at a first end and a second transverse dimension at a second end and being adapted for guiding light between their respective first and second ends, each...... further comprising a dielectric center element and a metallic side-wall region, which surrounds the dielectric center element. The coupling elements are arranged in a matrix comprising a matrix material and the first ends of the coupling elements are located at or in a vicinity of the first side...... of the matrix and the second ends of the coupling elements are located at or in a vicinity of the second side of the matrix. The second transverse dimension is larger than the first transverse dimension. A microscope objective system and a microscope comprising the super-resolution imaging device are also...

  3. Resolution limits for wave equation imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-01

    Formulas are derived for the resolution limits of migration-data kernels associated with diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They are applicable to images formed by reverse time migration (RTM), least squares migration (LSM), and full waveform inversion (FWI), and suggest a multiscale approach to iterative FWI based on multiscale physics. That is, at the early stages of the inversion, events that only generate low-wavenumber resolution should be emphasized relative to the high-wavenumber resolution events. As the iterations proceed, the higher-resolution events should be emphasized. The formulas also suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low- and intermediate-wavenumber components of the velocity model not available in the primaries. Finally, diffractions can provide twice or better the resolution than specular reflections for comparable depths of the reflector and diffractor. The width of the diffraction-transmission wavepath is approximately λ at the diffractor location for the diffraction-transmission wavepath. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  4. GRANULOMETRIC MAPS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Mering

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method of land cover mapping from satellite images using granulometric analysis is presented here. Discontinuous landscapes such as steppian bushes of semi arid regions and recently growing urban settlements are especially concerned by this study. Spatial organisations of the land cover are quantified by means of the size distribution analysis of the land cover units extracted from high resolution remotely sensed images. A granulometric map is built by automatic classification of every pixel of the image according to the granulometric density inside a sliding neighbourhood. Granulometric mapping brings some advantages over traditional thematic mapping by remote sensing by focusing on fine spatial events and small changes in one peculiar category of the landscape.

  5. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  6. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesh Kashyap; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha; B K Godwal

    2004-02-01

    X-ray holography is a new method of structure determination based on measurement of interference of a known reference wave with an unknown object wave (containing information on atomic sites scattering the reference wave) so that phase information is preserved. Unlike X-ray diffraction, it does not demand for translational periodicity in the material. It is based on the idea similar to that of optical holography and has been tested on crystals, quasicrystals, thin films and doped semiconductors for their structure determination. In order to analyse potentials and limitations of this technique, we have carried out theoretical simulation studies on simple structures. In this paper we describe the basic algorithm of hologram generation and reconstruction of atomic positions from generated data. We illustrate this technique using Fe (bcc) single crystal as sample case to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Simulations were carried out on the Cu (fcc) structure and on complex structure such as the Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal. Technical issues such as low signal to noise ratio, twin image problem etc have been discussed briefly to emphasize the need for high intensity X-ray source such as synchrotron for experiments and proper reconstruction algorithm. Finally the scope and potential of this technique have been discussed.

  7. AIRBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado-Molina, J.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost airborne digital imaging system capable to perform aerial surveys with small-format cameras isintroduced. The equipment is intended to obtain high-resolution multispectral digital photographs constituting so aviable alternative to conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery. Monitoring software handles all theprocedures involved in image acquisition, including flight planning, real-time graphics for aircraft position updatingin a mobile map, and supervises the main variables engaged in the imaging process. This software also creates fileswith the geographical position of the central point of every image, and the flight path followed by the aircraftduring the entire survey. The cameras are mounted on a three-axis stabilized platform. A set of inertial sensorsdetermines platform's deviations independently from the aircraft and an automatic control system keeps thecameras at a continuous nadir pointing and heading, with a precision better than ± 1 arc-degree in three-axis. Thecontrol system is also in charge of saving the platform’s orientation angles when the monitoring software triggersthe camera. These external orientation parameters, together with a procedure for camera calibration give theessential elements for image orthocorrection. Orthomosaics are constructed using commercial GIS software.This system demonstrates the feasibility of large area coverage in a practical and economical way using smallformatcameras. Monitoring and automatization reduce the work while increasing the quality and the amount ofuseful images.

  8. Image reconstruction techniques for high resolution human brain PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comtat, C.; Bataille, F.; Sureau, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    High resolution PET imaging is now a well established technique not only for small animal, but also for human brain studies. The ECAT HRRT brain PET scanner(Siemens Molecular Imaging) is characterized by an effective isotropic spatial resolution of 2.5 mm, about a factor of 2 better than for state-of-the-art whole-body clinical PET scanners. Although the absolute sensitivity of the HRRT (6.5 %) for point source in the center of the field-of-view is increased relative to whole-body scanner (typically 4.5 %) thanks to a larger co-polar aperture, the sensitivity in terms of volumetric resolution (75 (m{sup 3} at best for whole-body scanners and 16 (m{sup 3} for t he HRRT) is much lower. This constraint has an impact on the performance of image reconstruction techniques, in particular for dynamic studies. Standard reconstruction methods used with clinical whole-body PET scanners are not optimal for this application. Specific methods had to be developed, based on fully 3D iterative techniques. Different refinements can be added in the reconstruction process to improve image quality: more accurate modeling of the acquisition system, more accurate modeling of the statistical properties of the acquired data, anatomical side information to guide the reconstruction . We will present the performances these added developments for neuronal imaging in humans. (author)

  9. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-03

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation.

  10. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  11. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, M. A.; Gajdacz, M.; Pedersen, P. L.; Klempt, C.; Sherson, J. F.; Arlt, J. J.; Hilliard, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing N∼ 5× {10}6 atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  12. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  13. Note: High-speed Z tip scanner with screw cantilever holding mechanism for atomic-resolution atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy has attracted much attention due to its unique capability of visualizing nanoscale dynamic processes at a solid/liquid interface. However, its usability and resolution have yet to be improved. As one of the solutions for this issue, here we present a design of a high-speed Z-tip scanner with screw holding mechanism. We perform detailed comparison between designs with different actuator size and screw arrangement by finite element analysis. Based on the design giving the best performance, we have developed a Z tip scanner and measured its performance. The measured frequency response of the scanner shows a flat response up to ∼10 kHz. This high frequency response allows us to achieve wideband tip-sample distance regulation. We demonstrate the applicability of the scanner to high-speed atomic-resolution imaging by visualizing atomic-scale calcite crystal dissolution process in water at 2 s/frame.

  14. Sample preparation for atomic-resolution STEM at low voltages by FIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Miroslava, E-mail: mschaffer@SuperSTEM.org [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, George Holt Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Schaffer, Bernhard [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ramasse, Quentin [SuperSTEM, STFC Daresbury Laboratories, Keckwick Lane, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, George Holt Building, Ashton Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    While FIB sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy is a well established technique, few examples exist of samples of sufficient quality for atomic resolution imaging by aberration corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (STEM). In this work we demonstrate the successful preparation of such samples from five different materials and present the refined lift-out preparation technique, which was applied here. Samples with parallel surfaces and a general thickness between 20 and 40 nm over a range of several {mu}m were repeatedly prepared and analyzed by Cs-corrected STEM at 60 and 100 kV. Here, a novel 'wedge pre-milling' step helps to keep the protective surface layers intact during the whole milling process, allowing features close to or at the sample surface to be analyzed without preparation damage. Another example shows the cross-sectional preparation of a working thin film solar cell device to a final thickness of 10 to 20 nm over {mu}m sized areas in the region of interest, enabling atomic resolution imaging and elemental mapping across general grain boundaries without projection artefacts. All sample preparation has been carried out in modern Dual-Beam FIB microscopes capable of low-kV Ga{sup +} ion milling, but without additional preparation steps after the FIB lift-out procedure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suitability of stand-alone FIB preparation for atomic resolution STEM is shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reproducible preparation of 10-40 nm thick samples from 5 different materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-kV milling and adjusted procedure for crystalline, homogeneously thin specimen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wedge pre-milling to protect surface-near features.

  15. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  16. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  17. Atomic-scale imaging of few-layer black phosphorus and its reconstructed edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangjin; Yoon, Jun-Yeong; Scullion, Declan; Jang, Jeongsu; Santos, Elton J. G.; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Kwanpyo

    2017-03-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently emerged as an alternative 2D semiconductor owing to its fascinating electronic properties such as tunable bandgap and high charge carrier mobility. The structural investigation of few-layer BP, such as identification of layer thickness and atomic-scale edge structure, is of great importance to fully understand its electronic and optical properties. Here we report atomic-scale analysis of few-layered BP performed by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We establish the layer-number-dependent atomic resolution imaging of few-layer BP via TEM imaging and image simulations. The structural modification induced by the electron beam leads to revelation of crystalline edge and formation of BP nanoribbons. Atomic resolution imaging of BP clearly shows the reconstructed zigzag (ZZ) edge structures, which is also corroborated by van der Waals first principles calculations on the edge stability. Our study on the precise identification of BP thickness and atomic-resolution imaging of edge structures will lay the groundwork for investigation of few-layer BP, especially BP in nanostructured forms.

  18. Super-resolution photoacoustic fluctuation imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, Thomas; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    In deep tissue photoacoustic imaging, the spatial resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction. Moreover, as the ultrasound attenuation increases with frequency, resolution is often traded-off for penetration depth. Here we report on super-resolution photoacoustic imaging by use of multiple speckle illumination. Specifically, we show that the analysis of second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic images combined with image deconvolution enables resolving optically absorbing structures beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. A resolution increase of almost a factor 2 is demonstrated experimentally. Our method introduces a new framework that could potentially lead to deep tissue photoacoustic imaging with sub-acoustic resolution.

  19. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  20. Feasibility of filter atomization in high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Uwe; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Katskov, Dmitri

    2006-03-01

    A prototype spectrometer for high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS), built at ISAS Berlin, Germany, was combined with a graphite filter atomizer (GFA), earlier developed at TUT, Pretoria, South Africa. The furnace and auto-sampler units from a commercial AA spectrometer, model AAS vario 6 (Analytik Jena AG, Jena, Germany), were employed in the instrument. Instead of conventional platform tube, the GFA was used to provide low measurement susceptibility to interferences and short determination cycle. The GFA was modified according to the design of the furnace unit and optimal physical parameters of its components (filter and collector) found. Afterwards, optimal GFA was replicated and tested to outline analytical performances of the HR-CS GFA AA spectrometer in view of prospects of multi-element analysis. In particular, reproducibility of performances, repeatability of analytical signals, lifetime, temperature limit and duration of the measurement cycle were examined, and elements available for determination justified. The results show that the peak area of the atomic absorption signal is reproduced in various GFA copies within ± 4% deviation range. The GFA can stand temperatures of 2800 °C with 6 s hold time for 55 temperature cycles, and 2700 °C (8 s) for about 200 cycles. Only the external tube is prone to destruction while the filter and collector do not show any sign of erosion caused by temperature or aggressive matrix. Analytical signals are affected insignificantly by tube aging. Repeatability of the peak area remains within 1.1-1.7% RSD over more than hundred determination cycles. Peak areas are proportional to the sample volume of injected organic and inorganic liquids up to at least 50 μL. The drying stage is combined with hot sampling and cut down to 15-20 s. The list of metals available for determination with full vapor release includes Al, Co, Cr, Ni, Pt as well as more volatile metals. Characteristic masses at

  1. High-resolution colorimetric imaging of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kirk; Cupitt, John; Saunders, David R.

    1993-05-01

    With the aim of providing a digital electronic replacement for conventional photography of paintings, a scanner has been constructed based on a 3000 X 2300 pel resolution camera which is moved precisely over a 1 meter square area. Successive patches are assembled to form a mosaic which covers the whole area at c. 20 pels/mm resolution, which is sufficient to resolve the surface textures, particularly craquelure. To provide high color accuracy, a set of seven broad-band interference filters are used to cover the visible spectrum. A calibration procedure based upon a least-mean-squares fit to the color of patches from a Macbeth Colorchecker chart yields an average color accuracy of better than 3 units in the CMC uniform color space. This work was mainly carried out as part of the VASARI project funded by the European Commission's ESPRIT program, involving companies and galleries from around Europe. The system is being used to record images for conservation research, for archival purposes and to assist in computer-aided learning in the field of art history. The paper will describe the overall system design, including the selection of the various hardware components and the design of controlling software. The theoretical basis for the color calibration methodology is described as well as the software for its practical implementation. The mosaic assembly procedure and some of the associated image processing routines developed are described. Preliminary results from the research will be presented.

  2. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Z. Baykara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  3. Gibbs artifact reduction for POCS super-resolution image reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuangbai XIAO; Jing YU; Kaina SU

    2008-01-01

    The topic of super-resolution image reconstruc-tion has recently received considerable attention among the research community. Super-resolution image reconstruc-tion methods attempt to create a single high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution images (or a video sequence). The method of projections onto convex sets (POCS) for super-resolution image reconstruction attracts many researchers' attention. In this paper, we propose an improvement to reduce the amount of Gibbs artifacts pre-senting on the edges of the high-resolution image recon-structed by the POCS method. The proposed method weights the blur PSF centered at an edge pixel with an exponential function, and consequently decreases the coef-ficients of the PSF in the direction orthogonal to the edge. Experiment results show that the modification reduces effectively the visibility of Gibbs artifacts on edges and improves obviously the quality of the reconstructed high-resolution image.

  4. Separate-type scanner and wideband high-voltage amplifier for atomic-resolution and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kazuki; Usho, Satoshi; Yamada, Satoshi; Furuya, Shoji; Yoshida, Kiyonori; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a liquid-environment atomic force microscope with a wideband and low-noise scanning system for atomic-scale imaging of dynamic processes at solid/liquid interfaces. The developed scanning system consists of a separate-type scanner and a wideband high-voltage amplifier (HVA). By separating an XY-sample scanner from a Z-tip scanner, we have enabled to use a relatively large sample without compromising the high resonance frequency. We compared various cantilever- and sample-holding mechanisms by experiments and finite element analyses for optimizing the balance between the usability and frequency response characteristics. We specifically designed the HVA to drive the developed scanners, which enabled to achieve the positioning accuracy of 5.7 and 0.53 pm in the XY and Z axes, respectively. Such an excellent noise performance allowed us to perform atomic-resolution imaging of mica and calcite in liquid. Furthermore, we demonstrate in situ and atomic-resolution imaging of the calcite crystal growth process in water.

  5. Cellular replication and atomic force microscope imaging using a UV-Bioimprint technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muys, J J; Alkaisi, M M; Evans, J J

    2006-09-01

    Replication and fixation techniques have been of considerable interest for imaging and analysis of biological cells since the introduction of electron and scanning probe microscopy. Although such tools as the atomic force microscope (AFM) permit in situ morphological studies at a magnitude of resolution beyond traditional optical microscopy, they are difficult to operate and their resolution capabilities are rarely realized. We used a UV-Bioimprint replication technique to imprint a polymer layer onto cells attached to a substrate and rapidly cure to create an impression of cell topography. Replicas of chemically fixed and untreated cells analyzed by atomic force microscopy demonstrate nanometer resolution in the transfer of replicated features. UV-Bioimprint presents an improvement over techniques using heat-curable polymers as well as an alternative technique to the direct imaging of cells. The motivation for UV-Bioimprint is to effectively integrate scanning probe microscopy tools for imaging of cellular ultrastructure.

  6. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microsc

  7. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  8. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  9. Visualization and processing of images in nano-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozenilek, Vit; Pour, Tomas

    2017-02-01

    The paper aims to apply the methods of image processing which are widely used in Earth remote sensing for processing and visualization of images in nano-resolution because most of these images are currently analyzed only by an expert researcher without proper statistical background. Nano-resolution level may range from a resolution in picometres to the resolution of a light microscope that may be up to about 200 nanometers. Images in nano-resolution play an essential role in physics, medicine, and chemistry. Three case studies demonstrate different image visualization and image analysis approaches for different scales at the nano-resolution level. The results of case studies prove the suitability and applicability of Earth remote sensing methods for image visualization and processing for the nanoresolution level. It even opens new dimensions for spatial analysis at such an extreme spatial detail.

  10. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  11. Multiparametric atomic force microscopy imaging of single bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Trabelsi, Heykel; Soumillion, Patrice; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool to simultaneously image the structure and map the biophysical properties of biological samples at the nanoscale. Traditionally, FD-based atomic force microscopy has been severely limited by its poor temporal and lateral resolutions. Here we report the use of advanced FD-based technology combined with biochemically sensitive tips to image filamentous bacteriophages extruding from living bacteria at unprecedented speed and resolution. Directly correlated multiparametric images of the structure, adhesion and elasticity of infected bacteria demonstrate that the sites of assembly and extrusion localize at the bacterial septum in the form of soft nanodomains surrounded by stiff cell wall material. The quantitative nano-bio-imaging method presented here offers a wealth of opportunities for mapping the physical properties and molecular interactions of complex biosystems, from viruses to tissues.

  12. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  13. Atomic resolution of nitrogen-doped graphene on Cu foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chundong; Schouteden, Koen; Wu, Qi-Hui; Li, Zhe; Jiang, Jianjun; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Atomic-level substitutional doping can significantly tune the electronic properties of graphene. Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the atomic-scale crystalline structure of graphene grown on polycrystalline Cu, the distribution of nitrogen dopants and their effect on the electronic properties of graphene were investigated. Both the graphene sheet growth and nitrogen doping were performed using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The results indicated that the nitrogen dopants preferentially sit at the grain boundaries of the graphene sheets and confirmed that plasma treatment is a potential method to incorporate foreign atoms into the graphene lattice to tailor the graphene’s electronic properties.

  14. Spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement of digital images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝鹏威; 徐冠华; 朱重光

    1999-01-01

    A general matrix formula is proposed for signal spectral aliasing of various or mutual resolution, the concept of spectral aliasing matrix is introduced, and some general spectral methods for spatial resolution improvement from multiframes of undersampled digital images are discussed. A simplified iterative method of parallel row-action projection for spectral de-aliasing is also given. The method can be applied to multiframe images with various spatial resolution,relative displacement, dissimilar point spread function, different image radiance, and additive random noise. Some experiments with a resolution test pattern and an image of vertical fin performed the convergence and the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  15. Low-voltage coherent electron imaging based on a single-atom electron

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Wei-Tse; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Mu-Tung; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2015-01-01

    It has been a general trend to develop low-voltage electron microscopes due to their high imaging contrast of the sample and low radiation damage. Atom-resolved transmission electron microscopes with voltages as low as 15-40 kV have been demonstrated. However, achieving atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV is extremely difficult. An alternative approach is coherent imaging or phase retrieval imaging, which requires a sufficiently coherent source and an adequately small detection area on the sample as well as the detection of high-angle diffracted patterns with a sufficient resolution. In this work, we propose several transmission-type schemes to achieve coherent imaging of thin materials (less than 5 nm thick) with atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV. Experimental schemes of both lens-less and lens-containing designs are presented and the advantages and challenges of these schemes are discussed. Preliminary results based on a highly coherent single-atom electron source are presented. The ...

  16. Very high resolution satellite data: New challenges in image analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    or other natural landscapes. Having very high resolution digital data over a landscape will however create new challenges in the field of atmospheric correction, ground registration, image processing and finally the image interpretation itself. Even...

  17. Radiation damage free two-color X-ray ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Chapman, Henry; Shih, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) can enable diffractive structural determination of protein crystals or single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional X-ray analysis. However the electronic form factor could have been modified during the ultrashort X-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense X-ray pulse. For general X-ray imaging techniques, to minimize radiation damage effect is of major concern to ensure faithful reconstruction of the structure. Here we show that a radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with an atomic spatial resolution, by using X-ray parametric down-conversion (PDC), and two-color biphoton ghost imaging. We illustrate that formation of the diffractive patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that could be as fine as the lattice length scale of several Angstrom. Because the samples are illuminated by the optical photons of low energy, they can be free of radiation damage...

  18. Resolution and noise in ghost imaging with classical thermal light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jing; Han Shen-Sheng; Yan Yi-Jing

    2006-01-01

    The resolution and classical noise in ghost imaging with a classical thermal light are investigated theoretically. For ghost imaging with a Gaussian Schell model source, the dependences of the resolution and noise on the spatial coherence of the source and the aperture in the imaging system are discussed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations.The results show that an incoherent source and a large aperture will lead to a good image quality and small noise.

  19. Remote Sensing Image Resolution Enlargement Algorithm Based on Wavelet Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Azam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new image resolution enhancement algorithm based on cycle spinning and stationary wavelet subband padding. The proposed technique or algorithm uses stationary wavelet transformation (SWT to decompose the low resolution (LR image into frequency subbands. All these frequency subbands are interpolated using either bicubic or lanczos interpolation, and these interpolated subbands are put into inverse SWT process for generating intermediate high resolution (HR image. Finally, cycle spinning (CS is applied on this intermediate high resolution image for reducing blocking artifacts, followed by, traditional Laplacian sharpening filter is used to make the generated high resolution image sharper. This new technique has been tested on several satellite images. Experimental result shows that the proposed technique outperforms the conventional and the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error, entropy, as well as, visual perspective.

  20. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  1. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  2. Atomic resolution mapping of interfacial intermixing and segregation in InAs/GaSb superlattices: A correlative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Honggyu; Meng Yifei; Zuo Jianmin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA/INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, 19 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble (France); Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography (NUCAPT), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2013-03-14

    We combine quantitative analyses of Z-contrast images with composition analyses employing atom probe tomography (APT) correlatively to provide a quantitative measurement of atomic scale interfacial intermixing in an InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL). Contributions from GaSb and InAs in the Z-contrast images are separated using an improved image processing technique. Correlation with high resolution APT composition analyses permits an examination of interfacial segregation of both cations and anions and their incorporation in the short period InAs/GaSb SL. Results revealed short, intermediate, and long-range intermixing of In, Ga, and Sb during molecular beam epitaxial growth and their distribution in the SL.

  3. Atomic resolution tomography reconstruction of tilt series based on a GPU accelerated hybrid input-output algorithm using polar Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangwen; Gao, Wenpei; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yuan, Jiabin

    2015-02-01

    Advances in diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have greatly improved the prospect of three-dimensional (3D) structure reconstruction from two-dimensional (2D) images or diffraction patterns recorded in a tilt series at atomic resolution. Here, we report a new graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated iterative transformation algorithm (ITA) based on polar fast Fourier transform for reconstructing 3D structure from 2D diffraction patterns. The algorithm also applies to image tilt series by calculating diffraction patterns from the recorded images using the projection-slice theorem. A gold icosahedral nanoparticle of 309 atoms is used as the model to test the feasibility, performance and robustness of the developed algorithm using simulations. Atomic resolution in 3D is achieved for the 309 atoms Au nanoparticle using 75 diffraction patterns covering 150° rotation. The capability demonstrated here provides an opportunity to uncover the 3D structure of small objects of nanometers in size by electron diffraction.

  4. Validation methods for low-resolution fitting of atomic structures to electron microscopy data

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao-Ping; Volkmann, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Fitting of atomic-resolution structures into reconstructions from electron cryo-microscopy is routinely used to understand the structure and function of macromolecular machines. Despite the fact that a plethora of fitting methods has been developed over recent years, standard protocols for quality assessment and validation of these fits have not been established. Here, we present the general concepts underlying current validation ideas as they relate to fitting of atomic-resolution models int...

  5. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    , or a special case of compressed sensing. We argue that the preferred approach depends upon the type of image. Of the methods proposed for AFM, images containing high frequencies should be reconstructed using basis pursuit from data collected in a spiral pattern. Images without too much high frequency content...

  6. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-09-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit.

  7. 'Big Bang' tomography as a new route to atomic-resolution electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Dirk; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2012-06-13

    Until now it has not been possible to image at atomic resolution using classical electron tomographic methods, except when the target is a perfectly crystalline nano-object imaged along a few zone axes. The main reasons are that mechanical tilting in an electron microscope with sub-ångström precision over a very large angular range is difficult, that many real-life objects such as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices impose geometrical constraints and that many radiation-sensitive objects such as proteins limit the total electron dose. Hence, there is a need for a new tomographic scheme that is able to deduce three-dimensional information from only one or a few projections. Here we present an electron tomographic method that can be used to determine, from only one viewing direction and with sub-ångström precision, both the position of individual atoms in the plane of observation and their vertical position. The concept is based on the fact that an experimentally reconstructed exit wave consists of the superposition of the spherical waves that have been scattered by the individual atoms of the object. Furthermore, the phase of a Fourier component of a spherical wave increases with the distance of propagation at a known 'phase speed'. If we assume that an atom is a point-like object, the relationship between the phase and the phase speed of each Fourier component is linear, and the distance between the atom and the plane of observation can therefore be determined by linear fitting. This picture has similarities with Big Bang cosmology, in which the Universe expands from a point-like origin such that the distance of any galaxy from the origin is linearly proportional to the speed at which it moves away from the origin (Hubble expansion). The proof of concept of the method has been demonstrated experimentally for graphene with a two-layer structure and it will work optimally for similar layered materials, such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide.

  8. Improving spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy by super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Han; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Yun; Fan, Ying; Qiu, Lirong; Zhu, Ke

    2016-05-16

    A new super-resolution image restoration confocal Raman microscopy method (SRIR-RAMAN) is proposed for improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy. This method can recover the lost high spatial frequency of the confocal Raman microscopy by using Poisson-MAP super-resolution imaging restoration, thereby improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy and realizing its super-resolution imaging. Simulation analyses and experimental results indicate that the spatial resolution of SRIR-RAMAN can be improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm with the same confocal Raman microscopy system. This method can provide a new tool for high spatial resolution micro-probe structure detection in physical chemistry, materials science, biomedical science and other areas.

  9. Away from resolution, assessing the information content of super-resolution images

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, Thomas; Manley, Suliana

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has revolutionized optical fluorescence imaging by improving 3D resolution by 1-2 orders of magnitude. While different methods can successfully increase the resolution, all methods share significant differences with standard imaging methods, making the usual measures of resolution inapplicable. In particular image quality and information content are spatially heterogeneous with variabilities that can be comparable to their mean values, limiting the use of the average resolution as a predictor for local information. A common use of super-resolution data is to test or establish structural models, and in these cases it would be valuable to assess the capacity of the data to validate a model. We focus here on single-molecule localization methods and present a new way of assessing the quality and reliability of super-resolution data.

  10. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  11. Extraction and labeling high-resolution images from PDF documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachra, Suchet K.; Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2013-12-01

    Accuracy of content-based image retrieval is affected by image resolution among other factors. Higher resolution images enable extraction of image features that more accurately represent the image content. In order to improve the relevance of search results for our biomedical image search engine, Open-I, we have developed techniques to extract and label high-resolution versions of figures from biomedical articles supplied in the PDF format. Open-I uses the open-access subset of biomedical articles from the PubMed Central repository hosted by the National Library of Medicine. Articles are available in XML and in publisher supplied PDF formats. As these PDF documents contain little or no meta-data to identify the embedded images, the task includes labeling images according to their figure number in the article after they have been successfully extracted. For this purpose we use the labeled small size images provided with the XML web version of the article. This paper describes the image extraction process and two alternative approaches to perform image labeling that measure the similarity between two images based upon the image intensity projection on the coordinate axes and similarity based upon the normalized cross-correlation between the intensities of two images. Using image identification based on image intensity projection, we were able to achieve a precision of 92.84% and a recall of 82.18% in labeling of the extracted images.

  12. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  13. Improving resolution of optical coherence tomography for imaging of microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kai; Lu, Hui; Wang, James H.; Wang, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-frame superresolution technique has been used to improve the lateral resolution of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for imaging of 3D microstructures. By adjusting the voltages applied to ? and ? galvanometer scanners in the measurement arm, small lateral imaging positional shifts have been introduced among different C-scans. Utilizing the extracted ?-? plane en face image frames from these specially offset C-scan image sets at the same axial position, we have reconstructed the lateral high resolution image by the efficient multi-frame superresolution technique. To further improve the image quality, we applied the latest K-SVD and bilateral total variation denoising algorithms to the raw SD-OCT lateral images before and along with the superresolution processing, respectively. The performance of the SD-OCT of improved lateral resolution is demonstrated by 3D imaging a microstructure fabricated by photolithography and a double-layer microfluidic device.

  14. Introductory lecture: Time-resolved chemistry at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Philip; Novozhilova, Irina V

    2003-01-01

    Though time-resolved studies are still at an early stage, the field is rapidly being developed and applied to an increasingly broad spectrum of problems with timescales varying from seconds or more down to femtoseconds. In this overview a number of different techniques are discussed, with emphasis on chemical applications in which information is obtained at the atomic level. The need to correlate with theory, both for calibration of theoretical methods and to obtain related information not accessible experimentally, is stressed.

  15. Improvement in image resolution based on dispersive representation of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, V. F.; Ponomaryov, V. I.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    A method for reconstructing the resolution of images, based on selection and optimization of significant local features and sparse representation of processed-image blocks (using optimized low- and high-resolution dictionaries), has been substantiated for the first time. This method, making it possible to improve significantly the resolution of images of various nature, is interpreted physically. A block diagram of the processing system corresponding to the new approach to image reconstruction has been developed. A simulation of the new method for reconstructing images of different physical natures and known algorithms showed an advantage of the new scheme for reconstructing resolution in terms of universally recognized criteria (peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and structural similarity index measure) and in visual comparison of the processed images.

  16. Whole-animal imaging with high spatio-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2016-03-01

    We developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy in order to image fast cellular dynamics, such as cell movements in an entire developing embryo or neuronal activity throughput an entire brain or nervous system, with high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To achieve high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time, IsoView microscopy rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. In a post-processing step, these four views are then combined by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution to yield images with a system resolution of ≤ 450 nm in all three dimensions. Using IsoView microscopy, we performed whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila embryos and larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and at a temporal resolution of 2 Hz for up to 9 hours. We also performed whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish and multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across entire, gastrulating Drosophila embryos with isotropic, sub-cellular resolution. Compared with conventional (spatially anisotropic) light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, such as lattice lightsheet microscopy or diSPIM, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  17. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  18. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit...... is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times...

  19. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  20. Nanoprobes for super-resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU ShangGuo; LIANG Le; DENG SuHui; CHEN JianFang; HUANG Qing; CHENG Ya; FAN ChunHai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with other imaging techniques,fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool to study cell biology due to its high compatibility with living cells.Owing to the resolution limit set by the diffraction of light,fluorescence microscopy could not resolve the nanostructures in the range of〈200 nm.Recently,many techniques have been emerged to overcome the diffraction barrier,providing nanometer spatial resolution.In the course of development,the progress in fluorescent probes has helped to promote the development of the high-resolution fluorescence nanoscopy.Here,we describe the contributions of the fluorescent probes to far-field super resolution imaging,focusing on concepts of the existing super-resolution nanoscopy based on the photophysics of fluorescent nanoprobes,like photoswitching,bleaching and blinking.Fluorescent probe technology is crucial in the design and implementation of super-resolution imaging methods.

  1. Marvels of enzyme catalysis at true atomic resolution: distortions, bond elongations, hidden flips, protonation states and atom identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Piotr; Tittmann, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Although general principles of enzyme catalysis are fairly well understood nowadays, many important details of how exactly the substrate is bound and processed in an enzyme remain often invisible and as such elusive. In fortunate cases, structural analysis of enzymes can be accomplished at true atomic resolution thus making possible to shed light on otherwise concealed fine-structural traits of bound substrates, intermediates, cofactors and protein groups. We highlight recent structural studies of enzymes using ultrahigh-resolution X-ray protein crystallography showcasing its enormous potential as a tool in the elucidation of enzymatic mechanisms and in unveiling fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. We discuss the observation of seemingly hyper-reactive, physically distorted cofactors and intermediates with elongated scissile substrate bonds, the detection of 'hidden' conformational and chemical equilibria and the analysis of protonation states with surprising findings. In delicate cases, atomic resolution is required to unambiguously disclose the identity of atoms as demonstrated for the metal cluster in nitrogenase. In addition to the pivotal structural findings and the implications for our understanding of enzyme catalysis, we further provide a practical framework for resolution enhancement through optimized data acquisition and processing.

  2. Multiframe Blind Super Resolution Imaging Based on Blind Deconvolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元伟; 张立毅

    2016-01-01

    As an ill-posed problem, multiframe blind super resolution imaging recovers a high resolution image from a group of low resolution images with some degradations when the information of blur kernel is limited. Note that the quality of the recovered image is influenced more by the accuracy of blur estimation than an advanced regularization. We study the traditional model of the multiframe super resolution and modify it for blind deblurring. Based on the analysis, we proposed two algorithms. The first one is based on the total variation blind deconvolution algorithm and formulated as a functional for optimization with the regularization of blur. Based on the alternating minimization and the gradient descent algorithm, the high resolution image and the unknown blur kernel are esti-mated iteratively. By using the median shift and add operator, the second algorithm is more robust to the outlier influence. The MSAA initialization simplifies the interpolation process to reconstruct the blurred high resolution image for blind deblurring and improves the accuracy of blind super resolution imaging. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority and accuracy of our novel algorithms.

  3. Temporal Super Resolution Enhancement of Echocardiographic Images Based on Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifani, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Haddadi, Farzan; Sani, Zahra Alizadeh; Shojaeifard, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    A challenging issue for echocardiographic image interpretation is the accurate analysis of small transient motions of myocardium and valves during real-time visualization. A higher frame rate video may reduce this difficulty, and temporal super resolution (TSR) is useful for illustrating the fast-moving structures. In this paper, we introduce a novel framework that optimizes TSR enhancement of echocardiographic images by utilizing temporal information and sparse representation. The goal of this method is to increase the frame rate of echocardiographic videos, and therefore enable more accurate analyses of moving structures. For the proposed method, we first derived temporal information by extracting intensity variation time curves (IVTCs) assessed for each pixel. We then designed both low-resolution and high-resolution overcomplete dictionaries based on prior knowledge of the temporal signals and a set of prespecified known functions. The IVTCs can then be described as linear combinations of a few prototype atoms in the low-resolution dictionary. We used the Bayesian compressive sensing (BCS) sparse recovery algorithm to find the sparse coefficients of the signals. We extracted the sparse coefficients and the corresponding active atoms in the low-resolution dictionary to construct new sparse coefficients corresponding to the high-resolution dictionary. Using the estimated atoms and the high-resolution dictionary, a new IVTC with more samples was constructed. Finally, by placing the new IVTC signals in the original IVTC positions, we were able to reconstruct the original echocardiography video with more frames. The proposed method does not require training of low-resolution and high-resolution dictionaries, nor does it require motion estimation; it does not blur fast-moving objects, and does not have blocking artifacts.

  4. Super-resolution Restoration of Remote-sensing Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang-yang; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua; CHEN Hua; ZHANG Nan

    2006-01-01

    A novel image restoration scheme, which is super-resolution image restoration algorithm Poisson-maximum-afterword-probability based on Markvo constraint (MPMAP) combined with evaluating image detail parameter D, has been proposed. The advantage of super-resolution algorithm MPMAP incorporated with parameter D lies in the fact that super-resolution algorithm MPMAP model is discrete, which is in accordance with remote-sensing imaging model, and the algorithm MPMAP is proved applicable to linear and non-linear imaging models with a unique solution when noise is not severe. According to simulation experiments for practical images, super-resolution algorithm MPMAP can retain image details better than most of traditional restoration methods; at the same time, the proposed parameter D can help to identify real point spread function (PSF) value of degradation process. Processing result of practical remote-sensing images by MPMAP combined with parameter D are given, it illustrates that MPMAP restoration scheme combined PSF estimation has a better restoration result than that of Photoshop processing, based on the same original images. It is proved that the proposed scheme is helpful to offset the lack of resolution of the original remote-sensing images and has its extensive application foreground.

  5. Super-resolution Image Created from a Sequence of Images with Application of Character Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luiz de Almeida

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution techniques allow combine multiple images of the same scene to obtain an image with increased geometric and radiometric resolution, called super-resolution image. In this image are enhanced features allowing to recover important details and information. The objective of this work is to develop efficient algorithm, robust and automated fusion image frames to obtain a super-resolution image. Image registration is a fundamental step in combining several images that make up the scene. Our research is based on the determination and extraction of characteristics defined by the SIFT and RANSAC algorithms for automatic image registration. We use images containing characters and perform recognition of these characters to validate and show the effectiveness of our proposed method. The distinction of this work is the way to get the matching and merging of images because it occurs dynamically between elements common images that are stored in a dynamic matrix.

  6. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  7. Gradient-echo 3D imaging of Rb polarization in fiber-coupled atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, I

    2015-07-01

    The analogy between atomic and nuclear spins is exploited to implement 3D imaging of polarization inside the cell of an atomic magnetometer. The resolution of 0.8mm×1.2mm×1.4mm has been demonstrated with the gradient-echo imaging method. The imaging can be used in many applications. One such an application is the evaluation of active volume of an atomic magnetometer for sensitivity analysis and optimization. It has been found that imaging resolution is limited due to de-phasing from spin-exchange collisions and diffusion in the presence of gradients, and for a given magnetometer operational parameters, the imaging sequence has been optimized. Diffusion decay of the signal in the presence of gradients has been modeled numerically and analytically, and the analytical results, which agreed with numerical simulations, have been used to fit the spin-echo gradient measurements to extract the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient was found in agreement with previous measurements.

  8. Effect of chromatic aberration on atomic-resolved spherical aberration corrected STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Koji; Yamazaki, Takashi; Kotaka, Yasutoshi; Ohtsuka, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Iwao; Watanabe, Kazuto

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the chromatic aberration (C(c)) coefficient in a spherical aberration (C(s))- corrected electromagnetic lens on high-resolution high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images is explored in detail. A new method for precise determination of the C(c) coefficient is demonstrated, requiring measurement of an atomic-resolution one-frame through-focal HAADF STEM image. This method is robust with respect to instrumental drift, sample thickness, all lens parameters except C(c), and experimental noise. It is also demonstrated that semi-quantitative structural analysis on the nanometer scale can be achieved by comparing experimental C(s)- corrected HAADF STEM images with their corresponding simulated images when the effects of the C(c) coefficient and spatial incoherence are included.

  9. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-07-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  10. Imaging columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen with sub angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisielowski, C.; Hetherington, C.J.D.; Wang, Y.C.; Kilaas, R.; O' Keefe, M.A.; Thust, A.

    2000-01-02

    It is reported that lattice imaging with a 300 kV field emission microscope in combination with numerical reconstruction procedures can be used to reach an interpretable resolution of about 80 pm for the first time. A retrieval of the electron exit wave from focal series allows for the resolution of single atomic columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at a projected nearest neighbor spacing down to 85 pm. Lens aberrations are corrected on-line during the experiment and by hardware such that resulting image distortions are below 80 pm. Consequently, the imaging can be aberration-free to this extent. The resolution enhancement results from increased electrical and mechanical stability's of the instrument coupled with a low spherical aberration coefficient of 0.595 + 0.005 mm.

  11. Atomic resolution probe for allostery in the regulatory thin filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael R.; Lehman, Sarah J.; Tardiff, Jil C.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium binding and dissociation within the cardiac thin filament (CTF) is a fundamental regulator of normal contraction and relaxation. Although the disruption of this complex, allosterically mediated process has long been implicated in human disease, the precise atomic-level mechanisms remain opaque, greatly hampering the development of novel targeted therapies. To address this question, we used a fully atomistic CTF model to test both Ca2+ binding strength and the energy required to remove Ca2+ from the N-lobe binding site in WT and mutant troponin complexes that have been linked to genetic cardiomyopathies. This computational approach is combined with measurements of in vitro Ca2+ dissociation rates in fully reconstituted WT and cardiac troponin T R92L and R92W thin filaments. These human disease mutations represent known substitutions at the same residue, reside at a significant distance from the calcium binding site in cardiac troponin C, and do not affect either the binding pocket affinity or EF-hand structure of the binding domain. Both have been shown to have significantly different effects on cardiac function in vivo. We now show that these mutations independently alter the interaction between the Ca2+ ion and cardiac troponin I subunit. This interaction is a previously unidentified mechanism, in which mutations in one protein of a complex indirectly affect a third via structural and dynamic changes in a second to yield a pathogenic change in thin filament function that results in mutation-specific disease states. We can now provide atom-level insight that is potentially highly actionable in drug design. PMID:26957598

  12. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  13. Image resolution influence on determination of resin injection rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Hakami, Eva

    2006-01-01

    In the context of nuclear waste repositories, an important approach to understanding brittle rock mass behavior to integrate new and powerful observational and numerical methods with multi-functional 3-D imaging and visualization techniques. Since 1994, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) have identified the need for a better understanding of radionuclide transport and retention processes in fractured rock. As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyze rock fracture network by optical image technique. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV (Ultraviolet) light illumination. In the study period, we used different optical focuses to obtain the images from the same samples; we found that Image resolution influences on porosity determination of resin injected rock mass. This paper presents and discusses the six issues based on our research results: (1) Fracture porosity increases as camera focus distance decreases; (2) Porosity increases as illumination increases in resin injected fracture images; (3) To roughly estimate the porosity, the low resolution image can be used; (4) To collect more details of fracture information, the high resolution image is needed; (5) The resolution of image should be determined based on the aim of fracture analysis; (6) To acquire high resolution image, constructing a special illumination (standard) box maybe helpful to avoid light reflection and diffusion.

  14. Influence of imaging resolution on color fidelity in digital archiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchang; Toque, Jay Arre; Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Color fidelity is of paramount importance in digital archiving. In this paper, the relationship between color fidelity and imaging resolution was explored by calculating the color difference of an IT8.7/2 color chart with a CIELAB color difference formula for scanning and simulation images. Microscopic spatial sampling was used in selecting the image pixels for the calculations to highlight the loss of color information. A ratio, called the relative imaging definition (RID), was defined to express the correlation between image resolution and color fidelity. The results show that in order for color differences to remain unrecognizable, the imaging resolution should be at least 10 times higher than the physical dimension of the smallest feature in the object being studied.

  15. Heisenberg scaling of imaging resolution by coherent enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Yoder, Theodore J; Bruzewicz, Colin D; Chuang, Isaac L; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Classical imaging works by scattering photons from an object to be imaged, and achieves resolution scaling as $1/\\sqrt{t}$, with $t$ the imaging time. By contrast, the laws of quantum mechanics allow one to utilize quantum coherence to obtain imaging resolution that can scale as quickly as $1/t$ -- the so-called "Heisenberg limit." However, ambiguities in the obtained signal often preclude taking full advantage of this quantum enhancement, while imaging techniques designed to be unambiguous often lose this optimal Heisenberg scaling. Here, we demonstrate an imaging technique which combines unambiguous detection of the target with Heisenberg scaling of the resolution. We also demonstrate a binary search algorithm which can efficiently locate a coherent target using the technique, resolving a target trapped ion to within 3% of the $1/e^2$ diameter of the excitation beam.

  16. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  17. Edge Effects and Coupling Effects in Atomic Force Microscope Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiang-jun; MENGYong-gang; WENShi-zhu

    2004-01-01

    The AFM images were obtained by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and transformed from the deformation of AFM micro cantilever probe. However, due to the surface topography and surface forces applied on the AFM tip of sample, the deformation of AFM probe results in obvious edge effects and coupling effects in the AFM images. The deformation of AFM probe was analyzed,the mechanism of the edge effects and the coupling effects was investigated, and their results in the AFM images were studied. It is demanstrated by the theoretical analysis and AFM experiments that the edge effects make lateral force images more clear than the topography images, also make extraction of frictional force force from lateral force images mare complex and difficult. While the coupling effects make the comparison between topography images and lateral force images mare advantage to acquire precise topography information by AFM.

  18. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  19. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  20. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  1. Left-handed metamaterial coatings for subwavelength-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J; Pastor, David; Martínez, Luis E; Miret, Juan J

    2012-09-01

    We report on a procedure to improve the resolution of far-field imaging by using a neighboring high-index medium that is coated with a left-handed metamaterial. The resulting plot can also exhibit an enhanced transmission by considering proper conditions to retract backscattering. Based on negative refraction, geometrical aberrations are considered in detail since they may cause a great impact in this sort of diffraction-unlimited imaging by reducing its resolution power. We employ a standard aberration analysis to refine the asymmetric configuration of metamaterial superlenses. We demonstrate that low-order centrosymmetric aberrations can be fully corrected for a given object plane. For subwavelength-resolution imaging, however, high-order aberrations become of relevance, which may be balanced with defocus. Not only the point spread function but also numerical simulations based on the finite-element method support our theoretical analysis, and subwavelength resolution is verified in the image plane.

  2. Atomic resolution structure of serine protease proteinase K at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Song, Changyong; Nakane, Takanori; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Rie; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Mikami, Bunzo; Nureki, Osamu; Numata, Keiji; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    Atomic resolution structures (beyond 1.20 Å) at ambient temperature, which is usually hampered by the radiation damage in synchrotron X-ray crystallography (SRX), will add to our understanding of the structure-function relationships of enzymes. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) has attracted surging interest by providing a route to bypass such challenges. Yet the progress on atomic resolution analysis with SFX has been rather slow. In this report, we describe the 1.20 Å resolution structure of proteinase K using 13 keV photon energy. Hydrogen atoms, water molecules, and a number of alternative side-chain conformations have been resolved. The increase in the value of B-factor in SFX suggests that the residues and water molecules adjacent to active sites were flexible and exhibited dynamic motions at specific substrate-recognition sites. PMID:28361898

  3. High resolution 3-D wavelength diversity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, N. H.

    1981-09-01

    A physical optics, vector formulation of microwave imaging of perfectly conducting objects by wavelength and polarization diversity is presented. The results provide the theoretical basis for optimal data acquisition and three-dimensional tomographic image retrieval procedures. These include: (a) the selection of highly thinned (sparse) receiving array arrangements capable of collecting large amounts of information about remote scattering objects in a cost effective manner and (b) techniques for 3-D tomographic image reconstruction and display in which polarization diversity data is fully accounted for. Data acquisition employing a highly attractive AMTDR (Amplitude Modulated Target Derived Reference) technique is discussed and demonstrated by computer simulation. Equipment configuration for the implementation of the AMTDR technique is also given together with a measurement configuration for the implementation of wavelength diversity imaging in a roof experiment aimed at imaging a passing aircraft. Extension of the theory presented to 3-D tomographic imaging of passive noise emitting objects by spectrally selective far field cross-correlation measurements is also given. Finally several refinements made in our anechoic-chamber measurement system are shown to yield drastic improvement in performance and retrieved image quality.

  4. HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE PROJECTION IN FREQUENCY DOMAIN FOR CONTINUOUS IMAGE SEQUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nagaraju Naik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most other information technologies, which have enjoyed an exponential growth for the past several decades, display resolution has largely stagnated. Low display resolution has in turn limited the resolution of digital images. Scaling is a non-trivial process that involves a trade-off between efficiency, smoothness and sharpness. As the size of an image is increased, so the pixels, which comprise the image, become increasingly visible, making the image to appear soft. Super scalar representation of image sequence is limited due to image information present in low dimensional image sequence. To project a image frame sequence into high-resolution static or fractional scalingvalue, a scaling approach is developed based on energy spectral interpolation and frequency spectral interpolation techniques. To realize the frequency spectral resolution Cubic-B-Spline method is used.

  5. Site-resolved imaging of single atoms with a Faraday quantum gas microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ryuta; Kato, Kohei; Kuno, Takuma; Sakura, Yuto; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrate a quantum gas microscopy using the Faraday effect which has an inherently non-destructive nature. The observed Faraday rotation angle reaches 3.0(2) degrees for a single atom. We reveal the non-destructive feature of this Faraday imaging method by comparing the detuning dependence of the Faraday signal strength with that of the photon scattering rate. We determine the atom distribution with deconvolution analysis. We also demonstrate the absorption and the dark field Faraday imaging, and reveal the different shapes of the point spread functions for these methods, which are fully explained by theoretical analysis. Our result is an important first step towards an ultimate quantum non-demolition site-resolved imaging and furthermore opens up the possibilities for quantum feedback control of a quantum many-body system with a single-site resolution.

  6. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  7. GravityCam: Higher Resolution Visible Wide-Field Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Craig; Steele, Iain

    2016-01-01

    The limits to the angular resolution achievable with conventional ground-based telescopes are unchanged over 70 years. Atmospheric turbulence limits image quality to typically ~1 arcsec in practice. We have developed a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument called GravityCam capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. The acquisition of visible images at high speed without significant noise penalty has been made possible by advances in optical and near IR imaging technologies. Images are recorded at high speed and then aligned before combination and can yield a 3-5 fold improvement in image resolution. Very wide survey fields are possible with widefield telescope optics. We describe GravityCam and detail its application to accelerate greatly the rate of detection of Earth size planets by gravitational microlensing. GravityCam will also improve substantially the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant...

  8. Comparison between two super-resolution implementations in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Qiao, Feng; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2009-04-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this article, the authors propose a novel implementation of the SR technique whereby the required multiple low-resolution images are generated by shifting the reconstruction pixel grid during the image reconstruction process rather than being acquired from different POVs. The objective of this article is to compare the performances of the two SR implementations using theoretical and experimental studies. A mathematical framework is first provided to support the hypothesis that the two SR implementations have similar performance in current PET/CT scanners that use block detectors. Based on this framework, a simulation study, a point source study, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted to compare the performance of these two SR implementations with respect to contrast, resolution, noise, and SNR. For reference purposes, a comparison with a native reconstruction (NR) image using a high-resolution pixel grid was also performed. The mathematical framework showed that the two SR implementations are expected to achieve similar contrast and resolution but different noise contents. These results were confirmed by the simulation and experimental studies. The simulation study showed that the two SR implementations have an average contrast difference of 2.3%, while the point source study showed that their average differences in contrast and resolution were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Comparisons between the SR and NR images for the point source study showed that the NR image exhibited averages of 30% and 8% lower contrast and resolution, respectively. The NEMA/IEC phantom study showed that the three images (two SR and NR) exhibited different noise structures. The SNR of the new SR implementation was, on average, 21.5% lower than the original implementation largely due to an

  9. SINGLE FRAME SUPER RESOLUTION OF NONCOOPERATIVE IRIS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution, a process to enhance image resolution, has important applications in biometrics, satellite imaging, high definition television, medical imaging, etc. The long range captured iris identification systems often suffer from low resolution and meager focus of the captured iris images. These degrade the iris recognition performance. This paper proposes enhanced iterated back projection (EIBP method to super resolute the long range captured iris polar images. The performance of proposed method is tested and analyzed on CASIA long range iris database by comparing peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity index (SSIM with state-of-the-art super resolution (SR algorithms. It is further analyzed by increasing the up-sampling factor. Performance analysis shows that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art algorithms, the peak signal-to-noise ratio improved about 0.1-1.5 dB. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is well suited to super resolve the iris polar images captured at a long distance

  10. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  11. Robust Microbubble Tracking for Super Resolution Imaging in Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, kristoffer B; Villagómez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Currently ultrasound resolution is limited by diffraction to approximately half the wavelength of the sound wave employed. In recent years, super resolution imaging techniques have overcome the diffraction limit through the localization and tracking of a sparse set of microbubbles through...... the vasculature. However, this has only been performed on fixated tissue, limiting its clinical application. This paper proposes a technique for making super resolution images on non-fixated tissue by first compensating for tissue movement and then tracking the individual microbubbles. The experiment is performed...

  12. Enhancing resolution along multiple imaging dimensions using assorted pixels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Srinivasa G; Nayar, Shree K

    2005-04-01

    Multisampled imaging is a general framework for using pixels on an image detector to simultaneously sample multiple dimensions of imaging (space, time, spectrum, brightness, polarization, etc.). The mosaic of red, green, and blue spectral filters found in most solid-state color cameras is one example of multisampled imaging. We briefly describe how multisampling can be used to explore other dimensions of imaging. Once such an image is captured, smooth reconstructions along the individual dimensions can be obtained using standard interpolation algorithms. Typically, this results in a substantial reduction of resolution (and, hence, image quality). One can extract significantly greater resolution in each dimension by noting that the light fields associated with real scenes have enormous redundancies within them, causing different dimensions to be highly correlated. Hence, multisampled images can be better interpolated using local structural models that are learned offline from a diverse set of training images. The specific type of structural models we use are based on polynomial functions of measured image intensities. They are very effective as well as computationally efficient. We demonstrate the benefits of structural interpolation using three specific applications. These are 1) traditional color imaging with a mosaic of color filters, 2) high dynamic range monochrome imaging using a mosaic of exposure filters, and 3) high dynamic range color imaging using a mosaic of overlapping color and exposure filters.

  13. Intermolecular Contrast in Atomic Force Microscopy Images without Intermolecular Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hämäläinen, Sampsa K.; van der Heijden, N.J. (Nadine); van der Lit, Joost; den Hartog, Stephan; Liljeroth, Peter; Swart, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Intermolecular features in atomic force microscopy images of organic molecules have been ascribed to intermolecular bonds. A recent theoretical study [P. Hapala et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 085421 (2014)] showed that these features can also be explained by the flexibility of molecule-terminated tips. We

  14. Image Super-Resolution Using Deep Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Loy, Chen Change; He, Kaiming; Tang, Xiaoou

    2016-02-01

    We propose a deep learning method for single image super-resolution (SR). Our method directly learns an end-to-end mapping between the low/high-resolution images. The mapping is represented as a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that takes the low-resolution image as the input and outputs the high-resolution one. We further show that traditional sparse-coding-based SR methods can also be viewed as a deep convolutional network. But unlike traditional methods that handle each component separately, our method jointly optimizes all layers. Our deep CNN has a lightweight structure, yet demonstrates state-of-the-art restoration quality, and achieves fast speed for practical on-line usage. We explore different network structures and parameter settings to achieve trade-offs between performance and speed. Moreover, we extend our network to cope with three color channels simultaneously, and show better overall reconstruction quality.

  15. Resolution criteria in double-slit microscopic imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shangting; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Double-slit imaging is widely used for verifying the resolution of high-resolution and super-resolution microscopies. However, due to the fabrication limits, the slit width is generally non-negligible, which can affect the claimed resolution. In this paper we theoretically calculate the electromagnetic field distribution inside and near the metallic double slit using waveguide mode expansion method, and acquire the far-field image by vectorial Fourier optics. We find that the slit width has minimal influence when the illuminating light is polarized parallel to the slits. In this case, the claimed resolution should be based on the center-to-center distance of the double-slit. PMID:27640808

  16. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Terence T W; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Tang, Matthew Y H; Robles, Joseph D F; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C S; Tang, Anson H L; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Godfrey C F; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity- a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry- permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individu...

  17. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  18. High resolution OCT image generation using super resolution via sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad Usman; Hassan, Taimur; Shaukat, Arslan; Waqar, Razi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for obtaining a high resolution (HR) image from a single low resolution (LR) image -using joint learning dictionary - on the basis of image statistic research. It suggests that with an appropriate choice of an over-complete dictionary, image patches can be well represented as a sparse linear combination. Medical imaging for clinical analysis and medical intervention is being used for creating visual representations of the interior of a body, as well as visual representation of the function of some organs or tissues (physiology). A number of medical imaging techniques are in use like MRI, CT scan, X-rays and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT is one of the new technologies in medical imaging and one of its uses is in ophthalmology where it is being used for analysis of the choroidal thickness in the eyes in healthy and disease states such as age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, diabetic retinopathy and inherited retinal dystrophies. We have proposed a technique for enhancing the OCT images which can be used for clearly identifying and analyzing the particular diseases. Our method uses dictionary learning technique for generating a high resolution image from a single input LR image. We train two joint dictionaries, one with OCT images and the second with multiple different natural images, and compare the results with previous SR technique. Proposed method for both dictionaries produces HR images which are comparatively superior in quality with the other proposed method of SR. Proposed technique is very effective for noisy OCT images and produces up-sampled and enhanced OCT images.

  19. High-Resolution Imaging of Dendrimers Used in Drug Delivery via Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers and telodendrimer micelles represent two new classes of vehicles for drug delivery that have attracted much attention recently. Their structural characterization at the molecular and submolecular level remains a challenge due to the difficulties in reaching high resolution when imaging small particles in their native media. This investigation offers a new approach towards this challenge, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. By using new sample preparation protocols, this work demonstrates that (a intramolecular features such as drug molecules and dendrimer termini can be resolved; and (b telodendrimer micelles can be immobilized on the surface without compromising structural integrity, and as such, high resolution AFM imaging may be performed to attain 3D information. This high-resolution structural information should enhance our knowledge of the nanocarrier structure and nanocarrier-drug interaction and, therefore, facilitate design and optimization of the efficiency in drug delivery.

  20. An Effective Multi-Frame Super Resolution of Image from Blurry and Noisy Images Using PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati A. Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image super-resolution are techniques aiming restoration of a high-resolution image from one or several low-resolution observation images, which offer the advantages overcoming some of the inherent resolution limitations of low-cost imaging sensors (e.g., satellite image, cell phone, camera’s or surveillance camera’s, and allow better utilization of the growing capability and noise free image of HR displays. Conventional image super-resolution approaches normally require multiple LR inputs of the same scene with sub-pixel motions. This paper attempts to undertake the study of the super-resolution restoration problem and improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy images. The super-resolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the filters such as Median Filter, Adaptive Wiener Filter, Gaussian Filter these different noise densities have been removed between 10% to 65%. The Principal Component analysis (PCA is the technique which is useful for improving the image sharpness after the process of de-blurring

  1. On the Adaptability of Neural Network Image Super-Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Kah Keong; Tay, Yong Haur

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we described and developed a framework for Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) to work on low level image processing, where MLP will be used to perform image super-resolution. Meanwhile, MLP are trained with different types of images from various categories, hence analyse the behaviour and performance of the neural network. The tests are carried out using qualitative test, in which Mean Squared Error (MSE), Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Structural Similarity Index (SSIM). The r...

  2. Image Resolution of a Holographic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    transfer function and linear systems theory to optical systems. This has also been applied to holographic image analysis (Refs. l I and 12). The...view point, the linear systems theory is applied in correlating the intensity distribution of a known point or line radiation source with the intensity...function of a holographic system, (2) a discussion of linear systems theory to allow a thorough description of a method for obtaining the line

  3. Optimization of super-resolution processing using incomplete image sets in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2008-12-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POVs). The number of low-resolution images used defines the processing time and memory storage necessary to generate the SR image. In this paper, the authors propose two optimized SR implementations (ISR-1 and ISR-2) that require only a subset of the low-resolution images (two sides and diagonal of the image matrix, respectively), thereby reducing the overall processing time and memory storage. In an N x N matrix of low-resolution images, ISR-1 would be generated using images from the two sides of the N x N matrix, while ISR-2 would be generated from images across the diagonal of the image matrix. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether the two proposed SR methods can achieve similar performance in contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the SR image generated from a complete set of low-resolution images (CSR) using simulation and experimental studies. A simulation, a point source, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted for this investigation. In each study, 4 (2 x 2) or 16 (4 x 4) low-resolution images were reconstructed from the same acquired data set while shifting the reconstruction grid to generate images from different POVs. SR processing was then applied in each study to combine all as well as two different subsets of the low-resolution images to generate the CSR, ISR-1, and ISR-2 images, respectively. For reference purpose, a native reconstruction (NR) image using the same matrix size as the three SR images was also generated. The resultant images (CSR, ISR-1, ISR-2, and NR) were then analyzed using visual inspection, line profiles, SNR plots, and background noise spectra. The simulation study showed that the contrast and the SNR difference between the two ISR images and the CSR image were on average 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Line profiles of

  4. Semantic-based high resolution remote sensing image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dihua

    High Resolution Remote Sensing (HRRS) imagery has been experiencing extraordinary development in the past decade. Technology development means increased resolution imagery is available at lower cost, making it a precious resource for planners, environmental scientists, as well as others who can learn from the ground truth. Image retrieval plays an important role in managing and accessing huge image database. Current image retrieval techniques, cannot satisfy users' requests on retrieving remote sensing images based on semantics. In this dissertation, we make two fundamental contributions to the area of content based image retrieval. First, we propose a novel unsupervised texture-based segmentation approach suitable for accurately segmenting HRRS images. The results of existing segmentation algorithms dramatically deteriorate if simply adopted to HRRS images. This is primarily clue to the multi-texture scales and the high level noise present in these images. Therefore, we propose an effective and efficient segmentation model, which is a two-step process. At high-level, we improved the unsupervised segmentation algorithm by coping with two special features possessed by HRRS images. By preprocessing images with wavelet transform, we not only obtain multi-resolution images but also denoise the original images. By optimizing the splitting results, we solve the problem of textons in HRRS images existing in different scales. At fine level, we employ fuzzy classification segmentation techniques with adjusted parameters for different land cover. We implement our algorithm using real world 1-foot resolution aerial images. Second, we devise methodologies to automatically annotate HRRS images based on semantics. In this, we address the issue of semantic feature selection, the major challenge faced by semantic-based image retrieval. To discover and make use of hidden semantics of images is application dependent. One type of the semantics in HRRS image is conveyed by composite

  5. High resolution surface plasmon microscopy for cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoul, F.; Monier, K.; Roland, T.; Elezgaray, J.; Berguiga, L.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new non-labeling high resolution microscopy method for cellular imaging. This method called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) pushes down the resolution limit of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) to sub-micronic scales. High resolution SPRi is obtained by the surface plasmon lauching with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The advantages of SPPM compared to other high resolution SPRi's rely on three aspects; (i) the interferometric detection of the back reflected light after plasmon excitation, (ii) the twodimensional scanning of the sample for image reconstruction, (iii) the radial polarization of light, enhancing both resolution and sensitivity. This microscope can afford a lateral resolution of - 150 nm in liquid environment and - 200 nm in air. We present in this paper images of IMR90 fibroblasts obtained with SSPM in dried environment. Internal compartments such as nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, cellular and nuclear membrane can be recognized without labelling. We propose an interpretation of the ability of SSPM to reveal high index contrast zones by a local decomposition of the V (Z) function describing the response of the SSPM.

  6. Resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction for a high-resolution animal SPECT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Sajedi, Salar; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Arabi, Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    The small-animal High-Resolution SPECT (HiReSPECT) is a dedicated dual-head gamma camera recently designed and developed in our laboratory for imaging of murine models. Each detector is composed of an array of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) (pitch) pixelated CsI(Na) crystals. Two position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) are coupled to each head's crystal. In this paper, we report on a resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction code applicable to the system and present the experimental results achieved using different phantoms and mouse scans. Collimator-detector response functions (CDRFs) were measured via a pixel-driven method using capillary sources at finite distances from the head within the field of view (FOV). CDRFs were then fitted by independent Gaussian functions. Thereafter, linear interpolations were applied to the standard deviation (σ) values of the fitted Gaussians, yielding a continuous map of CDRF at varying distances from the head. A rotation-based maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was used for reconstruction. A fast rotation algorithm was developed to rotate the image matrix according to the desired angle by means of pre-generated rotation maps. The experiments demonstrated improved resolution utilizing our resolution-recovery-embedded image reconstruction. While the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) radial and tangential resolution measurements of the system were over 2 mm in nearly all positions within the FOV without resolution recovery, reaching around 2.5 mm in some locations, they fell below 1.8 mm everywhere within the FOV using the resolution-recovery algorithm. The noise performance of the system was also acceptable; the standard deviation of the average counts per voxel in the reconstructed images was 6.6% and 8.3% without and with resolution recovery, respectively.

  7. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  8. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-06-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions.

  9. Atomic-resolution chemical mapping of ordered precipitates in Al alloys using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Sigurd; Jones, Lewys; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2017-05-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a common technique for chemical mapping in thin samples. Obtaining high-resolution elemental maps in the STEM is jointly dependent on stepping the sharply focused electron probe in a precise raster, on collecting a significant number of characteristic X-rays over time, and on avoiding damage to the sample. In this work, 80kV aberration-corrected STEM-EDS mapping was performed on ordered precipitates in aluminium alloys. Probe and sample instability problems are handled by acquiring series of annular dark-field (ADF) images and simultaneous EDS volumes, which are aligned and non-rigidly registered after acquisition. The summed EDS volumes yield elemental maps of Al, Mg, Si, and Cu, with sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise ratio to determine the elemental species of each atomic column in a periodic structure, and in some cases the species of single atomic columns. Within the uncertainty of the technique, S and β" phases were found to have pure elemental atomic columns with compositions Al2CuMg and Al2Mg5Si4, respectively. The Q' phase showed some variation in chemistry across a single precipitate, although the majority of unit cells had a composition Al6Mg6Si7.2Cu2.

  10. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as "Einstein Rings" in high resolution images. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope $\\gamma'$ of the...

  11. Super Resolution from Hyperview Image Stack by Spatial Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2016-09-01

    An image stack for a hyperview representation could contain millions of different perspective views with extreme image similarity. The recording of all views from a computational 3d model implicates a lateral displacement of the virtual camera. Because of the huge number of views, the offset in between two adjoining camera positions can be very minor. If such a virtual setup reproduces a real hyperview screen setup, the offset can be below the wavelength of the visible light. But even with such small changes, there is an intrinsic probability for a measurable difference in between two neighbour images. Such image dissimilarity can be proofed successfully also in very basic 3d scenes. By using a quantity of juxtapositional images from the hyperview image stack, the resolution of the rendered images can be considerably improved, which is commonly known as super resolution. The utilisation of super resolution images in hyperview could cut the necessity of full frame computing and will reduce the effective render time.

  12. Coupled Deep Autoencoder for Single Image Super-Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kun; Yu, Jun; Wang, Ruxin; Li, Cuihua; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding has been widely applied to learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) and has obtained promising performance by jointly learning effective representations for low-resolution (LR) and high-resolution (HR) image patch pairs. However, the resulting HR images often suffer from ringing, jaggy, and blurring artifacts due to the strong yet ad hoc assumptions that the LR image patch representation is equal to, is linear with, lies on a manifold similar to, or has the same support set as the corresponding HR image patch representation. Motivated by the success of deep learning, we develop a data-driven model coupled deep autoencoder (CDA) for single image SR. CDA is based on a new deep architecture and has high representational capability. CDA simultaneously learns the intrinsic representations of LR and HR image patches and a big-data-driven function that precisely maps these LR representations to their corresponding HR representations. Extensive experimentation demonstrates the superior effectiveness and efficiency of CDA for single image SR compared to other state-of-the-art methods on Set5 and Set14 datasets.

  13. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  14. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency.

  15. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rakhshan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs.

  16. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs. PMID:25469352

  17. Image Resolution in the Digital Era: Notion and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rakhshan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs.

  18. An integral design strategy combining optical system and image processing to obtain high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoyang; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ying; Gong, Rui; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liang, Chao; Xu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an integral design that combines optical system with image processing is introduced to obtain high resolution images, and the performance is evaluated and demonstrated. Traditional imaging methods often separate the two technical procedures of optical system design and imaging processing, resulting in the failures in efficient cooperation between the optical and digital elements. Therefore, an innovative approach is presented to combine the merit function during optical design together with the constraint conditions of image processing algorithms. Specifically, an optical imaging system with low resolution is designed to collect the image signals which are indispensable for imaging processing, while the ultimate goal is to obtain high resolution images from the final system. In order to optimize the global performance, the optimization function of ZEMAX software is utilized and the number of optimization cycles is controlled. Then Wiener filter algorithm is adopted to process the image simulation and mean squared error (MSE) is taken as evaluation criterion. The results show that, although the optical figures of merit for the optical imaging systems is not the best, it can provide image signals that are more suitable for image processing. In conclusion. The integral design of optical system and image processing can search out the overall optimal solution which is missed by the traditional design methods. Especially, when designing some complex optical system, this integral design strategy has obvious advantages to simplify structure and reduce cost, as well as to gain high resolution images simultaneously, which has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  19. Super-resolution imaging based on virtual Airy spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Guo, Cheng; Cui, Junning; Wu, Qun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the theoretical model of Airy spot, a method is proposed for improving the imaging speed from confocal microscopy. The virtual Airy spot is designed for obtaining the pattern on CCD at detecting plane. Here the size of the spot is determined by the parameters of imaging system and intensity data from point detector, which can receive data quicker than CCD. The treatment can improve the speed of imaging comparing with CCD at receiving end. The virtual structured detection is also utilized for generating high-resolution image. Some numerical simulation results are provided for demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  20. High Resolution Linear Polarimetric Imaging for the Event Horizon Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chael, Andrew A; Narayan, Ramesh; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Wardle, John F C; Bouman, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Images of the linear polarization of synchrotron radiation around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identify their projected magnetic field lines and provide key data for understanding the physics of accretion and outflow from supermassive black holes. The highest resolution polarimetric images of AGN are produced with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Because VLBI incompletely samples the Fourier transform of the source image, any image reconstruction that fills in unmeasured spatial frequencies will not be unique and reconstruction algorithms are required. In this paper, we explore extensions of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to linear polarimetric VLBI imaging. In contrast to previous work, our polarimetric MEM algorithm combines a Stokes I imager that uses only bispectrum measurements that are immune to atmospheric phase corruption with a joint Stokes Q and U imager that operates on robust polarimetric ratios. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique on 7- and 3-mm wavelength quasar observat...

  1. High Speed and High Resolution Table-Top Nanoscale Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, G K; Demmler, S; HÄdrich, S; Wahyutama, I; Steinert, M; Spielmann, C; ZÜrch, M; TÜnnermann, A; Limpert, J; Rothhardt, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a table-top coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiment based on high-order harmonics generated at 18 nm by a high average power femtosecond fiber laser system. The high photon flux, narrow spectral bandwidth and high degree of spatial coherence allow for ultra-high sub-wavelength resolution imaging at a high numerical aperture. Our experiments demonstrate a half-pitch resolution of 13.6 nm, very close to the actual Abbe-limit of 12.4 nm, which is the highest resolution achieved from any table-top XUV or X-ray microscope. In addition, 20.5 nm resolution was achieved with only 3 sec of integration time bringing live diffraction imaging and 3D tomography on the nanoscale one step closer to reality. The current resolution is solely limited by the wavelength and the detector size. Thus, table-top nanoscopes with only a few-nm resolutions are in reach and will find applications in many areas of science and technology.

  2. Vehicle Detection and Classification from High Resolution Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, L.; Sasikumar, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the past decades satellite imagery has been used successfully for weather forecasting, geographical and geological applications. Low resolution satellite images are sufficient for these sorts of applications. But the technological developments in the field of satellite imaging provide high resolution sensors which expands its field of application. Thus the High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) proved to be a suitable alternative to aerial photogrammetric data to provide a new data source for object detection. Since the traffic rates in developing countries are enormously increasing, vehicle detection from satellite data will be a better choice for automating such systems. In this work, a novel technique for vehicle detection from the images obtained from high resolution sensors is proposed. Though we are using high resolution images, vehicles are seen only as tiny spots, difficult to distinguish from the background. But we are able to obtain a detection rate not less than 0.9. Thereafter we classify the detected vehicles into cars and trucks and find the count of them.

  3. Super resolution imaging of HER2 gene amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaya; Kubo, Takuya; Masumoto, Kanako; Iwanaga, Shigeki

    2016-02-01

    HER2 positive breast cancer is currently examined by counting HER2 genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-stained breast carcinoma samples. In this research, two-dimensional super resolution fluorescence microscopy based on stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), with a spatial resolution of approximately 20 nm in the lateral direction, was used to more precisely distinguish and count HER2 genes in a FISH-stained tissue section. Furthermore, by introducing double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF), an optical phase modulation technique, to super resolution microscopy, three-dimensional images were obtained of HER2 in a breast carcinoma sample approximately 4 μm thick.

  4. 3D super-resolution imaging by localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Astrid; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in all fields of biology to visualize structures and monitor dynamic processes and distributions. Contrary to conventional microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are limited by their spatial resolution, super-resolution techniques such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have made it possible to observe and quantify structure and processes on the single molecule level. Here, we describe a method to image and quantify the molecular distribution of membrane-associated proteins in two and three dimensions with nanometer resolution.

  5. Color-Coded Super-Resolution Small-Molecule Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuzer, Paolo; La Clair, James J; Cang, Hu

    2016-06-02

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy dates back to 1994, its applications have been primarily focused on visualizing cellular structures and targets, including proteins, DNA and sugars. We now report on a system that allows both monitoring of the localization of exogenous small molecules in live cells at low resolution and subsequent super-resolution imaging by using stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) on fixed cells. This represents a powerful new tool to understand the dynamics of subcellular trafficking associated with the mode and mechanism of action of exogenous small molecules.

  6. Towards an automatic tool for resolution evaluation of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, J. E. E. [FUMEC, Av. Alfonso Pena 3880, CEP 30130-009 Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S., E-mail: juliae@fumec.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Quality of Mammographies from the Public and Private Services of the State. With an essentially educational character, an evaluation of the image quality is monthly held from a breast phantom in each mammographic equipment. In face of this, this work proposes to develop a protocol for automatic evaluation of image quality of mammograms so that the radiological protection and image quality requirements are met in the early detection of breast cancer. Specifically, image resolution will be addressed and evaluated, as a part of the program of image quality evaluation. Results show that for the fourth resolution and using 28 phantom images with the ground truth settled, the computer analysis of the resolution is promising and may be used as a tool for the assessment of the image quality. (Author)

  7. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  8. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  9. A Multi Resolution Method for Detecting Defects in Fabric Images

    OpenAIRE

    Jianyun Ni; Jing Luo; Zaiping Chen; Enzeng Dong

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a novel technique for detecting defects in fabric image based on the features extracted using a new multi resolution analysis tool called Digital Curvelet Transform. The direction features of curvelet coefficients and texture features based on GLCM of curvelet coefficients act as the feature-sets for a k-nearest neighbor classifier. The validation tests on the developed algorithms were performed with images from TILDA’s Textile Texture Database. A comparative study between...

  10. Towards wide-field high-resolution retinal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optical correction is an efficient technique to obtain high-resolution images of the retinal surface. A main limitation of adaptive optical correction, however, is the small size of the corrected image. For medical purposes it is important to increase the size of the corrected images. This can be done through composite imaging, but a major difficulty is then the introduction of reconstruction artifacts. Another approach is multi-conjugate adaptive optics. MCAO comes in two flavors. The star- oriented approach has been demonstrated on the eye and allows to increase the diameter of the corrected image by a factor of approximately 2-3. Difficulties in the tomographic reconstruction precludes the correction of larger fields. Here we have investigate the possibility to apply a layer-oriented MCAO approach to retinal imaging.

  11. High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Duchin, Yuval; Ullberg, Christer; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with applying iterative image reconstruction, based on constrained total-variation minimization, to low-intensity X-ray CT systems that have a high sampling rate. Such systems pose a challenge for iterative image reconstruction, because a very fine image grid is needed to realize the resolution inherent in such scanners. These image arrays lead to under-determined imaging models whose inversion is unstable and can result in undesirable artifacts and noise patterns. There are many possibilities to stabilize the imaging model, and this work proposes a method which may have an advantage in terms of algorithm efficiency. The proposed method introduces additional constraints in the optimization problem; these constraints set to zero high spatial frequency components which are beyond the sensing capability of the detector. The method is demonstrated with an actual CT data set and compared with another method based on projection up-sampling.

  12. Versatile objective lenses for single atom trapping and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, J D; Saffman, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a pair of optimized objective lenses with long working distances of 117~mm and 65~mm respectively that offer diffraction limited performance for both Cs and Rb wavelengths when imaging through standard vacuum windows. The designs utilise standard catalog lens elements to provide a simple and cost-effective solution. Objective 1 provides $\\mathrm{NA}=0.175$ offering 3~$\\mu$m resolution whilst objective 2 is optimized for high collection efficiency with $\\mathrm{NA}=0.29$ and 1.8~$\\mu$m resolution. This flexible design can be further extended for use at shorter wavelengths by simply re-optimising the lens separations.

  13. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Seismic exploration utilizes controlled sources, which emit seismic waves that propagate through the earth subsurface and get reflected off subsurface interfaces and scatterers. The reflected and scattered waves are recorded by recording stations installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single-scattering assumption, where only energy that bounces once off a subsurface scatterer and recorded by a receiver is projected back to its subsurface position. The internally multiply scattered seismic energy is considered as unwanted noise and is usually suppressed or removed from the recorded data. Conventional seismic imaging techniques yield subsurface images that suffer from low spatial resolution, migration artifacts, and acquisition fingerprint due to the limited acquisition aperture, number of sources and receivers, and bandwidth of the source wavelet. Hydrocarbon traps are becoming more challenging and considerable reserves are trapped in stratigraphic and pinch-out traps, which require highly resolved seismic images to delineate them. This thesis focuses on developing and implementing new advanced cost-effective seismic imaging techniques aiming at enhancing the resolution of the migrated images by exploiting the sparseness of the subsurface reflectivity distribution and utilizing the multiples that are usually neglected when imaging seismic data. I first formulate the seismic imaging problem as a Basis pursuit denoise problem, which I solve using an L1-minimization algorithm to obtain the sparsest migrated image corresponding to the recorded data. Imaging multiples may illuminate subsurface zones, which are not easily illuminated by conventional seismic imaging using primary reflections only. I then develop an L2-norm (i.e. least-squares) inversion technique to image

  14. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  15. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  16. Ultra-high-resolution small-animal SPECT imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, F. van der

    2007-01-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the development of the first two in a series of dedicated ultra-high resolution Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems (U-SPECT-I and II) for the imaging of distributions of radio-isotope labeled tracers in small laboratory animals such as mice

  17. Effects of pose and image resolution on automatic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Ali, Tauseef; Khan, Samee U.

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of face recognition systems have increased due to their use in widespread applications. Driven by the enormous number of potential application domains, several algorithms have been proposed for face recognition. Face pose and image resolutions are among the two important factors that

  18. Super-resolution Microscopy in Plant Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy methods dates back to 1994, relevant applications in plant cell imaging only started to emerge in 2010. Since then, the principal super-resolution methods, including structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), have been implemented in plant cell research. However, progress has been limited due to the challenging properties of plant material. Here we summarize the basic principles of existing super-resolution methods and provide examples of applications in plant science. The limitations imposed by the nature of plant material are reviewed and the potential for future applications in plant cell imaging is highlighted.

  19. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  20. State of the art in atomic resolution off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linck, Martin, E-mail: mlinck@lbl.gov [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Freitag, Bert; Kujawa, Stephan [FEI Company, Eindhoven, Building AAE, Achtseweg Noord 5, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael; Niermann, Tore [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    As proposed by Hannes Lichte, to resolve structure-property relations not only the question 'Which atom is where?' but also the question 'Which fields are around?' has to be answered. High-resolution off-axis electron holography opens up an access to these key questions in that it allows accessing the complete exit-wave of the object provided within the information limit of the microscope, i.e. amplitude and phase including atomic details such as position and species, and moreover, information about large area electric potentials and magnetic fields, which a conventional transmission electron microscope is blind for-also when using a Cs-corrector. For an excellent object exit-wave reconstruction, special care has to be taken on the hologram quality, i.e. interference fringe contrast and electron dose. Severe restrictions are given to signal resolution by the limited brightness of the electron source. Utilizing a new high-brightness Schottky field electron emitter in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV, the phase signal resolution at atomic resolution can significantly be enhanced. An improvement by at least a factor of 2.88 compared to the most recently reported single hologram at atomic resolution is found. To proof the applicability of this setup to real materials science problems, a grain boundary of gold has been investigated holographically. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impact of the brightness on the reconstructed signal in electron holography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factor 2.8 gain in signal quality by setup with a high brightness electron gun. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of a grain boundary in gold with a state-of-the-art holography setup. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-posteriori aberration fine-tuning for true one Angstrom resolution in the object wave. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mistilt analysis on the atomic scale by numerical wave optics.

  1. High-resolution Image Reconstruction by Neural Network and Its Application in Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; JIN Wei-qi; SU Bing-hua

    2005-01-01

    As digital image techniques have been widely used, the requirements for high-resolution images become increasingly stringent. Traditional single-frame interpolation techniques cannot add new high frequency information to the expanded images, and cannot improve resolution in deed. Multiframe-based techniques are effective ways for high-resolution image reconstruction, but their computation complexities and the difficulties in achieving image sequences limit their applications. An original method using an artificial neural network is proposed in this paper. Using the inherent merits in neural network, we can establish the mapping between high frequency components in low-resolution images and high-resolution images. Example applications and their results demonstrated the images reconstructed by our method are aesthetically and quantitatively (using the criteria of MSE and MAE) superior to the images acquired by common methods. Even for infrared images this method can give satisfactory results with high definition. In addition, a single-layer linear neural network is used in this paper, the computational complexity is very low, and this method can be realized in real time.

  2. High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single Component Reference Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NC. 14. ABSTRACT A high-resolution numerical simulation of jet breakup and spray formation from a complex diesel fuel injector at diesel engine ... diesel fuel injector at diesel engine type conditions has been performed. A full understanding of the primary atomization process in diesel fuel...the capability of a recently adopted high fidelity two phase flow solver in the context of diesel engine sprays. Previous works relating to this

  3. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  4. Numerical simulations of volume holographic imaging system resolution characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajun; Jiang, Zhuqing; Liu, Shaojie; Tao, Shiquan

    2009-05-01

    Because of the Bragg selectivity of volume holographic gratings, it helps VHI system to optically segment the object space. In this paper, properties of point-source diffraction imaging in terms of the point-spread function (PSF) are investigated, and characteristics of depth and lateral resolutions in a VHI system is numerically simulated. The results show that the observed diffracted field obviously changes with the displacement in the z direction, and is nearly unchanged with displacement in the x and y directions. The dependence of the diffracted imaging field on the z-displacement provides a way to possess 3-D image by VHI.

  5. Quality enhancement of low-resolution image by using natural images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgazyev, E.; Yeniaras, E.; Uyanik, I.; Unan, M.; Leiss, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm to estimate a super-resolution image from a given low-resolution image, by adding high-frequency information that is extracted from natural high-resolution images in the training dataset. The selection of the high-frequency information from the training dataset is accomplished in two steps: a nearest-neighbor search algorithm is used to select the closest images from the training dataset, which can be implemented in the GPU, and a sparse-representation algorithm is used to estimate a weight parameter to combine the high-frequency information of selected images. This simple but very powerful super-resolution algorithm can produce state-of-the-art results. Qualitatively and quantitatively, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms existing common practices.

  6. A novel approach to radiographic image resolution gauge fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivelpiece, C. L.; Babcox, B. L.; Brenizer, J. S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Adair, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    A resolution gauge was fabricated for measuring the spatial resolution of radiographic imaging systems. Silicon wafers, 100 mm , were patterned using standard contact lithography and the patterned features were etched using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The smallest features were 5 μm wide line pairs. The resulting etched trenches included aspect ratios of up to 10:1 and were 40.6±0.2 μm deep. The etch rate was 2.7 μm/min for the reported etch depth. A Gd 2O 3 nanopowder was dispersed into a slurry using Darvan C and water as the dispersant and solvent, respectively. A rapid infiltration method was used to fill the etched trenches with the slurry. Neutron and X-ray radiographs of the resolution gauge and the results demonstrate that the prototype gauge would be a suitable standard for measuring the spatial resolution of both X-ray and neutron radiography systems.

  7. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  8. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  9. Natural-pose hand detection in low-resolution images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyan Bo Bo1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Robust real-time hand detection and tracking in video sequences would enable many applications in areas as diverse ashuman-computer interaction, robotics, security and surveillance, and sign language-based systems. In this paper, we introducea new approach for detecting human hands that works on single, cluttered, low-resolution images. Our prototype system, whichis primarily intended for security applications in which the images are noisy and low-resolution, is able to detect hands as smallas 2424 pixels in cluttered scenes. The system uses grayscale appearance information to classify image sub-windows as eithercontaining or not containing a human hand very rapidly at the cost of a high false positive rate. To improve on the false positiverate of the main classifier without affecting its detection rate, we introduce a post-processor system that utilizes the geometricproperties of skin color blobs. When we test our detector on a test image set containing 106 hands, 92 of those hands aredetected (86.8% detection rate, with an average false positive rate of 1.19 false positive detections per image. The rapiddetection speed, the high detection rate of 86.8%, and the low false positive rate together ensure that our system is useable asthe main detector in a diverse variety of applications requiring robust hand detection and tracking in low-resolution, clutteredscenes.

  10. Special issue on high-resolution optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J. S.; Davis, Ilan; Galbraith, Catherine G.; Stemmer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The pace of development in the field of advanced microscopy is truly breath-taking, and is leading to major breakthroughs in our understanding of molecular machines and cell function. This special issue of Journal of Optics draws attention to a number of interesting approaches, ranging from fluorescence and imaging of unlabelled cells, to computational methods, all of which are describing the ever increasing detail of the dynamic behaviour of molecules in the living cell. This is a field which traditionally, and currently, demonstrates a marvellous interplay between the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, where apparent boundaries to resolution dissolve and living cells are viewed in ever more clarity. It is fertile ground for those interested in optics and non-conventional imaging to contribute high-impact outputs in the fields of cell biology and biomedicine. The series of articles presented here has been selected to demonstrate this interdisciplinarity and to encourage all those with a background in the physical sciences to 'dip their toes' into the exciting and dynamic discoveries surrounding cell function. Although single molecule super-resolution microscopy is commercially available, specimen preparation and interpretation of single molecule data remain a major challenge for scientists wanting to adopt the techniques. The paper by Allen and Davidson [1] provides a much needed detailed introduction to the practical aspects of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, including sample preparation, image acquisition and image analysis, as well as a brief description of the different variants of single molecule localization microscopy. Since super-resolution microscopy is no longer restricted to three-dimensional imaging of fixed samples, the review by Fiolka [2] is a timely introduction to techniques that have been successfully applied to four-dimensional live cell super-resolution microscopy. The combination of multiple high-resolution techniques

  11. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  12. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  13. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  14. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  15. Content-based image hashing using wave atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fang; Leung Hon-Yin; Cheng Lee-Ming; Ji Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that robustness,fragility,and security are three important criteria of image hashing; however how to build a system that can strongly meet these three criteria is still a challenge.In this paper,a content-based image hashing scheme using wave atoms is proposed,which satisfies the above criteria.Compared with traditional transforms like wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform (DCT),wave atom transform is adopted for the sparser expansion and better characteristics of texture feature extraction which shows better performance in both robustness and fragility.In addition,multi-frequency detection is presented to provide an application-defined trade-off.To ensure the security of the proposed approach and its resistance to a chosen-plaintext attack,a randomized pixel modulation based on the Rényi chaotic map is employed,combining with the nonliner wave atom transform.The experimental results reveal that the proposed scheme is robust against content-preserving manipulations and has a good discriminative capability to malicious tampering.

  16. Atomic force microscopic imaging of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ateeq, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Kulsoom, Huma; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy have been successfully used in the study of microbes, as well as free-living protists. Unlike light microscopy, which enables us to observe living organisms or the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional image, atomic force microscopy provides a three-dimensional surface profile. Here, we observed two free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris under the phase contrast inverted microscope, transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Although light microscopy was of lower magnification, it revealed functional biology of live amoebae such as motility and osmoregulation using contractile vacuoles of the trophozoite stage, but it is of limited value in defining the cyst stage. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed significantly greater magnification and resolution to reveal the ultra-structural features of trophozoites and cysts including intracellular organelles and cyst wall characteristics but it only produced a snapshot in time of a dead amoeba cell. Atomic force microscopy produced three-dimensional images providing detailed topographic description of shape and surface, phase imaging measuring boundary stiffness, and amplitude measurements including width, height and length of A. castellanii and B. mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts. These results demonstrate the importance of the application of various microscopic methods in the biological and structural characterization of the whole cell, ultra-structural features, as well as surface components and cytoskeleton of protist pathogens.

  17. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  18. Developing terahertz imaging equation and enhancement of the resolution of terahertz images using deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces a novel reconstruction approach for enhancing the resolution of the terahertz (THz) images. For this purpose the THz imaging equation is derived. According to our best knowledge we are reporting the first THz imaging equation by this paper. This imaging equation is universal for THz far-field imaging systems and can be used for analyzing, describing and modeling of these systems. The geometry and behavior of Gaussian beams in far-field region imply that the FWHM of the THz beams diverge as the frequencies of the beams decrease. Thus, the resolution of the measurement decreases in lower frequencies. On the other hand, the depth of penetration of THz beams decreases as frequency increases. Roughly speaking beams in sub 1.5 THz, are transmitted into integrated circuit (IC) packages and the similar packaged objects. Thus, it is not possible to use the THz pulse with higher frequencies in order to achieve higher resolution inspection of packaged items. In this paper, after developing the 3-D THz point spread function (PSF) of the scanning THz beam and then the THz imaging equation, THz images are enhanced through deconvolution of the THz PSF and THz images. As a result, the resolution has been improved several times beyond the physical limitations of the THz measurement setup in the far-field region and sub-Nyquist images have been achieved. Particularly, MSE and SSIḾ have been increased by 27% and 50% respectively. Details as small as 0.2 mm were made visible in the THz images which originally reveals no details smaller than 2.2 mm. In other words the resolution of the images has been increased by 10 times. The accuracy of the reconstructed images was proved by high resolution X-ray images.

  19. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally.

  20. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-01-01

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. In this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from 9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of 4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging of the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between 4, 7, and 45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. We also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.

  1. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  2. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  4. Photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2017-01-12

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is a recently developed imaging tool for biological researches. Several methods have been developed for detection of fluorescence signals from molecules in a subdiffraction-limited area, breaking the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopies and allowing visualization of detailed macromolecular structures in cells. As objectives are exposed to intense laser in the optical systems, fluorophores for super-resolution microscopy must be tolerated even under severe light irradiation conditions. The fluorophores must also be photoactivatable and photoswitchable for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, because the number of active fluorophores must be controlled by light irradiation. This has led to growing interest in these properties in the development of fluorophores. In this mini-review, we focus on the development of photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution microscopy. We introduce recent efforts, including improvement of fluorophore photostability and control of photoswitching behaviors of fluorophores based on photochemical and photophysical processes. Understanding and manipulation of chemical reactions in excited fluorophores can develop highly photostable and efficiently photoswitchable fluorophores that are suitable for super-resolution imaging applications.

  5. Observation of antisite domain boundaries in Cu2ZnSnS4 by atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, N. A.; Griffiths, I. J.; Cherns, D.; Fermín, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine antisite defects in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) kesterite crystals grown by a hot injection method. High angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging at sub-0.1 nm resolution, and lower magnification dark field imaging using reflections sensitive to cation ordering, are used to reveal antisite domain boundaries (ADBs). These boundaries, typically 5-20 nm apart, and extending distances of 100 nm or more into the crystals, lie on a variety of planes and have displacements of the type ½[110] or ¼[201], which translate Sn, Cu and Zn cations into antisite positions. It is shown that some ADBs describe a change in the local stoichiometry by removing planes of S and either Cu or Zn atoms, implying that these boundaries can be electrically charged. The observations also showed a marked increase in cation disorder in regions within 1-2 nm of the grain surfaces suggesting that growth of the ordered crystal takes place at the interface with a disordered shell. It is estimated that the ADBs contribute on average ~0.1 antisite defect pairs per unit cell. Although this is up to an order of magnitude less than the highest antisite defect densities reported, the presence of high densities of ADBs that may be charged suggests these defects may have a significant influence on the efficiency of CZTS solar cells.Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine antisite defects in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) kesterite crystals grown by a hot injection method. High angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging at sub-0.1 nm resolution, and lower magnification dark field imaging using reflections sensitive to cation ordering, are used to reveal antisite domain boundaries (ADBs). These boundaries, typically 5-20 nm apart, and extending distances of 100 nm or more into the crystals, lie on a variety of planes and have displacements of the type ½[110] or ¼[201], which translate Sn, Cu and Zn cations into antisite

  6. Image Super-Resolution via Adaptive Regularization and Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feilong; Cai, Miaomiao; Tan, Yuanpeng; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that image patches can be well represented as a sparse linear combination of elements from an appropriately selected over-complete dictionary. Recently, single-image super-resolution (SISR) via sparse representation using blurred and downsampled low-resolution images has attracted increasing interest, where the aim is to obtain the coefficients for sparse representation by solving an l0 or l1 norm optimization problem. The l0 optimization is a nonconvex and NP-hard problem, while the l1 optimization usually requires many more measurements and presents new challenges even when the image is the usual size, so we propose a new approach for SISR recovery based on regularization nonconvex optimization. The proposed approach is potentially a powerful method for recovering SISR via sparse representations, and it can yield a sparser solution than the l1 regularization method. We also consider the best choice for lp regularization with all p in (0, 1), where we propose a scheme that adaptively selects the norm value for each image patch. In addition, we provide a method for estimating the best value of the regularization parameter λ adaptively, and we discuss an alternate iteration method for selecting p and λ . We perform experiments, which demonstrates that the proposed regularization nonconvex optimization method can outperform the convex optimization method and generate higher quality images.

  7. Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Applied to Medical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for many diagnostic applications due to its real-time image reconstruction and low cost. Nonetheless, conventional ultrasound is not used in many applications because of limited spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Most commercial ultrasound systems reconstruct images using a simple delay-and-sum architecture on receive, which is fast and robust but does not utilize all information available in the raw data. Recently, more sophisticated image reconstruction methods have been developed that make use of far more information in the raw data to improve resolution and contrast. One such method is the Time-Domain Optimized Near-Field Estimator (TONE), which employs a maximum a priori estimation to solve a highly underdetermined problem, given a well-defined system model. TONE has been shown to significantly improve both the contrast and resolution of ultrasound images when compared to conventional methods. However, TONE's lack of robustness to variations from the system model and extremely high computational cost hinder it from being readily adopted in clinical scanners. This dissertation aims to reduce the impact of TONE's shortcomings, transforming it from an academic construct to a clinically viable image reconstruction algorithm. By altering the system model from a collection of individual hypothetical scatterers to a collection of weighted, diffuse regions, dTONE is able to achieve much greater robustness to modeling errors. A method for efficient parallelization of dTONE is presented that reduces reconstruction time by more than an order of magnitude with little loss in image fidelity. An alternative reconstruction algorithm, called qTONE, is also developed and is able to reduce reconstruction times by another two orders of magnitude while simultaneously improving image contrast. Each of these methods for improving TONE are presented, their limitations are explored, and all are used in concert to reconstruct in

  8. Image super-resolution using windowed ordinary Kriging interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianying; Wu, Jitao

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a novel interpolation approach for single image super-resolution based on ordinary Kriging interpolation, which has been widely used in geostatistics. The proposed method simultaneously considers the intensity distances and geometry of the pixel data. We employ a new intensity distance definition and local windows surrounding each unknown high-resolution pixel to implement the algorithm. The proposed approach is able to produce adaptive weights and edge preservation is achieved. Our experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed approach compared to conventional interpolation methods in terms of the peak signal-to-noise (PNSR) and visual perception.

  9. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessin, Patrick J M; Finan, Kieran; Heilemann, Mike

    2012-02-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is a powerful tool for understanding cellular function. However one of the most important biomolecules - DNA - remains somewhat inaccessible because it cannot be effectively and appropriately labeled. Here, we demonstrate that robust and detailed super-resolution images of DNA can be produced by combining 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling using the 'click chemistry' approach and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). This method can resolve fine chromatin structure, and - when used in conjunction with pulse labeling - can reveal the paths taken by individual fibers through the nucleus. This technique should provide a useful tool for the study of nuclear structure and function.

  10. Radiation length imaging with high-resolution telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B.; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C.; Lütticke, F.

    2017-02-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length X/X0 profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the X/X0 imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of X/X0 imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of 100 million tracks at 4 GeV has been collected, which is sufficient to resolve complex material profiles on the 30 μm scale.

  11. Wide-Field-of-View, High-Resolution, Stereoscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechtl, Eric F.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    A device combines video feeds from multiple cameras to provide wide-field-of-view, high-resolution, stereoscopic video to the user. The prototype under development consists of two camera assemblies, one for each eye. One of these assemblies incorporates a mounting structure with multiple cameras attached at offset angles. The video signals from the cameras are fed to a central processing platform where each frame is color processed and mapped into a single contiguous wide-field-of-view image. Because the resolution of most display devices is typically smaller than the processed map, a cropped portion of the video feed is output to the display device. The positioning of the cropped window will likely be controlled through the use of a head tracking device, allowing the user to turn his or her head side-to-side or up and down to view different portions of the captured image. There are multiple options for the display of the stereoscopic image. The use of head mounted displays is one likely implementation. However, the use of 3D projection technologies is another potential technology under consideration, The technology can be adapted in a multitude of ways. The computing platform is scalable, such that the number, resolution, and sensitivity of the cameras can be leveraged to improve image resolution and field of view. Miniaturization efforts can be pursued to shrink the package down for better mobility. Power savings studies can be performed to enable unattended, remote sensing packages. Image compression and transmission technologies can be incorporated to enable an improved telepresence experience.

  12. 液体环境单分子免疫球蛋白G的原子力显微镜高分辨成像%High-Resolution Imaging of Single-Molecule Immunoglobulin G Antibodies with Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志杰; 张萍; 杨家香; 郝长春; 周星飞; 李宾

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy ( AFM) is one of important tools for studying the structure and function of biomolecules due to its nanoscale capability. A well prepared sample was the primary key issue for high-resolution imaging macromolecules. Here, by using self-assembly technology of DNA origami, antigens were modified on DNA origami. Afterward, antibodies reacted specifically with antigens by a molecular recognition way. Then, a nanostructure formed from DNA origami and antigen-antibody complexes. By the aid of adsorption character of DNA origami, individual antibodies could selectively adsorb on mica surface. As a result, the ultrastructural morphology image of a single IgG molecule, the characteristic“Y-shaped” domains, was resolved in liquid. The way for adsorbing biomolecules on the mica surface in a liquid environment was simple and convenient, and it may be useful to detect and measure biomoleculers at the singe-molecule level with AFM.%原子力显微镜技术( AFM)具有纳米级高分辨成像能力,是研究生物大分子结构和功能的重要工具之一。制备合适的样品是获取高分辨成像的关键要素。本研究结合DNA折纸技术,将抗原分子修饰在DNA折纸上,通过分子识别作用,抗体分子与抗原分子特异性结合,形成由DNA折纸和抗原抗体复合物构成的纳米结构。利用DNA折纸在云母表面上的吸附特点,使得抗体分子选择性地吸附在衬底表面上,由此获得了液体环境中的单个地高辛抗体免疫球蛋白G( IgG)分子的“Y”超微结构形貌。本方法简单、方便,为AFM在单分子水平上检测和表征生物分子结构和功能提供帮助。

  13. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  14. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  15. Super-Resolution Real Imaging in Microsphere-Assisted Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Yi; Jia, Boliang; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-01-01

    Microsphere-assisted microscopy has received a lot of attention recently due to its simplicity and its capability to surpass the diffraction limit. However, to date, sub-diffraction-limit features have only been observed in virtual images formed through the microspheres. We show that it is possible to form real, super-resolution images using high-refractive index microspheres. Also, we report on how changes to a microsphere’s refractive index and size affect image formation and planes. The relationship between the focus position and the additional magnification factor is also investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. We demonstrate that such a real imaging mode, combined with the use of larger microspheres, can enlarge sub-diffraction-limit features up to 10 times that of wide-field microscopy’s magnification with a field-of-view diameter of up to 9 μm. PMID:27768774

  16. Application of multi-resolution analysis in sonar image denoising

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sonar images have complex background, low contrast, and deteriorative edges; these characteristics make it difficult for researchers to dispose the sonar objects. The multi-resolution analysis represents the signals in different scales efficiently, which is widely used in image processing. Wavelets are successful in disposing point discontinuities in one dimension, but not in two dimensions. The finite Ridgelet transform (FRIT) deals efficiently with the singularity in high dimension. It presents three improved denoising approaches, which are based on FRIT and used in the sonar image disposal technique. By experiment and comparison with traditional methods, these approaches not only suppress the artifacts, but also obtain good effect in edge keeping and SNR of the sonar image denoising.

  17. Multi-resolution image segmentation based on Gaussian mixture model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yinggan; Liu Dong; Guan Xinping

    2006-01-01

    Mixture model based image segmentation method, which assumes that image pixels are independent and do not consider the position relationship between pixels, is not robust to noise and usually leads to misclassification. A new segmentation method, called multi-resolution Gaussian mixture model method, is proposed. First, an image pyramid is constructed and son-father link relationship is built between each level of pyramid. Then the mixture model segmentation method is applied to the top level. The segmentation result on the top level is passed top-down to the bottom level according to the son-father link relationship between levels. The proposed method considers not only local but also global information of image, it overcomes the effect of noise and can obtain better segmentation result. Experimental result demonstrates its effectiveness.

  18. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, P. L.; Pizarro, J.; Guerrero, E.; Guerrero-Lebrero, M. P.; Scavello, G.; Yáñez, A.; Núñez-Moraleda, B. M.; Maestre, J. M.; Sales, D. L.; Herrera, M.; Molina, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples.

  20. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  1. High-resolution NMR imaging of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, H.; Lucas, D.

    1986-12-01

    With high spatial resolution guaranteed, NMR imaging allows to simultaneously make visible the complex osseous, chondral, and ligamentous structures of the hand. The examinations reported on were made with a 1.0 Tesla Magnetom using a special surface coil so as to achieve cut heights of 3-4 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.5 mm. In addition to normal test persons, 29 patients were examined who had pseudoarthrosis of the os naviculare, lunatomalacia, rheumatic arthritis, or bone and soft-tissue tumors. Comparison with X-ray radiography or bone scintiscans showed that NMR imaging is capable of demonstrating localisation and extension of bone marrow or bone joint abnormalities at an earlier stage.

  2. Fast full resolution saliency detection based on incoherent imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang; Zhao, Jufeng; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yueting

    2016-08-01

    Image saliency detection is widely applied in many tasks in the field of the computer vision. In this paper, we combine the saliency detection with the Fourier optics to achieve acceleration of saliency detection algorithm. An actual optical saliency detection system is constructed within the framework of incoherent imaging system. Additionally, the application of our system to implement the bottom-up rapid pre-saliency process of primate visual saliency is discussed with dual-resolution camera. A set of experiments over our system are conducted and discussed. We also demonstrate the comparisons between our method and pure computer methods. The results show our system can produce full resolution saliency maps faster and more effective.

  3. Super-Resolution for Traditional and Omnidirectional Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Nagy

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a simple method on how to implement a super-resolutionbased video enhancement technique in .NET using the functions of the OpenCV library.First, we outline the goal of this project and after that, a short review of the steps of superresolutiontechnique is given. As a part of the discussion about the implementation itself,the general design aspects are detailed in short. Then, the different optical flow algorithmsare analyzed and the super-resolution calculation of omnidirectional image sequences isdiscussed. After all that, the achieved results can be seen and finally, a short generalconclusion can be read. This paper is a revision of our previous work [1]. In this edition,we focus on the super-resolution of omnidirectional image sequences rather than thetechnological issues that were discussed in our previous article. Further information aboutthe implementation and wrapper development can be found in [1 and 12].

  4. A Multi Resolution Method for Detecting Defects in Fabric Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyun Ni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a novel technique for detecting defects in fabric image based on the features extracted using a new multi resolution analysis tool called Digital Curvelet Transform. The direction features of curvelet coefficients and texture features based on GLCM of curvelet coefficients act as the feature-sets for a k-nearest neighbor classifier. The validation tests on the developed algorithms were performed with images from TILDA’s Textile Texture Database. A comparative study between the GLCM-based, wavelet-based and the curvelet-based techniques has also been included. The high accuracy achieved by the proposed method suggests an efficient solution for fabric defect. Furthermore, the algorithm has good robustness to white noise. Note that, this study is the first documented attempt to explore the possibilities of a new multi resolution analysis tool called digital Curvelet Transform to address the problem of fabric defect.

  5. Low-Resolution Vehicle Image Recognition Technology by Frame-Composition of Moving Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzawa, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Ohkawa, Takenao; Ito, Toshio

    Developing on-board automotive driver assistance systems aiming to alert drivers about driving environments, and possible collision with other vehicles has attracted a lot of attention lately. Especially, many researchers have suggested the forward vehicle recognition technology by a camera on vehicle. In the forward vehicle recognition, however, it is difficult to detect the features of vehicle from a distant vehicle image by conventional methods because the image is too low-resolution (LR). This paper presents vehicle image recognition technology for detecting of the features of a distant vehicle by frame-composition of moving images. To detect the vehicle features of a distant LR vehicle image, we use the moving images obtained from the camera on the vehicle, and utilize super-resolution (SR) image reconstruction. SR image reconstruction is to use signal processing techniques to obtain a high-resolution (or sequence) image from observed multiple LR images. Use of this technique on real road image, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  6. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  7. Sparse Representation through Multi-Resolution Transform for Image Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. P. Arockia Jansi Rani

    2013-01-01

    Having a compact basis is useful both for compression and fordesigning efficient numerical algorithms. In this paper, a newimage coding scheme using a multi-resolution transform knownas Bandelet Transform that provides an optimally compact basisfor images by exploring their directional characteristics isproposed. As this process results in a sparse representation,Zero Vector Pruning is applied in-order to extract the non-zerocoefficients. Further the geometric interpixel redundanciespresent i...

  8. Ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging of the human cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Sapeta, Sabina; Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmidinger, Gerald; Aranha dos Santos, Valentin; Aschinger, Gerold C.; Baumgartner, Isabella; Pircher, Niklas; Schwarzhans, Florian; Pantalon, Anca; Dua, Harminder; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2017-01-01

    We present imaging of corneal pathologies using optical coherence tomography (OCT) with high resolution. To this end, an ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain OCT (UHR-OCT) system based on a broad bandwidth Ti:sapphire laser is employed. With a central wavelength of 800 nm, the imaging device allows to acquire OCT data at the central, paracentral and peripheral cornea as well as the limbal region with 1.2 µm x 20 µm (axial x lateral) resolution at a rate of 140 000 A-scans/s. Structures of the anterior segment of the eye, not accessible with commercial OCT systems, are visualized. These include corneal nerves, limbal palisades of Vogt as well as several corneal pathologies. Cases such as keratoconus and Fuchs’s endothelial dystrophy as well as infectious changes caused by diseases like Acanthamoeba keratitis and scarring after herpetic keratitis are presented. We also demonstrate the applicability of our system to visualize epithelial erosion and intracorneal foreign body after corneal trauma as well as chemical burns. Finally, results after Descemet’s membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) are imaged. These clinical cases show the potential of UHR-OCT to help in clinical decision-making and follow-up. Our results and experience indicate that UHR-OCT of the cornea is a promising technique for the use in clinical practice, but can also help to gain novel insight in the physiology and pathophysiology of the human cornea. PMID:28271013

  9. High-resolution SIT TV tube for subnanosecond image shuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. J.; Vine, B. H.; Aeby, I.; Dunbar, D. L.; King, N. S. P.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Thayer, N. N.; Noel, B. W.

    1984-09-01

    A new ultrafast high-resolution image shutter tube with reasonable gain and shuttering efficiency has been designed and tested. The design uses a grid-gated silicon-intensified-target (SIT) image section and a high-speed focus projection and scan (FPS) vidicon read-out section in one envelope to eliminate resolution losses from external coupling. The design features low-gate-interface capacity, a high-conductivity shutter grid, and a segmented low-resistivity photocathode for optimum gating speed. Optical gate widths as short as 400 ps + or - 100 ps for full shuttering of the 25-mm-diam input window with spatial resolution as high as 15 1p/mm have been measured. Some design criteria, most of the electrical and optical performance data for several variations in the basic design, and a comparison (of several key response functions) with similarly tested 18- and 25-mm-diam proximity-focused microchannel-plate (MCP) image intensifier tubes (MCPTs) are included.

  10. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  11. Direct atomic imaging and density functional theory study of the Au24Pd1 cluster catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruma, A; Negreiros, F R; Xie, S; Tsukuda, T; Johnston, R L; Fortunelli, A; Li, Z Y

    2013-10-21

    In this study we report a direct, atomic-resolution imaging of calcined Au24Pd1 clusters supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes by employing aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Using gold atoms as mass standards, we confirm the cluster size to be 25 ± 2, in agreement with the Au24Pd1(SR)18 precursor used in the synthesis. Concurrently, a Density-Functional/Basin-Hopping computational algorithm is employed to locate the low-energy configurations of free Au24Pd1 cluster. Cage structures surrounding a single core atom are found to be favored, with a slight preference for Pd to occupy the core site. The cluster shows a tendency toward elongated arrangements, consistent with experimental data. The degree of electron transfer from the Pd dopant to Au is quantified through a Löwdin charge analysis, suggesting that Pd may act as an electron promoter to the surrounding Au atoms when they are involved in catalytic reactions.

  12. High spatiotemporal resolution imaging of mechanical processes in live cells using T-shaped cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriota, Nicola; Sahin, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of cells are paramount regulators of a plethora of physiological processes, such as cell adhesion, motility and proliferation. Yet, their knowledge is currently hampered by the lack of techniques with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to monitor the dynamics of such biological processes. We introduce an atomic force microscopy-based imaging platform based on newly-designed cantilevers with increased force sensitivity, while minimizing viscous drag. This allows us to uncover mechanical properties of a wide variety of living cells - including fibroblasts, neurons and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells - with an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Our mechanical maps approach 50nm resolution and monitor cellular features within a minute's timescale. To identify the counterparts of our mechanical maps' features we perform simultaneous fluorescence microscopy and recognize cytoskeletal elements as the main molecular contributors of cellular stiffness at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the enhanced resolution and speed of our method allows the recognition of dynamic changes in the mechanics of fine cellular structures, which occurred independently of changes within optical images of fluorescently-labeled actin.

  13. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Frank M., E-mail: frank.gagliardi@wbrc.org.au [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia and School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Cornelius, Iwan [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Blencowe, Anton [Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia and Division of Information Technology, Engineering and the Environment, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Franich, Rick D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Geso, Moshi [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  14. High resolution isotopic analysis of U-bearing particles via fusion of SIMS and EDS images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Willingham, David

    2016-01-01

    Image fusion of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) images and X-ray elemental maps from energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed to facilitate the isolation and re-analysis of isotopically unique U-bearing particles where the highest precision SIMS measurements are required. Image registration, image fusion and particle micromanipulation were performed on a subset of SIMS images obtained from a large area pre-screen of a particle distribution from a sample containing several certified reference materials (CRM) U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850, as well as a standard reference material (SRM) 8704 (Buffalo River Sediment) to simulate particles collected on swipes during routine inspections of declared uranium enrichment facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In total, fourteen particles, ranging in size from 5 – 15 µm, were isolated and re-analyzed by SIMS in multi-collector mode identifying nine particles of CRM U129A, one of U150, one of U500 and three of U850. These identifications were made within a few percent errors from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified atom percent values for 234U, 235U and 238U for the corresponding CRMs. This work represents the first use of image fusion to enhance the accuracy and precision of isotope ratio measurements for isotopically unique U-bearing particles for nuclear safeguards applications. Implementation of image fusion is essential for the identification of particles of interests that fall below the spatial resolution of the SIMS images.

  15. Zeeman Effect of Sm Atoms by High-Resolution Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution atomic-beam diode-laser spectroscopy in Sm I has been performed. Zeeman spectra have been measured for the three optical transitions at different external magnetic fields and well resolved at the magnetic fields of stronger than 6.0 mT. Using the known precise Landé -factors of the ground multiplet, the Landé -factors of the upper 4f66s6p   and levels have been determined, and their precision has been improved compared with the reference values.

  16. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2016-05-10

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument.

  17. Measurement of transient atomic displacements in thin films with picosecond and femtometer resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kozina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of the transient structural response of weakly photo-excited thin films of BiFeO3, Pb(Zr,TiO3, and Bi and time-scales for interfacial thermal transport. Utilizing picosecond x-ray diffraction at a 1.28 MHz repetition rate with time resolution extending down to 15 ps, transient changes in the diffraction angle are recorded. These changes are associated with photo-induced lattice strains within nanolayer thin films, resolved at the part-per-million level, corresponding to a shift in the scattering angle three orders of magnitude smaller than the rocking curve width and changes in the interlayer lattice spacing of fractions of a femtometer. The combination of high brightness, repetition rate, and stability of the synchrotron, in conjunction with high time resolution, represents a novel means to probe atomic-scale, near-equilibrium dynamics.

  18. Progress Toward A Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, Clarence M.; Vourlidas, A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Klimchuck, J.

    2007-07-01

    Recent imaging at arcsecond (TRACE) and sub-arcsecond (VAULT) spatial resolution clearly show that structures with fine spatial scales play a key role in the physics of the upper solar atmosphere. Both theoretical and observational considerations point to the importance of small spatial scales, impulsive energy release, strong dynamics, and extreme plasma nonuniformity. Fundamental questions regarding the nature, structure, properties and dynamics of loops and filamentary structures in the upper atmosphere have been raised. To address these questions, we are developing a next generation, VEry high angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) as a sounding rocket instrument. VERIS will obtain the necessary high spatial resolution, high fidelity measurements of plasma temperatures, densities and velocities. With broad simultaneous temperature coverage, the VERIS observations will directly address unresolved issues relating to interconnections of various temperature solar plasmas. VERIS will provide the first ever subarcsecond spectra of transition region and coronal structures. It will do so with a sufficient spectral resolution of to allow centroided Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Finally, in addition to the spectra, VERIS will simultaneously obtain spectrally pure slot images (10x150 arcsec) in the +/-1 grating orders, which can be combined to make instantaneous line-of-sight velocity maps with 8km/s accuracy over an unprecedented field of view. The VERIS program is beginning the second year of its three year development cycle. All design activities and reviews are complete. Fabrication of all major components has begun. Brassboard electronics cards have been fabricated, assembled and tested. The paper presents the essential scientific

  19. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    The purpose of this study is to develop methods in array signal processing which achieve accurate signal reconstruction from limited observations resulting in high-resolution imaging. The focus is on underwater acoustic applications and sonar signal processing both in active (transmit and receive...... in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering......) and passive (only receive) mode. The study addresses the limitations of existing methods and shows that, in many cases, the proposed methods overcome these limitations and outperform traditional methods for acoustic imaging. The project comprises two parts; The first part deals with computational methods...

  20. Black phosphorus photodetector for multispectral, high-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-11-12

    Black phosphorus is a layered semiconductor that is intensely researched in view of applications in optoelectronics. In this letter, we investigate a multilayer black phosphorus photodetector that is capable of acquiring high-contrast (V > 0.9) images both in the visible (λVIS = 532 nm) as well as in the infrared (λIR = 1550 nm) spectral regime. In a first step, by using photocurrent microscopy, we map the active area of the device and we characterize responsivity and gain. In a second step, by deploying the black phosphorus device as a point-like detector in a confocal microsope setup, we acquire diffraction-limited optical images with submicron resolution. The results demonstrate the usefulness of black phosphorus as an optoelectronic material for hyperspectral imaging applications.

  1. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  2. High Resolution Image Correspondences for Video Post-Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Magnor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for estimating dense image correspondences. Our versatile approach lends itself to various tasks typical for video post-processing, including image morphing, optical flow estimation, stereo rectification, disparity/depth reconstruction, and baseline adjustment. We incorporate recent advances in feature matching, energy minimization, stereo vision, and data clustering into our approach. At the core of our correspondence estimation we use Efficient Belief Propagation for energy minimization. While state-of-the-art algorithms only work on thumbnail-sized images, our novel feature downsampling scheme in combination with a simple, yet efficient data term compression, can cope with high-resolution data. The incorporation of SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform features into data term computation further resolves matching ambiguities, making long-range correspondence estimation possible. We detect occluded areas by evaluating the correspondence symmetry, we further apply Geodesic matting to automatically determine plausible values in these regions.

  3. The optical microscopy with virtual image breaks a record: 50-nm resolution imaging is demonstrated

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chen, Zaichun; Hong, Minghui

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new 'microsphere nanoscope' that uses ordinary SiO2 microspheres as superlenses to create a virtual image of the object in near field. The magnified virtual image greatly overcomes the diffraction limit. We are able to resolve clearly 50-nm objects under a standard white light source in both transmission and reflection modes. The resolution achieved for white light opens a new opportunity to image viruses, DNA and molecules in real time.

  4. Structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liqing, E-mail: chenlq@uah.edu; Wang, Yujun [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Wells, David; Toh, Diana; Harold, Hunt [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Zhou, Jing [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); DiGiammarino, Enrico [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Meehan, Edward J. [Laboratory for Structural Biology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Graduate Program of Biotechnology, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The crystal structure of the SH3 domain of human osteoclast-stimulating factor has been determined and refined to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors. Osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSF) is an intracellular signaling protein, produced by osteoclasts themselves, that enhances osteoclast formation and bone resorption. It is thought to act via an Src-related signaling pathway and contains SH3 and ankyrin-repeat domains which are involved in protein–protein interactions. As part of a structure-based anti-bone-loss drug-design program, the atomic resolution X-ray structure of the recombinant human OSF SH3 domain (hOSF-SH3) has been determined. The domain, residues 12–72, yielded crystals that diffracted to the ultrahigh resolution of 1.07 Å. The overall structure shows a characteristic SH3 fold consisting of two perpendicular β-sheets that form a β-barrel. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the putative proline-rich peptide-binding site of hOSF-SH3 consists of (i) residues that are highly conserved in the SH3-domain family, including residues Tyr21, Phe23, Trp49, Pro62, Asn64 and Tyr65, and (ii) residues that are less conserved and/or even specific to hOSF, including Thr22, Arg26, Thr27, Glu30, Asp46, Thr47, Asn48 and Leu60, which might be key to designing specific inhibitors for hOSF to fight osteoporosis and related bone-loss diseases. There are a total of 13 well defined water molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the above residues in and around the peptide-binding pocket. Some of those water molecules might be important for drug-design approaches. The hOSF-SH3 structure at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of its inhibitors.

  5. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  6. Face recognition with multi-resolution spectral feature images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Li Sun

    Full Text Available The one-sample-per-person problem has become an active research topic for face recognition in recent years because of its challenges and significance for real-world applications. However, achieving relatively higher recognition accuracy is still a difficult problem due to, usually, too few training samples being available and variations of illumination and expression. To alleviate the negative effects caused by these unfavorable factors, in this paper we propose a more accurate spectral feature image-based 2DLDA (two-dimensional linear discriminant analysis ensemble algorithm for face recognition, with one sample image per person. In our algorithm, multi-resolution spectral feature images are constructed to represent the face images; this can greatly enlarge the training set. The proposed method is inspired by our finding that, among these spectral feature images, features extracted from some orientations and scales using 2DLDA are not sensitive to variations of illumination and expression. In order to maintain the positive characteristics of these filters and to make correct category assignments, the strategy of classifier committee learning (CCL is designed to combine the results obtained from different spectral feature images. Using the above strategies, the negative effects caused by those unfavorable factors can be alleviated efficiently in face recognition. Experimental results on the standard databases demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  7. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of th...

  8. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  9. A superresolution land-cover change detection method using remotely sensed images with different spatial resolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodong; Ling, Feng; Giles M. Foody; Du, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The development of remote sensing has enabled the acquisition of information on land-cover change at different spatial scales. However, a trade-off between spatial and temporal resolutions normally exists. Fine-spatial-resolution images have low temporal resolutions, whereas coarse spatial resolution images have high temporal repetition rates. A novel super-resolution change detection method (SRCD)is proposed to detect land-cover changes at both fine spatial and temporal resolutions with the ...

  10. New high spatial resolution portable camera in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, C.; Massari, R.; Palermo, N.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the last years, many studies have been carried out on portable gamma cameras in order to optimize a device for medical imaging. In this paper, we present a new type of gamma camera, for low energies detection, based on a position sensitive photomultiplier tube Hamamatsu Flat Panel H8500 and an innovative technique based on CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals inserted into the square holes of a tungsten collimator. The geometrical features of this collimator-scintillator structure, which affect the camera spatial resolution and sensitivity, were chosen to offer optimal performances in clinical functional examinations. Detector sensitivity, energy resolution and spatial resolution were measured and the acquired image quality was evaluated with particular attention to the pixel identification capability. This low weight (about 2 kg) portable gamma camera was developed thanks to a miniaturized resistive chain electronic readout, combined with a dedicated compact 4 channel ADC board. This data acquisition board, designed by our research group, showed excellent performances, with respect to a commercial PCI 6110E card (National Intruments), in term of sampling period and additional on board operation for data pre-processing.

  11. Image Resolution Enhancement via Data-Driven Parametric Models in the Wavelet Space

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We present a data-driven, project-based algorithm which enhances image resolution by extrapolating high-band wavelet coefficients. High-resolution images are reconstructed by alternating the projections onto two constraint sets: the observation constraint defined by the given low-resolution image and the prior constraint derived from the training data at the high resolution (HR). Two types of prior constraints are considered: spatially homogeneous constraint suitable for texture images and p...

  12. Understanding atomic-resolved STM images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface by DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C; Gonzalez, C; Mendez, J; De Andres, P L; MartIn-Gago, J A; Lopez, M F [Instituto Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Jelinek, P, E-mail: mflopez@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53-Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-08

    We present a combination of experimental STM images and DFT calculations to understand the atomic scale contrast of features found in high-resolution STM images. Simulating different plausible structural models for the tip, we have been able to reproduce various characteristics previously reported in experimental images on TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) under controlled UHV conditions. Our results allow us to determine the influence of different chemical and morphological tip terminations on the atomic-resolution STM images of the TiO{sub 2}(110)-(1 x 1) surface. The commonest images have been properly explained using standard models for a W tip, either clean or with a single O atom located at the apex. Furthermore, a double transfer of oxygen atoms can account for different types of bizarre atomic-resolution features occasionally seen, and not conclusively interpreted before. Importantly, we discuss how typical point-defects are imaged on this surface by different tips, namely bridging O vacancies and adsorbed OH groups.

  13. A high-resolution full-field range imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, D. A.; Cree, M. J.; Dorrington, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    There exist a number of applications where the range to all objects in a field of view needs to be obtained. Specific examples include obstacle avoidance for autonomous mobile robots, process automation in assembly factories, surface profiling for shape analysis, and surveying. Ranging systems can be typically characterized as being either laser scanning systems where a laser point is sequentially scanned over a scene or a full-field acquisition where the range to every point in the image is simultaneously obtained. The former offers advantages in terms of range resolution, while the latter tend to be faster and involve no moving parts. We present a system for determining the range to any object within a camera's field of view, at the speed of a full-field system and the range resolution of some point laser scans. Initial results obtained have a centimeter range resolution for a 10 second acquisition time. Modifications to the existing system are discussed that should provide faster results with submillimeter resolution.

  14. ICORE: Image Co-addition with Optional Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, Frank

    2013-01-01

    ICORE is a command-line driven co-addition, mosaicking and resolution enhancement (HiRes) tool for creating science quality products from image data in FITS format and with World Coordinate System information following the FITS-WCS standard. It includes preparatory steps such as image background matching, photometric gain-matching, and pixel-outlier rejection. Co-addition and/or HiRes'ing can be performed in either the inertial WCS, or in the rest frame of a moving object. Three interpolation methods are supported: overlap-area weighting, drizzle, and weighting by the detector Point Response Function (PRF). The latter enables the creation of matched-filtered products for optimal point-source detection, but most importantly allows for resolution enhancement using a spatially-dependent deconvolution method. This is a variant of the classic Richardson-Lucy algorithm with the added benefit to simultaneously register and co-add multiple images to optimize signal-to-noise and sampling of the instrumental PSF. It ca...

  15. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  16. High-resolution panoramic images with megapixel MWIR FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboucher, Vincent; Aubry, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    In the continuity of its current strategy, HGH maintains a deep effort in developing its most recent product family: the infrared (IR) panoramic 360-degree surveillance sensors. During the last two years, HGH optimized its prototype Middle Wave IR (MWIR) panoramic sensor IR Revolution 360 HD that gave birth to Spynel-S product. Various test campaigns proved its excellent image quality. Cyclope, the software associated with Spynel, benefitted from recent image processing improvements and new functionalities such as target geolocalization, long range sensor slue to cue and facilitated forensics analysis. In the frame of the PANORAMIR project sustained by the DGA (Délégation Générale de l'Armement), HGH designed a new extra large resolution sensor including a MWIR megapixel Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector (1280×1024 pixels). This new sensor is called Spynel-X. It provides outstanding resolution 360-degree images (with more than 100 Mpixels). The mechanical frame of Spynel (-S and -X) was designed with the collaboration of an industrial design agency. Spynel got the "Observeur du Design 2013" label.

  17. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Le Roux, P. [GEHC, Buc (France); Dehaine-Lambertz, G. [Unite INSERM 562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  18. High-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo.

  19. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... used regular scintillators with similar resolution an efficiency increase by a factor 4 has been found for the structured scintillator....

  20. A Frequency Domain Approach to Registration of Aliased Images with Application to Super-resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewalle Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution algorithms reconstruct a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution images of a scene. Precise alignment of the input images is an essential part of such algorithms. If the low-resolution images are undersampled and have aliasing artifacts, the performance of standard registration algorithms decreases. We propose a frequency domain technique to precisely register a set of aliased images, based on their low-frequency, aliasing-free part. A high-resolution image is then reconstructed using cubic interpolation. Our algorithm is compared to other algorithms in simulations and practical experiments using real aliased images. Both show very good visual results and prove the attractivity of our approach in the case of aliased input images. A possible application is to digital cameras where a set of rapidly acquired images can be used to recover a higher-resolution final image.

  1. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  2. A high-resolution radio image of a young supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, N.; Rupen, M.P.; Shapiro, I.I. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA)); Preston, R.A. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Rius, A. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Astronomia y Geodesia)

    1991-03-21

    Supernovae in our own Galaxy are so rare that images of their remnants can show only the late aftermath of an explosion that occurred anything from a few hundred to several tens of thousands of years ago. Young supernovae are seen frequently in other galaxies, but because they are more distant it has not been possible until now to obtain high-resolution images that would reveal details of the explosion and the immediate development of the ejected material. Here we present a very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio image of the bright supernova 1986J, which occurred in the galaxy NGC891 at a distance of {similar to}12 Mpc. No detailed image of any supernova or remnant has been obtained before so soon after the explosion. Our image shows a shell of emission with jet-like protrusions. Their analysis should advance our understanding of the dynamics of the expanding debris, the dissipation of energy into the surrounding circumstellar medium, and the evolution of the supernova into the remnant. (author).

  3. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  4. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiao -Lei [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Treu, Tommaso [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Agnello, Adriano [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Auger, Matthew W. [Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Liao, Kai [Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marshall, Philip J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive

  5. All-passive pixel super-resolution of time-stretch imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Antony C. S.; Ng, Ho-Cheung; Bogaraju, Sharat C. V.; Hayden K. H. So; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Based on image encoding in a serial-temporal format, optical time-stretch imaging entails a stringent requirement of state-of-the- art fast data acquisition unit in order to preserve high image resolution at an ultrahigh frame rate --- hampering the widespread utilities of such technology. Here, we propose a pixel super-resolution (pixel-SR) technique tailored for time-stretch imaging that preserves pixel resolution at a relaxed sampling rate. It harnesses the subpixel shifts between image fr...

  6. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  7. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  8. Sparse coded image super-resolution using K-SVD trained dictionary based on regularized orthogonal matching pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Mehmood, Irfan; Baik, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Image super-resolution (SR) plays a vital role in medical imaging that allows a more efficient and effective diagnosis process. Usually, diagnosing is difficult and inaccurate from low-resolution (LR) and noisy images. Resolution enhancement through conventional interpolation methods strongly affects the precision of consequent processing steps, such as segmentation and registration. Therefore, we propose an efficient sparse coded image SR reconstruction technique using a trained dictionary. We apply a simple and efficient regularized version of orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) to seek the coefficients of sparse representation. ROMP has the transparency and greediness of OMP and the robustness of the L1-minization that enhance the dictionary learning process to capture feature descriptors such as oriented edges and contours from complex images like brain MRIs. The sparse coding part of the K-SVD dictionary training procedure is modified by substituting OMP with ROMP. The dictionary update stage allows simultaneously updating an arbitrary number of atoms and vectors of sparse coefficients. In SR reconstruction, ROMP is used to determine the vector of sparse coefficients for the underlying patch. The recovered representations are then applied to the trained dictionary, and finally, an optimization leads to high-resolution output of high-quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the super-resolution reconstruction quality of the proposed scheme is comparatively better than other state-of-the-art schemes.

  9. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  10. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  11. Multi-resolution waveguide image slicer for the PEPSI instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Erik; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Harnisch, Gerd; Hornaff, Marcel; Weber, Michael; Barnes, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A waveguide image slicer with resolutions up to 270.000 (planned: 300.000) for the fiber fed PEPSI echelle spectrograph at the LBT and single waveguide thicknesses of down to 70 μm has been manufactured and tested. The waveguides were macroscopically prepared, stacked up to an order of seven and thinned back to square stack cross sections. A high filling ratio was achieved by realizing homogenous adhesive gaps of 3.6 μm, using index matching adhesives for TIR within the waveguides. The image slicer stacks are used in immersion mode and are miniaturized to enable implementation in a set of 2x8. The overall efficiency is between 92 % and 96 %.

  12. Waveguide image-slicers for ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Erik; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas; Andersen, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Waveguide image-slicer prototypes with resolutions up to 310.000 for the fiber fed PEPSI echelle spectrograph at the LBT and single waveguide thicknesses of down to 30 μm have been manufactured. The waveguides were macroscopically prepared, stacked up to an order of 7 and thinned back to square stack cross sections. A high filling ratio was achieved by realizing homogenous adhesive gaps of 4.6 μm, using index matching adhesives for TIR within the waveguides. The image-slicer stacks can be used in immersion mode and are miniaturized to be implemented in a set of four, measurements indicate an overall efficiency of above 80% for them.

  13. Design of resolution testing facility for ultraviolet imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We present a resolution testing system of ultraviolet (UV) imager.In this system,an UV Czerny-Turner monochromator with a small f-number is designed to get more energy as an UV radiation source,and its stray light is rejected effectively by light traps.And UV diffuser is employed in order to get uniform light distribution on the resolving power test target.We also design a novel UV collimator which makes infinite UV testing targets.It can reduce the difficulty of optical design and the machining cost,and utilize UV energy at maximum extent.This facility has been applied in the imaging quality evaluation of the UV instrument,and the results accord with the theoretical analysis.

  14. High-resolution quantitative imaging of the substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Paula; Smith, Alex K; Summers, Paul E; Mainardi, Luca M; Cerutti, Sergio; Smith, Seth A; Costa, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying neuroimaging-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is the loss of pigmented dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Recently, an MRI technique dubbed "neuromelanin-sensitive MRI" (NM-MRI), has been found to provide notable contrast between the SN and surrounding brain tissues with potential applications as biomarker of PD. The contrast in NM-MRI has been associated with magnetization transfer (MT) effects, and thus the goal of this study was to characterize the impact of MT on NM-MRI, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing quantitative MT (qMT) imaging in human SN. The results of this study demonstrate that high-resolution rapid qMT imaging of the SN can be reliably obtained within reasonable scan times, thereby can be translatable into clinical practice.

  15. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    other than the diffusion gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE and lead to a disrupted experimental design. Here, we introduce a simple compensation to the STEAM acquisition that avoids the orientational bias and disrupted experiment design...... that these gradient pulses can otherwise produce. The compensation is simple to implement by adjusting the gradient vectors in the diffusion pulses of the STEAM sequence, so that the net effective gradient vector including contributions from diffusion and other gradient pulses is as the experiment intends. High...... angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM...

  16. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D{sub 2} and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground

  17. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Image Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes, their agglomerates, and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. Particle sizes of 1.9 to 8 mm (0.075 to 0.315 in.) were measured. The particle agglomerate sizes and areas were measured, and the total mass of solid hydrogen was computed. A total mass of from 0.22 to 7.9 grams of hydrogen was frozen. Compaction and expansion of the agglomerate implied that the particles remain independent particles, and can be separated and controlled. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  18. Imaging the dynamics of chlorine atom reactions with alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estillore, Armando D.; Visger, Laura M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2010-08-01

    We report a study of chlorine atom reactions with a series of target monounsaturated alkene molecules: 1-pentene, 1-hexene, 2-hexene, and cyclohexene. These reactions were studied using crossed-beam dc slice ion imaging at collision energies of 4 and 7 kcal/mol. Images of the reactively scattered alkenyl radical products were obtained via single photon ionization at 157 nm. The angular distributions at low collision energy are largely isotropic, suggesting the formation of a complex that has a lifetime comparable to or longer than its rotational period, followed by HCl elimination. At high collision energy, the distributions show a sharp forward peak superimposed on the isotropic component accounting for ˜13% of the product flux. The translational energy distributions peak near zero for the backscattered product, in sharp contrast to the results for alkanes. In the forward direction, the translational energy distributions change dramatically with collision energy. At the high collision energy, a sharp forward peak at ˜80% of the collision energy appears, quite reminiscent of results of our recent study of Cl+pentane reactions. The scattering distributions for all target molecules are similar, suggesting similarity of the reaction dynamics among these molecules. Ab initio calculations of the energetics and ionization energies for the various product channels were performed at the CBS-QB3 level to aid in interpreting the results.

  19. High resolution mm-VLBI imaging of Cygnus A

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, Bia; Bach, Uwe; Ros, Eduardo; Zensus, J Anton

    2015-01-01

    At a distance of 249 Mpc ($z$=0.056), Cygnus A is the only powerful FR II radio galaxy for which a detailed sub-parsec scale imaging of the base of both jet and counter-jet can be obtained. Observing with VLBI at millimeter wavelengths is fundamental for this object, as it uncovers those regions which appear self-absorbed or free-free absorbed by a circumnuclear torus at longer wavelengths. We performed 7 mm Global VLBI observations, achieving ultra-high resolution imaging on scales down to 90 $\\mu$as. This resolution corresponds to a linear scale of only $\\sim$400 Schwarzschild radii. We studied the transverse structure of the jets through a pixel-based analysis, and kinematic properties of the main emission features by modeling the interferometric visibilities with two-dimensional Gaussian components. Both jets appear limb-brightened, and their opening angles are relatively large ($\\phi_\\mathrm {j}\\sim 10^{\\circ}$). The flow is observed to accelerate within the inner-jet up to scales of $\\sim$1 pc, while lo...

  20. Fast Super-Resolution Imaging with Ultra-High Labeling Density Achieved by Joint Tagging Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging (JT-SOFI)

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Zhiping; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition....

  1. A rate adaptive control method for Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanyan [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Information Sensing and Intelligent Control, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, 300222 Tianjin (China); Wan, Jiahuan [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin (China); Hu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdhu@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin (China); Xu, Linyan; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2015-08-15

    A simple rate adaptive control method is proposed to improve the imaging speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in the paper. Conventionally, the probe implemented on the AFM scans the sample surface at a constant rate, resulting in low time efficiency. Numerous attempts have been made to realize high-speed AFMs, while little efforts are put into changing the constant-rate scanning. Here we report a rate adaptive control method based on variable-rate scanning. The method automatically sets the imaging speed for the x scanner through the analysis of the tracking errors in the z direction at each scanning point, thus improving the dynamic tracking performance of the z scanner. The development and functioning of the rate adaptive method are demonstrated, as well as how the approach significantly achieves faster scans and a higher resolution AFM imaging. - Highlights: • A rate adaptive control method is proposed to improve the imaging speed ofAFM. • The new method automatically selects appropriate scanning speed in the x direction through the analysis of the tracking errors in the z direction. • The system identification is carried out to obtain the mathematical model of thevertical feedback system of AFM.

  2. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging with the POLAR CEPPAD/ IPS Instrument : Initial Forward Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Moore, K. R.; Spence, H. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current. detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper. we present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  3. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, Lucie; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlina; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-12-01

    The virulence of the Candida pathogens is enhanced by the production of secreted aspartic proteases, which therefore represent possible targets for drug design. Here, the crystal structure of the secreted aspartic protease Sapp2p from Candida parapsilosis was determined. Sapp2p was isolated from its natural source and crystallized in complex with pepstatin A, a classical aspartic protease inhibitor. The atomic resolution of 0.83 Å allowed the protonation states of the active-site residues to be inferred. A detailed comparison of the structure of Sapp2p with the structure of Sapp1p, the most abundant C. parapsilosis secreted aspartic protease, was performed. The analysis, which included advanced quantum-chemical interaction-energy calculations, uncovered molecular details that allowed the experimentally observed equipotent inhibition of both isoenzymes by pepstatin A to be rationalized.

  4. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  5. Overcoming Registration Uncertainty in Image Super-Resolution: Maximize or Marginalize?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Zisserman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In multiple-image super-resolution, a high-resolution image is estimated from a number of lower-resolution images. This usually involves computing the parameters of a generative imaging model (such as geometric and photometric registration, and blur and obtaining a MAP estimate by minimizing a cost function including an appropriate prior. Two alternative approaches are examined. First, both registrations and the super-resolution image are found simultaneously using a joint MAP optimization. Second, we perform Bayesian integration over the unknown image registration parameters, deriving a cost function whose only variables of interest are the pixel values of the super-resolution image. We also introduce a scheme to learn the parameters of the image prior as part of the super-resolution algorithm. We show examples on a number of real sequences including multiple stills, digital video, and DVDs of movies.

  6. Production of High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images for Navigation Information Infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhijun; Djemel Ziou; Costas Armenakis

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces the image fusion approach of multi-resolution analysis-based intensity modulation (MRAIM) to produce the high-resolution multi-spectral images from high-resolution panchromatic image and low-resolution multi-spectral images for navigation information infrastructure. The mathematical model of image fusion is derived according to the principle of remote sensing image formation. It shows that the pixel values of a high-resolution multi-spectral images are determined by the pixel values of the approximation of a high-resolution panchromatic image at the resolution level of low-resolution multi-spectral images, and in the pixel valae computation the M-band wavelet theory and the à trous algorithm are then used. In order to evaluate the MRAIM approach, an experiment has been carried out on the basis of the IKONOS 1 m panchromatic image and 4 m multi-spectral images. The result demonstrates that MRAIM image fusion approach gives promising fusion results and it can be used to produce the high-resolution remote sensing images required for navigation information infrastructures.

  7. Reduction of interference fringes in absorption imaging of cold atom cloud using eigenface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolin Li; Min Ke; Bo Yan; Yuzhu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Eigenface method used in face recognition is introduced to reduce the pattern of interference fringes appearing in the absorption image of cold rubidium atom cloud trapped by an atom chip. The standard method for processing the absorption image is proposed, and the origin of the interference fringes is analyzed. Compared with the standard processing method which uses only one reference image, we take advantage of fifty reference images and reconstruct a new reference image which is more similar to the absorption image than all of the fifty original reference images. Then obvious reduction of interference fringes can be obtained.

  8. Photothermal imaging of damage and undercutting to gold-coated Kapton samples exposed to atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. W.; Wood, N. J.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design and construction of a laser-based photothermal imaging system, which we have used to evaluate damage to gold-coated Kapton samples that have been exposed to atomic oxygen in a laboratory atomic oxygen source. This exposure simulates the erosive effects of atomic oxygen on spacecraft materials in low Earth orbits. In particular, thermal wave imaging studies have been carried out for materials that are susceptible to atomic oxygen erosion. The photothermal imaging method is sensitive to invisible subsurface features such as the delamination of barrier coatings used to protect vulnerable substrates.

  9. Effects of frame rate and image resolution on pulse rate measured using multiple camera imaging photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses cameras to facilitate measurements including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, respiration rate, and blood perfusion by measuring characteristic changes in light absorption at the skin's surface resulting from changes in blood volume in the superficial microvasculature. Several factors may affect the accuracy of the physiological measurement including imager frame rate, resolution, compression, lighting conditions, image background, participant skin tone, and participant motion. Before this method can gain wider use outside basic research settings, its constraints and capabilities must be well understood. Recently, we presented a novel approach utilizing a synchronized, nine-camera, semicircular array backed by measurement of an electrocardiogram and fingertip reflectance photoplethysmogram. Twenty-five individuals participated in six, five-minute, controlled head motion artifact trials in front of a black and dynamic color backdrop. Increasing the input channel space for blind source separation using the camera array was effective in mitigating error from head motion artifact. Herein we present the effects of lower frame rates at 60 and 30 (reduced from 120) frames per second and reduced image resolution at 329x246 pixels (one-quarter of the original 658x492 pixel resolution) using bilinear and zero-order downsampling. This is the first time these factors have been examined for a multiple imager array and align well with previous findings utilizing a single imager. Examining windowed pulse rates, there is little observable difference in mean absolute error or error distributions resulting from reduced frame rates or image resolution, thus lowering requirements for systems measuring pulse rate over sufficient length time windows.

  10. Intrinsic Resolution of Molecular Electronic Wave Functions and Energies in Terms of Quasi-atoms and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron C; Schmidt, Michael W; Gordon, Mark S; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2017-02-09

    A general intrinsic energy resolution has been formulated for strongly correlated wave functions in the full molecular valence space and its subspaces. The information regarding the quasi-atomic organization of the molecular electronic structure is extracted from the molecular wave function without introducing any additional postulated model state wave functions. To this end, the molecular wave function is expressed in terms of quasi-atomic molecular orbitals, which maximize the overlap between subspaces of the molecular orbital space and the free-atom orbital spaces. As a result, the molecular wave function becomes the superposition of a wave function representing the juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms and a wave function describing the interatomic electron migrations that create bonds through electron sharing. The juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms are shown to consist of entangled quasi-atomic states from different atoms. The binding energy is resolved as a sum of contributions that are due to quasi-atom formation, quasiclassical electrostatic interactions, and interatomic interferences caused by electron sharing. The contributions are further resolved according to orbital interactions. The various transformations that generate the analysis are determined by criteria that are independent of the working orbital basis used for calculating the molecular wave function. The theoretical formulation of the resolution is quantitatively validated by an application to the C2 molecule.

  11. High resolution Ceres HAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chris T.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015, and will characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission was mapping Ceres in HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1475 km altitude) between August and October 2015. The framing camera took about 2,600 clear filter images with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected images from one cycle (cycle #1) for the mosaicking process to have similar viewing and illumination conditions. Very minor gaps in the coverage were filled with a few images from cycle #2. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain towards the cartographic products is to ortho-rectify the images to the proper scale and map projec-tion type. This process requires detailed information of the Dawn orbit and attitude data and of the topography of the targets. Both, improved orientation and a high-resolution shape model, are provided by stereo processing (bundle block adjustment) of the HAMO stereo image dataset [3]. Ceres's HAMO shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto the reference sphere of Ceres with a radius of 470 km. The final step is the controlled mosaicking) of all images to a global mosaic of Ceres, the so-called basemap. Ceres map tiles: The Ceres atlas was produced in a scale of 1:750,000 and consists of 15 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4]. A map scale of 1:750,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available Dawn resolution in HAMO. The individual tiles were extracted from the global mosaic and reprojected. Nomenclature: The Dawn team proposed 81 names for geological features. By international

  12. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  13. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  14. Improved SOT (Hinode mission) high resolution solar imaging observations

    CERN Document Server

    Goodarzi, Hadis; Adjabshirizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We consider the best today available observations of the Sun free of turbulent Earth atmospheric effects, taken with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft. Both the instrumental smearing and the observed stray light are analyzed in order to improve the resolution. The Point Spread Function (PSF) corresponding to the blue continuum Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) near 450 nm is deduced by analyzing i/ the limb of the Sun and ii/ images taken during the transit of the planet Venus in 2012. A combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian functions is selected to construct a PSF in order to remove both smearing due to the instrumental diffraction effects (PSF core) and the large-angle stray light due to the spiders and central obscuration (wings of the PSF) that are responsible for the parasitic stray light. A Max-likelihood deconvolution procedure based on an optimum number of iterations is discussed. It is applied to several solar field images, including the granulation near the limb. The norma...

  15. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  16. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Highly Neutralizing Fab Bound to Canine Parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organtini, Lindsey J; Lee, Hyunwook; Iketani, Sho; Huang, Kai; Ashley, Robert E; Makhov, Alexander M; Conway, James F; Parrish, Colin R; Hafenstein, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes severe disease in dogs and wildlife. Previously, a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) raised against CPV was characterized. An antibody fragment (Fab) of MAb E was found to neutralize the virus at low molar ratios. Using recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we determined the structure of CPV in complex with Fab E to 4.1 Å resolution, which allowed de novo building of the Fab structure. The footprint identified was significantly different from the footprint obtained previously from models fitted into lower-resolution maps. Using single-chain variable fragments, we tested antibody residues that control capsid binding. The near-atomic structure also revealed that Fab binding had caused capsid destabilization in regions containing key residues conferring receptor binding and tropism, which suggests a mechanism for efficient virus neutralization by antibody. Furthermore, a general technical approach to solving the structures of small molecules is demonstrated, as binding the Fab to the capsid allowed us to determine the 50-kDa Fab structure by cryo-EM.

  17. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-11

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits.

  18. Influence of angle's ranges for recording an X-ray fluorescence hologram on reconstructed atomic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hong-Lan; CHEN Jian-Wen; GAO Hong-Yi; ZHU Hua-Feng; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a novel method for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of atomic structure. Theoretically, in an XFH experiment, one has to measure the fluorescence energy on a spherical surface to get well-resolved 3D images of atoms. But in practice, the experimental system arrangement does not allow the measurement of the fluorescent intensity oscillations in the full sphere. The holographic information losses because of the limited sampling range (less than 4π) will directly result in defective reconstructed atomic images. In this work, the atomic image of a Fe single crystal (001) was reconstructed by numerically simulating X-ray fluorescence holograms of the crystal at different recording angle's ranges and step lengths. Influences of the ranges of azimuth angles and polar angles and the step length of polar angles on the reconstructed atomic images were discussed.

  19. Interaction Enhanced Imaging of Rydberg P states. Preparation and detection of Rydberg atoms for engineering long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavryusev, Vladislav; Ferreira-Cao, Miguel; Kekić, Armin; Zürn, Gerhard; Signoles, Adrien

    2016-12-01

    The Interaction Enhanced Imaging technique allows to detect the spatial distribution of strongly interacting impurities embedded within a gas of background atoms used as a contrast medium [1]. Here we present a detailed study of this technique, applied to detect Rydberg P states. We experimentally realize fast and efficient three-photon excitation of P states, optimized according to the results of a theoretical effective two-level model. Few Rydberg P-state atoms, prepared in a small cloud with dimensions comparable to the blockade radius, are detected with a good sensitivity by averaging over 50 shots. The main aspects of the technique are described with a hard-sphere model, finding good agreement with experimental data. This work paves the way to a non-destructive optical detection of single Rydberg atoms with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  20. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  1. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  2. Effects of reconstruction parameters on image noise and spatial resolution in cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Wan; Lee, Chang-Lae; Cho, Hyo-Min; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Dae-Hong; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    CBCT (cone-beam computed tomography) is a promising modality in many medical applications due to the properties of fast volume coverage, lower radiation dose, easy hardware implementation, and higher spatial resolution. Recently, attention is being paid to the noise and resolution relationship for CBCT. In a CBCT system, image noise and spatial resolution play very important roles in image quality. However, there have not been many works to evaluate the relationship between the image noise and the spatial resolution in CBCT. In this study, we evaluated the effects of reconstruction parameters, such as the characteristics of the filter, the number of projections, and the voxel size, on the image noise and the spatial resolution in a CBCT system. The simulated projection data of a Catphan 600 phantom were reconstructed using the FDK (Feldkamp) algorithm. To evaluate the image noise and the spatial resolution, we calculated the COV (coefficient of variation) of the attenuation coefficient and the MTF (modulation transfer function) in axial images. Five reconstruction filters, Ram-Lak, Shepp-Logan, Cosine, Hamming, and Hann, were used to reconstruct the images. Different numbers of projections for a circular scan of 360 degrees and different voxel sizes were used to reconstruct the images to evaluate their effect on image noise and spatial resolution. The image noise given by the Hann filter was the lowest and the spatial resolution given by the Ram-Lak filter was the highest. The image noise was decreased as functions of the number of projections and the voxel size. The spatial resolution was increased as a function of the number of projections and decreased as a function of the voxel size. The results of this study show the relationship between the image noise and the spatial resolution in a CBCT system and the characteristics of the reconstruction factors for trade-off between the image noise and the spatial resolution. It can also provide information of the image

  3. Investigation of Image Fusion Between High-Resolution Image and Multi-spectral Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pingxiang; WANG Zhijun

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of a thorough understanding of the physical characteristics of remote sensing image, this paper employs the theories of wavelet transform and signal sampling to develop a new image fusion algorithm. The algorithm has been successfully applied to the image fusion of SPOT PAN and TM of Guangdong province, China. The experimental results show that a perfect image fusion can be built up by using the image analytical solution and re-construction in the image frequency domain based on the physical characteristics of the image formation. The method has demonstrated that the results of the image fusion do not change spectral characteristics of the original image.

  4. Building identification from very high-resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Stephane

    Urbanisation still remains one of the main problems worldwide. The extent and rapidity of the urban growth induce a number of socio-economic and environmental conflicts everywhere. In order to reduce these problems, urban planners need to integrate spatial information in planning tools. Actually high expectations are made on Very High Spatial Resolution imagery (VHSR). These high-spatial resolution images are available at a reasonable price and due to short revisit periods, they offer a high degree of actuality. However, interpretation methods seem not to be adapted to this new type of images. The aim of our study is to develop a new method for semi-automatic building extraction with VHSR. The different steps performed to achieve our objective are each presented in a chapter. In the first chapter, the general context of our research is described with the definition of our objective. After a short historical review of urbanisation, we focus on urban growth and associated problems. In the following we discuss the possible contributions of geography to reduce these problems. After discussing concepts, theories and methodologies of geographical analysis in urban areas, we present existing general urban planning tools. Finally, we show the special interest of our study that is due to a growing need to integrate spatial information in these decision support tools. In the second chapter we verify the possibility of reaching our objective by analysing the technical characteristics of the images, the noise and the distortions which affect the images. Quality and interpretability of the studied image is analysed in order to show the capacity of these image to represent urban objects as close to reality as possible. The results confirm the potential of VHSR Imagery for urban objects analysis. The third chapter deal with the preliminary steps necessary for the elaboration of our method of building extraction. First, we evaluate the quality of the Sherbrooke Ikonos image

  5. Determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using atomic clock comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Wolf, P.; Guerlin, C.; Bize, S.; Delva, P.

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances in optical atomic clocks are opening new perspectives for the direct determination of geopotential differences between any two points at a centimeter-level accuracy in geoid height. However, so far detailed quantitative estimates of the possible improvement in geoid determination when adding such clock measurements to existing data are lacking. We present a first step in that direction with the aim and hope of triggering further work and efforts in this emerging field of chronometric geodesy and geophysics. We specifically focus on evaluating the contribution of this new kind of direct measurements in determining the geopotential at high spatial resolution (≈ 10 km). We studied two test areas, both located in France and corresponding to a middle (Massif Central) and high (Alps) mountainous terrain. These regions are interesting because the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high spatial resolution due to the complex topography. Our method consists in first generating a synthetic high-resolution geopotential map, then drawing synthetic measurement data (gravimetry and clock data) from it, and finally reconstructing the geopotential map from that data using least squares collocation. The quality of the reconstructed map is then assessed by comparing it to the original one used to generate the data. We show that adding only a few clock data points (less than 1% of the gravimetry data) reduces the bias significantly and improves the standard deviation by a factor 3. The effect of the data coverage and data quality on the results is investigated, and the trade-off between the measurement noise level and the number of data points is discussed.

  6. Monitoring of vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li; Li Li-juan; Liang Li-qiao; Li Jiu-yi

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of vegetation coverage on a small scale is the foundation for the monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage and of the inversion model of monitoring vegetation coverage on a large scale by remote sensing. Using the object-oriented analytical software,Definiens Professional 5,a new method for calculating vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images(aerial photographs or near-surface photography)is proposed. Our research supplies references to remote sensing measurements of vegetation coverage on a small scale and accurate fundamental data for the inversion model of vegetation coverage on a large and intermediatc scale to improve the accuracy of remote sensing monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage.

  7. A Fast Super-Resolution Reconstruction from Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of imagery, a novel method called the delaminating combining template method, used for the problem of super-resolution reconstruction from image sequence, is described in this paper. The combining template method contains two steps: a delaminating strategy and a combining template algorithm. The delaminating strategy divides the original problem into several sub-problems;each of them is only connected to one degrading factor. The combining template algorithm is suggested to resolve each sub-problem. In addition, to verify the valid of the method, a new index called oriental entropy is presented. The results from the theoretical analysis and experiments illustrate that this method to be promising and efficient.

  8. Single photon imaging at ultra-high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, R.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Baldini, L.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Sgrò, C.; Bregeon, J.; Razzano, M.; Pinchera, M.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O.

    2008-06-01

    We present a detection system capable of imaging both single photon/positive ion and multiple coincidence photons/positive ions with extremely high spatial resolution. In this detector the photoelectrons excited by the incoming photons are multiplied by microchannel plate(s) (MCP). The process of multiplication is spatially constrained within an MCP pore, which can be as small as 4 μm for commercially available MCPs. An electron cloud originated by a single photoelectron is then encoded by a pixellated custom analog ASIC consisting of 105 K charge sensitive pixels of 50 μm in size arranged on a hexagonal grid. Each pixel registers the charge with an accuracy of electrons rms. Computation of the event centroid from the readout charges results in an accurate event position. A large number of simultaneous photons spatially separated by ˜0.4 mm can be detected simultaneously allowing multiple coincidence operation for the experiments where a large number of incoming photons/positive ions have to be detected simultaneously. The experimental results prove that the spatial resolution of the readout system itself is ˜3 μm FWHM enabling detection resolution better than 6 μm for the small pore MCPs. An attractive feature of the detection system is its capability to register the timing of each incoming photon/positive ion (in single photon detection mode) or of the first incoming particle (for the multiple coincidence detection) with an accuracy of ˜130 ps FWHM. There is also virtually no dark count noise in the detection system making it suitable for low count rate applications.

  9. Infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiubao; Gao, Hang; Sun, Yicheng; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2013-09-01

    With the wide application of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA), military, aerospace, public security and other applications have higher and higher requirements on the spatial resolution of infrared images. However, traditional super-resolution imaging methods have increasingly unable to meet this requirement in technology. In this paper, we adopt the achievement that the human retina micro-motion is the important reason why the human has the hyperacuity ability. Based on the achievement, we bring forward an infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion. In the method, we use the piezoelectric ceramic equipment to control the infrared detector moving variably within a plane parallel to the focal plane. The motion direction is toward each other into a direction of 90°. In the four directions of the movement, we get four sub-images and generate a high spatial resolution infrared image by image interpolation method. In the process of the shifting movement of the detector, we set the threshold of the detector response and record the response time difference when adjacent pixel responses are up to the threshold. By the method, we get the object's edges, enhance them in the high resolution infrared image and get the super-resolution infrared image. The experimental results show that our proposed super-resolution imaging methods can improve the spatial resolution of the infrared image effectively. The method will offer a new idea for the super-resolution reconstruction of infrared images.

  10. Wavelet-Based Mixed-Resolution Coding Approach Incorporating with SPT for the Stereo Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With the advances of display technology, three-dimensional(3-D) imaging systems are becoming increasingly popular. One way of stimulating 3-D perception is to use stereo pairs, a pair of images of the same scene acquired from different perspectives. Since there is an inherent redundancy between the images of a stereo pairs, data compression algorithms should be employed to represent stereo pairs efficiently. The proposed techniques generally use blockbased disparity compensation. In order to get the higher compression ratio, this paper employs the wavelet-based mixed-resolution coding technique to incorporate with SPT-based disparity-compensation to compress the stereo image data. The mixed-resolution coding is a perceptually justified technique that is achieved by presenting one eye with a low-resolution image and the other with a high-resolution image. Psychophysical experiments show that the stereo image pairs with one high-resolution image and one low-resolution image provide almost the same stereo depth to that of a stereo image with two high-resolution images. By combining the mixed-resolution coding and SPT-based disparity-compensation techniques, one reference (left) high-resolution image can be compressed by a hierarchical wavelet transform followed by vector quantization and Huffman encoder. After two level wavelet decompositions, for the lowresolution right image and low-resolution left image, subspace projection technique using the fixed block size disparity compensation estimation is used. At the decoder, the low-resolution right subimage is estimated using the disparity from the low-resolution left subimage. A full-size reconstruction is obtained by upsampling a factor of 4 and reconstructing with the synthesis low pass filter. Finally, experimental results are presented, which show that our scheme achieves a PSNR gain (about 0.92dB) as compared to the current block-based disparity compensation coding techniques.``

  11. Spatiotonal adaptivity in super-resolution of under-sampled image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.Q.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis concerns the use of spatial and tonal adaptivity in improving the resolution of aliased image sequences under scene or camera motion. Each of the five content chapters focuses on a different subtopic of super-resolution: image registration (chapter 2), image fusion (chapter 3 and 4), sup

  12. A VLSI Processor Design of Real-Time Data Compression for High-Resolution Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W.

    1994-01-01

    For the high-resolution imaging radar systems, real-time data compression of raw imaging data is required to accomplish the science requirements and satisfy the given communication and storage constraints. The Block Adaptive Quantizer (BAQ) algorithm and its associated VLSI processor design have been developed to provide a real-time data compressor for high-resolution imaging radar systems.

  13. Image Segmentation By Cluster Analysis Of High Resolution Textured SPOT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, M.; Roux, C.; Hillion, A.

    1986-04-01

    Textural analysis is now a commonly used technique in digital image processing. In this paper, we present an application of textural analysis to high resolution SPOT satellite images. The purpose of the methodology is to improve classification results, i.e. image segmentation in remote sensing. Remote sensing techniques, based on high resolution satellite data offer good perspectives for the cartography of littoral environment. Textural information contained in the pan-chromatic channel of ten meters resolution is introduced in order to separate different types of structures. The technique we used is based on statistical pattern recognition models and operates in two steps. A first step, features extraction, is derived by using a stepwise algorithm. Segmentation is then performed by cluster analysis using these extracted. features. The texture features are computed over the immediate neighborhood of the pixel using two methods : the cooccurence matrices method and the grey level difference statistics method. Image segmentation based only on texture features is then performed by pixel classification and finally discussed. In a future paper, we intend to compare the results with aerial data in view of the management of the littoral resources.

  14. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  15. Gradient Permittivity Meta-Structure model for Wide-field Super-resolution imaging with a sub-45 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shun; Wang, Taisheng; Xu, Wenbin; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Hu, Bingliang; Yu, Weixing

    2016-03-21

    A gradient permittivity meta-structure (GPMS) model and its application in super-resolution imaging were proposed and discussed in this work. The proposed GPMS consists of alternate metallic and dielectric films with a gradient permittivity which can support surface plasmons (SPs) standing wave interference patterns with a super resolution. By employing the rigorous numerical FDTD simulation method, the GPMS was carefully simulated to find that the period of the SPs interference pattern is only 84 nm for a 532 nm incident light. Furthermore, the potential application of the GPMS for wide-field super-resolution imaging was also discussed and the simulation results show that an imaging resolution of sub-45 nm can be achieved based on the plasmonic structure illumination microscopic method, which means a 5.3-fold improvement on resolution has been achieved in comparison with conventional epifluorescence microscopy. Moreover, besides the super-resolution imaging application, the proposed GPMS model can also be applied for nanolithography and other areas where super resolution patterns are needed.

  16. A novel super resolution reconstruction of low reoslution images progressively using dct and zonal filter based denoising

    CERN Document Server

    Liyakathunisa,

    2011-01-01

    Due to the factors like processing power limitations and channel capabilities images are often down sampled and transmitted at low bit rates resulting in a low resolution compressed image. High resolution images can be reconstructed from several blurred, noisy and down sampled low resolution images using a computational process know as super resolution reconstruction. Super-resolution is the process of combining multiple aliased low-quality images to produce a high resolution, high-quality image. The problem of recovering a high resolution image progressively from a sequence of low resolution compressed images is considered. In this paper we propose a novel DCT based progressive image display algorithm by stressing on the encoding and decoding process. At the encoder we consider a set of low resolution images which are corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise and motion blur. The low resolution images are compressed using 8 by 8 blocks DCT and noise is filtered using our proposed novel zonal filter. Multifr...

  17. Pairwise Operator Learning for Patch Based Single-image Super-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Shao, Ling

    2016-12-14

    Motivated by the fact that image patches could be inherently represented by matrices, single-image super-resolution is treated as a problem of learning regression operators in a matrix space in this paper. The regression operators that map low-resolution image patches to high-resolution image patches are generally defined by left and right multiplication operators. The pairwise operators are respectively used to extract the raw and column information of low-resolution image patches for recovering high-resolution estimations. The patch based regression algorithm possesses three favorable properties. Firstly, the proposed super-resolution algorithm is efficient during both training and testing, because image patches are treated as matrices. Secondly, the data storage requirement of the optimal pairwise operator is far less than most popular single-image super-resolution algorithms because only two small sized matrices need to be stored. Lastly, the super-resolution performance is competitive with most popular single-image super-resolution algorithms because both raw and column information of image patches is considered. Experimental results show the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed patch-based single-image superresolution algorithm.

  18. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  19. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  20. Fast super-resolution imaging with ultra-high labeling density achieved by joint tagging super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Chen, Xuanze; Wang, Hening; Huang, Ning; Shan, Chunyan; Zhang, Hao; Teng, Junlin; Xi, Peng

    2015-02-10

    Previous stochastic localization-based super-resolution techniques are largely limited by the labeling density and the fidelity to the morphology of specimen. We report on an optical super-resolution imaging scheme implementing joint tagging using multiple fluorescent blinking dyes associated with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (JT-SOFI), achieving ultra-high labeling density super-resolution imaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of JT-SOFI, quantum dots with different emission spectra were jointly labeled to the tubulin in COS7 cells, creating ultra-high density labeling. After analyzing and combining the fluorescence intermittency images emanating from spectrally resolved quantum dots, the microtubule networks are capable of being investigated with high fidelity and remarkably enhanced contrast at sub-diffraction resolution. The spectral separation also significantly decreased the frame number required for SOFI, enabling fast super-resolution microscopy through simultaneous data acquisition. As the joint-tagging scheme can decrease the labeling density in each spectral channel, thereby bring it closer to single-molecule state, we can faithfully reconstruct the continuous microtubule structure with high resolution through collection of only 100 frames per channel. The improved continuity of the microtubule structure is quantitatively validated with image skeletonization, thus demonstrating the advantage of JT-SOFI over other localization-based super-resolution methods.

  1. The Effect of Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Resolution on Target Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    resolutions. 50 Figure 5.16: AUROC versus resolution in the x and y directions for the size features for image filter degradation. 51 Figure 5.17...AUROC versus resolution in the x and y directions for the mass feature for image filter degradation. 52 Figure 5.18: AUROC versus resolution in the x and...y directions for the diameter feature for image filter degradation. 53 Figure 5.19: AUROC versus resolution in the x and y directions for the

  2. Interaction networks in protein folding via atomic-resolution experiments and long-time-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Piana, Stefano;

    2015-01-01

    The integration of atomic-resolution experimental and computational methods offers the potential for elucidating key aspects of protein folding that are not revealed by either approach alone. Here, we combine equilibrium NMR measurements of thermal unfolding and long molecular dynamics simulation...

  3. Note: High-speed Z tip scanner with screw cantilever holding mechanism for atomic-resolution atomic force microscopy in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Akrami, Seyed; Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy has attracted much attention due to its unique capability of visualizing nanoscale dynamic processes at a solid/liquid interface. However, its usability and resolution have yet to be improved. As one of the solutions for this issue, here we present a design of a high-speed Z-tip scanner with screw holding mechanism. We perform detailed comparison between designs with different actuator size and screw arrangement by finite element analysis. Based on the desig...

  4. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  5. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  6. Learning Based Single Frame Image Super-resolution Using Fast Discrete Curvelet Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil A. Patil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (HR images play a vital role in all imaging applications as they offer more details. The images captured by the camera system are of degraded quality due to the imaging system and are low-resolution (LR images. Image super-resolution (SR is a process, where HR image is obtained from combining one or multiple LR images of same scene. In this paper, learning based single frame image super-resolution technique is proposed by using Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform (FDCT coefficients. FDCT is an extension to Cartesian wavelets having anisotropic scaling with many directions and positions, which forms tight wedges. Such wedges allow FDCT to capture the smooth curves and fine edges at multiresolution level. The finer scale curvelet coefficients of LR image are learnt locally from a set of high-resolution training images. The super-resolved image is reconstructed by inverse Fast Discrete Curvelet Transform (IFDCT. This technique represents fine edges of reconstructed HR image by extrapolating the FDCT coefficients from the high-resolution training images. Experimentation based results show appropriate improvements in MSE and PSNR.

  7. High resolution mosaic image of capillaries in human retina by adaptive optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ling; Yudong Zhang; Xuejun Rao; Cheng Wang; Yiyun Hu; Wenhan Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) has been proved as a powerful means for high resolution imaging of human retina.Because of the pixel number of charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, the field of view is limited to 1°.In order to have image of capillaries around vivo human fovea, we use mosaic method to obtain high resolution image in area of 6°× 6°. Detailed structures of capillaries around fovea with resolution of 2.3μm are clearly shown. Comparison shows that this method has a much higher resolution than current clinic retina imaging methods.

  8. Three-dimensional super-resolution structured illumination microscopy with maximum a posteriori probability image estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Tomáš; Křížek, Pavel; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Benda, Jakub; Ovesný, Martin; Fliegel, Karel; Klíma, Miloš; Hagen, Guy M

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a new high performance image reconstruction method for super-resolution structured illumination microscopy based on maximum a posteriori probability estimation (MAP-SIM). Imaging performance is demonstrated on a variety of fluorescent samples of different thickness, labeling density and noise levels. The method provides good suppression of out of focus light, improves spatial resolution, and allows reconstruction of both 2D and 3D images of cells even in the case of weak signals. The method can be used to process both optical sectioning and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy data to create high quality super-resolution images.

  9. Atomic resolution model of the antibody Fc interaction with the complement C1q component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The globular C1q heterotrimer is a subunit of the C1 complement factor. Binding of the C1q subunit to the constant (Fc) part of antibody molecules is a first step and key event of complement activation. Although three-dimensional structures of C1q and antibody Fc subunits have been determined experimentally no atomic resolution structure of the C1q-Fc complex is known so far. Based on systematic protein-protein docking searches and Molecular Dynamics simulations a structural model of the C1q-IgG1-Fc-binding geometry has been obtained. The structural model is compatible with available experimental data on the interaction between the two partner proteins. It predicts a binding geometry that involves mainly the B-subunit of the C1q-trimer and both subunits of the IgG1-Fc-dimer with small conformational adjustments with respect to the unbound partners to achieve high surface complementarity. In addition to several charge-charge and polar contacts in the rim region of the interface it also involves nonpolar contacts between the two proteins and is compatible with the carbohydrate moiety of the Fc subunit. The model for the complex structure provides a working model for rationalizing available biochemical data on this important interaction and can form the basis for the design of Fc variants with a greater capacity to activate the complement system for example on binding to cancer cells or other target structures.

  10. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  11. Detecting Changes Between Optical Images of Different Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: a Fusion-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraris, Vinicius; Wei, Qi; Chabert, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Change detection is one of the most challenging issues when analyzing remotely sensed images. Comparing several multi-date images acquired through the same kind of sensor is the most common scenario. Conversely, designing robust, flexible and scalable algorithms for change detection becomes even more challenging when the images have been acquired by two different kinds of sensors. This situation arises in case of emergency under critical constraints. This paper presents, to the best of authors' knowledge, the first strategy to deal with optical images characterized by dissimilar spatial and spectral resolutions. Typical considered scenarios include change detection between panchromatic or multispectral and hyperspectral images. The proposed strategy consists of a 3-step procedure: i) inferring a high spatial and spectral resolution image by fusion of the two observed images characterized one by a low spatial resolution and the other by a low spectral resolution, ii) predicting two images with respectively the...

  12. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  13. Near-Infrared Super Resolution Imaging with Metallic Nanoshell Particle Chain Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Weijie; Cao, Penfei; Cheng, Lin; Gong, Li; Zhao, Xining; Yang, Lili

    2012-01-01

    We propose a near-infrared super resolution imaging system without a lens or a mirror but with an array of metallic nanoshell particle chain. The imaging array can plasmonically transfer the near-field components of dipole sources in the incoherent and coherent manners and the super resolution images can be reconstructed in the output plane. By tunning the parameters of the metallic nanoshell particle, the plasmon resonance band of the isolate nanoshell particle red-shifts to the near-infrared region. The near-infrared super resolution images are obtained subsequently. We calculate the field intensity distribution at the different planes of imaging process using the finite element method and find that the array has super resolution imaging capability at near-infrared wavelengths. We also show that the image formation highly depends on the coherence of the dipole sources and the image-array distance.

  14. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    CERN Document Server

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  15. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live-cell imaging of focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschout, Hendrik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Live-cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenge for super-resolution microscopy. Here we address this important issue by combining photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed-cell focal adhesion images, we investigate the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework is used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualize the dynamics of focal adhesions, and reveal local mean velocities around 190 nm min-1. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI is assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of molecular parameters such as fluorophore densities and photoactivation or photoswitching kinetics.

  16. Discrete cosine transform based high-resolution image reconstruction considering the inaccurate subpixel motion information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min K.; Lee, Eun S.; Park, Jin Y.; Kang, Moon Gi; Kim, Jaihie

    2002-02-01

    The demand for high-resolution images is gradually increasing, whereas many imaging systems have been designed to enable a certain level of aliasing during image acquisition. In this sense, digital image processing approaches have recently been investigated to reconstruct a high-resolution image from aliased low-resolution images. However, since the subpixel motion information is assumed to be accurate in most conventional approaches, the satisfactory high-resolution image cannot be obtained when the subpixel motion information is inaccurate. Hence, we propose a new algorithm to reduce the distortion in the reconstructed high-resolution image due to the inaccuracy of subpixel motion information. For this purpose, we analyze the effect of inaccurate subpixel motion information on a high-resolution image reconstruction, and model it as zero-mean additive Gaussian errors added respectively to each low- resolution image. To reduce the distortion, we apply the modified multichannel image deconvolution approach to the problem. The validity of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally.

  17. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar.

  18. A theoretical analysis of the super-resolution capacity of imagers using speckle illuminations

    CERN Document Server

    Idier, Jérôme; Liu, Penghuan; Allain, Marc; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Sentenac, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Speckle based imaging consists in forming a super-resolved reconstruction of an unknown object from low-resolution images obtained under random inhomogeneous illuminations (speckles). However, the origin of this super-resolution is unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that, under physically realistic conditions, the correlation of the data have a super-resolution power corresponding to the squaring of the imager point spread function. This theoretical result is important for many practical imaging systems such as acoustic and electromagnetic tomographies, fluorescence and photoacoustic microscopies or synthetic aperture radar imaging.

  19. Multicolor 3D super-resolution imaging by quantum dot stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianquan; Tehrani, Kayvan F; Kner, Peter

    2015-03-24

    We demonstrate multicolor three-dimensional super-resolution imaging with quantum dots (QSTORM). By combining quantum dot asynchronous spectral blueing with stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and adaptive optics, we achieve three-dimensional imaging with 24 nm lateral and 37 nm axial resolution. By pairing two short-pass filters with two appropriate quantum dots, we are able to image single blueing quantum dots on two channels simultaneously, enabling multicolor imaging with high photon counts.

  20. A novel super resolution scheme to acquire and process satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dong-yu; Su, Xiao-feng; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Gan-quan; Kuang, Ding-bo

    2013-09-01

    Geosynchronous satellite has obvious limitations for the weight and the scale of payloads, and large aperture optical system is not permitted. The optical diffraction limit of small aperture optical system has an adverse impact on the resolution of the acquired images. Therefore, how to get high resolution images using super-resolution technique with the acquired low resolution images becomes a popular problem investigated by researchers. Here, we present a novel scheme to acquire low resolution images and process them to achieve a high resolution image. Firstly, to acquire low resolution images, we adopt a special arrangement pattern of four CCD staggered arrays on the focal plane in the remote sensing satellite framework .These four CCD linear arrays are parallelized with a 0.25√2 pixel shift along the CCD direction and a 1.25 pixel shift along the scanning direction. The rotation angle between the two directions is 45 degree. The tilting sampling mode and the special arrangement pattern allow the sensor to acquire images with a smaller sampling interval which can give the resolution a greater enhancement. Secondly, to reconstruct a high resolution image of pretty good quality with a magnification factor 4, we propose a novel algorithm based on the iterative-interpolation super resolution algorithm (IISR) and the new edge-directed interpolation algorithm (NEDI). The new algorithm makes a critical improvement to NEDI and introduces it into the multi-frame interpolation in IISR. The algorithm can preserve the edges well and requires a relatively small number of low-resolution images to achieve better reconstruction accuracy .In the last part of the paper, we carry out a simulation experiment, and use MSE as the quality measure. The results demonstrate that our new scheme substantially improves the image resolution with both better quantitative quality and visual quality compared with some previous normal methods.

  1. Image Resolution Enhancement via Data-Driven Parametric Models in the Wavelet Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a data-driven, project-based algorithm which enhances image resolution by extrapolating high-band wavelet coefficients. High-resolution images are reconstructed by alternating the projections onto two constraint sets: the observation constraint defined by the given low-resolution image and the prior constraint derived from the training data at the high resolution (HR. Two types of prior constraints are considered: spatially homogeneous constraint suitable for texture images and patch-based inhomogeneous one for generic images. A probabilistic fusion strategy is developed for combining reconstructed HR patches when overlapping (redundancy is present. It is argued that objective fidelity measure is important to evaluate the performance of resolution enhancement techniques and the role of antialiasing filter should be properly addressed. Experimental results are reported to show that our projection-based approach can achieve both good subjective and objective performance especially for the class of texture images.

  2. Image Resolution Enhancement via Data-Driven Parametric Models in the Wavelet Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a data-driven, project-based algorithm which enhances image resolution by extrapolating high-band wavelet coefficients. High-resolution images are reconstructed by alternating the projections onto two constraint sets: the observation constraint defined by the given low-resolution image and the prior constraint derived from the training data at the high resolution (HR. Two types of prior constraints are considered: spatially homogeneous constraint suitable for texture images and patch-based inhomogeneous one for generic images. A probabilistic fusion strategy is developed for combining reconstructed HR patches when overlapping (redundancy is present. It is argued that objective fidelity measure is important to evaluate the performance of resolution enhancement techniques and the role of antialiasing filter should be properly addressed. Experimental results are reported to show that our projection-based approach can achieve both good subjective and objective performance especially for the class of texture images.

  3. Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

  4. High-resolution photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of cryogenically cooled Fe4O- and Fe5O-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; DeVine, Jessalyn A.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-08-01

    We report high-resolution photodetachment spectra of the cryogenically cooled iron monoxide clusters Fe4O- and Fe5O- obtained with slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging (cryo-SEVI). Well-resolved vibrational progressions are observed in both sets of spectra, and transitions to low-lying excited states of both species are seen. In order to identify the structural isomers, electronic states, and vibrational modes that contribute to the cryo-SEVI spectra of these clusters, experimental results are compared with density functional theory calculations and Franck-Condon simulations. The main bands observed in the SEVI spectra are assigned to the 15A2←16B2 photodetachment transition of Fe4O- and the 17A'←18A″ photodetachment transition of Fe5O-. We report electron affinities of 1.6980(3) eV for Fe4O and 1.8616(3) eV for Fe5O, although there is some uncertainty as to whether the 15A2 state is the true ground state of Fe4O. The iron atoms have a distorted tetrahedral geometry in Fe4O0/- and a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal arrangement in Fe5O0/-. For both neutral and anionic species, the oxygen atom preferably binds in a μ2-oxo configuration along the cluster edge. This finding is in contrast to prior predictions that Fe5O0/- exhibits a μ3 face-bound structure.

  5. High resolution Doppler imager on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, W.R.; Hays, P.B.; Grassl, H.J.; Gell, D.A.; Burrage, M.D.; Marshall, A.R.; Ortland, D.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite has been providing measurements of the wind field in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere since November 1991. Examination of various calibration data indicates the instrument has remained remarkably stable since launch. The instrument has a thermal drift of about 30 m/s/{degree}C (slightly dependent on wavelength) and a long-term temporal drift that has amounted to about 80 m/s since launch. These effects are removed in the data processing leaving an uncertainty in the instrument stability of {minus}2 nVs. The temperature control of the instrument has improved significantly since launch as a new method was implemented. The initial temperature control held the instrument temperature at about {+-}1{degree}C. The improved method, which holds constant the temperature of the optical bench instead of the radiator, keeps the instrument temperature at about 0.2{degree}C. The calibrations indicate very little change in the sensitivity of the instrument. The detector response has shown no degradation and the optics have not changed their transmittance.

  6. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil and rock microstructure X-ray microtomography is extremely useful. However, as any other imaging technique, this one also has a significant drawback - a trade-off between sample size and resolution. The latter is a significant problem for multi-scale complex structures, especially such as soils and carbonates. Other imaging techniques, for example, SEM/FIB-SEM or X-ray macrotomography can be helpful in obtaining higher resolution or wider field of view. The ultimate goal is to create a single dataset containing information from all scales or to characterize such multi-scale structure. In this contribution we demonstrate a general solution for merging multiscale categorical spatial data into a single dataset using stochastic reconstructions with rescaled correlation functions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by merging three images representing macro, micro and nanoscale spatial information on porous media structure. Images obtained by X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy were fused into a single image with predefined resolution. The methodology is sufficiently generic for implementation of other stochastic reconstruction techniques, any number of scales, any number of material phases, and any number of images for a given scale. The methodology can be further used to assess effective properties of fused porous media images or to compress voluminous spatial datasets for efficient data storage. Potential practical applications of this method are abundant in soil science, hydrology and petroleum engineering, as well as other geosciences. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (X-ray microtomography study of shale

  7. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  8. Single-Molecular Imaging of Anticoagulation Factor I from Snake Venom by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU,Xiao-Long(徐小龙); ZHOU,Yun-Shen(周云申); LIU,Qing-Liang(刘清亮); HOU,Jian-Guo(侯建国); YANG,Jing-Long(杨金龙); XIE,Yong-Shu(解永树)

    2002-01-01

    Anticoagulation factor I (ACF I) from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus is a binding protein to activated coagulation factor X (FXa) and possesses marked anticoagulant activity. Single ACF I molecule has been successfully imaged in air by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) with high-resolution using glutaraldehyde as a coupling agent. The physical adsorption and covalent binding of ACF I onto the mica show very different surface topographies. The former exhibits the characteristic strand-like structure with much less reproducibility, the latter displays a elliptic granular structure with better reproducibility, which suggests that the stability of ACF I molecules on the mica is enhanced by covalent bonding in the presence of glutaraldehyde. A small-scale AFM amplitude-mode image clearly shows that the covalently bonded ACF I molecule by glutaraldehyde has olive shape structure with an average size of 7.4 nm× 3.6 nm × 3.1 nm, which is very similar to the size determined from the crystal structure of ACF I.

  9. Atomic scale imaging of hydroxyapatite and brushite in air by force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siperko, Lorraine M.; Landis, William J.

    1992-11-01

    A method for obtaining atomic scale images of powder samples by force microscopy has been used to determine surface structures of hydroxyapatite and brushite. From isolated hydroxyapatite crystal clusters, two crystal planes have been identified. The and spacings obtained agree well with published crystallographic values. Groups of brushite platelets yielded atomic spacings which are presumed to be those of the crystal plane.

  10. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-01-25

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials.

  11. Higher resolution satellite remote sensing and the impact on image mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Allen H.; Thormodsgard, June M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of civil land remote sensing satellite data are presenting new opportunities for image mapping applications. The U.S. Geological Survey's experimental satellite image mapping program is evolving toward larger scale image map products with increased information content as a result of improved image processing techniques and increased resolution. Thematic mapper data are being used to produce experimental image maps at 1:100,000 scale that meet established U.S. and European map accuracy standards. Availability of high quality, cloud-free, 30-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper sensor, along with 10-meter ground resolution panchromatic and 20-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the recently launched French SPOT satellite, present new cartographic and image processing challenges. The need to fully exploit these higher resolution data increases the complexity of processing the images into large-scale image maps. The removal of radiometric artifacts and noise prior to geometric correction can be accomplished by using a variety of image processing filters and transforms. Sensor modeling and image restoration techniques allow maximum retention of spatial and radiometric information. An optimum combination of spectral information and spatial resolution can be obtained by merging different sensor types. These processing techniques are discussed and examples are presented. 

  12. Higher resolution satellite remote sensing and the impact on image mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Allen H.; Thormodsgard, June M.

    Recent advances in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of civil land remote sensing satellite data are presenting new opportunities for image mapping applications. The U.S. Geological Survey's experimental satellite image mapping program is evolving toward larger scale image map products with increased information content as a result of improved image processing techniques and increased resolution. Thematic mapper data are being used to produce experimental image maps at 1:100,000 scale that meet established U.S. and European map accuracy standards. Availability of high quality, cloud-free, 30-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper sensor, along with 10-meter ground resolution panchromatic and 20-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the recently launched French SPOT satellite, present new cartographic and image processing challenges. The need to fully exploit these higher resolution data increases the complexity of processing the images into large-scale image maps. The removal of radiometric artifacts and noise prior to geometric correction can be accomplished by using a variety of image processing filters and transforms. Sensor modeling and image restoration techniques allow maximum retention of spatial and radiometric information. An optimum combination of spectral information and spatial resolution can be obtained by merging different sensor types. These processing techniques are discussed and examples are presented.

  13. Super-resolution deep imaging with hollow Bessel beam STED microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wentao; Dong, Dashan; Yang, Xusan; Xiao, Yunfeng; Gong, Qihuang; Xi, Peng; Shi, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy has become a powerful imaging and localized excitation method beating the diffraction barrier for improved lateral spatial resolution in cellular imaging, lithography, etc. Due to specimen-induced aberrations and scattering distortion, it has been a great challenge for STED to maintain consistent lateral resolution deeply inside the specimens. Here we report on a deep imaging STED microscopy by using Gaussian beam for excitation and hollow Bessel beam for depletion (GB-STED). The proposed scheme shows the improved imaging depth up to ~155{\\mu}m in solid agarose sample, ~115{\\mu}m in PDMS and ~100{\\mu}m in phantom of gray matter in brain tissue with consistent super resolution, while the standard STED microscopy shown a significantly reduced lateral resolution at the same imaging depth. The results indicate the excellent imaging penetration capability of GB-STED, making it a promising tool for deep 3D imaging optical nanoscopy and laser fabrication.

  14. Capturing the multiscale dynamics of membrane protein complexes with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhao, Xiaochuan; Liu, Jiyuan; Schneebeli, Severin T; Shelley, John C; Li, Jianing

    2017-03-20

    The structures and dynamics of protein complexes are often challenging to model in heterogeneous environments such as biological membranes. Herein, we meet this fundamental challenge at attainable cost with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models of vital membrane proteins. We systematically simulated five complex models formed by two distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the lipid-bilayer membrane on the ns-to-μs timescales. These models, which suggest the swinging motion of an intracellular loop, for the first time, provide the molecular details for the regulatory role of such a loop. For the models at different resolutions, we observed consistent structural stability but various levels of speed-ups in protein dynamics. The mixed-resolution and coarse-grained models show two and four times faster protein diffusion than the all-atom models, in addition to a 4- and 400-fold speed-up in the simulation performance. Furthermore, by elucidating the strengths and challenges of combining all-atom models with reduced resolution models, this study can serve as a guide to simulating other complex systems in heterogeneous environments efficiently.

  15. Fourier domain design of microgrid imaging polarimeters with improved spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Keigo; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2014-05-01

    Microgrid polarimetric imagers sacrifice spatial resolution for sensitivity to states of linear polarization. We have recently shown that a 2 × 4 microgrid analyzer pattern sacrifices less spatial resolution than the conventional 2× 2 case without compromising polarization sensitivity. In this paper, we discuss the design strategy that uncovered the spatial resolution benefits of the 2 × 4 array.

  16. Single-particle cryoEM analysis at near-atomic resolution from several thousand asymmetric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    A single-particle cryoEM reconstruction of the large ribosomal subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained from a dataset of ∼75,000 particles. The gold-standard and frequency-limited approaches to single-particle refinement were each independently used to determine orientation parameters for the final reconstruction. Both approaches showed similar resolution curves and nominal resolution values for the 60S dataset, estimated at 2.9 Å. The amount of over-fitting present during frequency-limited refinement was quantitatively analyzed using the high-resolution phase-randomization test, and the results showed no apparent over-fitting. The number of asymmetric subunits required to reach specific resolutions was subsequently analyzed by refining subsets of the data in an ab initio manner. With our data collection and processing strategies, sub-nanometer resolution was obtained with ∼200 asymmetric subunits (or, equivalently for the ribosomal subunit, particles). Resolutions of 5.6 Å, 4.5 Å, and 3.8 Å were reached with ∼1000, ∼1600, and ∼5000 asymmetric subunits, respectively. At these resolutions, one would expect to detect alpha-helical pitch, separation of beta-strands, and separation of Cα atoms, respectively. Using this map, together with strategies for ab initio model building and model refinement, we built a region of the ribosomal protein eL6, which was missing in previous models of the yeast ribosome. The relevance for more routine high-resolution structure determination is discussed.

  17. Whole-animal functional and developmental imaging with isotropic spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C; Keller, Philipp J

    2015-12-01

    Imaging fast cellular dynamics across large specimens requires high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To meet these requirements, we developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy, which rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. Combining these four views by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution yields images with high resolution in all three dimensions. We demonstrate whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and temporal resolution of 2 Hz for several hours. We also present spatially isotropic whole-brain functional imaging in Danio rerio larvae and spatially isotropic multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across gastrulating Drosophila embryos. Compared with conventional light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  18. U-SPECT-II: An Ultra-High-Resolution Device for Molecular Small-Animal Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Ramakers, R.M.; Branderhorst, W.; Krah, J.O.; Ji, C.; Staelens, S.G.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new rodent SPECT system (U-SPECT-II) that enables molecular imaging of murine organs down to resolutions of less than half a millimeter and high-resolution total-body imaging. Methods: The U-SPECT-II is based on a triangular stationary detector set-up, an XYZ stage that moves the animal

  19. Radial Basis Function Neural Network Based Super-Resolution Restoration for an Underspled Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏秉华; 金伟其; 牛丽红

    2004-01-01

    To achieve restoration of high frequency information for an underspled and degraded low-resolution image, a nonlinear and real-time processing method-the radial basis function (RBF) neural network based super-resolution method of restoration is proposed. The RBF network configuration and processing method is suitable for a high resolution restoration from an underspled low-resolution image. The soft-competition learning scheme based on the k-means algorithm is used, and can achieve higher mapping approximation accuracy without increase in the network size. Experiments showed that the proposed algorithm can achieve a super-resolution restored image from an underspled and degraded low-resolution image, and requires a shorter training time when compared with the multiplayer perception (MLP) network.

  20. Resolution of ghost imaging with entangled photons for different types of momentum correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, MaLin; Xu, Ping; Lu, LiangLiang; Zhu, ShiNing

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical analysis of the spatial resolution of quantum ghost imaging implemented by entangled photons from a general, spontaneously parametric, down-conversion process. We find that the resolution is affected by both the pump beam waist and the nonlinear crystal length. Hence, we determined a method to improve the resolution for a certain imaging setup. It should be noted that the resolution is not uniquely related to the degree of entanglement of the photon pair since the resolution can be optimized for a certain degree of entanglement. For certain types of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states——namely the momentum-correlated or momentum-positively correlated states——the resolution exhibits a simpler relationship with the pump beam waist and crystal length. Further, a vivid numerical simulation of ghost imaging is presented for different types of EPR states, which supports our analysis. This work discusses applicable references to the applications of quantum ghost imaging.

  1. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen; Arildsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    provides researchers in compressed sensing with a selection of algorithms for reconstructing undersampled general images, and offers a consistent and rigorous way to efficiently evaluate the researchers own developed reconstruction algorithms in terms of phase transitions. The package also serves......Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also...

  2. Ultrafast probing of the x-ray-induced lattice and electron dynamics in graphite at atomic-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau-Riege, S

    2010-10-07

    We used LCLS pulses to excite thin-film and bulk graphite with various different microstructures, and probed the ultrafast ion and electron dynamics through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS). We pioneered XRTS at LCLS, making this technique viable for other users. We demonstrated for the first time that the LCLS can be used to characterize warm-dense-matter through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering. The warm-dense-matter conditions were created using the LCLS beam. Representative examples of the results are shown in the Figure above. In our experiment, we utilized simultaneously both Bragg and two Thomson spectrometers. The Bragg measurements as a function of x-ray fluence and pulse length allows us to characterize the onset of atomic motion at 2 keV with the highest resolution to date. The Bragg detector was positioned in back-reflection, providing us access to scattering data with large scattering vectors (nearly 4{pi}/{lambda}). We found a clear difference between the atomic dynamics for 70 and 300 fs pulses, and we are currently in the process of comparing these results to our models. The outcome of this comparison will have important consequences for ultrafast diffractive imaging, for which it is still not clear if atomic resolution can truly be achieved. The backward x-ray Thomson scattering data suggests that the average graphite temperature and ionization was 10 eV and 1.0, respectively, which agrees with our models. In the forward scattering data, we observed an inelastic feature in the Thomson spectrum that our models currently do not reproduce, so there is food for thought. We are in the process of writing these results up. Depending on if we can combine the Bragg and Thomson data or not, we plan to publish them in a single paper (e.g. Nature or Science) or as two separate papers (e.g. two Phys. Rev. Lett.). We will present the first analysis of the results at the APS Plasma Meeting in November 2010. We had a fantastic experience performing our

  3. Extracting a Good Quality Frontal Face Image from a Low-Resolution Video Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images and on the......Feeding low-resolution and low-quality images, from inexpensive surveillance cameras, to systems like, e.g., face recognition, produces erroneous and unstable results. Therefore, there is a need for a mechanism to bridge the gap between on one hand low-resolution and low-quality images...... and on the other hand facial analysis systems. The proposed system in this paper deals with exactly this problem. Our approach is to apply a reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithm. Such an algorithm, however, has two main problems: first, it requires relatively similar images with not too much noise...

  4. One-dimensional Fibonacci grating for far-field super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2013-06-15

    One-dimensional Fibonacci gratings are used to transform evanescent waves into propagating waves for far-field super-resolution imaging. By detecting far-field intensity distributions of light through objects in front of the Fibonacci grating in free space, we can observe the objects with nearly λ/9 spatial resolution. Analytical results are verified by numerical simulations. We also discuss the effect of sampling error on imaging resolution of the system.

  5. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  6. POCS Based Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Using an Adaptive Regularization Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Panda, S S; Jena, G

    2011-01-01

    Crucial information barely visible to the human eye is often embedded in a series of low-resolution images taken of the same scene. Super-resolution enables the extraction of this information by reconstructing a single image, at a high resolution than is present in any of the individual images. This is particularly useful in forensic imaging, where the extraction of minute details in an image can help to solve a crime. Super-resolution image restoration has been one of the most important research areas in recent years which goals to obtain a high resolution (HR) image from several low resolutions (LR) blurred, noisy, under sampled and displaced images. Relation of the HR image and LR images can be modeled by a linear system using a transformation matrix and additive noise. However, a unique solution may not be available because of the singularity of transformation matrix. To overcome this problem, POCS method has been used. However, their performance is not good because the effect of noise energy has been ign...

  7. Super-resolution imaging strategies for cell biologists using a spinning disk microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Song, Mingying; Connelly, John T; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Knight, Martin M; Wheeler, Ann P

    2013-01-01

    In this study we use a spinning disk confocal microscope (SD) to generate super-resolution images of multiple cellular features from any plane in the cell. We obtain super-resolution images by using stochastic intensity fluctuations of biological probes, combining Photoactivation Light-Microscopy (PALM)/Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) methodologies. We compared different image analysis algorithms for processing super-resolution data to identify the most suitable for analysis of particular cell structures. SOFI was chosen for X and Y and was able to achieve a resolution of ca. 80 nm; however higher resolution was possible >30 nm, dependant on the super-resolution image analysis algorithm used. Our method uses low laser power and fluorescent probes which are available either commercially or through the scientific community, and therefore it is gentle enough for biological imaging. Through comparative studies with structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and widefield epifluorescence imaging we identified that our methodology was advantageous for imaging cellular structures which are not immediately at the cell-substrate interface, which include the nuclear architecture and mitochondria. We have shown that it was possible to obtain two coloured images, which highlights the potential this technique has for high-content screening, imaging of multiple epitopes and live cell imaging.

  8. Super-resolution imaging strategies for cell biologists using a spinning disk microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neveen A Hosny

    Full Text Available In this study we use a spinning disk confocal microscope (SD to generate super-resolution images of multiple cellular features from any plane in the cell. We obtain super-resolution images by using stochastic intensity fluctuations of biological probes, combining Photoactivation Light-Microscopy (PALM/Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM methodologies. We compared different image analysis algorithms for processing super-resolution data to identify the most suitable for analysis of particular cell structures. SOFI was chosen for X and Y and was able to achieve a resolution of ca. 80 nm; however higher resolution was possible >30 nm, dependant on the super-resolution image analysis algorithm used. Our method uses low laser power and fluorescent probes which are available either commercially or through the scientific community, and therefore it is gentle enough for biological imaging. Through comparative studies with structured illumination microscopy (SIM and widefield epifluorescence imaging we identified that our methodology was advantageous for imaging cellular structures which are not immediately at the cell-substrate interface, which include the nuclear architecture and mitochondria. We have shown that it was possible to obtain two coloured images, which highlights the potential this technique has for high-content screening, imaging of multiple epitopes and live cell imaging.

  9. Fluorescent Nanodiamond: A Versatile Tool for Long-Term Cell Tracking, Super-Resolution Imaging, and Nanoscale Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Hui, Yuen Yung; Tsai, Pei-Chang; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) has recently played a central role in fueling new discoveries in interdisciplinary fields spanning biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences. The nanoparticle is unique in that it contains a high density ensemble of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers as built-in fluorophores. The center possesses a number of outstanding optical and magnetic properties. First, NV(-) has an absorption maximum at ∼550 nm, and when exposed to green-orange light, it emits bright fluorescence at ∼700 nm with a lifetime of longer than 10 ns. These spectroscopic properties are little affected by surface modification but are distinctly different from those of cell autofluorescence and thus enable background-free imaging of FNDs in tissue sections. Such characteristics together with its excellent biocompatibility render FND ideal for long-term cell tracking applications, particularly in stem cell research. Next, as an artificial atom in the solid state, the NV(-) center is perfectly photostable, without photobleaching and blinking. Therefore, the NV-containing FND is suitable as a contrast agent for super-resolution imaging by stimulated emission depletion (STED). An improvement of the spatial resolution by 20-fold is readily achievable by using a high-power STED laser to deplete the NV(-) fluorescence. Such improvement is crucial in revealing the detailed structures of biological complexes and assemblies, including cellular organelles and subcellular compartments. Further enhancement of the resolution for live cell imaging is possible by manipulating the charge states of the NV centers. As the "brightest" member of the nanocarbon family, FND holds great promise and potential for bioimaging with unprecedented resolution and precision. Lastly, the NV(-) center in diamond is an atom-like quantum system with a total electron spin of 1. The ground states of the spins show a crystal field splitting of 2.87 GHz, separating the ms = 0 and

  10. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  11. 3D multicolor super-resolution imaging offers improved accuracy in neuron tracing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Lakadamyali

    Full Text Available The connectivity among neurons holds the key to understanding brain function. Mapping neural connectivity in brain circuits requires imaging techniques with high spatial resolution to facilitate neuron tracing and high molecular specificity to mark different cellular and molecular populations. Here, we tested a three-dimensional (3D, multicolor super-resolution imaging method, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM, for tracing neural connectivity using cultured hippocampal neurons obtained from wild-type neonatal rat embryos as a model system. Using a membrane specific labeling approach that improves labeling density compared to cytoplasmic labeling, we imaged neural processes at 44 nm 2D and 116 nm 3D resolution as determined by considering both the localization precision of the fluorescent probes and the Nyquist criterion based on label density. Comparison with confocal images showed that, with the currently achieved resolution, we could distinguish and trace substantially more neuronal processes in the super-resolution images. The accuracy of tracing was further improved by using multicolor super-resolution imaging. The resolution obtained here was largely limited by the label density and not by the localization precision of the fluorescent probes. Therefore, higher image resolution, and thus higher tracing accuracy, can in principle be achieved by further improving the label density.

  12. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-10-21

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions.

  13. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  14. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  15. Enhanced Singular Value Decomposition based Fusion for Super Resolution Image Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Joseph Abraham Sundar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The singular value decomposition (SVD plays a very important role in the field of image processing for applications such as feature extraction, image compression, etc. The main objective is to enhance the resolution of the image based on Singular Value Decomposition. The original image and the subsequent sub-pixel shifted image, subjected to image registration is transferred to SVD domain. An enhanced method of choosing the singular values from the SVD domain images to reconstruct a high resolution image using fusion techniques is proposesed. This technique is called as enhanced SVD based fusion. Significant improvement in the performance is observed by applying enhanced SVD method preceding the various interpolation methods which are incorporated. The technique has high advantage and computationally fast which is most needed for satellite imaging, high definition television broadcasting, medical imaging diagnosis, military surveillance, remote sensing etc.

  16. Developing an efficient technique for satellite image denoising and resolution enhancement for improving classification accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaswamy, Sree Sharmila; Kadarkarai, Ramar; Thangaswamy, Sree Renga Raja

    2013-01-01

    Satellite images are corrupted by noise during image acquisition and transmission. The removal of noise from the image by attenuating the high-frequency image components removes important details as well. In order to retain the useful information, improve the visual appearance, and accurately classify an image, an effective denoising technique is required. We discuss three important steps such as image denoising, resolution enhancement, and classification for improving accuracy in a noisy image. An effective denoising technique, hybrid directional lifting, is proposed to retain the important details of the images and improve visual appearance. The discrete wavelet transform based interpolation is developed for enhancing the resolution of the denoised image. The image is then classified using a support vector machine, which is superior to other neural network classifiers. The quantitative performance measures such as peak signal to noise ratio and classification accuracy show the significance of the proposed techniques.

  17. Tools for Model Building and Optimization into Near-Atomic Resolution Electron Cryo-Microscopy Density Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, F; Chiu, W

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) has advanced dramatically to become a viable tool for high-resolution structural biology research. The ultimate outcome of a cryoEM study is an atomic model of a macromolecule or its complex with interacting partners. This chapter describes a variety of algorithms and software to build a de novo model based on the cryoEM 3D density map, to optimize the model with the best stereochemistry restraints and finally to validate the model with proper protocols. The full process of atomic structure determination from a cryoEM map is described. The tools outlined in this chapter should prove extremely valuable in revealing atomic interactions guided by cryoEM data.

  18. A Time-Dependent Approach to High-Resolution Photoabsorption Spectrum of Rydberg Atoms in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xue-Bin; LIU Hong-Ping; SHI Ting-Yun

    2008-01-01

    A robust time-dependent approach to the high-resolution photoabsorption spectrum of Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields is presented. Traditionally we have to numerically diagonalize a huge matrix to solve the eigen-problem and then to obtain the spectral information. This matrix operation requires high-speed computers with large memories. Alternatively we present a unitary but very easily parallelized time-evolution method in an inexpensive way, which is very accurate and stable even in long-time scale evolution. With this method, we perform the spectral calculation of hydrogen atom in magnetic field, which agrees well with the experimental observation. It can be extended to study the dynamics of Rydberg atoms in more complicated cases such as in combined electric and magnetic fields.

  19. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator∕HARP (SHARP) combination is read out ...

  20. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  1. A Bayesian Super-Resolution Approach to Demosaicing of Blurred Images

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Rafael; Katsaggelos Aggelos K; Vega Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Most of the available digital color cameras use a single image sensor with a color filter array (CFA) in acquiring an image. In order to produce a visible color image, a demosaicing process must be applied, which produces undesirable artifacts. An additional problem appears when the observed color image is also blurred. This paper addresses the problem of deconvolving color images observed with a single coupled charged device (CCD) from the super-resolution point of view. Utilizing the Bayes...

  2. High-Resolution MR Imaging with Strong Local "surface" Gradient Coils, and, Optimization of Spgr Techniques for Functional MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoran

    In this thesis we discuss two specific topics in magnetic resonance imaging. The first concerns the technical requirements of high resolution MR imaging. Unique local "surface" gradient coils have been designed, constructed, integrated with a whole body MR imaging system, and used to acquire MR images demonstrating higher spatial resolution in three dimensions. The novel gradient coil design generates a strong linear gradient-field in three dimensions near the planar surface of the coil assembly for high resolution MR skin imaging. The rise times of the gradient coils were measured to be less than 250 mus, allowing rapid gradient coil switching. No significant eddy current effects have been found on the images. Images of a phantom and human skin with a field of view 3 cm by 3 cm and matrix size of 512 x 384 were obtained, corresponding to an in-plane resolution of 58 by 78 mu m. The resulting images represent a significant improvement in limiting spatial resolution compared to conventional MR images. The second topic of this thesis is functional MR imaging (FMRI). Functional MR imaging is based on the concept that neural activity in the cerebral cortex causes an increase in blood flow and a decrease in capillary deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, producing a signal enhancement in T2 ^*-weighted pulse sequences. The magnetic susceptibility of blood changes the oxygenation, changing the local T2^*. Spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) techniques both theoretically and experimentally have been optimized for functional MRI of human motor cortex. Experimental measurements have been performed and compared with the theoretical optimizations of signal to noise ratios of subtracted SPGR imaging. The experimental data are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. An FMRI of motor cortex stimulation with more than 5% intensity change has been observed using optimized techniques. Post imaging processing has been employed for displaying signal changes in the functional MR imaging.

  3. A novel super-resolution image fusion algorithm based on improved PCNN and wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gao, Kun; Song, Yajun; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-10-01

    Super-resolution reconstruction technology is to explore new information between the under-sampling image series obtained from the same scene and to achieve the high-resolution picture through image fusion in sub-pixel level. The traditional super-resolution fusion methods for sub-sampling images need motion estimation and motion interpolation and construct multi-resolution pyramid to obtain high-resolution, yet the function of the human beings' visual features are ignored. In this paper, a novel resolution reconstruction for under-sampling images of static scene based on the human vision model is considered by introducing PCNN (Pulse Coupled Neural Network) model, which simplifies and improves the input model, internal behavior and control parameters selection. The proposed super-resolution image fusion algorithm based on PCNN-wavelet is aimed at the down-sampling image series in a static scene. And on the basis of keeping the original features, we introduce Relief Filter(RF) to the control and judge segment to overcome the effect of random factors(such as noise, etc) effectively to achieve the aim that highlighting interested object though the fusion. Numerical simulations show that the new algorithm has the better performance in retaining more details and keeping high resolution.

  4. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F=1 atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sooshin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y

    2016-01-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of $^{23}$Na atoms in the $F=1$ hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations under a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the $F=1$ absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of $^{23}$Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in quantitative analysis of $F=1$ spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali atoms with $I=3/2$ nuclear spin such as $^{87}$Rb.

  5. Design and Implementation of a High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Image Intelligent Interpretation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Kui Mo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Very high spatial resolution remote sensing images have applications in many fields. However, research on the intelligent interpretation of such images is insufficient partly because of their the complexity and large size. In this study, a high spatial resolution remote sensing image intelligent interpretation system (HSR-RSIIIs was designed with image segmentation, a geographical information system, and a data-mining algorithm. Some key methods such as image segmentation, feature extraction, feature selection, and classification algorithm for interpreting high spatial resolution remote sensing image have been studied. A land cover classification experiment was performed in the Zhuzhou area using a Quickbird multi-spectral image. The classification results were consistent with the visual interpretation results. In additional, the proposed interpretation method was compared with the traditional pixel-based method. The results indicate that the method proposed in the literature is more effective and intelligent than that used previously.

  6. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, Soumyabrata; Lee, Yee Hui; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cloud imaging using ground-based whole sky imagers is essential for a fine-grained understanding of the effects of cloud formations, which can be useful in many applications. Some such imagers are available commercially, but their cost is relatively high, and their flexibility is limited. Therefore, we built a new daytime Whole Sky Imager (WSI) called Wide Angle High-Resolution Sky Imaging System. The strengths of our new design are its simplicity, low manufacturing cost and high resolution. Our imager captures the entire hemisphere in a single high-resolution picture via a digital camera using a fish-eye lens. The camera was modified to capture light across the visible as well as the near-infrared spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of the device as well as the geometric and radiometric calibration of the imaging system.

  7. High resolution retinal image restoration with wavefront sensing and self-extracted filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuyu; Erry, Gavin; Nemeth, Sheila; Mitra, Sunanda; Soliz, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy commonly rely on a clear view of the retina. The challenge in obtaining high quality retinal image lies in the design of the imaging system that can reduce the strong aberrations of the human eye. Since the amplitudes of human eye aberrations decrease rapidly as the aberration order goes up, it is more cost-effective to correct low order aberrations with adaptive optical devices while process high order aberrations through image processing. A cost effective fundus imaging device that can capture high quality retinal images with 2-5 times higher resolution than conventional retinal images has been designed [1]. This imager improves image quality by attaching complementary adaptive optical components to a conventional fundus camera. However, images obtained with the high resolution camera are still blurred due to some uncorrected aberrations as well as defocusing resulting from non-isoplanatic effect. Therefore, advanced image restoration algorithms have been employed for further improvement in image quality. In this paper, we use wavefront-based and self-extracted blind deconvolution techniques to restore images captured by the high resolution fundus camera. We demonstrate that through such techniques, pathologies that are critical to retinal disease diagnosis but not clear or not observable in the original image can be observed clearly in the restored images. Image quality evaluation is also used to finalize the development of a cost-effective, fast, and automated diagnostic system that can be used clinically.

  8. Resolution-Adapted All-Atomic and Coarse-Grained Model for Biomolecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Hu, Hao

    2014-06-10

    We develop here an adaptive multiresolution method for the simulation of complex heterogeneous systems such as the protein molecules. The target molecular system is described with the atomistic structure while maintaining concurrently a mapping to the coarse-grained models. The theoretical model, or force field, used to describe the interactions between two sites is automatically adjusted in the simulation processes according to the interaction distance/strength. Therefore, all-atomic, coarse-grained, or mixed all-atomic and coarse-grained models would be used together to describe the interactions between a group of atoms and its surroundings. Because the choice of theory is made on the force field level while the sampling is always carried out in the atomic space, the new adaptive method preserves naturally the atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of the entire system throughout the simulation processes. The new method will be very useful in many biomolecular simulations where atomistic details are critically needed.

  9. Imaging Multi-Particle Atomic and Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, Allen [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Final Report for Grant Number: DE- FG02-10ER16146 This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms and molecules with photons and electrons. The duration of the grant was the 5 year period from 4/1/2010 – 10/31/2015. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 20 peer reviewed publications over these 5 years with 2 of the publications in Physical Review Letters and 1 in Nature; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B ...).

  10. A High-resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Study of the Co Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Hailing; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the vacuum ultraviolet-photoionization efficiency (VUV-PIE) spectrum of Co in the energy range of 63,500-67,000 cm-1, which covers the photoionization transitions of Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F4), Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F2), and Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d74s1 5F5). We have also recorded the pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectrum of Co in the same energy range, allowing accurate determinations of ionization energies (IEs) for the photoionization transitions from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state to the Co+(3F J ) (J = 4 and 3) and Co+(5F5) ionic states, as well as from the Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) excited neural state to the Co+(3d8 3F3) ionic state. The high-resolution nature of the VUV laser used has allowed the observation of many well-resolved autoionizing resonances in the VUV-PIE spectrum, among which an autoionizing Rydberg series, 3d74s1(5F5)np (n = 19-38), converging to the Co+(3d74s1 5F5) ionic state from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state is identified. The fact that no discernible step-like structures are present at these ionization thresholds in the VUV-PIE spectrum indicates that direct photoionization of Co is minor compared to autoionization in this energy range. The IE values, the autoionizing Rydberg series, and the photoionization cross sections obtained in this experiment are valuable for understanding the VUV opacity and abundance measurement of the Co atom in stars and solar atmospheres, as well as for benchmarking the theoretical results calculated in the Opacity Project and the IRON Project, and thus are of relevance to astrophysics.

  11. Super-Resolution Imaging on Microfluidic Super-Resolution Near-Field Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pei; TANG Lin; ZHANG Dou-Guo; LU Yong-Hua; JIAO Xiao-Jin; XIE Jian-Ping; MING Hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present a new concept of the microfluidic super-resolution near-field structure (MSRENS) based on a microfluidic structure and a super-resolution near-field structure. The near-field distance control, "nano-probe"and scanning can be realized simultaneously using the MSRENS, which is similar to a near-field scanning optical microscope. The design and simulation results are presented. Numerical simulation has demonstrated that the MSRENS with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit could be applicable in chemistry, biologics, and many other fields.

  12. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  13. Fast, background-free, 3D super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, T; Colyer, R; Iyer, G; Weiss, S; Enderlein, J

    2009-12-29

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is a rapidly evolving area of fluorescence microscopy with a tremendous potential for impacting many fields of science. Several super-resolution methods have been developed over the last decade, all capable of overcoming the fundamental diffraction limit of light. We present here an approach for obtaining subdiffraction limit optical resolution in all three dimensions. This method relies on higher-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations (caused by fluorescence blinking/intermittency) recorded in a sequence of images (movie). We demonstrate a 5-fold improvement in spatial resolution by using a conventional wide-field microscope. This resolution enhancement is achieved in iterative discrete steps, which in turn allows the evaluation of images at different resolution levels. Even at the lowest level of resolution enhancement, our method features significant background reduction and thus contrast enhancement and is demonstrated on quantum dot-labeled microtubules of fibroblast cells.

  14. Sharp-Tip Silver Nanowires Mounted on Cantilevers for High-Aspect-Ratio High-Resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuezhi; Zhu, Yangzhi; Kim, Sanggon; Liu, Qiushi; Byrley, Peter; Wei, Yang; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan; Yan, Ruoxue; Liu, Ming

    2016-11-09

    Despite many efforts to fabricate high-aspect-ratio atomic force microscopy (HAR-AFM) probes for high-fidelity, high-resolution topographical imaging of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured surfaces, current HAR probes still suffer from unsatisfactory performance, low wear-resistivity, and extravagant prices. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate a novel design of a high-resolution (HR) HAR AFM probe, which is fabricated through a reliable, cost-efficient benchtop process to precisely implant a single ultrasharp metallic nanowire on a standard AFM cantilever probe. The force-displacement curve indicated that the HAR-HR probe is robust against buckling and bending up to 150 nN. The probes were tested on polymer trenches, showing a much better image fidelity when compared with standard silicon tips. The lateral resolution, when scanning a rough metal thin film and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SW-CNTs), was found to be better than 8 nm. Finally, stable imaging quality in tapping mode was demonstrated for at least 15 continuous scans indicating high resistance to wear. These results demonstrate a reliable benchtop fabrication technique toward metallic HAR-HR AFM probes with performance parallel or exceeding that of commercial HAR probes, yet at a fraction of their cost.

  15. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu [Radiotracer Imaging Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2015-03-21

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from {sup 137}Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm {sup 137}Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq {sup 137}Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a {sup 137}Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  16. MAP estimation for hyperspectral image resolution enhancement using an auxiliary sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Russell C; Eismann, Michael T; Wilson, Gregory L

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a novel maximum a posteriori estimator for enhancing the spatial resolution of an image using co-registered high spatial-resolution imagery from an auxiliary sensor. Here, we focus on the use of high-resolution panchomatic data to enhance hyperspectral imagery. However, the estimation framework developed allows for any number of spectral bands in the primary and auxiliary image. The proposed technique is suitable for applications where some correlation, either localized or global, exists between the auxiliary image and the image being enhanced. To exploit localized correlations, a spatially varying statistical model, based on vector quantization, is used. Another important aspect of the proposed algorithm is that it allows for the use of an accurate observation model relating the "true" scene with the low-resolutions observations. Experimental results with hyperspectral data derived from the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed estimator.

  17. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  18. Sub-pixel processing for super-resolution scanning imaging system with fiber bundle coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bowen An; Bingbin Xue; Shengda Pan; Guilin Chen

    2011-01-01

    A multilayer fiber bundle is used to couple the image in a remote sensing imaging system. The object image passes through all layers of the fiber bundle in micro-scanning mode. The malposition of adjacent layers arranged in a hexagonal pattern is at sub-pixel scale. Therefore, sub-pixel processing can be applied to improve the spatial resolution. The images coupled by the adjacent layer fibers are separated, and subsequently, the intermediate image is obtained by histogram matching based on one of the separated image called base image. Finally, the intermediate and base images are processed in the frequency domain. The malposition of the adjacent layer fiber is converted to the phase difference in Fourier transform. Considering the limited sensitivity of the experimental instruments and human sight, the image is set as a band-limited signal and the interpolation function of image fusion is found. The results indicate that a super-resolution image with ultra-high spatial resolution is obtained.%@@ A multilayer fiber bundle is used to couple the image in a remote sensing imaging system.The object image passes through all layers of the fiber bundle in micro-scanning mode.The malposition of adjacent layers arranged in a hexagonal pattern is at sub-pixel scale.

  19. Supervised Sub-Pixel Mapping for Change Detection from Remotely Sensed Images with Different Resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relatively low temporal resolutions of high spatial resolution (HR remotely sensed images, land-cover change detection (LCCD may have to use multi-temporal images with different resolutions. The low spatial resolution (LR images often have high temporal repetition rates, but they contain a large number of mixed pixels, which may seriously limit their capability in change detection. Soft classification (SC can produce the proportional fractions of land-covers, on which sub-pixel mapping (SPM can construct fine resolution land-cover maps to reduce the low-spatial-resolution-problem to some extent. Thus, in this paper, sub-pixel land-cover change detection with the use of different resolution images (SLCCD_DR is addressed based on SC and SPM. Previously, endmember combinations within pixels are ignored in the LR image, which may result in flawed fractional differences. Meanwhile, the information of a known HR land-cover map is insignificantly treated in the SPM models, which leads to a reluctant SLCCD_DR result. In order to overcome these issues, a novel approach based on a back propagation neural network (BPNN with different resolution images (BPNN_DR is proposed in this paper. Firstly, endmember variability per pixel is considered during the SC process to ensure the high accuracy of the derived proportional fractional difference image. After that, the BPNN-based SPM model is constructed by a complete supervised framework. It takes full advantage of the prior known HR image, whether it predates or postdates the LR image, to train the BPNN, so that a sub-pixel change detection map is generated effectively. The proposed BPNN_DR is compared with four state-of-the-art methods at different scale factors. The experimental results using both synthetic data and real images demonstrated that it can outperform with a more detailed change detection map being produced.

  20. Real Space Imaging of Nanoparticle Assembly at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with Nanoscale Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Li-Destri, Giovanni; Thomson, Neil H; Konovalov, Oleg; Pontoni, Diego

    2016-09-14

    Bottom up self-assembly of functional materials at liquid-liquid interfaces has recently emerged as method to design and produce novel two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured membranes and devices with tailored properties. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be seen as a "factory floor" for nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly, because NPs are driven there by a reduction of interfacial energy. Such 2D assembly can be characterized by reciprocal space techniques, namely X-ray and neutron scattering or reflectivity. These techniques have drawbacks, however, as the structural information is averaged over the finite size of the radiation beam and nonperiodic isolated assemblies in 3D or defects may not be easily detected. Real-space in situ imaging methods are more appropriate in this context, but they often suffer from limited resolution and underperform or fail when applied to challenging liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we study the surfactant-induced assembly of SiO2 nanoparticle monolayers at a water-oil interface using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) achieving nanoscale resolved imaging capabilities. Hitherto, AFM imaging has been restricted to solid-liquid interfaces because applications to liquid interfaces have been hindered by their softness and intrinsic dynamics, requiring accurate sample preparation methods and nonconventional AFM operational schemes. Comparing both AFM and grazing incidence X-ray small angle scattering data, we unambiguously demonstrate correlation between real and reciprocal space structure determination showing that the average interfacial NP density is found to vary with surfactant concentration. Additionally, the interaction between the tip and the interface can be exploited to locally determine the acting interfacial interactions. This work opens up the way to studying complex nanostructure formation and phase behavior in a range of liquid-liquid and complex liquid interfaces.